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Sample records for abnormal spindle formation

  1. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived NT3

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, Neil A.; Mentis, George Z.; Schustak, Joshua; O’Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest (~30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by ~80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections, but not their initial formation or their specificity. PMID:19369542

  2. Sleep Spindles as Facilitators of Memory Formation and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of sleep spindle generation. At the same time a physiological role of sleep spindles is starting to be revealed. Behavioural studies in humans and animals have found significant correlations between the recall performance in different learning tasks and the amount of sleep spindles in the intervening sleep. Concomitant neurophysiological experiments showed a close relationship between sleep spindles and other sleep related EEG rhythms as well as a relationship between sleep spindles and synaptic plasticity. Together, there is growing evidence from several disciplines in neuroscience for a participation of sleep spindles in memory formation and learning. PMID:27119026

  3. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  4. Spindle

    2013-04-04

    Spindle is software infrastructure that solves file system scalabiltiy problems associated with starting dynamically linked applications in HPC environments. When an HPC applications starts up thousands of pricesses at once, and those processes simultaneously access a shared file system to look for shared libraries, it can cause significant performance problems for both the application and other users. Spindle scalably coordinates the distribution of shared libraries to an application to avoid hammering the shared file system.

  5. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  6. PLK1 regulates spindle formation kinetics and APC/C activation in mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Baran, Vladimir; Brzakova, Adela; Rehak, Pavol; Kovarikova, Veronika; Solc, Petr

    2016-06-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is involved in essential events of cell cycle including mitosis in which it participates in centrosomal microtubule nucleation, spindle bipolarity establishment and cytokinesis. Although PLK1 function has been studied in cycling cancer cells, only limited data are known about its role in the first mitosis of mammalian zygotes. During the 1-cell stage of mouse embryo development, the acentriolar spindle is formed and the shift from acentriolar to centrosomal spindle formation progresses gradually throughout the preimplantation stage, thus providing a unique possibility to study acentriolar spindle formation. We have shown previously that PLK1 activity is not essential for entry into first mitosis, but is required for correct spindle formation and anaphase onset in 1-cell mouse embryos. In the present study, we extend this knowledge by employing quantitative confocal live cell imaging to determine spindle formation kinetics in the absence of PLK1 activity and answer the question whether metaphase arrest at PLK1-inhibited embryos is associated with low anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) activity and consequently high securin level. We have shown that inhibition of PLK1 activity induces a delay in onset of acentriolar spindle formation during first mitosis. Although these PLK1-inhibited 1-cell embryos were finally able to form a bipolar spindle, not all chromosomes were aligned at the metaphase equator. PLK1-inhibited embryos were arrested in metaphase without any sign of APC/C activation with high securin levels. Our results document that PLK1 controls the onset of spindle assembly and spindle formation, and is essential for APC/C activation before anaphase onset in mouse zygotes. PMID:26174739

  7. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  8. Bisphenol A Exposure during Oocyte Maturation in vitro Results in Spindle Abnormalities and Chromosome Misalignment in Bos taurus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Jacqueline; Favetta, Laura A; King, W Allan

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure in humans is widespread, and BPA has been detected in a variety of samples including follicular fluid. BPA levels have been found to negatively correlate with the developmental potential of oocytes in women undergoing in vitro fertilization and to induce meiotic abnormalities experimentally in human and mouse models. BPA may detrimentally affect oocyte maturation, and different concentrations of exposure can cause various outcomes. Because of the importance of oocyte maturation on developmental potential, disturbances during this time can significantly impact oocyte viability. Here, bovine oocytes were matured in vitro with and without BPA treatment of the media. The levels of BPA taken up by the oocytes were much lower than the initial exposure. Medium treatment with 30 ng/ml resulted in an average of 2.48 ng/ml BPA measured in mature oocytes. These oocytes exhibited decreased maturation and increased incidence of spindle abnormalities. Only 57.4% of oocytes exposed to 30 ng/ml BPA reached maturity compared to 72.4% of controls (p < 0.05). Mature oocytes following BPA exposure displayed increased abnormal spindle morphology (67.9%) and chromosome dispersal (60%) compared to all other groups analyzed (p < 0.05). Thus, exposure to BPA during in vitro oocyte maturation has the potential to decrease oocyte quality. PMID:25871885

  9. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  10. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  11. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells. PMID:22696268

  12. Abnormal mitotic spindle assembly and cytokinesis induced by D-Limonene in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Irene; Naselli, Flores; Sciandrello, Giulia; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    D-Limonene is found widely in citrus and many other plant species; it is a major constituent of many essential oils and is used as a solvent for commercial purposes. With the discovery of its chemotherapeutic properties against cancer, it is important to investigate the biological effects of the exposure to D-Limonene and elucidate its, as yet unknown, mechanism of action. We reported here that D-Limonene is toxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, to determine the cellular target of D-Limonene, we performed morphological observations and immunocytochemical analysis and we showed that this drug has a direct effect on dividing cells preventing assembly of mitotic spindle microtubules. This affects both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, resulting in aneuploidy that in turn can lead to cell death or genomic instability. PMID:23913329

  13. [The ultrastructure of mixed mammary gland tumors in bitches. IV. The incidence of myoepithelial cells in formation of spindle cells (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    von Bomhard, D; von Sandersleben, J

    1976-09-21

    Spindle cells of myomatous formations of 19 canine mixed mammary tumors were studied by light and electron microscopy. The EM findings indicate that the spindle-shaped tumor cells are mostly of myoepithelial origin. However there were also formations of spindle cells which consisted of fibroblasts or fibrocytes. By light microscopy they are not always clearly distinguishable. PMID:823695

  14. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  15. GSI promotes vincristine-induced apoptosis by enhancing multi-polar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akannsha; Zapata, Mariana C; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Sun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI), cell-permeable small-molecule inhibitors of gamma secretase activity, had been originally developed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In recent years, it has been exploited in cancer research to inhibit Notch signaling that is aberrantly activated in various cancers. We previously found that GSI could synergize with anti-microtubule agent, vincristine (VCR) in a Notch-independent manner. Here, we delineate the underlying cell cycle-related mechanism using HeLa cells, which have strong mitotic checkpoints. GSI enhanced VCR-induced cell death, although GSI alone did not affect cell viability at all. GSI augmented VCR-induced mitotic arrest in a dose-dependent manner, which was preceded by apoptotic cell death, as shown by an increase in Annexin V-positive and caspase-positive cell population. Furthermore, GSI amplified multi-polar spindle formation triggered by VCR. Altogether, we show the evidence that GSI enhances VCR-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via multi-polar mitotic spindle formation, independent of Notch signaling. These data suggest that one or more GS substrates, yet to be identified, in a post-GS processed form, may play a role in maintaining functional centrosomes/mitotic spindles. More significantly, the synergistic effect of GSI in combination with VCR could be exploited in clinical setting to improve the efficacy of VCR. PMID:24200971

  16. A spindle-independent cleavage pathway controls germ cell formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cinalli, Ryan M; Lehmann, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    The primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first cells to form during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. Whereas the process of somatic cell formation has been studied in detail, the mechanics of PGC formation are poorly understood. Here, using four-dimensional multi-photon imaging combined with genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we find that PGC formation requires an anaphase spindle-independent cleavage pathway. In addition to using core regulators of cleavage, including the small GTPase RhoA (Drosophila rho1) and the Rho-associated kinase, ROCK (Drosophila drok), we show that this pathway requires Germ cell-less (GCL), a conserved BTB-domain protein not previously implicated in cleavage mechanics. This alternative form of cell formation suggests that organisms have evolved multiple molecular strategies for regulating the cytoskeleton during cleavage. PMID:23728423

  17. mini spindles

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, C. Fiona; Deák, Peter; Glover, David M.; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new Drosophila gene, mini spindles (msps) identified in a cytological screen for mitotic mutant. Mutation in msps disrupts the structural integrity of the mitotic spindle, resulting in the formation of one or more small additional spindles in diploid cells. Nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes, metaphase alignment of chromosomes, or the focusing of spindle poles appears much less affected. The msps gene encodes a 227-kD protein with high similarity to the vertebrate microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), human TOGp and Xenopus XMAP215, and with limited similarity to the Dis1 and STU2 proteins from fission yeast and budding yeast. Consistent with their sequence similarity, Msps protein also associates with microtubules in vitro. In the embryonic division cycles, Msps protein localizes to centrosomal regions at all mitotic stages, and spreads over the spindles during metaphase and anaphase. The absence of centrosomal staining in interphase of the cellularized embryos suggests that the interactions between Msps protein and microtubules or centrosomes may be regulated during the cell cycle. PMID:10477755

  18. Inhibition of the Binding between RGS2 and β-Tubulin Interferes with Spindle Formation and Chromosome Segregation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao-Gui; Zhang, Zhi; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    RGS2 is a negative regulator of G protein signaling that contains a GTPase-activating domain and a β-tubulin binding region. This study aimed to determine the localization and function of RGS2 during mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that RGS2 was widely expressed in the cytoplasm with a greater abundance on both meiotic spindles and first/second polar bodies from the fully-grown germinal vesicle (GV) stage to the MII stages. Co-expression of RGS2 and β-tubulin could also be detected in the spindle and polar body of mouse oocytes at the MI, AI, and MII stages. Inhibition of the binding site between RGS2 and β-tubulin was accomplished by injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into GV-stage oocytes, which could result in oocytes arrest at the MI or AI stage during in vitro maturation, but it did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown. Moreover, injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into oocytes resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of first polar body extrusion and abnormal spindle formation. Additionally, levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2 were significantly reduced in anti-RGS2 antibody injected oocytes compared with control oocytes. These findings suggest that RGS2 might play a critical role in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by affecting β-tubulin polymerization and chromosome segregation. PMID:27463806

  19. Spindle assembly checkpoint inactivation fails to suppress neuroblast tumour formation in aurA mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Romé, Pierre; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Karess, Roger; Giet, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires accurate control of cell proliferation, differentiation and chromosome segregation. Drosophila sas-4 and aurA mutants present brain tumours with extra neuroblasts (NBs), defective mitotic spindle assembly and delayed mitosis due to activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here we inactivate the SAC in aurA and sas-4 mutants to determine whether the generation of aneuploidy compromises NB proliferation. Inactivation of the SAC in the sas-4 mutant impairs NB proliferation and disrupts euploidy. By contrast, disrupting the SAC in the aurA mutant does not prevent NB amplification, tumour formation or chromosome segregation. The monitoring of Mad2 and cyclin B dynamics in live aurA NBs reveals that SAC satisfaction is not coupled to cyclin B degradation. Thus, the NBs of aurA mutants present delayed mitosis, with accurate chromosome segregation occurring in a SAC-independent manner. We report here the existence of an Aurora A-dependent mechanism promoting efficient, timed cyclin B degradation. PMID:26568519

  20. Coupling of rotational cortical flow, asymmetric midbody positioning, and spindle rotation mediates dorsoventral axis formation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepika; Pohl, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Cortical flows mediate anteroposterior polarization in Caenorhabditis elegans by generating two mutually exclusive membrane domains. However, factors downstream of anteroposterior polarity that establish the dorsoventral axis remain elusive. Here, we show that rotational cortical flow orthogonal to the anteroposterior axis during the division of the AB blastomere in the two-cell embryo positions the cytokinetic midbody remnant of the previous division asymmetrically at the future ventral side of the embryo. In the neighboring P1 blastomere, astral microtubules contact a transient PAR-2-dependent actin coat that forms asymmetrically onto the midbody remnant-P1 interface. Ablation of the midbody remnant or perturbation of rotational cortical flow reveals that microtubule-midbody remnant contacts are crucial for P1 spindle rotation and dorsoventral axis formation. Thus, our findings suggest a mechanism for dorsoventral patterning that relies on coupling of anteroposterior polarity, rotational cortical flow, midbody remnant positioning, and spindle orientation. PMID:24525186

  1. CEP215 is involved in the dynein-dependent accumulation of pericentriolar matrix proteins for spindle pole formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongju; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2010-02-15

    CEP 215 is a human orthologue of Drosophila centrosomin which is a core centrosome component for the pericentriolar matrix protein recruitment. Recent investigations revealed that CEP 215 is required for centrosome cohesion, centrosomal attachment of the gamma-TuRC, and microtubule dynamics. However, it remains obscure how CEP 215 functions for recruitment of the centrosomal proteins during the centrosome cycle. Here, we investigated a role of CEP 215 during mitosis. Knockdown of CEP 215 resulted in characteristic mitotic phenotypes, including monopolar spindle formation, a decrease in distance between the spindle pole pair, and detachment of the centrosomes from the spindle poles. We noticed that CEP 215 is critical for centrosomal localization of dynein throughout the cell cycle. As a consequence, the selective centrosomal proteins were not recruited to the centrosome properly. Finally, the centrosomal localization of CEP 215 also depends on the dynein-dynactin complex. Based on the results, we propose that CEP 215 regulates a dynein-dependent transport of the pericentriolar matrix proteins during the centrosome maturation. PMID:20139723

  2. Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) with spindle cell differentiation and tumour formation.

    PubMed Central

    Macgillivray, J B; Duthie, J S

    1977-01-01

    Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) in a 45-year-old white man is described. Unusual features were presentation as a surgical emergency with signs of obstruction and peritonitis due to an ileal tumour and extensive spindle cell differentiation. Problems in the differential diagnosis of malignant histiocytosis are briefly discussed. Images PMID:845260

  3. The Mother Centriole Appendage Protein Cenexin Modulates Lumen Formation through Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    Establishing apical-basal polarity is instrumental in the functional shaping of a solitary lumen within an acinus. By exploiting micropatterned slides, wound healing assays, and three-dimensional culture systems, we identified a mother centriole subdistal appendage protein, cenexin, as a critical player in symmetric lumen expansion through the control of microtubule organization. In this regard, cenexin was required for both centrosome positioning in interphase cells and proper spindle orientation during mitosis. In contrast, the essential mother centriole distal appendage protein CEP164 did not play a role in either process, demonstrating the specificity of subdistal appendages for these events. Importantly, upon closer examination we found that cenexin depletion decreased astral microtubule length, disrupted astral microtubule minus-end organization, and increased levels of the polarity protein NuMA at the cell cortex. Interestingly, spindle misorientation and NuMA mislocalization were reversed by treatment with a low dose of the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Taken together, these results suggest that cenexin modulates microtubule organization and stability to mediate spindle orientation. PMID:26948879

  4. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  5. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  6. TPPP/p25 promotes tubulin assemblies and blocks mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tirián, L.; Hlavanda, E.; Oláh, J.; Horváth, I.; Orosz, F.; Szabó, B.; Kovács, J.; Szabad, J.; Ovádi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we isolated from bovine brain a protein, TPPP/p25 and identified as p25, a brain-specific protein that induced aberrant tubulin assemblies. The primary sequence of this protein differs from that of other proteins identified so far; however, it shows high homology with p25-like hypothetical proteins sought via blast. Here, we characterized the binding of TPPP/p25 to tubulin by means of surface plasmon resonance; the kinetic parameters are as follows: kon, 2.4 × 104 M–1·s–1; koff, 5.4 × 10–3 s–1; and Kd, 2.3 × 10–7 M. This protein at substoichometric concentration promotes the polymerization of tubulin into double-walled tubules and polymorphic aggregates or bundles paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules as judged by quantitative data of electron and atomic force microscopies. Injection of bovine TPPP/p25 into cleavage Drosophila embryos expressing tubulin–GFP fusion protein reveals that TPPP/p25 inhibits mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope breakdown without affecting other cellular events like centrosome replication and separation, microtubule nucleation by the centrosomes, and nuclear growth. GTP counteracts TPPP/p25 both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14623963

  7. A Novel Rho-Like Protein TbRHP Is Involved in Spindle Formation and Mitosis in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Kanwal; DuBois, Kelly N.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background In animals and fungi Rho subfamily small GTPases are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal function and cellular proliferation. These organisms typically possess multiple Rho paralogues and numerous downstream effectors, consistent with the highly complex contributions of Rho proteins to cellular physiology. By contrast, trypanosomatids have a much simpler Rho-signaling system, and the Trypanosoma brucei genome contains only a single divergent Rho-related gene, TbRHP (Tb927.10.6240). Further, only a single RhoGAP-like protein (Tb09.160.4180) is annotated, contrasting with the >70 Rho GAP proteins from Homo sapiens. We wished to establish the function(s) of TbRHP and if Tb09.160.4180 is a potential GAP for this protein. Methods/Findings TbRHP represents an evolutionarily restricted member of the Rho GTPase clade and is likely trypanosomatid restricted. TbRHP is expressed in both mammalian and insect dwelling stages of T. brucei and presents with a diffuse cytoplasmic location and is excluded from the nucleus. RNAi ablation of TbRHP results in major cell cycle defects and accumulation of multi-nucleated cells, coinciding with a loss of detectable mitotic spindles. Using yeast two hybrid analysis we find that TbRHP interacts with both Tb11.01.3180 (TbRACK), a homolog of Rho-kinase, and the sole trypanosome RhoGAP protein Tb09.160.4180, which is related to human OCRL. Conclusions Despite minimization of the Rho pathway, TbRHP retains an important role in spindle formation, and hence mitosis, in trypanosomes. TbRHP is a partner for TbRACK and an OCRL-related trypanosome Rho-GAP. PMID:22096505

  8. CYLD regulates spindle orientation by stabilizing astral microtubules and promoting dishevelled-NuMA-dynein/dynactin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfan; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Ran, Jie; Gao, Jinmin; Suo, Shaojun; Sun, Shao-Cong; Zhou, Jun

    2014-02-11

    Oriented cell division is critical for cell fate specification, tissue organization, and tissue homeostasis, and relies on proper orientation of the mitotic spindle. The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of spindle orientation remain largely unknown. Herein, we identify a critical role for cylindromatosis (CYLD), a deubiquitinase and regulator of microtubule dynamics, in the control of spindle orientation. CYLD is highly expressed in mitosis and promotes spindle orientation by stabilizing astral microtubules and deubiquitinating the cortical polarity protein dishevelled. The deubiquitination of dishevelled enhances its interaction with nuclear mitotic apparatus, stimulating the cortical localization of nuclear mitotic apparatus and the dynein/dynactin motor complex, a requirement for generating pulling forces on astral microtubules. These findings uncover CYLD as an important player in the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division and have important implications in health and disease. PMID:24469800

  9. Mei-1, a Gene Required for Meiotic Spindle Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Is a Member of a Family of ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Maguire, S.; Mains, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    Meiotic spindle formation in the female germline of Caenorhabditis elegans requires expression of the gene mei-1. We have cloned mei-1 by transformation rescue and found that it resides near a hot spot for recombination, in an area of high gene density. The highest levels of mei-1 mRNA accumulate in the female germline of adult hermaphrodites as well as in fertilized embryos. The message persists for several hours after the protein functions in embryos, implying the need for post-transcriptional regulation. Two alternatively spliced messages are made that would result in proteins that differ internally by three amino acids; the larger of the two mRNAs is preferentially enriched in the female germline. The sequence of mei-1 shows that it is a member of a newly described family of ATPases that share a highly conserved nucleotide-binding site; four dominant-negative mutations of mei-1 are found at or near this region. Divergent roles ascribed to this family include membrane function, proteolysis, transcription and cell cycle regulation. PMID:8150281

  10. Spatiotemporal control of spindle midzone formation by PRC1 in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Lau, Eric; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella; Jiang, Wei

    2006-04-18

    We have examined the role of PRC1, a midzone-associated, microtubule bundling, Cdk substrate protein, in regulating the spatiotemporal formation of the midzone in HeLa cells. Cdk-mediated phosphorylation of PRC1 in early mitosis holds PRC1 in an inactive monomeric state. During the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, PRC1 is dephosphorylated, promoting PRC1 oligomerization. Using time-lapse video microscopy, RNA interference, 3D immunofluorescence reconstruction imaging, and rescue experiments, we demonstrate that the dephosphorylated form of PRC1 is essential for bundling antiparallel, nonkinetochore, interdigitating microtubules to establish the midzone that is necessary for cytokinesis. Our results thus indicate that PRC1 is an essential factor in controlling the spatiotemporal formation of the midzone in human cells. PMID:16603632

  11. The Clathrin-dependent Spindle Proteome.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sushma R; Flores-Rodriguez, Neftali; Page, Scott L; Wong, Chin; Robinson, Phillip J; Chircop, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The mitotic spindle is required for chromosome congression and subsequent equal segregation of sister chromatids. These processes involve a complex network of signaling molecules located at the spindle. The endocytic protein, clathrin, has a "moonlighting" role during mitosis, whereby it stabilizes the mitotic spindle. The signaling pathways that clathrin participates in to achieve mitotic spindle stability are unknown. Here, we assessed the mitotic spindle proteome and phosphoproteome in clathrin-depleted cells using quantitative MS/MS (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001603). We report a spindle proteome that consists of 3046 proteins and a spindle phosphoproteome consisting of 5157 phosphosites in 1641 phosphoproteins. Of these, 2908 (95.4%) proteins and 1636 (99.7%) phosphoproteins are known or predicted spindle-associated proteins. Clathrin-depletion from spindles resulted in dysregulation of 121 proteins and perturbed signaling to 47 phosphosites. The majority of these proteins increased in mitotic spindle abundance and six of these were validated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Functional pathway analysis confirmed the reported role of clathrin in mitotic spindle stabilization for chromosome alignment and highlighted possible new mechanisms of clathrin action. The data also revealed a novel second mitotic role for clathrin in bipolar spindle formation. PMID:27174698

  12. Identification and characterization of INMAP, a novel interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus protein that is involved in spindle formation and cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Enzhi; Lei, Yan; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yanbo; Song, Chunqing; Marc, Jan; Wang, Yongchao; Sun, Le; Liang, Qianjin

    2009-04-15

    A novel protein that associates with interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus (INMAP) was identified by screening HeLa cDNA expression library with an autoimmune serum followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Its complete cDNA sequence of 1.818 kb encodes 343 amino acids with predicted molecular mass of 38.2 kDa and numerous phosphorylation sites. The sequence is identical with nucleotides 1-1800 bp of an unnamed gene (GenBank accession no. (7022388)) and highly homologous with the 3'-terminal sequence of POLR3B. A monoclonal antibody against INMAP reacted with similar proteins in S. cerevisiae, Mel and HeLa cells, suggesting that it is a conserved protein. Confocal microscopy using either GFP-INMAP fusion protein or labeling with the monoclonal antibody revealed that the protein localizes as distinct dots in the interphase nucleus, but during mitosis associates closely with the spindle. Double immunolabeling using specific antibodies showed that the INMAP co-localizes with {alpha}-tubulin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA. INMAP also co-immunoprecipitated with these proteins in their native state. Stable overexpression of INMAP in HeLa cell lines leads to defects in the spindle, mitotic arrest, formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, inhibition of growth, and apoptosis. We propose that INMAP is a novel protein that plays essential role in spindle formation and cell-cycle progression.

  13. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} mouse model of core myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-04-24

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed.

  14. Loss of BubR1 acetylation causes defects in spindle assembly checkpoint signaling and promotes tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inai; Lee, Hae-ock; Choi, Eunhee; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; Kwon, Mi-Sun; Min, Jaewon; Park, Pil-Gu; Lee, Seonju; Kong, Young-Yun; Gong, Gyungyub

    2013-01-01

    BubR1 acetylation is essential in mitosis. Mice heterozygous for the acetylation-deficient BubR1 allele (K243R/+) spontaneously developed tumors with massive chromosome missegregations. K243R/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibited a weakened spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) with shortened mitotic timing. The generation of the SAC signal was intact, as Mad2 localization to the unattached kinetochore (KT) was unaltered; however, because of the premature degradation of K243R-BubR1, the mitotic checkpoint complex disassociated prematurely in the nocodazole-treated condition, suggesting that maintenance of the SAC is compromised. BubR1 acetylation was also required to counteract excessive Aurora B activity at the KT for stable chromosome–spindle attachments. The association of acetylation-deficient BubR1 with PP2A-B56α phosphatase was reduced, and the phosphorylated Ndc80 at the KT was elevated in K243R/+ MEFs. In relation, there was a marked increase of micronuclei and p53 mutation was frequently detected in primary tumors of K243R/+ mice. Collectively, the combined effects of failure in chromosome–spindle attachment and weakened SAC cause genetic instability and cancer in K243R/+ mice. PMID:23878276

  15. Nek9 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiosis and its location in early embryo mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shang-Wu; Gao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Song, Ya-Li; Zhu, Jin-Liang; Qi, Shu-Tao; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Wang, Zhong-Wei; Lin, Fei; Huang, Hao; Xing, Fu-Qi; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Nek9 (also known as Nercc1), a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis A) family of protein kinases, regulates spindle formation, chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Here, we showed that Nek9 protein was expressed from germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages in mouse oocytes with no detectable changes. Confocal microscopy identified that Nek9 was localized to the spindle poles at the metaphase stages and associated with the midbody at anaphase or telophase stage in both meiotic oocytes and the first mitotic embyros. Depletion of Nek9 by specific morpholino injection resulted in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes with significant pro-MI/MI arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Knockdown of Nek9 also impaired the spindle-pole localization of γ-tubulin and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Bub3 at the kinetochores even after 10 h of culture. Live-cell imaging analysis also confirmed that knockdown of Nek9 resulted in oocyte arrest at the pro-MI/MI stage with abnormal spindles, misaligned chromosomes and failed polar body emission. Taken together, our results suggest that Nek9 may act as a MTOC-associated protein regulating microtubule nucleation, spindle organization and, thus, cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation, fertilization and early embryo cleavage. PMID:23159858

  16. Nuclear envelope-associated dynein drives prophase centrosome separation and enables Eg5-independent bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, Jonne A; van Heesbeen, Roy G H P; Meaders, Johnathan L; Geers, Erica F; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Medema, René H; Tanenbaum, Marvin E

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule motor protein kinesin-5 (Eg5) provides an outward force on centrosomes, which drives bipolar spindle assembly. Acute inhibition of Eg5 blocks centrosome separation and causes mitotic arrest in human cells, making Eg5 an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. Using in vitro directed evolution, we show that human cells treated with Eg5 inhibitors can rapidly acquire the ability to divide in the complete absence of Eg5 activity. We have used these Eg5-independent cells to study alternative mechanisms of centrosome separation. We uncovered a pathway involving nuclear envelope (NE)-associated dynein that drives centrosome separation in prophase. This NE-dynein pathway is essential for bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5, but also functions in the presence of full Eg5 activity, where it pulls individual centrosomes along the NE and acts in concert with Eg5-dependent outward pushing forces to coordinate prophase centrosome separation. Together, these results reveal how the forces are produced to drive prophase centrosome separation and identify a novel mechanism of resistance to kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:23034402

  17. Origin of abnormal formation of pearlite in medium-carbon steel under nonequilibrium conditions of heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, D. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Urtsev, V. N.; Degtyarev, V. N.; Shmakov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and kinetics of the formation of austenite in medium-carbon steel during shortterm heating above the temperature Ac 1 followed by accelerated cooling are analyzed. It has been shown that the abnormal formation of pearlite in steel results from the concentrational and structural inhomogeneity of austenite, as well as the presence of carbide particles in ferrite areas.

  18. Thioglycolic acid inhibits mouse oocyte maturation and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration.

    PubMed

    Hou, S Y; Zhang, L; Wu, K; Xia, L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that thioglycolic acid (TGA) leads to potential reproductive toxicology. To clarify the exact effects of this compound on reproduction, mice oocytes were treated with different TGA doses. At the end of the culture period, the nuclear status of mice oocytes was assessed under an inverted microscope. After immunofluorescence staining, the chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration of oocytes were evaluated. The results indicated that TGA decreases the percentage of first polar body formation but does not influence that of germinal vesicle breakdown. TGA induces abnormal chromosomal arrangement and spindle elongation. In conclusion, TGA inhibits in-vitro maturation of mice oocytes and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration. Furthermore, it probably interferes with biochemical changes that occur during meiosis, resulting in aberrant development. PMID:19022875

  19. In Nicotiana species, an artificial microRNA corresponding to the virulence modulating region of Potato spindle tuber viroid directs RNA silencing of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase gene and the development of abnormal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Andrew L; Smith, Neil A; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wassenegger, Michael; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-02-01

    Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is a small non-protein-coding RNA pathogen that can induce disease symptoms in a variety of plant species. How PSTVd induces disease symptoms is a long standing question. It has been suggested that PSTVd-derived small RNAs (sRNAs) could direct RNA silencing of a targeted host gene(s) resulting in symptom development. To test this, we expressed PSTVd sequences as artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) in Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana. One amiRNA, amiR46 that corresponds to sequences within the PSTVd virulence modulating region (VMR), induced abnormal phenotypes in both Nicotiana species that closely resemble those displayed by PSTVd infected plants. In N. tabacum amiR46 plants, phenotype severity correlated with amiR46 accumulation and expression down-regulation of the bioinformatically-identified target gene, a Nicotiana soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (siPPase). Taken together, our phenotypic and molecular analyses suggest that disease symptom development in Nicotiana species following PSTVd infection results from sRNA-directed RNA silencing of the host gene, siPPase. PMID:24503090

  20. Paratesticular Spindle Cell Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Biswajit; Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Dange, Prasad; Desai, Parth Anil; Khurana, Nita; Chander, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare variant of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma that affects young males and most commonly involves the paratesticular region. We report a case of paratesticular spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma in a 14-year-old boy, who presented with a painless scrotal mass. Left inguinal orchidectomy was performed. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of the mass revealed spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma of the paratesticular region. PMID:26500726

  1. A unique set of centrosome proteins requires pericentrin for spindle-pole localization and spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ting; Hehnly, Heidi; Yu, Qing; Farkas, Debby; Zheng, Guoqiang; Redick, Sambra D; Hung, Hui-Fang; Samtani, Rajeev; Jurczyk, Agata; Akbarian, Schahram; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew; Bober, Michael; Guo, Yin; Lo, Cecilia; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is caused by mutations in the centrosome gene pericentrin (PCNT) that lead to severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. As in MOPDII patients, disruption of pericentrin (Pcnt) in mice caused a number of abnormalities including microcephaly, aberrant hemodynamics analyzed by in utero echocardiography, and cardiovascular anomalies; the latter being associated with mortality, as in the human condition. To identify the mechanisms underlying these defects, we tested for changes in cell and molecular function. All Pcnt(-/-) mouse tissues and cells examined showed spindle misorientation. This mouse phenotype was associated with misdirected ventricular septal growth in the heart, decreased proliferative symmetric divisions in brain neural progenitors, and increased misoriented divisions in fibroblasts; the same phenotype was seen in fibroblasts from three MOPDII individuals. Misoriented spindles were associated with disrupted astral microtubules and near complete loss of a unique set of centrosome proteins from spindle poles (ninein, Cep215, centriolin). All these proteins appear to be crucial for microtubule anchoring and all interacted with Pcnt, suggesting that Pcnt serves as a molecular scaffold for this functionally linked set of spindle pole proteins. Importantly, Pcnt disruption had no detectable effect on localization of proteins involved in the cortical polarity pathway (NuMA, p150(glued), aPKC). Not only do these data reveal a spindle-pole-localized complex for spindle orientation, but they identify key spindle symmetry proteins involved in the pathogenesis of MOPDII. PMID:25220058

  2. Effects of expected-value information and display format on recognition of aircraft subsystem abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Abbott, Kathy H.

    1994-01-01

    This study identifies improved methods to present system parameter information for detecting abnormal conditions and to identify system status. Two workstation experiments were conducted. The first experiment determined if including expected-value-range information in traditional parameter display formats affected subject performance. The second experiment determined if using a nontraditional parameter display format, which presented relative deviation from expected value, was better than traditional formats with expected-value ranges included. The inclusion of expected-value-range information onto traditional parameter formats was found to have essentially no effect. However, subjective results indicated support for including this information. The nontraditional column deviation parameter display format resulted in significantly fewer errors compared with traditional formats with expected-value-ranges included. In addition, error rates for the column deviation parameter display format remained stable as the scenario complexity increased, whereas error rates for the traditional parameter display formats with expected-value ranges increased. Subjective results also indicated that the subjects preferred this new format and thought that their performance was better with it. The column deviation parameter display format is recommended for display applications that require rapid recognition of out-of-tolerance conditions, especially for a large number of parameters.

  3. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  4. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220038

  5. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  6. A computational model predicts Xenopus meiotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Rose

    2010-01-01

    The metaphase spindle is a dynamic bipolar structure crucial for proper chromosome segregation, but how microtubules (MTs) are organized within the bipolar architecture remains controversial. To explore MT organization along the pole-to-pole axis, we simulated meiotic spindle assembly in two dimensions using dynamic MTs, a MT cross-linking force, and a kinesin-5–like motor. The bipolar structures that form consist of antiparallel fluxing MTs, but spindle pole formation requires the addition of a NuMA-like minus-end cross-linker and directed transport of MT depolymerization activity toward minus ends. Dynamic instability and minus-end depolymerization generate realistic MT lifetimes and a truncated exponential MT length distribution. Keeping the number of MTs in the simulation constant, we explored the influence of two different MT nucleation pathways on spindle organization. When nucleation occurs throughout the spindle, the simulation quantitatively reproduces features of meiotic spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:21173114

  7. The integrated method to select drilling muds for abnormally high pressure formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorev, V. S.; Dmitriev, A. Yu; Boyko, I. A.; Kayumova, N. S.; Rakhimov, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the method for choosing a drilling mud for drilling abnormally high pressure formations. A carefully selected drilling mud formulation would not only enhance an array of interrelated fluid properties, but also minimize the impact on the pay zones when the drill bit first penetrates the pay. To ensure a better assessment of drilling mud impact on the pay zone, it is reasonable to carry out the study focused on the analysis of technological parameters, involving filtration, acid and drilling mud tests, as well as formation damage analysis. This would enable evaluating the degree of mudding off, reservoirs acid fracturing effect and the risks of pipe sticking at significant depth. The article presents the results of the above-described study with regard to the currently used drilling mud and new experimental formulations developed at National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (Drilling Mud and Cement Slurry Laboratory).

  8. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  9. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  10. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  11. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  12. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  13. Constitutive Notch Signaling Causes Abnormal Development of the Oviducts, Abnormal Angiogenesis, and Cyst Formation in Mouse Female Reproductive Tract.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lydia; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Manresa, Carmen; Barbara, Agustin M; Poppiti, Robert J; Tan, Yingchun; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critical for the differentiation of many tissues and organs in the embryo. To study the consequences of Notch1 gain-of-function signaling on female reproductive tract development, we used a cre-loxP strategy andAmhr2-cretransgene to generate mice with conditionally activated Notch1 (Rosa(Notch1)). TheAmhr2-cretransgene is expressed in the mesenchyme of developing female reproductive tract and in granulosa cells in the ovary. Double transgenicAmhr2-cre, Rosa(Notch1)females were infertile, whereas controlRosa(Notch1)mice had normal fertility. All female reproductive organs in mutants showed hemorrhaging of blood vessels progressing with age. The mutant oviducts did not develop coiling, and were instead looped around the ovary. There were multiple blockages in the lumen along the oviduct length, creating a barrier for sperm or oocyte passage. Mutant females demonstrated inflamed uteri with increased vascularization and an influx of inflammatory cells. Additionally, older females developed ovarian, oviductal, and uterine cysts. The significant change in gene expression was detected in the mutant oviduct expression ofWnt4, essential for female reproductive tract development. Similar oviductal phenotypes have been detected previously in mice with activatedSmoand inbeta-catenin,Wnt4,Wnt7a, andDicerconditional knockouts, indicating a common regulatory pathway disrupted by these genetic abnormalities. PMID:26843448

  14. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  15. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  16. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  17. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin. PMID:26088160

  18. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin.

  19. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  20. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. PMID:26426912

  1. Abnormal Ras signaling in Costello syndrome (CS) negatively regulates enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Tidyman, William E.; Jheon, Andrew H.; Sharir, Amnon; Zheng, Xu; Charles, Cyril; Fagin, James A.; McMahon, Martin; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Ganss, Bernhard; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    RASopathies are syndromes caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Ras signaling pathway. One of these conditions, Costello syndrome (CS), is typically caused by an activating de novo germline mutation in HRAS and is characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological and developmental abnormalities. We report that a majority of individuals with CS have hypo-mineralization of enamel, the outer covering of teeth, and that similar defects are present in a CS mouse model. Comprehensive analysis of the mouse model revealed that ameloblasts, the cells that generate enamel, lacked polarity, and the ameloblast progenitor cells were hyperproliferative. Ras signals through two main effector cascades, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. To determine through which pathway Ras affects enamel formation, inhibitors targeting either PI3K or MEK 1 and 2 (MEK 1/2), kinases in the MAPK pathway, were utilized. MEK1/2 inhibition rescued the hypo-mineralized enamel, normalized the ameloblast polarity defect and restored normal progenitor cell proliferation. In contrast, PI3K inhibition only corrected the progenitor cell proliferation phenotype. We demonstrate for the first time the central role of Ras signaling in enamel formation in CS individuals and present the mouse incisor as a model system to dissect the roles of the Ras effector pathways in vivo. PMID:24057668

  2. Emergence of synchronous EEG spindles from asynchronous MEG spindles.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Nima; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Sleep spindles are bursts of rhythmic 10-15 Hz activity, lasting ∼0.5-2 s, that occur during Stage 2 sleep. They are coherent across multiple cortical and thalamic locations in animals, and across scalp EEG sites in humans, suggesting simultaneous generation across the cortical mantle. However, reports of MEG spindles occurring without EEG spindles, and vice versa, are inconsistent with synchronous distributed generation. We objectively determined the frequency of MEG-only, EEG-only, and combined MEG-EEG spindles in high density recordings of natural sleep in humans. About 50% of MEG spindles occur without EEG spindles, but the converse is rare (∼15%). Compared to spindles that occur in MEG only, those that occur in both MEG and EEG have ∼1% more MEG coherence and ∼15% more MEG power, insufficient to account for the ∼55% increase in EEG power. However, these combined spindles involve ∼66% more MEG channels, especially over frontocentral cortex. Furthermore, when both MEG and EEG are involved in a given spindle, the MEG spindle begins ∼150 ms before the EEG spindle and ends ∼250 ms after. Our findings suggest that spindles begin in focal cortical locations which are better recorded with MEG gradiometers than referential EEG due to the biophysics of their propagation. For some spindles, only these regions remain active. For other spindles, these locations may recruit other areas over the next 200 ms, until a critical mass is achieved, including especially frontal cortex, resulting in activation of a diffuse and/or multifocal generator that is best recorded by referential EEG derivations due to their larger leadfields. PMID:21337472

  3. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  4. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1(Ser137) involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210)) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1(Ser137) with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1(Thr210) was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1(Ser137) was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1(Thr210) was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1(Ser137) accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210), as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1(Thr210), were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1(Ser137) is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  5. Axin-1 Regulates Meiotic Spindle Organization in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Shen, Yu-Ting; Xu, Lin; Chen, Ming-Huang; Wang, Ya-Long; Xu, Bai-Hui; Yang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Hai-Long

    2016-01-01

    Axin-1, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, is a versatile scaffold protein involved in centrosome separation and spindle assembly in mitosis, but its function in mammalian oogenesis remains unknown. Here we examined the localization and function of Axin-1 during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Axin-1 was localized around the spindle. Knockdown of the Axin1 gene by microinjection of specific short interfering (si)RNA into the oocyte cytoplasm resulted in severely defective spindles, misaligned chromosomes, failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion, and impaired pronuclear formation. However, supplementing the culture medium with the Wnt pathway activator LiCl improved spindle morphology and pronuclear formation. Downregulation of Axin1 gene expression also impaired the spindle pole localization of γ-tubulin/Nek9 and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 at kinetochores after 8.5 h of culture. Our results suggest that Axin-1 is critical for spindle organization and cell cycle progression during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:27284927

  6. Distinct roles for antiparallel microtubule pairing and overlap during early spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Nazarova, Elena; O'Toole, Eileen; Kaitna, Susi; Francois, Paul; Winey, Mark; Vogel, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    During spindle assembly, microtubules may attach to kinetochores or pair to form antiparallel pairs or interpolar microtubules, which span the two spindle poles and contribute to mitotic pole separation and chromosome segregation. Events in the specification of the interpolar microtubules are poorly understood. Using three-dimensional electron tomography and analysis of spindle dynamical behavior in living cells, we investigated the process of spindle assembly. Unexpectedly, we found that the phosphorylation state of an evolutionarily conserved Cdk1 site (S360) in γ-tubulin is correlated with the number and organization of interpolar microtubules. Mimicking S360 phosphorylation (S360D) results in bipolar spindles with a normal number of microtubules but lacking interpolar microtubules. Inhibiting S360 phosphorylation (S360A) results in spindles with interpolar microtubules and high-angle, antiparallel microtubule pairs. The latter are also detected in wild-type spindles <1 μm in length, suggesting that high-angle microtubule pairing represents an intermediate step in interpolar microtubule formation. Correlation of spindle architecture with dynamical behavior suggests that microtubule pairing is sufficient to separate the spindle poles, whereas interpolar microtubules maintain the velocity of pole displacement during early spindle assembly. Our findings suggest that the number of interpolar microtubules formed during spindle assembly is controlled in part through activities at the spindle poles. PMID:23966467

  7. A novel strategy for targeted killing of tumor cells: Induction of multipolar acentrosomal mitotic spindles with a quinazolinone derivative mdivi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingnan; Li, Jianfeng; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Shuda, Masahiro; Sobol, Robert W; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Traditional antimitotic drugs for cancer chemotherapy often have undesired toxicities to healthy tissues, limiting their clinical application. Developing novel agents that specifically target tumor cell mitosis is needed to minimize the toxicity and improve the efficacy of this class of anticancer drugs. We discovered that mdivi-1 (mitochondrial division inhibitor-1), which was originally reported as an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, specifically disrupts M phase cell cycle progression only in human tumor cells, but not in non-transformed fibroblasts or epithelial cells. The antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is Drp1 independent, as mdivi-1 induces M phase abnormalities in both Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 knockout SV40-immortalized/transformed MEF cells. We also identified that the tumor transformation process required for the antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is downstream of SV40 large T and small t antigens, but not hTERT-mediated immortalization. Mdivi-1 induces multipolar mitotic spindles in tumor cells regardless of their centrosome numbers. Acentrosomal spindle poles, which do not contain the bona-fide centrosome components γ-tubulin and centrin-2, were found to contribute to the spindle multipolarity induced by mdivi-1. Gene expression profiling revealed that the genes involved in oocyte meiosis and assembly of acentrosomal microtubules are highly expressed in tumor cells. We further identified that tumor cells have enhanced activity in the nucleation and assembly of acentrosomal kinetochore-attaching microtubules. Mdivi-1 inhibited the integration of acentrosomal microtubule-organizing centers into centrosomal asters, resulting in the development of acentrosomal mitotic spindles preferentially in tumor cells. The formation of multipolar acentrosomal spindles leads to gross genome instability and Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, our studies indicate that inducing multipolar spindles composing of acentrosomal poles in mitosis could achieve

  8. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  9. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Perturbs Cell Cycle Progression and Spindle Organization in Porcine Meiotic Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wang, Yan-Kui; Song, Zhi-Qiang; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic maturation of mammalian oocytes is a precisely orchestrated and complex process. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widely used solvent, drug, and cryoprotectant, is capable of disturbing asymmetric cytokinesis of oocyte meiosis in mice. However, in pigs, DMSO’s effect on oocyte meiosis still remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate if DMSO treatment will affect porcine oocyte meiosis and the underlying molecular changes as well. Interestingly, we did not observe the formation of the large first polar body and symmetric division for porcine oocytes treated with DMSO, contrary to findings reported in mice. 3% DMSO treatment could inhibit cumulus expansion, increase nuclear abnormality, disturb spindle organization, decrease reactive oxygen species level, and elevate mitochondrial membrane potential of porcine oocytes. There was no effect on germinal vesicle breakdown rate regardless of DMSO concentration. 3% DMSO treatment did not affect expression of genes involved in spindle organization (Bub1 and Mad2) and apoptosis (NF-κB, Pten, Bcl2, Caspase3 and Caspase9), however, it significantly decreased expression levels of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Sox2 and Lin28) in mature oocytes. Therefore, we demonstrated that disturbed cumulus expansion, chromosome alignment, spindle organization and pluripotency gene expression could be responsible for DMSO-induced porcine oocyte meiotic arrest and the lower capacity of subsequent embryo development. Our results provide new insights on DMSO’s effect on porcine oocyte meiosis and raise safety concerns over DMSO’s usage on female reproduction in both farm animals and humans. PMID:27348312

  10. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  11. Abnormal fiber end migration in Royal College of Surgeons rats during posterior subcapsular cataract formation

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anita; Al-Ghoul, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    lenses showed the expected peripheral pattern of labeling at all ages. Dystrophic RCS lenses at 2 weeks were comparable to controls, however by 3–4 weeks they displayed scattered foci of F-actin within the BMC. At all time points thereafter, F-actin was rearranged into a ‘rosette’ pattern of prominent foci at cell vertices. Conclusions The data are consistent with the hypothesis that migration of basal fiber ends is altered in a two stage process wherein initially, migration patterns undergo a rapid shift resulting in abnormal suture sub-branch formation. Subsequent cytological alterations are consistent with an eventual cessation of migration, precluding proper targeting of basal ends to their sutural destinations and leading to cataract plaque formation. PMID:20806082

  12. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  13. Spindle picker harvest speed effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gear drive of a modern John Deere Pro 16 picker unit was modified so that spindle speed was reduced without changing the drum speed. Three 1-row picking units were used in the study, one with the standard drive speeds, one with 25% reduction in spindle drive speed, and one with 50% reduction in...

  14. The Spindle Type Cotton Harvester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spindle type cotton picker was commercialized during the mid 1900’s and is currently produced by two US agricultural equipment manufacturers, John Deere and CaseIH. Picking is the predominate machine harvest method used throughout the US and world. Harvesting efficiency of a spindle type cotton ...

  15. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  16. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Basu, S; Paul, R

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed. PMID:26565279

  17. Abnormal electron-heating mode and formation of secondary-energetic electrons in pulsed microwave-frequency atmospheric microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H. C.; Jung, S. Y.; Kim, H. Y.; Won, I. H.; Lee, J. K.

    2014-03-15

    The formation of secondary energetic electrons induced by an abnormal electron-heating mode in pulsed microwave-frequency atmospheric microplasmas was investigated using particle-in-cell simulation. We found that additional high electron heating only occurs during the first period of the ignition phase after the start of a second pulse at sub-millimeter dimensions. During this period, the electrons are unable to follow the abruptly retreating sheath through diffusion alone. Thus, a self-consistent electric field is induced to drive the electrons toward the electrode. These behaviors result in an abnormal electron-heating mode that produces high-energy electrons at the electrode with energies greater than 50 eV.

  18. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Christoph; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L

    2016-01-01

    Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs) and adult sleep spindles (ASSs) show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research. PMID:27293903

  19. Sleep Spindle Deficit in Schizophrenia: Contextualization of Recent Findings.

    PubMed

    Castelnovo, Anna; D'Agostino, Armando; Casetta, Cecilia; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Sleep spindles are wax and waning brain oscillations at a frequency range of 11-16 Hz, lasting 0.5-2 s, that define non-rapid eye movement sleep stage 2. Over the past few years, several independent studies pointed to a decrease of sleep spindles in schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to contextualize these findings within the growing literature on these oscillations across other neuro-psychiatric disorders. Indeed, spindles reflect the coordinated activity of thalamocortical networks, and their abnormality can be observed in a variety of conditions that disrupt local or global thalamocortical connectivity. Although the broad methodological variability across studies limits the possibility of drawing firm conclusions, impaired spindling activity has been observed in several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite such lack of specificity, schizophrenia remains the only condition with a typical late adolescence to young adulthood onset in which impaired spindling has been consistently reported. Further research is necessary to clearly define the pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to this deficit and the validity of its widespread use as a clinical biomarker. PMID:27299655

  20. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Christoph; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H.; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L.

    2016-01-01

    Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs) and adult sleep spindles (ASSs) show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research. PMID:27293903

  1. WD40-repeat protein 62 is a JNK-phosphorylated spindle pole protein required for spindle maintenance and timely mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Qu, Zhengdong; Ngoei, Kevin R.; Yip, Yan Y.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Heng, Julian I.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The impact of aberrant centrosomes and/or spindles on asymmetric cell division in embryonic development indicates the tight regulation of bipolar spindle formation and positioning that is required for mitotic progression and cell fate determination. WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) was recently identified as a spindle pole protein linked to the neurodevelopmental defect of microcephaly but its roles in mitosis have not been defined. We report here that the in utero electroporation of neuroprogenitor cells with WDR62 siRNAs induced their cell cycle exit and reduced their proliferative capacity. In cultured cells, we demonstrated cell-cycle-dependent accumulation of WDR62 at the spindle pole during mitotic entry that persisted until metaphase–anaphase transition. Utilizing siRNA depletion, we revealed WDR62 function in stabilizing the mitotic spindle specifically during metaphase. WDR62 loss resulted in spindle orientation defects, decreased the integrity of centrosomes displaced from the spindle pole and delayed mitotic progression. Additionally, we revealed JNK phosphorylation of WDR62 is required for maintaining metaphase spindle organization during mitosis. Our study provides the first functional characterization of WDR62 and has revealed requirements for JNK/WDR62 signaling in mitotic spindle regulation that may be involved in coordinating neurogenesis. PMID:22899712

  2. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization.

    PubMed

    Higgins, David M; Nannas, Natalie J; Dawe, R Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  3. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  4. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Florencia; Echard, Arnaud; Morin, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is essential for cell fate decisions, epithelial maintenance, and tissue morphogenesis. In most animal cell types, the dynein motor complex is anchored at the cell cortex and exerts pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the spindle. Early studies identified the evolutionarily conserved Gαi/LGN/NuMA complex as a key regulator that polarizes cortical force generators. In recent years, a combination of genetics, biochemistry, modeling, and live imaging has contributed to decipher the mechanisms of spindle orientation. Here, we highlight the dynamic nature of the assembly of this complex and discuss the molecular regulation of its localization. Remarkably, a number of LGN-independent mechanisms were described recently, whereas NuMA remains central in most pathways involved in recruiting force generators at the cell cortex. We also describe the emerging role of the actin cortex in spindle orientation and discuss how dynamic astral microtubule formation is involved. We further give an overview on instructive external signals that control spindle orientation in tissues. Finally, we discuss the influence of cell geometry and mechanical forces on spindle orientation. PMID:27432284

  5. Abnormal dynamic changes in β-tubulin in somatic nuclear transfer cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jingling; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Xinghui; Zheng, Zhong; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xiuqing; Hu, Lili; Lei, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning remains low, thus limiting the applications of this technique. In this study, we used immunochemistry and confocal microscopy to detect the microtubule component, β-tubulin, in SCNT, parthenogenetic (PA), and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) embryos before the first mitotic division. β-Tubulin is the component subunit of microtubule, which plays critical roles in regulating localization of cellular organelles, and the growth, maturation and fertilization of oocytes. Our results demonstrated similar changes of spindle patterns in PA and ICSI embryos. The second meiotic division resumed 1 h post-treatment, and the cytoplasmic asters (CAs) disappeared. After about 4-6 h of treatment, pronuclei formed with the midbodies connecting each other. Meanwhile, the CAs reappeared and a microtubule network developed in the cytoplasm. However, SCNT embryos showed abnormal multipolar spindles, and the pseudopronuclei that contained many nucleoli existed after 6 h of SrCl2 activation. Enucleated oocytes alone did not form spindle-like structures when they were artificially activated for 6 h, indicating that somatic cell chromosomes might be necessary for spindle formation in SCNT embryos. These results demonstrated abnormal changes of β-tubulin in mouse SCNT embryos, compared with PA and ICSI embryos. PMID:24345634

  6. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  7. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  8. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  9. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  10. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  11. Identification of Abnormal Phase and its Formation Mechanism in Synthesizing Chalcogenide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kegao; Ji, Nianjing; Xu, Yong; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Chalcogenide films can be used in thin-film solar cells due to their high photoelectric conversion efficiencies. It was difficult to identify one abnormal phase with high X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensity and preferred orientation in the samples for preparing chalcogenide films by spin-coating and co-reduction on soda-lime glass (Na2OṡCaOṡ6SiO2) substrates. The raw materials and reductant are metal chlorides and hydrazine hydrate respectively. In order to identify this phase, a series of experiments were done under different conditions. The phases of obtained products were analyzed by XRD and the size and morphology were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the experimental results, first it was proved that the abnormal phase was water-soluble by water immersion experiment, then it was identified as NaCl crystal through XRD, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and SEM. The cubic NaCl crystals have high crystallinity with size lengths of about 0.5-2μm and show a <100> preferred orientation. The reaction mechanism of NaCl crystal was proposed as follows: The NaCl crystal was formed by reaction of Na2O and HCl in a certain experimental conditions.

  12. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Yeong, Foong May

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS) formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR) constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p) neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit. PMID:27447488

  13. Using theories of delusion formation to explain abnormal beliefs in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD).

    PubMed

    Rossell, Susan L; Labuschagne, Izelle; Dunai, Judy; Kyrios, Michael; Castle, David J

    2014-03-30

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterised by overvalued or delusional beliefs of 'imagined ugliness'. Delusional beliefs have been explained by a number of cognitive theories, including faulty perceptions, biases in attention, and corruption of semantic memory. Atypical aesthetics may also influence beliefs in BDD. In fourteen BDD patients, compared to controls (n=14), we examined these theories of beliefs in a cognitive test battery consisting of perceptual organisation and visual affect perception tasks, a Stroop task using body words, a sentence verification task, a fluency task, and an attractiveness task. BDD patients performed similar to controls on tasks measuring information (bias) processing and aesthetics. However, BDD showed abnormal abilities on semantic processing involving sentence verification and category fluency. There was only a trend finding of impaired performance on perceptual processing tasks in BDD. The findings suggest that the delusional beliefs in BDD may be explained by impaired semantic processing. PMID:24412353

  14. Abnormal proplatelet formation and emperipolesis in cultured human megakaryocytes from gray platelet syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Buduo, Christian A.; Alberelli, Maria Adele; Glembostky, Ana C.; Podda, Gianmarco; Lev, Paola R.; Cattaneo, Marco; Landolfi, Raffaele; Heller, Paula G.; Balduini, Alessandra; De Candia, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited bleeding disorder characterized by deficiency of platelet α-granules, macrothrombocytopenia and marrow fibrosis. The autosomal recessive form of GPS is linked to loss of function mutations in NBEAL2, which is predicted to regulate granule trafficking in megakaryocytes, the platelet progenitors. We report the first analysis of cultured megakaryocytes from GPS patients with NBEAL2 mutations. Megakaryocytes cultured from peripheral blood or bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells from four patients were used to investigate megakaryopoiesis, megakaryocyte morphology and platelet formation. In vitro differentiation of megakaryocytes was normal, whereas we observed deficiency of megakaryocyte α-granule proteins and emperipolesis. Importantly, we first demonstrated that platelet formation by GPS megakaryocytes was severely affected, a defect which might be the major cause of thrombocytopenia in patients. These results demonstrate that cultured megakaryocytes from GPS patients provide a valuable model to understand the pathogenesis of GPS in humans. PMID:26987485

  15. The Transcriptional Repressor Kaiso Localizes at the Mitotic Spindle and Is a Constituent of the Pericentriolar Material

    PubMed Central

    Soubry, Adelheid; Staes, Katrien; Parthoens, Eef; Noppen, Sam; Stove, Christophe; Bogaert, Pieter; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Kaiso is a BTB/POZ zinc finger protein known as a transcriptional repressor. It was originally identified through its in vitro association with the Armadillo protein p120ctn. Subcellular localization of Kaiso in cell lines and in normal and cancerous human tissues revealed that its expression is not restricted to the nucleus. In the present study we monitored Kaiso's subcellular localization during the cell cycle and found the following: (1) during interphase, Kaiso is located not only in the nucleus, but also on microtubular structures, including the centrosome; (2) at metaphase, it is present at the centrosomes and on the spindle microtubules; (3) during telophase, it accumulates at the midbody. We found that Kaiso is a genuine PCM component that belongs to a pericentrin molecular complex. We analyzed the functions of different domains of Kaiso by visualizing the subcellular distribution of GFP-tagged Kaiso fragments throughout the cell cycle. Our results indicate that two domains are responsible for targeting Kaiso to the centrosomes and microtubules. The first domain, designated SA1 for spindle-associated domain 1, is located in the center of the Kaiso protein and localizes at the spindle microtubules and centrosomes; the second domain, SA2, is an evolutionarily conserved domain situated just before the zinc finger domain and might be responsible for localizing Kaiso towards the centrosomal region. Constructs containing both SA domains and Kaiso's aminoterminal BTB/POZ domain triggered the formation of abnormal centrosomes. We also observed that overexpression of longer or full-length Kaiso constructs led to mitotic cell arrest and frequent cell death. Knockdown of Kaiso accelerated cell proliferation. Our data reveal a new target for Kaiso at the centrosomes and spindle microtubules during mitosis. They also strongly imply that Kaiso's function as a transcriptional regulator might be linked to the control of the cell cycle and to cell proliferation in cancer

  16. Disruption of IFT Complex A Causes Cystic Kidneys without Mitotic Spindle Misorientation

    PubMed Central

    Jonassen, Julie A.; SanAgustin, Jovenal; Baker, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes A and B build and maintain primary cilia. In the mouse, kidney-specific or hypomorphic mutant alleles of IFT complex B genes cause polycystic kidneys, but the influence of IFT complex A proteins on renal development is not well understood. In the present study, we found that HoxB7-Cre–driven deletion of the complex A gene Ift140 from collecting ducts disrupted, but did not completely prevent, cilia assembly. Mutant kidneys developed collecting duct cysts by postnatal day 5, with rapid cystic expansion and renal dysfunction by day 15 and little remaining parenchymal tissue by day 20. In contrast to many models of polycystic kidney disease, precystic Ift140-deleted collecting ducts showed normal centrosomal positioning and no misorientation of the mitotic spindle axis, suggesting that disruption of oriented cell division is not a prerequisite to cyst formation in these kidneys. Precystic collecting ducts had an increased mitotic index, suggesting that cell proliferation may drive cyst expansion even with normal orientation of the mitotic spindle. In addition, we observed significant increases in expression of canonical Wnt pathway genes and mediators of Hedgehog and tissue fibrosis in highly cystic, but not precystic, kidneys. Taken together, these studies indicate that loss of Ift140 causes pronounced renal cystic disease and suggest that abnormalities in several different pathways may influence cyst progression. PMID:22282595

  17. Optimization study of the efficient spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. D.; Chun, D. H.; Kang, M. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2008-09-01

    In the field of yarn dyeing, the most generally employed method is a type of package dyeing which uses a package of cheese stacked on a spindle made of a perforated tube. Spindles up to now, have been designed without considering the characteristics of dyeing liquid, focusing only on the geometric configuration which cause many problems such as lack of level dyeing. To improve the level dyeing and find the appropriate spindle configuration for the most effective dyeing process, this study examines the spindle flow-field in detail, using a computational method. Flow characteristics inside the spindle have been investigated with varying in porosity, porous diameter and the velocity of the flow. The results show that the total pressure of the flow through the spindle is used to overcome body force. The characteristics of the flow from the porous spindle could also be observed. Based on the results from this study, an effective spindle configuration for level-dyeing has been proposed.

  18. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during the hot rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Yagi, Akira; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite (γ) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hotrolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometers in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain rowth which occurred during reheating at around 930 °C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  19. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during hot rolling process

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Ueno, Masakatsu; Yagi, Akira

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite ({gamma}) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hot-rolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometer in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain growth which occurred during reheating at around 930 C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  20. Cep192 and the generation of the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Sharp, David J

    2008-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms used to generate sufficient microtubule polymer mass to drive the assembly and function of the mitotic spindle remain a matter of great interest. As the primary microtubule nucleating structures in somatic animal cells, centrosomes have been assumed to figure prominently in spindle assembly. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a dramatic increase in size and microtubule nucleating capacity, termed maturation, which is likely a key event in mitotic spindle formation. Interestingly, however, spindles can still form in the absence of centrosomes calling into question the specific mitotic role of these organelles. Recent work has shown that the human centrosomal protein, Cep192, is required for both centrosome maturation and spindle assembly thus providing a molecular link between these two processes. In this article, we propose that Cep192 does so by forming a scaffolding on which proteins involved in microtubule nucleation are sequestered and become active in mitotic cells. Normally, this activity is largely confined to centrosomes but in their absence continues to function but is dispersed to other sites within the cell. PMID:18469523

  1. Insights regarding the normal and abnormal formation of the atrial and ventricular septal structures.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Brown, Nigel A; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of cardiac development can provide the basis for understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations. Only recently, however, has the quality of information regarding cardiac embryology been sufficient to justify this approach. In this review, we show how such knowledge of development of the normal atrial and ventricular septal structures underscores the interpretation of the lesions that provide the basis for interatrial and interventricular shunting of blood. We show that current concepts of atrial septation, which frequently depend on a suggested formation of an extensive secondary septum, are simplistic. There are additional contributions beyond growth of the primary septum, but the new tissue is added to form the ventral buttress of the definitive atrial septum, rather than its cranial margin, as is usually depicted. We show that the ventricular septum possesses muscular and membranous components, with the entirety of the muscular septum produced concomitant with the so-called ballooning of the apical ventricular component. It is expansion of the atrioventricular canal that creates the inlet of the right ventricle, with no separate formation of an "inlet" septum. The proximal parts of the outflow cushions initially form a septal structure between the developing ventricular outlets, but this becomes converted into the free-standing muscular subpulmonary infundibulum as the aortic outlet is transferred to the left ventricle. These features of normal development are then shown to provide the basis for understanding of the channels that provide the means for interatrial and interventricular shunting. PMID:26378977

  2. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  3. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Ujma, Péter P.; Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Stintzing, Johannes; Konrad, Boris N.; Genzel, Lisa; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a circadian rhythm, however the association between spindles and intelligence has not been investigated in daytime nap sleep so far. In a sample of 86 healthy male human subjects, we investigated the correlation between fluid intelligence and sleep spindle parameters in an afternoon nap of 100 minutes. Mean sleep spindle length, amplitude and density were computed for each subject and for each derivation for both slow and fast spindles. A positive association was found between intelligence and slow spindle duration, but not any other sleep spindle parameter. As a positive correlation between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in full-night polysomnography has only been reported in females but not males, our results suggest that the association between intelligence and sleep spindles is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26607963

  4. SPINDLE SPEED EFFECTS ON COTTON QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and harvested at three different spindle speeds (1500, 2000, and 2400 rpm). Stalk losses were significantly greater with a spindle speed of 1500 rpm than with the higher spindle speeds, particularly for the D...

  5. Spindle speed optimization for cotton pickers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes to cotton pickers over the years regarding the operating speed and size of the spindles have resulted in a general decrease in cotton fiber quality, particularly regarding spindle twists, preparation, and neps. Previous research showed that spindle speeds of 3000 and 4000 rpm had more detri...

  6. Spectrotemporal receptive fields during spindling and non-spindling epochs in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-07-17

    It was often thought that synchronized rhythmic epochs of spindle waves disconnect thalamo-cortical system from incoming sensory signals. The present study addresses this issue by simultaneous extracellular action potential and local field potential (LFP) recordings from primary auditory cortex of ketamine-anesthetized cats during spindling activity. We compared cortical spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRF) obtained during spindling and non-spindling epochs. The basic spectro-temporal parameters of "spindling" and "non-spindling" STRFs were similar. However, the peak-firing rate at the best frequency was significantly enhanced during spindling epochs. This enhancement was mainly caused by the increased probability of a stimulus to evoke spikes (effectiveness of stimuli) during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Augmented LFPs associated with effective stimuli and increased single-unit pair correlations during spindling epochs suggested higher synchrony of thalamo-cortical inputs during spindling that resulted in increased effectiveness of stimuli presented during spindling activity. The neuronal firing rate, both stimulus-driven and spontaneous, was higher during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Overall, our results suggests that thalamic cells during spindling respond to incoming stimuli-related inputs and, moreover, cause more powerful stimulus-related or spontaneous activation of the cortex. PMID:18515012

  7. Synchronization and Propagation of Global Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rafael Toledo Fernandes; Gerhardt, Günther Johannes Lewczuk; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles occur thousands of times during normal sleep and can be easily detected by visual inspection of EEG signals. These characteristics make spindles one of the most studied EEG structures in mammalian sleep. In this work we considered global spindles, which are spindles that are observed simultaneously in all EEG channels. We propose a methodology that investigates both the signal envelope and phase/frequency of each global spindle. By analysing the global spindle phase we showed that 90% of spindles synchronize with an average latency time of 0.1 s. We also measured the frequency modulation (chirp) of global spindles and found that global spindle chirp and synchronization are not correlated. By investigating the signal envelopes and implementing a homogeneous and isotropic propagation model, we could estimate both the signal origin and velocity in global spindles. Our results indicate that this simple and non-invasive approach could determine with reasonable precision the spindle origin, and allowed us to estimate a signal speed of 0.12 m/s. Finally, we consider whether synchronization might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. PMID:26963102

  8. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  9. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  10. Chromosomes rein back the spindle pole body during horsetail movement in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Yamane, Miho; Okamasa, Kasumi; Mori, Chie; Fukuta, Noriko; Matsuda, Atsushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    In meiosis, pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes are crucial for the correct segregation of chromosomes, and substantial movements of chromosomes are required to achieve homolog pairing. During this process, it is known that telomeres cluster to form a bouquet arrangement of chromosomes. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a striking example of bouquet formation, after which the entire nucleus oscillates between the cell poles (these oscillations are generally called horsetail nuclear movements) while the telomeres remain clustered to the spindle pole body (SPB; a centrosome-equivalent structure in fungi) at the leading edge of the moving nucleus. S. pombe mutants defective in telomere clustering frequently form aberrant spindles, such as monopolar or nonpolar spindles, leading to missegregation of the chromosomes at the subsequent meiotic divisions. Here we demonstrate that such defects in meiotic spindle formation caused by loss of meiotic telomere clustering are rescued when nuclear movement is prevented. On the other hand, stopping nuclear movement does not rescue defects in telomere clustering, nor chromosome missgregation even in cells that have formed a bipolar spindle. These results suggest that movement of the SPB without attachment of telomeres leads to the formation of aberrant spindles, but that recovering bipolar spindles is not sufficient for rescue of chromosome missegregation in mutants lacking telomere clustering. PMID:24954111

  11. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  12. Meiotic Spindle Assessment in Mouse Oocytes by siRNA-mediated Silencing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Errors in chromosome segregation during meiotic division in gametes can lead to aneuploidy that is subsequently transmitted to the embryo upon fertilization. The resulting aneuploidy in developing embryos is recognized as a major cause of pregnancy loss and congenital birth defects such as Down's syndrome. Accurate chromosome segregation is critically dependent on the formation of the microtubule spindle apparatus, yet this process remains poorly understood in mammalian oocytes. Intriguingly, meiotic spindle assembly differs from mitosis and is regulated, at least in part, by unique microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Assessment of MTOC-associated proteins can provide valuable insight into the regulatory mechanisms that govern meiotic spindle formation and organization. Here, we describe methods to isolate mouse oocytes and deplete MTOC-associated proteins using a siRNA-mediated approach to test function. In addition, we describe oocyte fixation and immunofluorescence analysis conditions to evaluate meiotic spindle formation and organization. PMID:26485537

  13. Expression of B-RAF V600E in Type II Pneumocytes Causes Abnormalities in Alveolar Formation, Airspace Enlargement and Tumor Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zanucco, Emanuele; Götz, Rudolf; Potapenko, Tamara; Carraretto, Irene; Ceteci, Semra; Ceteci, Fatih; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2011-01-01

    Growth factor induced signaling cascades are key regulatory elements in tissue development, maintenance and regeneration. Perturbations of these cascades have severe consequences, leading to developmental disorders and neoplastic diseases. As a major function in signal transduction, activating mutations in RAF family kinases are the cause of human tumorigenesis, where B-RAF V600E has been identified as the prevalent mutant. In order to address the oncogenic function of B-RAF V600E, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the activated oncogene specifically in lung alveolar epithelial type II cells. Constitutive expression of B-RAF V600E caused abnormalities in alveolar epithelium formation that led to airspace enlargements. These lung lesions showed signs of tissue remodeling and were often associated with chronic inflammation and low incidence of lung tumors. The inflammatory cell infiltration did not precede the formation of the lung lesions but was rather accompanied with late tumor development. These data support a model where the continuous regenerative process initiated by oncogenic B-RAF-driven alveolar disruption provides a tumor-promoting environment associated with chronic inflammation. PMID:22194995

  14. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  15. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  16. Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Atrazine and Ametrine Induce Micronuclei Formation and Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Fish.

    PubMed

    Botelho, R G; Monteiro, S H; Christofoletti, C A; Moura-Andrade, G C R; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry triple quadrupole direct aqueous injection for analysis of atrazine and ametrine herbicides in surface waters was developed. According to the validation method, water samples from six different locations in the Piracicaba River were collected monthly from February 2011 to January 2012 and injected into a liquid chromatographer/dual mass spectrometer without the need for sample extraction. The method was validated and shown to be precise and accurate; limits of detection and quantification were 0.07 and 0.10 µg L(-1) for atrazine and 0.09 and 0.14 µg L(-1) for ametrine. During the sampling period, concentrations of atrazine ranged from 0.11 to 1.92 µg L(-1) and ametrine from 0.25 to 1.44 µg L(-1). After analysis of the herbicides, Danio rerio were exposed a range of concentrations found in the river water to check the induction of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in erythrocytes. Concentrations of atrazine and ametrine >1.0 and 1.5 µg L(-1), respectively, induced MN formation in D. rerio. Ametrine was shown to be more genotoxic to D. rerio because a greater incidence of NAs was observed compared with atrazine. Therefore, environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine and ametrine found in the Piracicaba River are dangerous to the aquatic biota. PMID:26081367

  17. Targeted skin overexpression of the mineralocorticoid receptor in mice causes epidermal atrophy, premature skin barrier formation, eye abnormalities, and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Sainte Marie, Yannis; Toulon, Antoine; Paus, Ralf; Maubec, Eve; Cherfa, Aicha; Grossin, Maggy; Descamps, Vincent; Clemessy, Maud; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Peuchmaur, Michel; Glick, Adam; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2007-09-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor family, activation of which by aldosterone enhances salt reabsorption in the kidney. The MR is also expressed in nonclassical aldosterone target cells (brain, heart, and skin), in which its functions are incompletely understood. To explore the functional importance of MR in mammalian skin, we have generated a conditional doxycycline-inducible model of MR overexpression, resulting in double-transgenic (DT) mice [keratin 5-tTa/tetO-human MR (hMR)], targeting the human MR specifically to keratinocytes of the epidermis and hair follicle (HF). Expression of hMR throughout gestation resulted in early postnatal death that could be prevented by antagonizing MR signaling. DT mice exhibited premature epidermal barrier formation at embryonic day 16.5, reduced HF density and epidermal atrophy, increased keratinocyte apoptosis at embryonic day 18.5, and premature eye opening. When hMR expression was initiated after birth to overcome mortality, DT mice developed progressive alopecia and HF cysts, starting 4 months after hMR induction, preceded by dystrophy and cycling abnormalities of pelage HF. In contrast, interfollicular epidermis, vibrissae, and footpad sweat glands in DT mice were normal. This new mouse model reveals novel biological roles of MR signaling and offers an instructive tool for dissecting nonclassical functions of MR signaling in epidermal, hair follicle, and ocular physiology. PMID:17675581

  18. DDA3 targets Cep290 into the centrosome to regulate spindle positioning.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyu; Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Chang-Young

    The centrosome is an important cellular organelle which nucleates microtubules (MTs) to form the cytoskeleton during interphase and the mitotic spindle during mitosis. The Cep290 is one of the centrosomal proteins and functions in cilia formation. Even-though it is in the centrosome, the function of Cep290 in mitosis had not yet been evaluated. In this study, we report a novel function of Cep290 that is involved in spindle positioning. Cep290 was identified as an interacting partner of DDA3, and we confirmed that Cep290 specifically localizes in the mitotic centrosome. Depletion of Cep290 caused a reduction of the astral spindle, leading to misorientation of the mitotic spindle. MT polymerization also decreased in Cep290-depleted cells, suggesting that Cep290 is involved in spindle nucleation. Furthermore, DDA3 stabilizes and transports Cep290 to the centrosome. Therefore, we concluded that DDA3 controls astral spindle formation and spindle positioning by targeting Cep290 to the centrosome. PMID:25998387

  19. The nuclear scaffold protein SAF-A is required for kinetochore-microtubule attachment and contributes to the targeting of Aurora-A to mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Morimoto, Akihiro; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Urano, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2011-02-01

    Segregation of chromosomes during cell division requires correct formation of mitotic spindles. Here, we show that a scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also known as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U, contributes to the attachment of spindle microtubules (MTs) to kinetochores and spindle organization. During mitosis, SAF-A was localized at the spindles, spindle midzone and cytoplasmic bridge. Depletion of SAF-A by RNA interference induced mitotic delay and defects in chromosome alignment and spindle assembly. We found that SAF-A specifically co-immunoprecipitated with the chromosome peripheral protein nucleolin and the spindle regulators Aurora-A and TPX2, indicating that SAF-A is associated with nucleolin and the Aurora-A-TPX2 complex. SAF-A was colocalized with TPX2 and Aurora-A in spindle poles and MTs. Elimination of TPX2 or Aurora-A from cells abolished the association of SAF-A with the mitotic spindle. Interestingly, SAF-A can bind to MTs and contributes to the targeting of Aurora-A to mitotic spindle MTs. Our finding indicates that SAF-A is a novel spindle regulator that plays an essential role in kinetochore-MT attachment and mitotic spindle organization. PMID:21242313

  20. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Jay P.; Payne, Scott W. T.; Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were conducted

  1. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This ‘pushing’ mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03398.001 PMID:25521247

  2. Complex Commingling: Nucleoporins and the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Mossaid, Ikram; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of the chromosomes during mitosis is an important process, in which the replicated DNA content is properly allocated into two daughter cells. To ensure their genomic integrity, cells present an essential surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which monitors the bipolar attachment of the mitotic spindle to chromosomes to prevent errors that would result in chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy. Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gigantic protein complex that forms a channel through the nuclear envelope to allow nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules, were shown to be critical for faithful cell division and implicated in the regulation of different steps of the mitotic process, including kinetochore and spindle assembly as well as the SAC. In this review, we will describe current knowledge about the interconnection between the NPC and the SAC in an evolutional perspective, which primarily relies on the two mitotic checkpoint regulators, Mad1 and Mad2. We will further discuss the role of NPC constituents, the nucleoporins, in kinetochore and spindle assembly and the formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex during mitosis and interphase. PMID:26540075

  3. Abnormal formation of collagen cross-links in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, M; Still, M J; Vales, T; Rosen, R I; Evinger, J D; Dembure, P P; Longo, N; Elsas, L J

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI (EDS VI) is an autosomal recessive disorder of connective tissue characterized by hyperextensible, friable skin and joint hypermobility. Severe scoliosis and ocular fragility are present in some patients. This disease is caused by defective collagen lsyl hydroxylase, a vitamin C-dependent enzyme that converts lysyl residues to hydroxylysine on procollagen peptides. Hydroxylysine is essential for the formation of the covalent pyridinium cross-links pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr), among mature collagen molecules. Pyr derives from three hydroxylysyl residues, whereas Dpyr derives from one lysyl and two hydroxylysyl residues. Patients with EDS VI have high urinary excretion of Dpyr, resulting in a high ratio of Dpyr-Pyr. In this study, we evaluate content and production of pyridinium cross-links in the skin and cultured fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI. The skin of normal controls contained both Pyr and Dpyr, with a marked predominance of Pyr as observed in normal urine. The skin of patients with EDS VI had reduced total content of pyridinium cross-links, with the presence of Dpyr but not Pyr. Long-term cultures of control fibroblasts produced both Pyr and Dpyr, with a pattern resembling that of normal skin. By contrast, cross-links were not detected in dermal fibroblasts cultured from patients with EDS VI. Vitamin C, which improves the clinical manifestations of some patients with EDS VI, decreased Dpyr accumulation though only minimally affecting Pyr content in control cells. By contrast, addition of vitamin C to fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI stimulated the formation of Dpyr more than that of Pyr and greatly increased total pyridinium cross-link formation. These results indicate that qualitative and quantitative alterations of pyridinium cross-links occur in skin and in cultured dermal fibroblasts of patients with EDS VI and may be responsible for their abnormal skin findings. The vitamin C

  4. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  5. Reduced Sleep Spindle Activity in Early-Onset and Elevated Risk for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than…

  6. Phosphorylation of Targeting Protein for Xenopus Kinesin-like Protein 2 (TPX2) at Threonine 72 in Spindle Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Su Yeon; de Castro, Ignacio Perez; Neumayer, Gernot; Wang, Jian; Park, Sang Ki; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang

    2015-01-01

    The human ortholog of the targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2) is a cytoskeletal protein that plays a major role in spindle assembly and is required for mitosis. During spindle morphogenesis, TPX2 cooperates with Aurora A kinase and Eg5 kinesin to regulate microtubule organization. TPX2 displays over 40 putative phosphorylation sites identified from various high-throughput proteomic screenings. In this study, we characterize the phosphorylation of threonine 72 (Thr72) in human TPX2, a residue highly conserved across species. We find that Cdk1/2 phosphorylate TPX2 in vitro and in vivo. Using homemade antibodies specific for TPX2 phosphorylated at Thr72, we show that this phosphorylation is cell cycle-dependent and peaks at M phase. Endogenous TPX2 phosphorylated at Thr72 does not associate with the mitotic spindle. Furthermore, ectopic GFP-TPX2 T72A preferentially concentrates on the spindle, whereas GFP-TPX2 WT distributes to both spindle and cytosol. The T72A mutant also increases the proportion of cells with multipolar spindles phenotype. This effect is associated with increased Aurora A activity and abnormally elongated spindles, indicative of higher Eg5 activity. In summary, we propose that phosphorylation of Thr72 regulates TPX2 localization and impacts spindle assembly via Aurora A and Eg5. PMID:25688093

  7. Spindle Dynamics during Meiosis in Drosophila Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Endow, Sharyn A.; Komma, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Mature oocytes of Drosophila are arrested in metaphase of meiosis I. Upon activation by ovulation or fertilization, oocytes undergo a series of rapid changes that have not been directly visualized previously. We report here the use of the Nonclaret disjunctional (Ncd) microtubule motor protein fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to monitor changes in the meiotic spindle of live oocytes after activation in vitro. Meiotic spindles of metaphase-arrested oocytes are relatively stable, however, meiotic spindles of in vitro–activated oocytes are highly dynamic: the spindles elongate, rotate around their long axis, and undergo an acute pivoting movement to reorient perpendicular to the oocyte surface. Many oocytes spontaneously complete the meiotic divisions, permitting visualization of progression from meiosis I to II. The movements of the spindle after oocyte activation provide new information about the dynamic changes in the spindle that occur upon re-entry into meiosis and completion of the meiotic divisions. Spindles in live oocytes mutant for a lossof-function ncd allele fused to gfp were also imaged. The genesis of spindle defects in the live mutant oocytes provides new insights into the mechanism of Ncd function in the spindle during the meiotic divisions. PMID:9182665

  8. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Merrill S.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and “off-line” processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population. PMID:27478646

  9. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  10. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reut; Wise, Merrill S

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and "off-line" processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population. PMID:27478646

  11. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin−/− mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09384.001 PMID:26406118

  12. Spindle Size Scaling Contributes to Robust Silencing of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis hinges on proper assembly of the microtubule spindle that establishes bipolar attachment to each chromosome. Experiments demonstrate allometry of mitotic spindles and a universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size across metazoans, which indicates a conserved principle of spindle assembly at play during evolution. However, the nature of this principle is currently unknown. Researchers have focused on deriving the mechanistic underpinning of the size scaling from the mechanical aspects of the spindle assembly process. In this work we take a different standpoint and ask: What is the size scaling for? We address this question from the functional perspectives of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is the critical surveillance mechanism that prevents premature chromosome segregation in the presence of unattached or misattached chromosomes. The SAC signal gets silenced after and only after the last chromosome-spindle attachment in mitosis. We previously established a model that explains the robustness of SAC silencing based on spindle-mediated spatiotemporal regulation of SAC proteins. Here, we refine the previous model, and find that robust and timely SAC silencing entails proper size scaling of mitotic spindle. This finding provides, to our knowledge, a novel, function-oriented angle toward understanding the observed spindle allometry, and the universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size in metazoans. In a broad sense, the functional requirement of robust SAC silencing could have helped shape the spindle assembly mechanism in evolution. PMID:27602734

  13. NuMA Phosphorylation by Aurora-A Orchestrates Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Gallini, Sara; Carminati, Manuel; De Mattia, Fabiola; Pirovano, Laura; Martini, Emanuele; Oldani, Amanda; Asteriti, Italia Anna; Guarguaglini, Giulia; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-22

    Spindle positioning is essential for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The signaling network synchronizing spindle placement with mitotic progression relies on timely recruitment at the cell cortex of NuMA:LGN:Gαi complexes, in which NuMA acts as a receptor for the microtubule motor Dynein. To study the implication of Aurora-A in spindle orientation, we developed protocols for the partial inhibition of its activity. Under these conditions, in metaphase NuMA and Dynein accumulate abnormally at the spindle poles and do not reach the cortex, while the cortical distribution of LGN remains unperturbed. FRAP experiments revealed that Aurora-A governs the dynamic exchange between the cytoplasmic and the spindle pole-localized pools of NuMA. We show that Aurora-A phosphorylates directly the C terminus of NuMA on three Ser residues, of which Ser1969 determines the dynamic behavior and the spindle orientation functions of NuMA. Most interestingly, we identify a new microtubule-binding domain of NuMA, which does not overlap with the LGN-binding motif. Our study demonstrates that in metaphase the direct phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A controls its cortical enrichment, and that this is the major event underlying the spindle orientation functions of Aurora-A in transformed and non-transformed cells in culture. Phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A does not affect its affinity for microtubules or for LGN but rather determines the mobility of the protein at the spindle poles. The finding that NuMA can associate concomitantly with LGN and microtubules suggests that its microtubule-binding activity contributes to anchor Dynein-loaded microtubule +TIPs at cortical sites with LGN. PMID:26832443

  14. A Specific Form of Phospho Protein Phosphatase 2 Regulates Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome Association with Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    In early mitosis, the END (Emi1/NuMA/Dynein-dynactin) network anchors the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) to the mitotic spindle and poles. Spindle anchoring restricts APC/C activity, thereby limiting the destruction of spindle-associated cyclin B and ensuring maintenance of spindle integrity. Emi1 binds directly to hypophosphorylated APC/C, linking the APC/C to the spindle via NuMA. However, whether the phosphorylation state of the APC/C is important for its association with the spindle and what kinases and phosphatases are necessary for regulating this event remain unknown. Here, we describe the regulation of APC/C-mitotic spindle pole association by phosphorylation. We find that only hypophosphorylated APC/C associates with microtubule asters, suggesting that phosphatases are important. Indeed, a specific form of PPP2 (CA/R1A/R2B) binds APC/C, and PPP2 activity is necessary for Cdc27 dephosphorylation. Screening by RNA interference, we find that inactivation of CA, R1A, or R2B leads to delocalization of APC/C from spindle poles, early mitotic spindle defects, a failure to congress chromosomes, and decreased levels of cyclin B on the spindle. Consistently, inhibition of cyclin B/Cdk1 activity increased APC/C binding to microtubules. Thus, cyclin B/Cdk1 and PPP2 regulate the dynamic association of APC/C with spindle poles in early mitosis, a step necessary for proper spindle formation. PMID:20089842

  15. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that upon mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally-observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores. PMID:26258631

  16. Ionic effects on spindle adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Husmark, I.; Ottoson, D.

    1971-01-01

    1. Effects of changes in ionic environment on the receptor potential were studied in isolated frog spindle. Particular attention was focused on the action of potassium removal on the early adaptive decline of the response. 2. Removal of potassium caused a reduction and final disappearance of the dynamic overshoot of the receptor potential. The static phase of the response was also reduced although to less extent. The repolarization phase of the response following release of phasic or maintained stretch was greatly prolonged. 3. Increased potassium concentration caused a reduction of the response, but did not change its general time course. The amount of reduction was related to the potassium concentration. 4. Removal of sodium caused a marked diminution of the response, the static phase being in general more affected than the dynamic phase. 5. It is suggested that the effects of potassium removal are caused by a delay in sodium inactivation and a partial depolarization of the endings. It is concluded that the greater part of the early adaptation of the spindle proper may be attributed to ionic mechanisms in the transducer membrane. PMID:4256546

  17. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint machinery are expressed in these cells and behave as their homologue proteins do in systems with an active spindle checkpoint. To establish whether the spindle checkpoint is active in Drosophila spermatocytes we have followed meiosis progression by time-lapse microscopy under conditions where the checkpoint is likely to be activated. We have found that the presence of a relatively high number of misaligned chromosomes or a severe disruption of the meiotic spindle results in a significant delay in the time of entry into anaphase. These observations provide the first direct evidence substantiating the activity of a meiotic spindle checkpoint in male Drosophila. PMID:11256627

  18. Muscle-spindle distribution in relation to the fibre-type composition of masseter in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Rowlerson, A; Mascarello, F; Barker, D; Saed, H

    1988-01-01

    The various parts of the masseter muscle complex (pars superficialis, pars profunda, zygomaticomandibularis, maxillomandibularis) in the rat, guinea-pig, rabbit, cat and macaque monkey were examined to discover whether they showed any relationship between the distribution of muscle spindles and extrafusal fibre types. Intrafusal (spindle) and extrafusal fibre types in masseter were compared with those in limb muscles and were identified by a combination of standard histochemical methods and indirect immunoperoxidase staining with antibodies specific for the various isoforms of myosin characteristic of fibre types in mammalian muscle. In general, the fibre-type properties of intrafusal fibres in masseter resembled those in limb muscle spindles, but the extrafusal fibre-type composition was unlike that in most limb muscles. In the rat masseter, most of the spindles were clustered together in a few very restricted areas. Extensive fusion of the external capsules of adjacent spindles, resulting in the formation of giant spindles, was seen in the cat and monkey masseter; this was sometimes accompanied by the enclosure of extrafusal fibres within the fused spindles. Common to all species, but strongest of all in the rat, was a close association between the distributions of muscle spindles and extrafusal Type I (slow twitch) fibres within the masseter complex. Muscle spindles and Type I fibres were either absent or rarest in the superficial part of masseter, but were most common in the deep layer (pars profunda) or zygomaticomandibularis. The functional significance of these observations is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2978294

  19. XMAP215 activity sets spindle length by controlling the total mass of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Reber, Simone B; Baumgart, Johannes; Widlund, Per O; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Howard, Jonathon; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Metaphase spindles are microtubule-based structures that use a multitude of proteins to modulate their morphology and function. Today, we understand many details of microtubule assembly, the role of microtubule-associated proteins, and the action of molecular motors. Ultimately, the challenge remains to understand how the collective behaviour of these nanometre-scale processes gives rise to a properly sized spindle on the micrometre scale. By systematically engineering the enzymatic activity of XMAP215, a processive microtubule polymerase, we show that Xenopus laevis spindle length increases linearly with microtubule growth velocity, whereas other parameters of spindle organization, such as microtubule density, lifetime and spindle shape, remain constant. We further show that mass balance can be used to link the global property of spindle size to individual microtubule dynamic parameters. We propose that spindle length is set by a balance of non-uniform nucleation and global microtubule disassembly in a liquid-crystal-like arrangement of microtubules. PMID:23974040

  20. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27121275

  1. Clathrin heavy chain 1 is required for spindle assembly and chromosome congression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Liu, Li; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Guang-Peng; Schatten, Heide; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Clathrin heavy chain 1 (CLTC) has been considered a “moonlighting protein” which acts in membrane trafficking during interphase and in stabilizing spindle fibers during mitosis. However, its roles in meiosis, especially in mammalian oocyte maturation, remain unclear. This study investigated CLTC expression and function in spindle formation and chromosome congression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Our results showed that the expression level of CLTC increased after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and peaked in the M phase. Immunostaining results showed CLTC distribution throughout the cytoplasm in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Appearance and disappearance of CLTC along with β-tubulin (TUBB) could be observed during spindle dynamic changes. To explore the relationship between CLTC and microtubule dynamics, oocytes at metaphase were treated with taxol or nocodazole. CLTC colocalized with TUBB at the enlarged spindle and with cytoplasmic asters after taxol treatment; it disassembled and distributed into the cytoplasm along with TUBB after nocodazole treatment. Disruption of CLTC function using stealth siRNA caused a decreased first polar body extrusion rate and extensive spindle formation and chromosome congression defects. Taken together, these results show that CLTC plays an important role in spindle assembly and chromosome congression through a microtubule correlation mechanism during mouse oocyte maturation. PMID:23816345

  2. Ska1 cooperates with DDA3 for spindle dynamics and spindle attachment to kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Eun; Song, Haiyu; Kwon, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-02-12

    Spindle microtubules (MTs) capture kinetochores (KTs) on the centromere sequence of sister chromatids to align at the mitotic equator and segregate toward spindle poles during mitosis. For efficient chromosome capture, KTs initially attach to the lateral surface of a MT, providing a considerably larger contact surface than the MT tip. A sequential change of KT composition upon spindle attachment enables a conversion from lateral to stable end-on attachment. However, the molecular link between spindle dynamics and KT composition is not fully understood. Here, we report that Ska1 and DDA3 act as molecular linkers in the interplay between KTs and spindle dynamics. After recruitment of Kif2a onto the mitotic spindle by DDA3, Ska1 targets Kif2a to the minus-end of spindle MTs and facilitates spindle dynamics. Furthermore, DDA3 targets Ska1 to KTs to stabilize end-on attachment. Thus, our findings identified a definite regulatory mechanism of the search and capture process for stable spindle attachment through cross-talk between spindle dynamics and KT composition mediated by DDA3 and Ska1. PMID:26797278

  3. Chromosome misalignments induce spindle-positioning defects.

    PubMed

    Tame, Mihoko A; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; Afanasyev, Pavel; Medema, René H

    2016-03-01

    Cortical pulling forces on astral microtubules are essential to position the spindle. These forces are generated by cortical dynein, a minus-end directed motor. Previously, another dynein regulator termed Spindly was proposed to regulate dynein-dependent spindle positioning. However, the mechanism of how Spindly regulates spindle positioning has remained elusive. Here, we find that the misalignment of chromosomes caused by Spindly depletion is directly provoking spindle misorientation. Chromosome misalignments induced by CLIP-170 or CENP-E depletion or by noscapine treatment are similarly accompanied by severe spindle-positioning defects. We find that cortical LGN is actively displaced from the cortex when misaligned chromosomes are in close proximity. Preventing the KT recruitment of Plk1 by the depletion of PBIP1 rescues cortical LGN enrichment near misaligned chromosomes and re-establishes proper spindle orientation. Hence, KT-enriched Plk1 is responsible for the negative regulation of cortical LGN localization. In summary, we uncovered a compelling molecular link between chromosome alignment and spindle orientation defects, both of which are implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:26882550

  4. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  5. Mos/mitogen-activated protein kinase can induce early meiotic phenotypes in the absence of maturation-promoting factor: a novel system for analyzing spindle formation during meiosis I.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, T; Rulong, S; Resau, J; Fukasawa, K; Matten, W; Kuriyama, R; Mansour, S; Ahn, N; Vande Woude, G F

    1996-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is selectively activated by injecting either mos or MAPK kinase (mek) RNA into immature mouse oocytes maintained in the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). IBMX arrests oocyte maturation, but Mos (or MEK) overexpression overrides this block. Under these conditions, meiosis I is significantly prolonged, and MAPK becomes fully activated in the absence of p34cdc2 kinase or maturation-promoting factor. In these oocytes, large openings form in the germinal vesicle adjacent to condensing chromatin, and microtubule arrays, which stain for both MAPK and centrosomal proteins, nucleate from these regions. Maturation-promoting factor activation occurs later, concomitant with germinal vesicle breakdown, the contraction of the microtubule arrays into a precursor of the spindle, and the redistribution of the centrosomal proteins into the newly forming spindle poles. These studies define important new functions for the Mos/MAPK cascade in mouse oocyte maturation and, under these conditions, reveal novel detail of the early stages of oocyte meiosis I. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8643471

  6. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huan; Zhao, Qun; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  7. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  8. Abnormal spermatid formation in the presence of the parasitic B(24) chromosome in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Teruel, M; Cabrero, J; Perfectti, F; Alché, J D; Camacho, J P M

    2009-01-01

    Morphology and size of spermatids were analysed in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans by means of light and electron microscopy. At light microscopy, normal and abnormal (macro- and micro-) spermatids differed in size and number of centriolar adjuncts (CAs): 1 CA in normal spermatids and 2 or more CAs, depending on ploidy level, in macrospermatids. Males carrying the additional B(24) chromosome showed significantly more macro- and microspermatids than 0B males. The frequency of macro- and microspermatids showed an odd-even pattern in respect to the number of B chromosomes, with a higher frequency of abnormal spermatids associated with odd B numbers. Transmission electron microscopy showed that macrospermatids carried more than one axoneme, depending on ploidy level: 2 for diploid, 3 for triploid, and 4 for tetraploid spermatids. In 0B males, the most frequent abnormal spermatids were diploid, whereas in 1B males they were the tetraploid spermatids and, to a lesser extent, triploid ones. This suggests that most macrospermatids derived from cytokinesis failure and nucleus restitution. The implications of aberrant spermatids on B chromosome transmission and male fertility are discussed. PMID:19864877

  9. Assays to Study Mitotic Centrosome and Spindle Pole Assembly and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C; De Nicolo, Arcangela

    2016-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during cell division requires proper bipolar spindle assembly and critically depends on spindle pole integrity. In most animal cells, spindle poles form as the result of the concerted action of various factors operating in two independent pathways of microtubule assembly mediated by chromatin/RanGTP and by centrosomes. Mutation or deregulation of a number of spindle pole-organizing proteins has been linked to human diseases, including cancer and microcephaly. Our knowledge on how the spindle pole-organizing factors function at the molecular level and cooperate with one another is still quite limited. As the list of these factors expands, so does the need for the development of experimental approaches to study their function. Cell-free extracts from Xenopus laevis eggs have played an instrumental role in the dissection of the mechanisms of bipolar spindle assembly and have recently allowed the reconstitution of the key steps of the centrosome-driven microtubule nucleation pathway (Joukov et al., Mol Cell 55:578-591, 2014). Here we describe assays to study both centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent spindle pole formation in Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide experimental procedures for the use of artificial centrosomes, such as microbeads coated with an anti-Aurora A antibody or a recombinant fragment of the Cep192 protein, to model and study centrosome maturation in egg extract. In addition, we detail the protocol for a microtubule regrowth assay that allows assessment of the centrosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27193852

  10. Force and Length in the Mitotic Spindle

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sophie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembles to a steady-state length at metaphase through the integrated action of molecular mechanisms that generate and respond to mechanical forces. While molecular mechanisms that produce force have been described, our understanding of how they integrate with each other, and with the assembly-disassembly mechanisms that regulate length, is poor. We review current understanding of the basic architecture and dynamics of the metaphase spindle, and some of the elementary force producing mechanisms. We then discuss models for force integration, and spindle length determination. We also emphasize key missing data that notably includes absolute values of forces, and how they vary as a function of position, within the spindle. PMID:19906577

  11. Tipping the spindle into the right position.

    PubMed

    Akhmanova, Anna; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-05-01

    The position of the mitotic spindle determines the cleavage plane in animal cells, but what controls spindle positioning? Kern et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201510117) demonstrate that the microtubule plus end-associated SKAP/Astrin complex participates in this process, possibly by affecting dynein-dependent pulling forces exerted on the tips of astral microtubules. PMID:27138251

  12. Interpolar spindle microtubules in PTK cells.

    PubMed

    Mastronarde, D N; McDonald, K L; Ding, R; McIntosh, J R

    1993-12-01

    Spindle microtubules (MTs) in PtK1 cells, fixed at stages from metaphase to telophase, have been reconstructed using serial sections, electron microscopy, and computer image processing. We have studied the class of MTs that form an interdigitating system connecting the two spindle poles (interpolar MTs or ipMTs) and their relationship to the spindle MTs that attach to kinetochores (kMTs). Viewed in cross section, the ipMTs cluster with antiparallel near neighbors throughout mitosis; this bundling becomes much more pronounced as anaphase proceeds. While the minus ends of most kMTs are near the poles, those of the ipMTs are spread over half of the spindle length, with at least 50% lying > 1.5 microns from the poles. Longitudinal views of the ipMT bundles demonstrate a major rearrangement of their plus ends between mid- and late anaphase B. However, the minus ends of these MTs do not move appreciably farther from the spindle midplane, suggesting that sliding of these MTs contributes little to anaphase B. The minus ends of ipMTs are markedly clustered in the bundles of kMTs throughout anaphase A. These ends lie close to kMTs much more frequently than would be expected by chance, suggesting a specific interaction. As sister kinetochores separate and kMTs shorten, the minus ends of the kMTs remain associated with the spindle poles, but the minus ends of many ipMTs are released from the kMT bundles, allowing the spindle pole and the kMTs to move away from the ipMTs as the spindle elongates. PMID:8253845

  13. Lipoma of the Thumb: Spindle Cell Subtype

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Johnny; Bou Sader, Roula; Saliba, Elie

    2016-01-01

    We report hereby the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with a soft-tissue swelling on the palmar aspect of the thumb. A detailed clinical examination followed by ultrasonography and excisional biopsy confirmed a spindle cell lipoma. Lipomas are rare in the hand and exceptional in the fingers, and we report, to our knowledge, the first spindle cell lipoma in the thumb to help in the differential diagnosis of a similar swelling. PMID:27088022

  14. MLL5 maintains spindle bipolarity by preventing aberrant cytosolic aggregation of PLK1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2016-03-28

    Faithful chromosome segregation with bipolar spindle formation is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Perturbation of this process often leads to severe mitotic failure, contributing to tumorigenesis. MLL5 has been demonstrated to play vital roles in cell cycle progression and the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we identify a novel interaction between MLL5 and PLK1 in the cytosol that is crucial for sustaining spindle bipolarity during mitosis. Knockdown of MLL5 caused aberrant PLK1 aggregation that led to acentrosomal microtubule-organizing center (aMTOC) formation and subsequent spindle multipolarity. Further molecular studies revealed that the polo-box domain (PBD) of PLK1 interacted with a binding motif on MLL5 (Thr887-Ser888-Thr889), and this interaction was essential for spindle bipolarity. Overexpression of wild-type MLL5 was able to rescue PLK1 mislocalization and aMTOC formation in MLL5-KD cells, whereas MLL5 mutants incapable of interacting with the PBD failed to do so. We thus propose that MLL5 preserves spindle bipolarity through maintaining cytosolic PLK1 in a nonaggregated form. PMID:27002166

  15. Spindle microtubule dysfunction and cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Stumpff, Jason; Ghule, Prachi N.; Shimamura, Akiko; Stein, Janet L.; Greenblatt, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and spindle microtubule dynamics are strictly coordinated during cell division in order to preserve genomic integrity. Alterations in the genome that affect microtubule stability and spindle assembly during mitosis may contribute to genomic instability and cancer predisposition, but directly testing this potential link poses a significant challenge. Germ-line mutations in tumor suppressor genes that predispose patients to cancer and alter spindle microtubule dynamics offer unique opportunities to investigate the relationship between spindle dysfunction and carcinogenesis. Mutations in two such tumor suppressors, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), affect multifunctional proteins that have been well characterized for their roles in Wnt signaling and interphase ribosome assembly, respectively. Less understood, however, is how their shared involvement in stabilizing the microtubules that comprise the mitotic spindle contributes to cancer predisposition. Here, we briefly discuss the potential for mutations in APC and SBDS as informative tools for studying the impact of mitotic spindle dysfunction on cellular transformation. PMID:24905602

  16. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part I-Evolution of Precipitates and Formation of Abnormal Al2Cu Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Frankel, G. S.; Huang, I. Wen; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Friction stir welding was performed on AA2219-T8 plates with 6.31 wt pct Cu. The thermal cycles were measured in different regions of the joint during welding. Differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to analyze the evolution of precipitates in the joint. The relationships between welding peak temperature, precipitate evolution, and microhardness distribution are discussed. The temperature in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) ranged from 453 K to 653 K (180 °C to 380 °C). The θ″ and some θ' phases redissolved into the HAZ matrix, while the rest of the θ' phases coarsened. In the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ), the temperature range was from 653 K to 673 K (380 °C to 400 °C), causing both θ″ phase and θ' phase to redissolve. In the weld nugget zone (WNZ), all the θ″, θ', and some of the θ phase (Al2Cu) redissolved. Abnormal θ particles were observed in the WNZ, including agglomerated θ with sizes around 100 to 1000 µm and a ring-shaped distribution of normal size θ particles. The formation of abnormal θ particles resulted from metal plastic flow during welding and the high content of Cu in AA2219. No abnormal θ particles were observed in joints of another AA2219 plate, which had a lower Cu content of 5.83 wt pct.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part I-Evolution of Precipitates and Formation of Abnormal Al2Cu Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Frankel, G. S.; Huang, I. Wen; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed on AA2219-T8 plates with 6.31 wt pct Cu. The thermal cycles were measured in different regions of the joint during welding. Differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to analyze the evolution of precipitates in the joint. The relationships between welding peak temperature, precipitate evolution, and microhardness distribution are discussed. The temperature in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) ranged from 453 K to 653 K (180 °C to 380 °C). The θ″ and some θ' phases redissolved into the HAZ matrix, while the rest of the θ' phases coarsened. In the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ), the temperature range was from 653 K to 673 K (380 °C to 400 °C), causing both θ″ phase and θ' phase to redissolve. In the weld nugget zone (WNZ), all the θ″, θ', and some of the θ phase (Al2Cu) redissolved. Abnormal θ particles were observed in the WNZ, including agglomerated θ with sizes around 100 to 1000 µm and a ring-shaped distribution of normal size θ particles. The formation of abnormal θ particles resulted from metal plastic flow during welding and the high content of Cu in AA2219. No abnormal θ particles were observed in joints of another AA2219 plate, which had a lower Cu content of 5.83 wt pct.

  19. Efficacy and Mechanism of a Glycoside Compound Inhibiting Abnormal Prion Protein Formation in Prion-Infected Cells: Implications of Interferon and Phosphodiesterase 4D-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Keiko; Oguma, Ayumi; Kawata, Maki; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new type of antiprion compound, Gly-9, was found to inhibit abnormal prion protein formation in prion-infected neuroblastoma cells, in a prion strain-independent manner, when the cells were treated for more than 1 day. It reduced the intracellular prion protein level and significantly modified mRNA expression levels of genes of two types: interferon-stimulated genes were downregulated after more than 2 days of treatment, and the phosphodiesterase 4D-interacting protein gene, a gene involved in microtubule growth, was upregulated after more than 1 day of treatment. A supplement of interferon given to the cells partly restored the abnormal prion protein level but did not alter the normal prion protein level. This interferon action was independent of the Janus activated kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway. Therefore, the changes in interferon-stimulated genes might be a secondary effect of Gly-9 treatment. However, gene knockdown of phosphodiesterase 4D-interacting protein restored or increased both the abnormal prion protein level and the normal prion protein level, without transcriptional alteration of the prion protein gene. It also altered the localization of abnormal prion protein accumulation in the cells, indicating that phosphodiesterase 4D-interacting protein might affect prion protein levels by altering the trafficking of prion protein-containing structures. Interferon and phosphodiesterase 4D-interacting protein had no direct mutual link, demonstrating that they regulate abnormal prion protein levels independently. Although the in vivo efficacy of Gly-9 was limited, the findings for Gly-9 provide insights into the regulation of abnormal prion protein in cells and suggest new targets for antiprion compounds. IMPORTANCE This report describes our study of the efficacy and potential mechanism underlying the antiprion action of a new antiprion compound with a glycoside structure in prion-infected cells, as well as

  20. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  1. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C.; Tan, Chia H.; Pereira, Antonio J.; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end–directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  2. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  3. Characterization of Topographically Specific Sleep Spindles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Hwang, Eunjin; Lee, Mina; Sung, Hokun; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep spindles in humans have been classified as slow anterior and fast posterior spindles; recent findings indicate that their profiles differ according to pharmacology, pathology, and function. However, little is known about the generation mechanisms within the thalamocortical system for different types of spindles. In this study, we aim to investigate the electrophysiological behaviors of the topographically distinctive spindles within the thalamocortical system by applying high-density EEG and simultaneous thalamic LFP recordings in mice. Design: 32-channel extracranial EEG and 2-channel thalamic LFP were recorded simultaneously in freely behaving mice to acquire spindles during spontaneous sleep. Subjects: Hybrid F1 male mice of C57BL/6J and 129S4/svJae. Measurements and Results: Spindle events in each channel were detected by spindle detection algorithm, and then a cluster analysis was applied to classify the topographically distinctive spindles. All sleep spindles were successfully classified into 3 groups: anterior, posterior, and global spindles. Each spindle type showed distinct thalamocortical activity patterns regarding the extent of similarity, phase synchrony, and time lags between cortical and thalamic areas during spindle oscillation. We also found that sleep slow waves were likely to associate with all types of sleep spindles, but also that the ongoing cortical decruitment/recruitment dynamics before the onset of spindles and their relationship with spindle generation were also variable, depending on the spindle types. Conclusion: Topographically specific sleep spindles show distinctive thalamocortical network behaviors. Citation: Kim D, Hwang E, Lee M, Sung H, Choi JH. Characterization of topographically specific sleep spindles in mice. SLEEP 2015;38(1):85–96. PMID:25325451

  4. Kinetic analysis of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baskin, T I; Cande, W Z

    1990-09-01

    Studies of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro using populations of diatom spindles visualized with immunofluorescence microscopy have shown that the two interdigitating half-spindles are driven apart by an ATP-dependent process that generates force in the zone of overlap between half-spindles. To characterize further the system responsible for spindle elongation, we observed spindle elongation directly with polarized light or phase-contrast video-microscopy. We report that the kinetics of spindle elongation versus time are linear. A constant rate of spindle elongation occurs despite the continuous decrease in length of the zone of overlap between half-spindles. The average rate of spindle elongation varies as a function of treatment, and rates measured match spindle elongation rates measured in vivo. When spindles elongated in the presence of polymerizing tubulin (from bovine brain), the extent of elongation was greater than the original zone of half-spindle overlap, but the rate of elongation was constant. No component of force due to tubulin polymerization was found. The total elongation observed in the presence of added tubulin could exceed a doubling of original spindle length, matching the elongation in the intact diatom. The linear rate of spindle elongation in vitro suggests that the force transducer for anaphase B is a mechanochemical ATPase, analogous to dynein or myosin, and that the force for spindle elongation does not arise from stored energy, e.g. in an elastic matrix in the midzone. Additionally, on the basis of observations described here, we conclude that the force-transduction system for spindle elongation must be able to remain in the zone of microtubule overlap during the sliding apart of half-spindles, and that the transducer can generate force between microtubules that are not strictly antiparallel. PMID:2258393

  5. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Neuromuscular spindles of several amphibia and reptiles].

    PubMed

    Kurkina, E A

    1976-09-01

    The work presents data on the structure and innervation of the nerve-muscle spindles in the soleus of the lake from Rana ridibunda, Bufo bufo, turtle Testudo horsfieldi, lizzard Lacerta agilis. The animals under study were shown to have different structure and innervation of these receptors. The thickness of the spindle connective tissue capsule has certain correlation with the width of the subcapsular space. The innervation apparatus in the muscle spindles of reptiles and turtles are similar in the following: sensory nerve terminations in the equatorial area of the spindle are represented by reticulars, bushes, loops and in the lizzard there appear annulo-spirals with a small amount of coils. The character of motor nerve terminations in polar zones of intrafusal muscle fibres in the spindles of reptiles is similar to that of the extrafusal fibres: in the shape of "bayonets" and end bundles (Endbüuschel). In the muscle fibres of the turtle and lizzard in addition to typical motor plaques there occur trail endings. PMID:136238

  7. Do All Dinoflagellates have an Extranuclear Spindle?

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunyoung; Nam, Seung Won; Shin, Woongghi; Park, Myung Gil; Coats, D Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The syndinean dinoflagellates are a diverse assemblage of alveolate endoparasites that branch basal to the core dinoflagellates. Because of their phylogenetic position, the syndineans are considered key model microorganisms in understanding early evolution in the dinoflagellates. Closed mitosis with an extranuclear spindle that traverses the nucleus in cytoplasmic grooves or tunnels is viewed as one of the morphological features shared by syndinean and core dinoflagellates. Here we describe nuclear morphology and mitosis in the syndinean dinoflagellate Amoebophrya sp. from Akashiwo sanguinea, a member of the A. ceratii complex, as revealed by protargol silver impregnation, DNA specific fluorochromes, and transmission electron microscopy. Our observations show that not all species classified as dinoflagellates have an extranuclear spindle. In Amoebophrya sp. from A. sanguinea, an extranuclear microtubule cylinder located in a depression in the nuclear surface during interphase moves into the nucleoplasm via sequential membrane fusion events and develops into an entirely intranuclear spindle. Results suggest that the intranuclear spindle of Amoebophrya spp. may have evolved from an ancestral extranuclear spindle and indicate the need for taxonomic revision of the Amoebophryidae. PMID:26491972

  8. Association of Maternal mRNA and Phosphorylated EIF4EBP1 Variants With the Spindle in Mouse Oocytes: Localized Translational Control Supporting Female Meiosis in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Romasko, Edward J.; Amarnath, Dasari; Midic, Uros; Latham, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other species, localized maternal mRNAs are not believed to be prominent features of mammalian oocytes. We find by cDNA microarray analysis enrichment for maternal mRNAs encoding spindle and other proteins on the mouse oocyte metaphase II (MII) spindle. We also find that the key translational regulator, EIF4EBP1, undergoes a dynamic and complex spatially regulated pattern of phosphorylation at sites that regulate its association with EIF4E and its ability to repress translation. These phosphorylation variants appear at different positions along the spindle at different stages of meiosis. These results indicate that dynamic spatially restricted patterns of EIF4EBP1 phosphorylation may promote localized mRNA translation to support spindle formation, maintenance, function, and other nearby processes. Regulated EIF4EBP1 phosphorylation at the spindle may help coordinate spindle formation with progression through the cell cycle. The discovery that EIF4EBP1 may be part of an overall mechanism that integrates and couples cell cycle progression to mRNA translation and subsequent spindle formation and function may be relevant to understanding mechanisms leading to diminished oocyte quality, and potential means of avoiding such defects. The localization of maternal mRNAs at the spindle is evolutionarily conserved between mammals and other vertebrates and is also seen in mitotic cells, indicating that EIF4EBP1 control of localized mRNA translation is likely key to correct segregation of genetic material across cell types. PMID:23852387

  9. Rare Case of Spindle Cell Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Chavva, Sunanda; Garlapati, Komali; Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Gannepalli, Ashalata

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell haemangioma (SCH) is a benign vascular lesion which usually occurs on distal extremities. It was previously regarded as haemangioendothelioma and was initially perceived to be low grade angiosarcoma.They are characterized by cavernous blood vessels and spindle cell proliferation. It is now considered as a reactive lesion and conservative surgical excision is preferred treatment. Intraoral occurrence is rare; hence we present a case of SCH in a 33-year-old male that presented as a swelling below the tongue. Histopathology showed well circumscribed proliferating spindle cells attached to vessel walls, dilated vascular spaces. The lesion was positive for CD31 and CD34 markers suggesting it to be of endothelial cell origin. PMID:26266229

  10. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter's cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  11. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter’s cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  12. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles. Images Fig. 7 PMID:2532636

  13. Katanin contributes to interspecies spindle length scaling in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Rose; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; McNally, Francis J.; Nédélec, François J.; Heald, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bipolar spindles must separate chromosomes by the appropriate distance during cell division, but mechanisms determining spindle length are poorly understood. Based on a 2D model of meiotic spindle assembly, we predicted that higher localized microtubule (MT) depolymerization rates could generate the shorter spindles observed in egg extracts of X. tropicalis compared to X. laevis. We found that katanin-dependent MT severing was increased in X. tropicalis, which lacks an inhibitory phosphorylation site in the p60 catalytic subunit that is present in X. laevis p60. Katanin inhibition lengthened spindles in both species, and kinetochore fibers extended through X. tropicalis spindle poles disrupting them. In both X. tropicalis extracts and the spindle simulation, a threshold number of stable kinetochore fibers could overwhelm MT depolymerization, leading to similar phenotypes. Thus, mechanisms have evolved in different species to scale spindle size and coordinate regulation of multiple MT populations in order to generate a robust steady state structure. PMID:22153081

  14. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Marina E; Flynn, Jonathan R; McNally, Karen P; Cortes, Daniel B; Price, Kari L; Kuehnert, Paul A; Panzica, Michelle T; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A; McNally, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  15. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Flynn, Jonathan R.; McNally, Karen P.; Cortes, Daniel B.; Price, Kari L.; Kuehnert, Paul A.; Panzica, Michelle T.; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A.; McNally, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  16. Aurora B suppresses microtubule dynamics and limits central spindle size by locally activating KIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Gandhi, Sapan R.; Baron, Ryan D.; Gruneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    Anaphase central spindle formation is controlled by the microtubule-stabilizing factor PRC1 and the kinesin KIF4A. We show that an MKlp2-dependent pool of Aurora B at the central spindle, rather than global Aurora B activity, regulates KIF4A accumulation at the central spindle. KIF4A phosphorylation by Aurora B stimulates the maximal microtubule-dependent ATPase activity of KIF4A and promotes its interaction with PRC1. In the presence of phosphorylated KIF4A, microtubules grew more slowly and showed long pauses in growth, resulting in the generation of shorter PRC1-stabilized microtubule overlaps in vitro. Cells expressing only mutant forms of KIF4A lacking the Aurora B phosphorylation site overextended the anaphase central spindle, demonstrating that this regulation is crucial for microtubule length control in vivo. Aurora B therefore ensures that suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by KIF4A is restricted to a specific subset of microtubules and thereby contributes to central spindle size control in anaphase. PMID:23940115

  17. Compartmentalized Toxoplasma EB1 bundles spindle microtubules to secure accurate chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Kelly, Megan; de Leon, Jessica; Nwagbara, Belinda; Ebbert, Patrick; Ferguson, David J. P.; Lowery, Laura Anne; Morrissette, Naomi; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii replicates asexually by a unique internal budding process characterized by interwoven closed mitosis and cytokinesis. Although it is known that the centrosome coordinates these processes, the spatiotemporal organization of mitosis remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that centrosome positioning around the nucleus may signal spindle assembly: spindle microtubules (MTs) are first assembled when the centrosome moves to the basal side and become extensively acetylated after the duplicated centrosomes reposition to the apical side. We also tracked the spindle MTs using the MT plus end–binding protein TgEB1. Endowed by a C-terminal NLS, TgEB1 resides in the nucleoplasm in interphase and associates with the spindle MTs during mitosis. TgEB1 also associates with the subpellicular MTs at the growing end of daughter buds toward the completion of karyokinesis. Depletion of TgEB1 results in escalated disintegration of kinetochore clustering. Furthermore, we show that TgEB1’s MT association in Toxoplasma and in a heterologous system (Xenopus) is based on the same principles. Finally, overexpression of a high-MT-affinity TgEB1 mutant promotes the formation of overstabilized MT bundles, resulting in avulsion of otherwise tightly clustered kinetochores. Overall we conclude that centrosome position controls spindle activity and that TgEB1 is critical for mitotic integrity. PMID:26466679

  18. Compartmentalized Toxoplasma EB1 bundles spindle microtubules to secure accurate chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Kelly, Megan; Leon, Jessica de; Nwagbara, Belinda; Ebbert, Patrick; Ferguson, David J P; Lowery, Laura Anne; Morrissette, Naomi; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-12-15

    Toxoplasma gondii replicates asexually by a unique internal budding process characterized by interwoven closed mitosis and cytokinesis. Although it is known that the centrosome coordinates these processes, the spatiotemporal organization of mitosis remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that centrosome positioning around the nucleus may signal spindle assembly: spindle microtubules (MTs) are first assembled when the centrosome moves to the basal side and become extensively acetylated after the duplicated centrosomes reposition to the apical side. We also tracked the spindle MTs using the MT plus end-binding protein TgEB1. Endowed by a C-terminal NLS, TgEB1 resides in the nucleoplasm in interphase and associates with the spindle MTs during mitosis. TgEB1 also associates with the subpellicular MTs at the growing end of daughter buds toward the completion of karyokinesis. Depletion of TgEB1 results in escalated disintegration of kinetochore clustering. Furthermore, we show that TgEB1's MT association in Toxoplasma and in a heterologous system (Xenopus) is based on the same principles. Finally, overexpression of a high-MT-affinity TgEB1 mutant promotes the formation of overstabilized MT bundles, resulting in avulsion of otherwise tightly clustered kinetochores. Overall we conclude that centrosome position controls spindle activity and that TgEB1 is critical for mitotic integrity. PMID:26466679

  19. Impaired prefrontal sleep spindle regulation of hippocampal-dependent learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mander, Bryce A; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J; Walker, Matthew P

    2014-12-01

    A hallmark feature of cognitive aging is a decline in the ability to form new memories. Parallel to these cognitive impairments are marked disruptions in sleep physiology. Despite recent evidence in young adults establishing a role for sleep spindles in restoring hippocampal-dependent memory formation, the possibility that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related decline in hippocampal-dependent learning remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reduced prefrontal sleep spindles by over 40% in older adults statistically mediates the effects of old age on next day episodic learning, such that the degree of impaired episodic learning is explained by the extent of impoverished prefrontal sleep spindles. In addition, prefrontal spindles significantly predicted the magnitude of impaired next day hippocampal activation, thereby determining the influence of spindles on post-sleep learning capacity. These data support the hypothesis that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related cognitive decline in later life, the consequence of which has significant treatment intervention potential. PMID:23901074

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  1. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  2. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  3. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  4. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  5. Sleep spindles in Parkinson's disease may predict the development of dementia.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Véronique; Carrier, Julie; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Postuma, Ronald B; Bertrand, Josie-Anne; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disturbances and cognitive impairment are common non-motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent studies suggest that sleep spindles and slow waves play a role in brain plasticity mechanisms and are associated with cognitive performance. However, it remains unknown whether these sleep parameters could serve as markers of cognitive decline in PD. Therefore, we examined whether alterations in sleep spindles and slow waves at baseline visit were associated with increased likelihood of developing dementia at follow-up in PD. Sixty-eight nondemented PD patients (64.9 ± 8.8 years old; 46 men) participated in the study, along with 47 healthy individuals (65.0 ± 10.6 years old; 30 men). All participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recording and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Sleep spindles (12-15 Hz) and slow waves (>75 μV and <4 Hz) were automatically detected on all-night non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalography. At follow-up (mean: 4.5 years later), 18 PD patients developed dementia (70.2 ± 7.6 years old; 13 men) and 50 remained dementia-free (63.0 ± 8.5 years old; 33 men). Sleep spindle density and amplitude were lower in PD patients who converted to dementia compared with both patients who remained dementia-free and controls, mostly in posterior cortical regions (p < 0.05). Dementia-free PD patients were intermediate between dementia patients and controls, with lower baseline sleep spindle density in all cortical areas compared with controls (p < 0.01). In demented PD patients, lower sleep spindle amplitude in parietal and occipital areas was associated with poorer visuospatial abilities. Although slow wave amplitude was lower in PD patients compared with controls (p < 0.0001), no difference was observed between those who developed or did not develop dementia. Results demonstrate non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalographic abnormalities in PD patients. Sleep spindle activity was particularly impaired

  6. The Xenopus TACC Homologue, Maskin, Functions in Mitotic Spindle AssemblyD⃞

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lori L.; Albee, Alison J.; Liu, Lingling; Tao, Wei; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Wiese, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Maskin is the Xenopus homolog of the transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC)-family of microtubule and centrosome-interacting proteins. Members of this family share a ∼200 amino acid coiled coil motif at their C-termini, but have only limited homology outside of this domain. In all species examined thus far, perturbations of TACC proteins lead to disruptions of cell cycle progression and/or embryonic lethality. In Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans, these disruptions have been attributed to mitotic spindle assembly defects, and the TACC proteins in these organisms are thought to function as structural components of the spindle. In contrast, cell division failure in early Xenopus embryo blastomeres has been attributed to a role of maskin in regulating the translation of, among others, cyclin B1 mRNA. In this study, we show that maskin, like other TACC proteins, plays a direct role in mitotic spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts and that this role is independent of cyclin B. Maskin immunodepletion and add-back experiments demonstrate that maskin, or a maskin-associated activity, is required for two distinct steps during spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts that can be distinguished by their response to “rescue” experiments. Defects in the “early” step, manifested by greatly reduced aster size during early time points in maskin-depleted extracts, can be rescued by readdition of purified full-length maskin. Moreover, defects in this step can also be rescued by addition of only the TACC-domain of maskin. In contrast, defects in the “late” step during spindle assembly, manifested by abnormal spindles at later time points, cannot be rescued by readdition of maskin. We show that maskin interacts with a number of proteins in egg extracts, including XMAP215, a known modulator of microtubule dynamics, and CPEB, a protein that is involved in translational regulation of important cell cycle regulators. Maskin depletion from egg extracts results

  7. Interaction between RB protein and NuMA is required for proper alignment of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Chiharu; Hattori, Takayuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Taya, Yoichi

    2014-02-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) controls cell cycle progression and cell cycle exit through interactions with cellular proteins. Many pRB-binding proteins, which function in gene transcription or modulation of chromatin structure, harbor LXCXE motifs in their binding domain for pRB. In this study, we found that nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a mitotic spindle organizer, interacts with pRB through LSCEE sequences located in its C-terminal region. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of pRB caused aberrant distribution of NuMA and alignment of spindle microtubules in mitotic cells. Abnormal organization of spindle microtubules was also accompanied by misalignment of an over-expressed NuMA mutant (mut-NuMA) with a defect in pRB binding caused by an LSGEK mutation. The mut-NuMA-over-expressing cells showed lower potency for survival than wild-type NuMA (wt-NuMA)-over-expressing cells during 2 weeks of culture. Interestingly, knockdown of pRB reduced the population of wt-NuMA-over-expressing cells to the same level as mut-NuMA cells after 2 weeks. Taken together, pRB may have a novel function in regulating the mitotic function of NuMA and spindle organization, which are required for proper cell cycle progression. PMID:24350565

  8. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  9. Use of abnormal and health psychology as topics in a classroom format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among college students at risk.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M

    2001-12-01

    This study was done to assess whether classes containing topics derived from two college courses, Abnormal Psychology and Health Psychology, could be used in a class room format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among at-risk college students. Topics covered included stress and stress management, alcohol and other drug use and abuse, chronic illnesses and psychological disorders that develop from an unhealthy lifestyle, and factors that play a role in good health and well-being. Students were enrolled in a semester-long course for college credit as an alternative to punitive sanctions for on-campus alcohol violations and other drug violations. The Midwest Institute on Drug Use Survey and the CORE Alcohol and Drug Survey were administered on the first and last days of class. Analysis indicated a significant self-reported reduction in drug use and associated negative symptoms and behavioral effects. Women were more likely to report reductions in drug use than men. PMID:11824744

  10. Spindle speed effects on cotton fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 to...

  11. Spinning Wool with a Hand Spindle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, Margo

    1982-01-01

    Describes an eight-week program in which 8- to 14-year-olds learned to spin raw wool into yarn. Students observed wool shearing at a sheep farm, learned to prepare wool for spinning, and spun their own yarn. Detail directions for carding and use of hand spindles are included. (AM)

  12. Abnormal Eu behavior at formation of H2O- and Cl-bearing fluids during degassing of granite magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    melt. The abnormal behavior of Eu shows itself the stronger, the lower fO2and, accordingly, the more fraction of Eu2+is present in melt. The work is supported of the Geosciences Department of the Russian Academy of Science (the program 2- 2010) and RFBR (grant 08-05-00022). References [1] Reed M.J., Candela Ph.A., Piccoli Ph.M. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 2000. V. 140. P. 251-262. [2] Lukanin O.A., Dernov-Pegarev V.F. Vestnik Otd. Nauk Zemle RAN, No 1(25)'2007 URL: http://www.scgis.ru/russian/cp1251/h_dgggms/1-2007/informbul-1_2007/term-30e.pdf [3] Drake M.J. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 1975. V. 39. P. 55-64. [4] Wilke M. Behrens H. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 1999. V. 137. P. 102-114. [5] Lukanin O.A. Vestnik Otd. Nauk o Zemle RAN, No 1(26)'2008. URL: http://www.scgis.ru/russian/cp1251/h_dgggms/1-2008/informbul-1_2008/magm-20e.pdf [6] Lukanin O.A., Dernov-Pegarev V.F. Geochemistry International, 2010 (in press)

  13. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  14. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  15. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates.

    PubMed

    Do, Kevin K; Hoàng, Kim Liên; Endow, Sharyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient - KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form. PMID:24907370

  16. Abnormal Early Cleavage Events Predict Early Embryo Demise: Sperm Oxidative Stress and Early Abnormal Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie; Barker, Christopher M.; Pera, Renee Reijo; Meyers, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Human embryos resulting from abnormal early cleavage can result in aneuploidy and failure to develop normally to the blastocyst stage. The nature of paternal influence on early embryo development has not been directly demonstrated although many studies have suggested effects from spermatozoal chromatin packaging, DNA damage, centriolar and mitotic spindle integrity, and plasma membrane integrity. The goal of this study was to determine whether early developmental events were affected by oxidative damage to the fertilizing sperm. Survival analysis was used to compare patterns of blastocyst formation based on P2 duration. Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrate that relatively few embryos with short (<1 hr) P2 times reached blastocysts, and the two curves diverged beginning on day 4, with nearly all of the embryos with longer P2 times reaching blastocysts by day 6 (p < .01). We determined that duration of the 2nd to 3rd mitoses were sensitive periods in the presence of spermatozoal oxidative stress. Embryos that displayed either too long or too short cytokineses demonstrated an increased failure to reach blastocyst stage and therefore survive for further development. Although paternal-derived gene expression occurs later in development, this study suggests a specific role in early mitosis that is highly influenced by paternal factors. PMID:25307782

  17. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  18. Pten regulates spindle pole movement through Dlg1-mediated recruitment of Eg5 to centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Ree, Janine H.; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Kanakkanthara, Arun; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (Pten) suppresses neoplastic growth by negatively regulating PI(3)K signalling through its phosphatase activity1. To gain insight into the actions of non-catalytic Pten domains in normal physiological processes and tumorigenesis2,3, we engineered mice lacking the PDZ-binding domain (PDZ-BD). Here, we show that the PDZ-BD regulates centrosome movement and that its heterozygous or homozygous deletion promotes aneuploidy and tumour formation. We found that Pten is recruited to pre-mitotic centrosomes in a Plk1-dependent fashion to create a docking site for protein complexes containing the PDZ-domain-containing protein Dlg1 (also known as Sap97) and Eg5 (also known as Kif11), a kinesin essential for centrosome movement and bipolar spindle formation4. Docking of Dlg1–Eg5 complexes to Pten depended on Eg5 phosphorylation by the Nek9–Nek6 mitotic kinase cascade and Cdk1. PDZ-BD deletion or Dlg1 ablation impaired loading of Eg5 onto centrosomes and spindle pole motility, yielding asymmetrical spindles that are prone to chromosome missegregation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Pten, through the Dlg1-binding ability of its PDZ-BD, accumulates phosphorylated Eg5 at duplicated centrosomes to establish symmetrical bipolar spindles that properly segregate chromosomes, and suggest that this function contributes to tumour suppression. PMID:27240320

  19. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  20. RanGTP is required for meiotic spindle organization and the initiation of embryonic development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cesario, J.; McKim, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    RanGTP is important for chromosome-dependent spindle assembly in Xenopus extracts. Here we report on experiments to determine the role of the Ran pathway on microtubule dynamics in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. Females expressing a dominant-negative form of Ran have fertility defects, suggesting that RanGTP is required for normal fertility. This is not, however, because of a defect in acentrosomal meiotic spindle assembly. Therefore, RanGTP does not appear to be essential or sufficient for the formation of the acentrosomal spindle. Instead, the most important function of the Ran pathway in spindle assembly appears to be in the tapering of microtubules at the spindle poles, which might be through regulation of proteins such as TACC and the HURP homolog, Mars. One consequence of this spindle organization defect is an increase in the nondisjunction of achiasmate chromosomes. However, the meiotic defects are not severe enough to cause the decreased fertility. Reductions in fertility occur because RanGTP has a role in microtubule assembly that is not directly nucleated by the chromosomes. This includes microtubules nucleated from the sperm aster, which are required for pronuclear fusion. We propose that following nuclear envelope breakdown, RanGTP is released from the nucleus and creates a cytoplasm that is activated for assembling microtubules, which is important for processes such as pronuclear fusion. Around the chromosomes, however, RanGTP might be redundant with other factors such as the chromosome passenger complex. PMID:22100918

  1. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  2. Breast spindle cell tumours: about eight cases

    PubMed Central

    Abd El All, Howayda S

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast spindle cell tumours (BSCTs), although rare, represent a heterogeneous group with different treatment modalities. This work was undertaken to evaluate the utility of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differentiating BSCTs. Methods FNAC of eight breast masses diagnosed cytologically as BSCTs was followed by wide excision biopsy. IHC using a panel of antibodies against vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, s100, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD34, and CD10 was evaluated to define their nature. Results FNAC defined the tumors as benign (n = 4), suspicious (n = 2) and malignant (n = 3), based on the cytopathological criteria of malignancy. Following wide excision biopsy, the tumors were reclassified into benign (n = 5) and malignant (n = 3). In the benign group, the diagnosis was raised histologically and confirmed by IHC for 3 cases (one spindle cell lipoma, one myofibroblastoma and one leiomyoma). For the remaining two cases, the diagnosis was set up after IHC (one fibromatosis and one spindle cell variant of adenomyoepithelioma). In the malignant group, a leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed histologically, while IHC was crucial to set up the diagnosis of one case of spindle cell carcinoma and one malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion FNAC in BSCTs is an insufficient tool and should be followed by wide excision biopsy. The latter technique differentiate benign from malignant BSCTs and is able in 50% of the cases to set up the definite diagnosis. IHC is of value to define the nature of different benign lesions and is mandatory in the malignant ones for optimal treatment. Awareness of the different types of BSCTs prevents unnecessary extensive therapeutic regimes. PMID:16859566

  3. Equilibrium stellar systems with spindle singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium sequences of axisymmetric Newtonian clusters that tend toward singular states are constructed. The distribution functions are chosen to be of the form f = f(E, Jz). The numerical method then determines the density and gravitational potential self-consistently to satisfy Poisson's equation. For the prolate models, spindle singularities arise from the depletion of angular momentum near the symmetry axis. While the resulting density enhancement is confined to the region near the axis, the influence of the spindle extends much further out through its tidal gravitational field. Centrally condensed prolate clusters may contain strong-field regions even though the spindle mass is small and the mean cluster eccentricity is not extreme. While the calculations performed here are entirely Newtonian, the issue of singularities is an important topic in general relativity. Equilibrium solutions for relativistic star clusters can provide a testing ground for exploring this issue. The methods used in this paper for building nonspherical clusters can be extended to relativistic systems.

  4. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  5. Adaptive Spindle Balancing Using Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY,PATRICK S.; LAUFFER,JAMES P.; PETTEYS,REBECCA; REDMOND,JAMES M.; SULLIVAN,WILLIAM N.

    1999-09-20

    A technological break through for supporting rotating shafts is the active magnetic bearing (AMB). Active magnetic bearings offer some important advantages over conventional ball, roller or journal bearings such as reduced frictional drag, no physical contact in the bearing, no need for lubricants, compatibility with high vacuum and ultra-clean environments, and ability to control shaft position within the bearing. The disadvantages of the AMB system are the increased cost and complexity, reduced bearing stiffness and the need for a controller. Still, there are certain applications, such as high speed machining, biomedical devices, and gyroscopes, where the additional cost of an AMB system can be justified. The inherent actuator capabilities of the AMB offer the potential for active balancing of spindles and micro-shaping capabilities for machine tools, The work presented in this paper concentrates on an AMB test program that utilizes the actuator capability to dynamically balance a spindle. In this study, an unbalanced AMB spindle system was enhanced with an LMS (Least Mean Squares) algorithm combined with an existing PID (proportional, integral, differential) control. This enhanced controller significantly improved the concentricity of an intentionally unbalanced shaft. The study included dynamic system analysis, test validation, control design and simulation, as well as experimental implementation using a digital LMS controller.

  6. A Balance between Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Volumes Controls Spindle Length

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Lucia; Kovacovicova, Kristina; Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Sodek, Martin; Skultety, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Proper assembly of the spindle apparatus is crucially important for faithful chromosome segregation during anaphase. Thanks to the effort over the last decades, we have very detailed information about many events leading to spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, however we still do not understand certain aspects, including, for example, spindle length control. When tight regulation of spindle size is lost, chromosome segregation errors emerge. Currently, there are several hypotheses trying to explain the molecular mechanism of spindle length control. The number of kinetochores, activity of molecular rulers, intracellular gradients, cell size, limiting spindle components, and the balance of the spindle forces seem to contribute to spindle size regulation, however some of these mechanisms are likely specific to a particular cell type. In search for a general regulatory mechanism, in our study we focused on the role of cell size and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio in this process. To this end, we used relatively large cells isolated from 2-cell mouse embryos. Our results showed that the spindle size upper limit is not reached in these cells and suggest that accurate control of spindle length requires balanced ratio between nuclear and cytoplasmic volumes. PMID:26886125

  7. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males. PMID:25471574

  8. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  9. Spindle activity phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Klinzing, Jens G; Mölle, Matthias; Weber, Frederik; Supp, Gernot; Hipp, Jörg F; Engel, Andreas K; Born, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle activity occurring phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing. PMID:27103135

  10. Aurora-A-Dependent Control of TACC3 Influences the Rate of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nimesh; Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle; Pfuhl, Mark; Gergely, Fanni; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The essential mammalian gene TACC3 is frequently mutated and amplified in cancers and its fusion products exhibit oncogenic activity in glioblastomas. TACC3 functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In particular, phosphorylation on S558 by the mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, promotes spindle recruitment of TACC3 and triggers the formation of a complex with ch-TOG-clathrin that crosslinks and stabilises kinetochore microtubules. Here we map the Aurora-A-binding interface in TACC3 and show that TACC3 potently activates Aurora-A through a domain centered on F525. Vertebrate cells carrying homozygous F525A mutation in the endogenous TACC3 loci exhibit defects in TACC3 function, namely perturbed localization, reduced phosphorylation and weakened interaction with clathrin. The most striking feature of the F525A cells however is a marked shortening of mitosis, at least in part due to rapid spindle assembly. F525A cells do not exhibit chromosome missegregation, indicating that they undergo fast yet apparently faithful mitosis. By contrast, mutating the phosphorylation site S558 to alanine in TACC3 causes aneuploidy without a significant change in mitotic duration. Our work has therefore defined a regulatory role for the Aurora-A-TACC3 interaction beyond the act of phosphorylation at S558. We propose that the regulatory relationship between Aurora-A and TACC3 enables the transition from the microtubule-polymerase activity of TACC3-ch-TOG to the microtubule-crosslinking activity of TACC3-ch-TOG-clathrin complexes as mitosis progresses. Aurora-A-dependent control of TACC3 could determine the balance between these activities, thereby influencing not only spindle length and stability but also the speed of spindle formation with vital consequences for chromosome alignment and segregation. PMID:26134678

  11. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  12. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were carried out in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis. PMID:25470754

  13. Self-Organization and Forces in the Mitotic Spindle.

    PubMed

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-07-01

    At the onset of division, the cell forms a spindle, a precise self-constructed micromachine composed of microtubules and the associated proteins, which divides the chromosomes between the two nascent daughter cells. The spindle arises from self-organization of microtubules and chromosomes, whose different types of motion help them explore the space and eventually approach and interact with each other. Once the interactions between the chromosomes and the microtubules have been established, the chromosomes are moved to the equatorial plane of the spindle and ultimately toward the opposite spindle poles. These transport processes rely on directed forces that are precisely regulated in space and time. In this review, we discuss how microtubule dynamics and their rotational movement drive spindle self-organization, as well as how the forces acting in the spindle are generated, balanced, and regulated. PMID:27145873

  14. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  15. Nucleolar Separation from Chromosomes during Aspergillus nidulans Mitosis Can Occur Without Spindle Forces

    PubMed Central

    Ukil, Leena; De Souza, Colin P.; Liu, Hui-Lin

    2009-01-01

    How the nucleolus is segregated during mitosis is poorly understood and occurs by very different mechanisms during closed and open mitosis. Here we report a new mechanism of nucleolar segregation involving removal of the nucleolar-organizing regions (NORs) from nucleoli during Aspergillus nidulans mitosis. This involves a double nuclear envelope (NE) restriction which generates three NE-associated structures, two daughter nuclei (containing the NORs), and the nucleolus. Therefore, a remnant nucleolar structure can exist in the cytoplasm without NORs. In G1, this parental cytoplasmic nucleolus undergoes sequential disassembly releasing nucleolar proteins to the cytoplasm as nucleoli concomitantly reform in daughter nuclei. By depolymerizing microtubules and mutating spindle assembly checkpoint function, we demonstrate that a cycle of nucleolar “segregation” can occur without a spindle in a process termed spindle-independent mitosis (SIM). During SIM physical separation of the NOR from the nucleolus occurs, and NE modifications promote expulsion of the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. Subsequently, the cytoplasmic nucleolus is disassembled and rebuilt at a new site around the nuclear NOR. The data demonstrate the existence of a mitotic machinery for nucleolar segregation that is normally integrated with mitotic spindle formation but that can function without it. PMID:19211837

  16. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  17. Morphogenesis of the mitotic and meiotic spindle: Conclusions obtained from one system are not necessarily applicable to the other

    SciTech Connect

    Rieder, C.L.; Ault, J.G.; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U.; Sluder, G.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosome distribution during both mitosis and meiosis is effected by the {open_quotes}spindle{close_quotes}, a complex ensemble formed from an interaction between chromosomes and microtubules (MTs). One of the most important characteristics of the spindle is its bipolar structure, established as it forms during prometaphase, which ensures that the replicated chromosomes are segregated equivalently to two daughter cells. A major goal of cell division research is to understand the mechanism of spindle morphogenesis and how bipolarity is established. Because they are relatively flat and easily obtained year-round, spermatocytes, especially those from insects, have been a favored material for the study of animal cell division since the process was first described by Flemming in the late 1800`s. Like living cultured cells, spindle formation in spermatocytes can be detailed by all forms of light microscopy (LM), and cells followed in vivo can be fixed and processed for a subsequent analysis with the electron microscope (EM). Unfortunately, with the exception of a few marine organisms, the large size and opaque nature of most oocytes impedes a detailed analysis of their meiosis in vivo. As a result, information regarding spindle formation and function during meiosis in oocytes is typically derived from EM or immunofluorescent (IMF) studies of fixed cells or cell-free oocyte extracts.

  18. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  19. Form and Function of Sleep Spindles across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Brittany C; Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of EEG recordings, sleep spindles have been identified as hallmarks of non-REM sleep. Despite a broad general understanding of mechanisms of spindle generation gleaned from animal studies, the mechanisms underlying certain features of spindles in the human brain, such as "global" versus "local" spindles, are largely unknown. Neither the topography nor the morphology of sleep spindles remains constant throughout the lifespan. It is likely that changes in spindle phenomenology during development and aging are the result of dramatic changes in brain structure and function. Across various developmental windows, spindle activity is correlated with general cognitive aptitude, learning, and memory; however, these correlations vary in strength, and even direction, depending on age and metrics used. Understanding these differences across the lifespan should further clarify how these oscillations are generated and their function under a variety of circumstances. We discuss these issues, and their translational implications for human cognitive function. Because sleep spindles are similarly affected in disorders of neurodevelopment (such as schizophrenia) and during aging (such as neurodegenerative conditions), both types of disorders may benefit from therapies based on a better understanding of spindle function. PMID:27190654

  20. Form and Function of Sleep Spindles across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Brittany C.; Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of EEG recordings, sleep spindles have been identified as hallmarks of non-REM sleep. Despite a broad general understanding of mechanisms of spindle generation gleaned from animal studies, the mechanisms underlying certain features of spindles in the human brain, such as “global” versus “local” spindles, are largely unknown. Neither the topography nor the morphology of sleep spindles remains constant throughout the lifespan. It is likely that changes in spindle phenomenology during development and aging are the result of dramatic changes in brain structure and function. Across various developmental windows, spindle activity is correlated with general cognitive aptitude, learning, and memory; however, these correlations vary in strength, and even direction, depending on age and metrics used. Understanding these differences across the lifespan should further clarify how these oscillations are generated and their function under a variety of circumstances. We discuss these issues, and their translational implications for human cognitive function. Because sleep spindles are similarly affected in disorders of neurodevelopment (such as schizophrenia) and during aging (such as neurodegenerative conditions), both types of disorders may benefit from therapies based on a better understanding of spindle function. PMID:27190654

  1. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  2. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  3. Downregulation of protein 4.1R, a mature centriole protein, disrupts centrosomes, alters cell cycle progression, and perturbs mitotic spindles and anaphase.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I M; Go, Minjoung M; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J

    2008-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G(1) accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  4. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R, a Mature Centriole Protein, Disrupts Centrosomes, Alters Cell Cycle Progression, and Perturbs Mitotic Spindles and Anaphase▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R.; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I. M.; Go, Minjoung M.; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G1 accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  5. Lin-5 Is a Novel Component of the Spindle Apparatus Required for Chromosome Segregation and Cleavage Plane Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lorson, Monique A.; Horvitz, H. Robert; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2000-01-01

    Successful divisions of eukaryotic cells require accurate and coordinated cycles of DNA replication, spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and cytoplasmic cleavage. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene lin-5 is essential for multiple aspects of cell division. Cells in lin-5 null mutants enter mitosis at the normal time and form bipolar spindles, but fail chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, sister chromatid separation, and cytokinesis. Despite these defects, cells exit from mitosis without delay and progress through subsequent rounds of DNA replication, centrosome duplication, and abortive mitoses. In addition, early embryos that lack lin-5 function show defects in spindle positioning and cleavage plane specification. The lin-5 gene encodes a novel protein with a central coiled-coil domain. This protein localizes to the spindle apparatus in a cell cycle- and microtubule-dependent manner. The LIN-5 protein is located at the centrosomes throughout mitosis, at the kinetochore microtubules in metaphase cells, and at the spindle during meiosis. Our results show that LIN-5 is a novel component of the spindle apparatus required for chromosome and spindle movements, cytoplasmic cleavage, and correct alternation of the S and M phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10629219

  6. XCTK2: A Kinesin-related Protein That Promotes Mitotic Spindle Assembly in Xenopus laevis Egg Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Claire E.; Verma, Suzie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    We used a peptide antibody to a conserved sequence in the motor domain of kinesins to screen a Xenopus ovary cDNA expression library. Among the clones isolated were two that encoded a protein we named XCTK2 for Xenopus COOH-terminal kinesin 2. XCTK2 contains an NH2-terminal globular domain, a central α-helical stalk, and a COOH-terminal motor domain. XCTK2 is similar to CTKs in other organisms and is most homologous to CHO2. Antibodies raised against XCTK2 recognize a 75-kD protein in Xenopus egg extracts that cosediments with microtubules. In Xenopus tissue culture cells, the anti-XCTK2 antibodies stain mitotic spindles as well as a subset of interphase nuclei. To probe the function of XCTK2, we have used an in vitro assay for spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Addition of antibodies to cytostatic factor- arrested extracts causes a 70% reduction in the percentage of bipolar spindles formed. XCTK2 is not required for maintenance of bipolar spindles, as antibody addition to preformed spindles has no effect. To further evaluate the function of XCTK2, we expressed XCTK2 in insect Sf-9 cells using the baculovirus expression system. When purified (recombinant XCTK2 is added to Xenopus egg extracts at a fivefold excess over endogenous levels) there is a stimulation in both the rate and extent of bipolar spindle formation. XCTK2 exists in a large complex in extracts and can be coimmunoprecipitated with two other proteins from extracts. XCTK2 likely plays an important role in the establishment and structural integrity of mitotic spindles. PMID:9049251

  7. Reduced O-GlcNAcase expression promotes mitotic errors and spindle defects.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Chris; Tan, Ee Phie; Zhang, Zhen; Machacek, Miranda; Brinker, Amanda E; Azuma, Mizuki; Slawson, Chad

    2016-05-18

    Alterations in O-GlcNAc cycling, the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc, lead to mitotic defects and increased aneuploidy. Herein, we generated stable O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc) knockdown HeLa cell lines and characterized the effect of the reduction in OGA activity on cell cycle progression. After release from G1/S, the OGA knockdown cells progressed normally through S phase but demonstrated mitotic exit defects. Cyclin A was increased in the knockdown cells while Cyclin B and D expression was reduced. Retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation was also increased in the knockdown compared to control. At M phase, the knockdown cells showed more compact spindle chromatids than control cells and had a greater percentage of cells with multipolar spindles. Furthermore, the timing of the inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1) was altered in the OGA knockdown cells. Although expression and localization of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC) was unchanged, histone H3 threonine 3 phosphorylation was decreased in one of the OGA knockdown cell lines. The Ewing Sarcoma Breakpoint Region 1 Protein (EWS) participates in organizing the CPC at the spindle and is a known substrate for O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the enzyme that adds O-GlcNAc). EWS O-GlcNAcylation was significantly increased in the OGA knockdown cells promoting uneven localization of the mitotic midzone. Our data suggests that O-GlcNAc cycling is an essential mechanism for proper mitotic signaling and spindle formation, and alterations in the rate of O-GlcNAc cycling produces aberrant spindles and promotes aneuploidy. PMID:27070276

  8. Sleep Spindle Density Predicts the Effect of Prior Knowledge on Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Kempkes, Marleen; Cousins, James N.; Lewis, Penelope A.

    2016-01-01

    Information that relates to a prior knowledge schema is remembered better and consolidates more rapidly than information that does not. Another factor that influences memory consolidation is sleep and growing evidence suggests that sleep-related processing is important for integration with existing knowledge. Here, we perform an examination of how sleep-related mechanisms interact with schema-dependent memory advantage. Participants first established a schema over 2 weeks. Next, they encoded new facts, which were either related to the schema or completely unrelated. After a 24 h retention interval, including a night of sleep, which we monitored with polysomnography, participants encoded a second set of facts. Finally, memory for all facts was tested in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Behaviorally, sleep spindle density predicted an increase of the schema benefit to memory across the retention interval. Higher spindle densities were associated with reduced decay of schema-related memories. Functionally, spindle density predicted increased disengagement of the hippocampus across 24 h for schema-related memories only. Together, these results suggest that sleep spindle activity is associated with the effect of prior knowledge on memory consolidation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Episodic memories are gradually assimilated into long-term memory and this process is strongly influenced by sleep. The consolidation of new information is also influenced by its relationship to existing knowledge structures, or schemas, but the role of sleep in such schema-related consolidation is unknown. We show that sleep spindle density predicts the extent to which schemas influence the consolidation of related facts. This is the first evidence that sleep is associated with the interaction between prior knowledge and long-term memory formation. PMID:27030764

  9. Sleep spindles and hippocampal functional connectivity in human NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Kátia C; Spoormaker, Victor I; Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Holsboer, Florian; Sämann, Philipp G; Czisch, Michael

    2011-07-13

    We investigated human hippocampal functional connectivity in wakefulness and throughout non-rapid eye movement sleep. Young healthy subjects underwent simultaneous EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements at 1.5 T under resting conditions in the descent to deep sleep. Continuous 5 min epochs representing a unique sleep stage (i.e., wakefulness, sleep stages 1 and 2, or slow-wave sleep) were extracted. fMRI time series of subregions of the hippocampal formation (HF) (cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus, and subiculum) were extracted based on cytoarchitectonical probability maps. We observed sleep stage-dependent changes in HF functional coupling. The HF was integrated to variable strength in the default mode network (DMN) in wakefulness and light sleep stages but not in slow-wave sleep. The strongest functional connectivity between the HF and neocortex was observed in sleep stage 2 (compared with both slow-wave sleep and wakefulness). We observed a strong interaction of sleep spindle occurrence and HF functional connectivity in sleep stage 2, with increased HF/neocortical connectivity during spindles. Moreover, the cornu ammonis exhibited strongest functional connectivity with the DMN during wakefulness, while the subiculum dominated hippocampal functional connectivity to frontal brain regions during sleep stage 2. Increased connectivity between HF and neocortical regions in sleep stage 2 suggests an increased capacity for possible global information transfer, while connectivity in slow-wave sleep is reflecting a functional system optimal for segregated information reprocessing. Our data may be relevant to differentiating sleep stage-specific contributions to neural plasticity as proposed in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:21753010

  10. A diagnostic algorithm to distinguish desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Weissinger, Stephanie E; Keil, Philipp; Silvers, David N; Klaus, Beate M; Möller, Peter; Horst, Basil A; Lennerz, Jochen K

    2014-04-01

    Spindle cell melanoma and desmoplastic melanoma differ clinically in prognosis and therapeutic implications; however, because of partially overlapping histopathological features, diagnostic distinction of spindle cell from desmoplastic melanoma is not always straightforward. A direct comparison of diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers has not been performed. Meta-review of the literature discloses key clinicopathological differences between spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma, including immunophenotypes. Using 50 biomarkers available in routine diagnostics, we examined 38 archival cases (n=16 spindle, 18 desmoplastic, 4 mixed spindle/desmoplastic melanoma). S100 remains as the most reliable routine marker to reach the diagnosis of melanoma in spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma. We identified nine distinctly labeling markers with spindle cell melanoma showing positivity for laminin, p75, HMB45, c-kit, and MelanA, and desmoplastic melanoma preferentially labeling with collagen IV, trichrome, CD68, and MDM2. On the basis of comparisons of test performance measures, MelanA and trichrome were used to devise a 94% sensitive diagnostic algorithm for the distinction of desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma. Gene amplification and expression status was assessed for a set of potentially drugable targets (HER2, EGFR, MET, MDM2, TP53, ALK, MYC, FLI-1, and KIT). Fluorescent in situ hybridizations did not reveal a significant number of gene aberrations/rearrangements; however, protein overexpression for at least one of these markers was identified in 35 of 38 cases (92%). In addition, we found BRAF mutations in 31% of spindle cell and 5% of desmoplastic melanoma, with an overall mutation frequency of 16% (n=6/38). We present the first comprehensive screening study of diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma. The devised algorithm allows diagnostic distinction of desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma when routine histology is not

  11. Delocalization of the Microtubule Motor Dynein from Mitotic Spindles by the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncoprotein is Not Sufficient for Induction of Multipolar Mitoses

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Christine L.; McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Dynein is a minus-end directed microtubule motor that transports numerous cargoes throughout the cell. During mitosis, dynein motor activity is necessary for the positioning of spindle microtubules and has also been implicated in inactivating the spindle assembly checkpoint. Mutations in dynein motor and/or accessory proteins are associated with human disease, including cancer, and the delocalization of dynein from mitotic spindles has been correlated with an increased incidence of multipolar spindle formation in some cancer cells that contain supernumerary centrosomes. The high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein induces centrosome overduplication and has been shown to cause multipolar mitotic spindle formation, a diagnostic hallmark of HPV-associated neoplasias. Here we show that HPV16 E7 expression leads to an increased population of mitotic cells with dynein delocalized from the mitotic spindle. This function maps to sequences of HPV16 E7 that are distinct from the region necessary for centrosome overduplication. However, contrary to previous reports, we provide evidence that dynein delocalization by HPV16 E7 is neither necessary nor sufficient to cause the formation of multipolar mitoses. PMID:18974113

  12. Centrosomal abnormalities characterize human and rodent cystic cholangiocytes and are associated with Cdc25A overexpression.

    PubMed

    Masyuk, Tatyana V; Lee, Seung-Ok; Radtke, Brynn N; Stroope, Angela J; Huang, Bing; Banales, Jesús M; Masyuk, Anatoliy I; Splinter, Patrick L; Gradilone, Sergio A; Gajdos, Gabriella B; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic cystogenesis in polycystic liver diseases is associated with abnormalities of cholangiocyte cilia. Given the crucial association between cilia and centrosomes, we tested the hypothesis that centrosomal defects occur in cystic cholangiocytes of rodents (Pkd2(WS25/-) mice and PCK rats) and of patients with polycystic liver diseases, contributing to disturbed ciliogenesis and cyst formation. We examined centrosomal cytoarchitecture in control and cystic cholangiocytes, the effects of centrosomal abnormalities on ciliogenesis, and the role of the cell-cycle regulator Cdc25A in centrosomal defects by depleting cholangiocytes of Cdc25A in vitro and in vivo and evaluating centrosome morphology, cell-cycle progression, proliferation, ciliogenesis, and cystogenesis. The cystic cholangiocytes had atypical centrosome positioning, supernumerary centrosomes, multipolar spindles, and extra cilia. Structurally aberrant cilia were present in cystic cholangiocytes during ciliogenesis. Depletion of Cdc25A resulted in i) a decreased number of centrosomes and multiciliated cholangiocytes, ii) an increased fraction of ciliated cholangiocytes with longer cilia, iii) a decreased proportion of cholangiocytes in G1/G0 and S phases of the cell cycle, iv) decreased cell proliferation, and v) reduced cyst growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data support the hypothesis that centrosomal abnormalities in cholangiocytes are associated with aberrant ciliogenesis and that accelerated cystogenesis is likely due to overexpression of Cdc25A, providing additional evidence that pharmacological targeting of Cdc25A has therapeutic potential in polycystic liver diseases. PMID:24211536

  13. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust – yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design. PMID:20930139

  14. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  15. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  16. Correlations between adolescent processing speed and specific spindle frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Rebecca S.; Smith, Carlyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are waxing and waning thalamocortical oscillations with accepted frequencies of between 11 and 16 Hz and a minimum duration of 0.5 s. Our research has suggested that there is spindle activity in all of the sleep stages, and thus for the present analysis we examined the link between spindle activity (Stage 2, rapid eye movement (REM) and slow wave sleep (SWS)) and waking cognitive abilities in 32 healthy adolescents. After software was used to filter frequencies outside the desired range, slow spindles (11.00–13.50 Hz), fast spindles (13.51–16.00 Hz) and spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) were observed in Stage 2, SWS and REM sleep. Our analysis suggests that these specific EEG frequencies were significantly related to processing speed, which is one of the subscales of the intelligence score, in adolescents. The relationship was prominent in SWS and REM sleep. Further, the spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) that occurred during SWS was strongly related to processing speed. Results suggest that the ability of adolescents to respond to tasks in an accurate, efficient and timely manner is related to their sleep quality. These findings support earlier research reporting relationships between learning, learning potential and sleep spindle activity in adults and adolescents. PMID:25709575

  17. Interictal Hippocampal Spiking Influences the Occurrence of Hippocampal Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Bernasconi, Neda; Caldairou, Benoit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Bernasconi, Andrea; Gotman, Jean; Dubeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The significance of hippocampal sleep spindles and their relation to epileptic activity is still a matter of controversy. Hippocampal spindles have been considered a physiological phenomenon, an evoked response to afferent epileptic discharges, or even the expression of an epileptic manifestation. To address this question, we investigated the presence and rate of hippocampal spindles in focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy patients undergoing scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography (EEG). Design: Sleep recording with scalp-intracerebral EEG. Setting: Tertiary referral epilepsy center. Patients: Twenty-five epilepsy patients (extratemporal: n = 6, temporal: n = 15, and multifocal including the temporal lobe: n = 4). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: We analyzed associations between hippocampal spindles and hippocampal electrophysiological findings (interictal spiking, seizure onset zone) and magnetic resonance imaging volumetry. Sixteen of 25 patients (64%) had hippocampal spindles (extratemporal epilepsy: 6/6; temporal epilepsy: 10/15; and multifocal epilepsy: 0/4; P = 0.005). Median spindle rate was 0.6 (range, 0.1–8.6)/min in nonrapid eye movement sleep. Highest spindle rates were found in hippocampi of patients with extratemporal epilepsy (P < 0.001). A negative association was found between hippocampal spiking activity and spindle rate (P = 0.003). We found no association between the presence (n = 21) or absence (n = 17) of hippocampal seizure onset zone and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.114), and between a normal (n = 30) or atrophic (n = 8) hippocampus and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.195). Conclusions: Hippocampal spindles represent a physiological phenomenon, with an expression that is diminished in epilepsy affecting the temporal lobe. Hippocampal spiking lowered the rate of hippocampal spindles, suggesting that epileptic discharges may at least in part be a transformation of these physiological events, similar to the

  18. Centrosomes and spindles in ascidian embryos and eggs.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Alex; Chenevert, Janet; Pruliere, Gerard; Costache, Vlad; Hebras, Celine; Salez, Gregory; Dumollard, Remi

    2015-01-01

    During embryonic development and maternal meiotic maturation, positioning of the mitotic/meiotic spindle is subject to control mechanisms that meet the needs of the particular cell type. Here we review the methods, molecular tools, and the ascidian model we use to study three different ways in which centrosomes or spindles are positioned in three different cellular contexts. First, we review unequal cleavage in the ascidian germ lineage. In the germ cell precursors, a large macromolecular structure termed the centrosome-attracting body causes three successive rounds of unequal cleavage from the 8- to the 64-cell stage. Next, we discuss spindle positioning underlying the invariant cleavage pattern. Ascidian embryos display an invariant cleavage pattern whereby the mitotic spindle aligns in a predetermined orientation in every blastomere up to the gastrula stage (composed of 112 cells). Finally, we review methods and approaches to study meiotic spindle positioning in eggs. PMID:26175446

  19. Measuring Microtubule Polarity in Spindles with Second-Harmonic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Che-Hang; Langowitz, Noah; Wu, Hai-Yin; Farhadifar, Reza; Brugues, Jan; Yoo, Tae Yeon; Needleman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of microtubule polarity, and the interplay between microtubule polarity and protein localization, is thought to be crucial for spindle assembly, anaphase, and cytokinesis, but these phenomena remain poorly understood, in part due to the difficulty of measuring microtubule polarity in spindles. We develop and implement a method to nonperturbatively and quantitatively measure microtubule polarity throughout spindles using a combination of second-harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence. We validate this method using computer simulations and by comparison to structural data on spindles obtained from electron tomography and laser ablation. This method should provide a powerful tool for studying spindle organization and function, and may be applicable for investigating microtubule polarity in other systems. PMID:24739157

  20. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  1. Atypical spindle cell lipoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular study emphasizing its relationship to classical spindle cell lipoma.

    PubMed

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Savola, Suvi; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Mentzel, Thomas; Libbrecht, Louis

    2014-07-01

    We studied a series of spindle cell lipomas arising in atypical sites and showing unusual morphologic features (which we called atypical spindle cell lipoma) to assess if these lesions have the same chromosomal alterations as classical spindle cell lipoma but different from those found in atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. We investigated alterations of different genes in the 13q14 region and the amplification status of the MDM2 and CDK4 genes at 12q14-15 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. In the atypical spindle cell lipomas, MLPA revealed deletions in the two nearest flanking genes of RB1 (ITM2B and RCBTB2) and in multiple important exons of RB1. In contrast, in classical spindle cell lipomas, a less complex loss of RB1 exons was found but no deletion of ITM2B and RCBTB2. Moreover, MLPA identified a deletion of the DLEU1 gene, a finding which has not been reported earlier. We propose an immunohistochemical panel for lipomatous tumors which comprises of MDM2, CDK4, p16, Rb, which we have found useful in discriminating between atypical or classical spindle cell lipomas and other adipocytic neoplasms, especially atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. Our findings strengthen the link between atypical spindle cell lipoma and classical spindle cell lipoma, and differentiate them from atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. PMID:24659226

  2. Fluorinated quinazolinones as potential radiotracers for imaging kinesin spindle protein expression.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Jones, Michael W; Cohrs, Susan; Schibli, Roger; Fischer, Eliane

    2013-01-15

    Anti-mitotic anti-cancer drugs offer a potential platform for developing new radiotracers for imaging proliferation markers associated with the mitosis-phase of the cell-cycle. One interesting target is kinesin spindle protein (KSP)-an ATP-dependent motor protein that plays a vital role in bipolar spindle formation. In this work we synthesised a range of new fluorinated-quinazolinone compounds based on the structure of the clinical candidate KSP inhibitor, ispinesib, and investigated their properties in vitro as potential anti-mitotic agents targeting KSP expression. Anti-proliferation (MTT and BrdU) assays combined with additional studies including fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) analysis of cell-cycle arrest confirmed the mechanism and potency of these biphenyl compounds in a range of human cancer cell lines. Additional studies using confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that these compounds induce M-phase arrest via monoaster spindle formation. Structural studies revealed that compound 20-(R) is the most potent fluorinated-quinazolinone inhibitor of KSP and represents a suitable lead candidate for further studies on designing (18)F-radiolabelled agents for positron-emission tomography (PET). PMID:23245569

  3. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  4. Rare Occurrence of Lip Spindle Cell Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Sandra; Cheng, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a rare distinct variant of lipoma, which presents as a painless, circumscribed, slow-growing, superficial lesion on the lip and can mimic a minor salivary gland tumour. We present a slow growing lower lip lesion and its management. Case Report. A 38-year-old female gave an eight-year history of a slow-growing mass on her lower lip with intermittent change in size. She presented with a submucosal nodule and thin overlying mucosa adjacent to the vermilion border. Surgical excision was carried as the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Conclusion. Lip SCL is rare, and surgical excision is advocated in order to exclude underlying pathology and minor salivary gland tumours. PMID:25815220

  5. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment. PMID:26775206

  6. Topography of age-related changes in sleep spindles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Godbout, Jonathan; Barakat, Marc; Robillard, Rebecca; Poirier, Gaétan; Bastien, Célyne; Carrier, Julie

    2013-02-01

    Aging induces multiple changes to sleep spindles, which may hinder their alleged functional role in memory and sleep protection mechanisms. Brain aging in specific cortical regions could affect the neural networks underlying spindle generation, yet the topography of these age-related changes is currently unknown. In the present study, we analyzed spindle characteristics in 114 healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 73 years over 5 anteroposterior electroencephalography scalp derivations. Spindle density, amplitude, and duration were higher in young subjects than in middle-aged and elderly subjects in all derivations, but the topography of age effects differed drastically. Age-related decline in density and amplitude was more prominent in anterior derivations, whereas duration showed a posterior prominence. Age groups did not differ in all-night spindle frequency for any derivation. These results show that age-related changes in sleep spindles follow distinct topographical patterns that are specific to each spindle characteristic. This topographical specificity may provide a useful biomarker to localize age-sensitive changes in underlying neural systems during normal and pathological aging. PMID:22809452

  7. Development of sleep spindles in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J R

    1996-07-01

    Spindles develop in a man at 6 weeks conceptional age, at first at a low amplitude, gradually increasing in amplitude but especially in duration to a maximum at 13 weeks (mean, 6 sec; longest, 21 sec), rapidly decreasing in duration with age to 23 weeks (mean, 2.5 sec) and then slowly decreasing to the end of the first year (mean, 1.5 sec). The pause between the spindles is usually inversely related to the spindle duration and stabilizes after 23 weeks at 7 sec. The complex of spindle and pause is the longest at 10 weeks (12.5 sec), decreasing with age and stabilizing at 17 weeks at 8.1 sec. Thus, from 17 weeks until the end of the first year, spindles tend to recur every 8-9 sec, although variability is evident, especially in the duration of the pause. Synchronous spindles develop from a low value of 10% to around a 30% value until the end of the year, and asynchronous ones tend to have the same value (30%) for most of the year, except in the youngest patients. The reticular nucleus of the thalamus is known to be the generator of spindles and an increase in some size may be related to the great increase in duration, peaking at 13 weeks, and an increase in the development of the dendritic tree of this nucleus may be related to the many changes that stabilize at 23 weeks of age. PMID:8828973

  8. A comparative analysis of spindle morphometrics across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Good, Matthew C.; von Dassow, George; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in all eukaryotes depends on function of the spindle, a microtubule-based structure that segregates chromosomes to generate daughter cells in mitosis or haploid gametes in meiosis. Spindle size adapts to changes in cell size and shape, which vary dramatically across species and within a multicellular organism, but the nature of scaling events and their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cell size variations are most pronounced in early animal development, as egg diameters range from tens of microns up to millimeters across animal phyla, and decrease several orders of magnitude during rapid reductive divisions. During early embryogenesis in the model organisms X. laevis and C. elegans, the spindle scales with cell size [1,2], a phenomenon regulated by molecules that modulate microtubule dynamics [3–6], as well as by limiting cytoplasmic volume [7,8]. However, it is not known to what extent spindle scaling is conserved across organisms and among different cell types. Here we show that in a range of metazoan phyla, mitotic spindle length decreased with cell size across a ~30 fold difference in zygote size. Maximum spindle length varied, but linear spindle scaling occurred similarly in all species once embryonic cell diameter reduced to 140 μm. In contrast, we find that the female meiotic spindle does not scale as closely to egg size, adopting a more uniform size across species that likely reflects its specialized function. Our analysis reveals that spindle morphometrics change abruptly, within one cell cycle, at the transition from meiosis to mitosis in most animals. PMID:26004761

  9. X-43A Rudder Spindle Fatigue Life Estimate and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.; Simonsen, Micah; Mason, Brian H.

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue life analyses were performed using a standard strain-life approach and a linear cumulative damage parameter to assess the effect of a single accidental overload on the fatigue life of the Haynes 230 nickel-base superalloy X-43A rudder spindle. Because of a limited amount of information available about the Haynes 230 material, a series of tests were conducted to replicate the overload and in-service conditions for the spindle and corroborate the analysis. Both the analytical and experimental results suggest that the spindle will survive the anticipated flight loads.

  10. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  11. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  12. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  13. Mitotic control of kinetochore-associated dynein and spindle orientation by human Spindly

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Wai; Fava, Luca L.; Uldschmid, Andreas; Schmitz, Michael H.A.; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation and chromosome segregation depend critically on kinetochore–microtubule (KT–MT) interactions. A new protein, termed Spindly in Drosophila and SPDL-1 in C. elegans, was recently shown to regulate KT localization of dynein, but depletion phenotypes revealed striking differences, suggesting evolutionarily diverse roles of mitotic dynein. By characterizing the function of Spindly in human cells, we identify specific functions for KT dynein. We show that localization of human Spindly (hSpindly) to KTs is controlled by the Rod/Zw10/Zwilch (RZZ) complex and Aurora B. hSpindly depletion results in reduced inter-KT tension, unstable KT fibers, an extensive prometaphase delay, and severe chromosome misalignment. Moreover, depletion of hSpindly induces a striking spindle rotation, which can be rescued by co-depletion of dynein. However, in contrast to Drosophila, hSpindly depletion does not abolish the removal of MAD2 and ZW10 from KTs. Collectively, our data reveal hSpindly-mediated dynein functions and highlight a critical role of KT dynein in spindle orientation. PMID:19468067

  14. Microcystin-LR induces mitotic spindle assembly disorders in Vicia faba by protein phosphatase inhibition and not reactive oxygen species induction.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Tándor, Ildikó; Beyer, Dániel; Vasas, Gábor; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vereb, György; Papp, Georgina; Riba, Milán; M-Hamvas, Márta; Máthé, Csaba

    2016-07-20

    We aimed to reveal the mechanisms of mitotic spindle anomalies induced by microcystin-LR (MCY-LR), a cyanobacterial toxin in Vicia faba, a well-known model in plant cell and molecular biology. MCY-LR inhibits type 1 and 2A phosphoserine/threonine specific protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of the cyanotoxin during cytopathogenesis. Histochemical-immunohistochemical and biochemical methods were used. A significant number of MCY-LR induced spindle alterations are described for the first time. Disrupted, multipolar spindles and missing kinetochore fibers were detected both in metaphase and anaphase cells. Additional polar microtubule (MT) bundles, hyperbundling of spindle MTs, monopolar spindles, C-S- shaped, additional and asymmetric spindles were detected in metaphase, while midplane kinetochore fibers were detected in anaphase cells only. Several spindle anomalies induced mitotic disorders, i.e. they occurred concomitantly with altered sister chromatid separation. Alterations were dependent on the MCY-LR dose and exposure time. Under long-term (2 and mainly 6 days') exposure they were detected in the concentration range of 0.1-20μgmL(-1) MCY-LR that inhibited PP1 and PP2A significantly without significant ROS induction. Elevated peroxidase/catalase activities indicated that MCY-LR treated V. faba plants showed efficient defense against oxidative stress. Thus, although the elevation of ROS is known to induce cytoskeletal aberrations in general, this study shows that long-term protein phosphatase inhibition is the primary cause of MCY-LR induced spindle disorders. PMID:27186862

  15. Facile synthesis and luminescent properties of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles from titanate nanotubes precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongbo; Sheng, Ye; Zhao, Huan; Song, Yanhua; Gao, Fei; Huo, Qisheng; Zou, Haifeng

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: This picture illustration for the formation process of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles. Display Omitted Highlights: ► TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles were prepared. ► The nanotubes could transform to nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles. ► The luminescence properties are dependent on the increases of the bandgap. -- Abstract: TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles have been successfully prepared through simple calcination and hydrothermal process respectively using titanate as the precursors. On the basis of X-ray diffraction results, the as-obtained precursors are titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O), while nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles are pure anatase phase of TiO{sub 2}. TEM and SEM images show that the as-formed precursor could be transformed from nanotubes into nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles by the calcination and hydrothermal process respectively. Under UV light excitation, both the TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods and spindle-shaped nanoparticles exhibit the strong red emission. In addition, the luminescence intensity of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanorods is higher than that of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} spindle-shaped nanoparticles due to the increases of the bandgap of the TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

  16. Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma: a brief diagnostic review and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Sarah Jayne; Nodit, Laurentia

    2013-08-01

    Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare variant of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma that has a predilection for young males and most commonly involves the paratesticular region followed by head and neck. Histopathology demonstrates elongated spindle cells with fusiform to cigar-shaped nuclei and indistinct eosinophilic cytoplasm arranged in fascicles or whorls. Although the tumor demonstrates increased cellularity and moderate atypia, the microscopic and architectural patterns can allow this tumor to be confused with multiple entities, such as leiomyosarcoma, spindle cell carcinoma, desmoplastic melanoma, or fibrosarcoma, with important therapeutic implications. Immunohistochemical workup demonstrates sarcomeric differentiation with reactivity for desmin, myogenin, and MyoD1 markers. Compared with other subtypes, the spindle cell variant in children is associated with a favorable outcome; however, in the adult population there does not appear to be any prognostic advantage. PMID:23899074

  17. Spindle extraction method for ISAR image based on Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xia; Zheng, Sheng; Zeng, Xiangyun; Zhu, Daoyuan; Xu, Gaogui

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method of spindle extraction of target in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) image is proposed which depends on Radon Transform. Firstly, utilizing Radon Transform to detect all straight lines which are collinear with these line segments in image. Then, using Sobel operator to detect image contour. Finally, finding all intersections of each straight line and image contour, the two intersections which have maximum distance between them is the two ends of this line segment and the longest line segment of all line segments is spindle of target. According to the proposed spindle extraction method, one hundred simulated ISAR images which are respectively rotated 0 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees in counterclockwise are used to do experiment and the proposed method and the detection results are more close to the real spindle of target than the method based on Hough Transform .

  18. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  19. A requirement for epsin in mitotic membrane and spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a sophisticated membrane system to facilitate diverse functions. Whereas much is known about the nature of membrane systems in interphase, the organization and function of the mitotic membrane system are less well understood. In this study, we show that epsin, an endocytic adapter protein, regulates mitotic membrane morphology and spindle integrity in HeLa cells. Using epsin that harbors point mutations in the epsin NH2-terminal homology domain and spindle assembly assays in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we show that epsin-induced membrane curvature is required for proper spindle morphogenesis, independent of its function in endocytosis during interphase. Although several other membrane-interacting proteins, including clathrin, AP2, autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia, and GRASP65, are implicated in the regulation of mitosis, whether they participate through regulation of membrane organization is unclear. Our study of epsin provides evidence that mitotic membrane organization influences spindle integrity. PMID:19704019

  20. Detail of post, brackets, railing, and spindle work frieze; camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of post, brackets, railing, and spindle work frieze; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Bandstand, Eighth Street, south side between Railroad Avenue & Walnut Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  2. The deafferented reticular thalamic nucleus generates spindle rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Steriade, M; Domich, L; Oakson, G; Deschênes, M

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that nucleus reticularis thalami (RE) is the generator of spindle rhythmicity during electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization was tested in acutely prepared cats. Unit discharges and focal waves were extracellularly recorded in the rostral pole of RE nucleus, which was completely disconnected by transections from all other thalamic nuclei. In some experiments, additional transections through corona radiata created a triangular island in which the rostral RE pole survived with the caudate nucleus, putamen, basal forebrain nuclei, prepyriform area, and the adjacent cortex. Similar results were obtained in two types of experiments: brain stem-transected preparations that exhibited spontaneous spindle sequences, and animals under ketamine anesthesia in which transient spindling was repeatedly precipitated during recording by very low doses of a short-acting barbiturate. Both spindle-related rhythms (7- to 16-Hz waves grouped in sequences that recur with a rhythm of 0.1-0.3 Hz) are seen in focal recordings of the deafferented RE nucleus. The presence of spindling rhythmicity in the disconnected RE nucleus contrasts with total absence of spindles in cortical EEG leads and in thalamic recordings behind the transection. Oscillations within the same frequency range as that of spontaneous spindles can be evoked in the deafferented RE nucleus by subcortical white matter stimulation. In deafferented RE cells, the burst structure consists of an initially biphasic acceleration-deceleration pattern, eventually leading to a long-lasting tonic tail. Quantitative group data show that the burst parameters of disconnected RE cells are very similar to those of RE neurons with intact connections. In the deafferented RE nucleus, spike bursts of RE neurons recur periodically (0.1-0.3 Hz) in close time-relation with simultaneously recorded focal spindle sequences. The burst occurrence of deafferented RE cells is greatly reduced after systemic administration of bicuculline

  3. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon. PMID:27081680

  4. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  5. Actin-based spindle positioning: new insights from female gametes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Émilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2014-02-01

    Asymmetric divisions are essential in metazoan development, where they promote the emergence of cell lineages. The mitotic spindle has astral microtubules that contact the cortex, which act as a sensor of cell geometry and as an integrator to orient cell division. Recent advances in live imaging revealed novel pools and roles of F-actin in somatic cells and in oocytes. In somatic cells, cytoplasmic F-actin is involved in spindle architecture and positioning. In starfish and mouse oocytes, newly discovered meshes of F-actin control chromosome gathering and spindle positioning. Because oocytes lack centrosomes and astral microtubules, F-actin networks are key players in the positioning of spindles by transmitting forces over long distances. Oocytes also achieve highly asymmetric divisions, and thus are excellent models to study the roles of these newly discovered F-actin networks in spindle positioning. Moreover, recent studies in mammalian oocytes provide a further understanding of the organisation of F-actin networks and their biophysical properties. In this Commentary, we present examples of the role of F-actin in spindle positioning and asymmetric divisions, with an emphasis on the most up-to-date studies from mammalian oocytes. We also address specific technical issues in the field, namely live imaging of F-actin networks and stress the need for interdisciplinary approaches. PMID:24413163

  6. [A case of spindle cell carcinoma of the breast].

    PubMed

    Oshida, Sayuri; Hayashi, Keiko; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Nemoto, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 53-year-old woman in whom ultrasonography of the breast revealed a lobular mass, 14 mm in diameter, in the right AB region. Spindle cells were obtained on fine-needle aspiration biopsy, but it was not possible to diagnose whether the tumor was benign or malignant. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass with a cystic component that was darkly stained in the early phase. Needle biopsy showed a dense proliferation of atypical spindle cells with no distinct epithelial-like arrangement. The differential diagnosis included mesenchymal malignant tumors such as fibrosarcoma, some phyllodes tumors, and epithelial tumors with sarcomatoid differentiation. Immunostaining revealed that the tumor was cytokeratin (AE1/AE3)-negative, partially CAM 5.2-positive, p63-positive, S100-negative, SMA-positive, partially vimentin-positive, with a Ki-67 index of 80% and negativity for ER, PgR, and HER2. Spindle-cell carcinoma was thus diagnosed. A partial right mastectomy with sentinel lymph-node biopsy was performed. Immunostaining of the resected specimen confirmed spindle cell carcinoma. The General Rules for Clinical and Pathological Recording of Breast Cancer classify spindle cell carcinoma as a special type of invasive cancer with a sarcomatoid structure, consisting of spindle-shaped cancer cells. This type of carcinoma is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancers. PMID:25731380

  7. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. PMID:27166637

  8. Microcephaly protein Asp focuses the minus ends of spindle microtubules at the pole and within the spindle

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ami

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of Drosophila melanogaster Asp, an orthologue of microcephaly protein ASPM, causes spindle pole unfocusing during mitosis. However, it remains unclear how Asp contributes to pole focusing, a process that also requires the kinesin-14 motor Ncd. We show that Asp localizes to the minus ends of spindle microtubule (MT) bundles and focuses them to make the pole independent of Ncd. We identified a critical domain in Asp exhibiting MT cross-linking activity in vitro. Asp was also localized to, and focuses the minus ends of, intraspindle MTs that were nucleated in an augmin-dependent manner and translocated toward the poles by spindle MT flux. Ncd, in contrast, functioned as a global spindle coalescence factor not limited to MT ends. We propose a revised molecular model for spindle pole focusing in which Asp at the minus ends cross-links MTs at the pole and within the spindle. Additionally, this study provides new insight into the dynamics of intraspindle MTs by using Asp as a minus end marker. PMID:26644514

  9. Microcephaly protein Asp focuses the minus ends of spindle microtubules at the pole and within the spindle.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ami; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-12-01

    Depletion of Drosophila melanogaster Asp, an orthologue of microcephaly protein ASPM, causes spindle pole unfocusing during mitosis. However, it remains unclear how Asp contributes to pole focusing, a process that also requires the kinesin-14 motor Ncd. We show that Asp localizes to the minus ends of spindle microtubule (MT) bundles and focuses them to make the pole independent of Ncd. We identified a critical domain in Asp exhibiting MT cross-linking activity in vitro. Asp was also localized to, and focuses the minus ends of, intraspindle MTs that were nucleated in an augmin-dependent manner and translocated toward the poles by spindle MT flux. Ncd, in contrast, functioned as a global spindle coalescence factor not limited to MT ends. We propose a revised molecular model for spindle pole focusing in which Asp at the minus ends cross-links MTs at the pole and within the spindle. Additionally, this study provides new insight into the dynamics of intraspindle MTs by using Asp as a minus end marker. PMID:26644514

  10. Contribution of Noncentrosomal Microtubules to Spindle Assembly in Drosophila Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Previous data suggested that anastral spindles, morphologically similar to those found in oocytes, can assemble in a centrosome-independent manner in cells that contain centrosomes. It is assumed that the microtubules that build these acentrosomal spindles originate over the chromatin. However, the actual processes of centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, polymerisation, and sorting have not been documented in centrosome-containing cells. We have identified two experimental conditions in which centrosomes are kept close to the plasma membrane, away from the nuclear region, throughout meiosis I in Drosophila spermatocytes. Time-lapse confocal microscopy of these cells labelled with fluorescent chimeras reveals centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, growth, and sorting into a bipolar spindle array over the nuclear region, away from the asters. The onset of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation is significantly delayed with respect to nuclear envelope breakdown and coincides with the end of chromosome condensation. It takes place in foci that are close to the membranes that ensheath the nuclear region, not over the condensed chromosomes. Metaphase plates are formed in these spindles, and, in a fraction of them, some degree of polewards chromosome segregation takes place. In these cells that contain both membrane-bound asters and an anastral spindle, the orientation of the cytokinesis furrow correlates with the position of the asters and is independent of the orientation of the spindle. We conclude that the fenestrated nuclear envelope may significantly contribute to the normal process of spindle assembly in Drosophila spermatocytes. We also conclude that the anastral spindles that we have observed are not likely to provide a robust back-up able to ensure successful cell division. We propose that these anastral microtubule arrays could be a constitutive component of wild-type spindles, normally masked by the abundance of centrosome-derived microtubules

  11. Trim32 facilitates degradation of MYCN on spindle poles and induces asymmetric cell division in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a physiologic process during development and tissue homeostasis. ACD produces two unequal daughter cells: one has stem/progenitor cell activity and the other has potential for differentiation. Recent studies showed that misregulation of the balance between self-renewal and differentiation by ACD may lead to tumorigenesis in Drosophila neuroblasts. However, it is still largely unknown whether human cancer stem-like cells exhibit ACD or not. Here, using human neuroblastoma cells as an ACD model, we found that MYCN accumulates at spindle poles by GSK-3β phosphorylation during mitosis. In parallel, the ACD-related ubiquitin ligase Trim32 was recruited to spindle poles by CDK1/cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation. Trim32 interacted with MYCN at spindle poles during mitosis, facilitating proteasomal degradation of MYCN at spindle poles and inducing ACD. Trim32 also suppressed sphere formation of neuroblastoma-initiating cells, suggesting that the mechanisms of ACD produce differentiated neuroblastoma cells that will eventually die. Thus, Trim32 is a positive regulator of ACD that acts against MYCN and should be considered as a tumor-suppressor candidate. Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanisms of ACD and clarify its contributions to human tumorigenesis. PMID:25100564

  12. Mosaic isodicentric chromosome 9 with triplication (9p22-pter) and no deletion in an abnormal infant presenting with clinical features of trisomy 9; a new type of isodicentric chromosome formation

    SciTech Connect

    Batanian, J.R.; Chen, X.; Grange, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    All human isodicentric chromosomes reported thus far have shown partial or complete deletion of either the short or the long arm of the chromosome. We report a patient who had a complete isodicentric chromosome 9, in which the two long and two short arms have no deletion, but have triplication of the band p22 to pterminal. This abnormality was detected at 10% mosaicism in the blood of an infant with multiple congenital anomalies and clinical features of mosaic trisomy 9. The remaining 90% of metaphases showed one normal 9 and one abnormal monocentric 9 with an inversion triplication of the band 9p22 to 9pterminal. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome 9 painting probe (Imagnetics), and all human telomere probe (Oncor) confirmed the nature of these two abnormal 9`s, which were found in two different cell lines. FISH revealed the presence of short arm interstitial telomeric sequences that defined the borders of the extra copy of 9p22-pter. Error of replication, ligation and crossing-over within the 4 sister chromatids of chromosome 9 is the most likely explanation for the formation of this rare type of isodicentric chromosome. Parental blood chromosomes were normal. Skin fibroblast obtained post mortem failed to grow. Therefore, we can not exclude the possibility that a higher than 10% level of mosaicism of the isodicentric 9 could explain the severe clinical presentation of this patient.

  13. Abnormal proteins can form aggresome in yeast: aggresome-targeting signals and components of the machinery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Meriin, Anatoli B.; Zaarur, Nava; Romanova, Nina V.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Costello, Catherine E.; Sherman, Michael Y.

    2009-01-01

    In mammalian cells, abnormal proteins that escape proteasome-dependent degradation form small aggregates that can be transported into a centrosome-associated structure, called an aggresome. Here we demonstrate that in yeast a single aggregate formed by the huntingtin exon 1 with an expanded polyglutamine domain (103QP) represents a bona fide aggresome that colocalizes with the spindle pole body (the yeast centrosome) in a microtubule-dependent fashion. Since a polypeptide lacking the proline-rich region (P-region) of huntingtin (103Q) cannot form aggresomes, this domain serves as an aggresome-targeting signal. Coexpression of 103Q with 25QP, a soluble polypeptide that also carries the P-region, led to the recruitment of 103Q to the aggresome via formation of hetero-oligomers, indicating the aggresome targeting in trans. To identify additional factors involved in aggresome formation and targeting, we purified 103QP aggresomes and 103Q aggregates and identified the associated proteins using mass spectrometry. Among the aggresome-associated proteins we identified, Cdc48 (VCP/p97) and its cofactors, Ufd1 and Nlp4, were shown genetically to be essential for aggresome formation. The 14-3-3 protein, Bmh1, was also found to be critical for aggresome targeting. Its interaction with the huntingtin fragment and its role in aggresome formation required the huntingtin N-terminal N17 domain, adjacent to the polyQ domain. Accordingly, the huntingtin N17 domain, along with the P-region, plays a role in aggresome targeting. We also present direct genetic evidence for the protective role of aggresomes by demonstrating genetically that aggresome targeting of polyglutamine polypeptides relieves their toxicity.—Wang, Y., Meriin, A. B., Zaarur, N., Romanova, N. V., Chernoff, Y. O., Costello, C. E., Sherman, M. Y. Abnormal proteins can form aggresome in yeast: aggresome-targeting signals and components of the machinery. PMID:18854435

  14. Topography-specific spindle frequency changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep spindles, as detected on scalp electroencephalography (EEG), are considered to be markers of thalamo-cortical network integrity. Since obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a known cause of brain dysfunction, the aim of this study was to investigate sleep spindle frequency distribution in OSA. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA (11 mild and 10 moderate) were studied. A matching pursuit procedure was used for automatic detection of fast (≥13Hz) and slow (<13Hz) spindles obtained from 30min samples of NREM sleep stage 2 taken from initial, middle and final night thirds (sections I, II and III) of frontal, central and parietal scalp regions. Results Compared to non-OSA subjects, Moderate OSA patients had higher central and parietal slow spindle percentage (SSP) in all night sections studied, and higher frontal SSP in sections II and III. As the night progressed, there was a reduction in central and parietal SSP, while frontal SSP remained high. Frontal slow spindle percentage in night section III predicted OSA with good accuracy, with OSA likelihood increased by 12.1%for every SSP unit increase (OR 1.121, 95% CI 1.013 - 1.239, p=0.027). Conclusions These results are consistent with diffuse, predominantly frontal thalamo-cortical dysfunction during sleep in OSA, as more posterior brain regions appear to maintain some physiological spindle frequency modulation across the night. Displaying changes in an opposite direction to what is expected from the aging process itself, spindle frequency appears to be informative in OSA even with small sample sizes, and to represent a sensitive electrophysiological marker of brain dysfunction in OSA. PMID:22985414

  15. Multi-frequency auditory stimulation disrupts spindling activity in anesthetized animals.

    PubMed

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-02-01

    It is often implied that during the occurrence of spindle oscillations, thalamocortical neurons do not respond to signals from the outside world. Since recording of sound-evoked activity from cat auditory cortex is common during spindling this implies that sound stimulation changes the spindle-related brain state. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity recorded from cat primary auditory cortex under ketamine anesthesia during successive silence-stimulus-silence conditions were used to investigate the effect of sound on cortical spindle oscillations. Multi-frequency stimulation suppresses spindle waves, as shown by the decrease of spectral power within the spindle frequency range during stimulation as compared with the previous silent period. We show that the percentage suppression is independent of the power of the spindle waves during silence, and that the suppression of spindle power occurs very fast after stimulus onset. The global inter-spindle rhythm was not disturbed during stimulation. Spectrotemporal and correlation analysis revealed that beta waves (15-26 Hz), and to a lesser extent delta waves, were modulated by the same inter-spindle rhythm as spindle oscillations. The suppression of spindle power during stimulation had no effect on the spatial correlation of spindle waves. Firing rates increased under stimulation and spectro-temporal receptive fields could reliably be obtained. The possible mechanism of suppression of spindle waves is discussed and it is suggested that suppression likely occurs through activity of the specific auditory pathway. PMID:18164553

  16. A CEP215–HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Pavithra L.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R.; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215–HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome–spindle pole interface by the CEP215–HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  17. γ-Tubulin Ring Complexes and EB1 play antagonistic roles in microtubule dynamics and spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Bouissou, Anaїs; Vérollet, Christel; de Forges, Hélène; Haren, Laurence; Bellaїche, Yohanns; Perez, Franck; Merdes, Andreas; Raynaud-Messina, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    γ-Tubulin is critical for microtubule (MT) assembly and organization. In metazoa, this protein acts in multiprotein complexes called γ-Tubulin Ring Complexes (γ-TuRCs). While the subunits that constitute γ-Tubulin Small Complexes (γ-TuSCs), the core of the MT nucleation machinery, are essential, mutation of γ-TuRC-specific proteins in Drosophila causes sterility and morphological abnormalities via hitherto unidentified mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a role of γ-TuRCs in controlling spindle orientation independent of MT nucleation activity, both in cultured cells and in vivo, and examine a potential function for γ-TuRCs on astral MTs. γ-TuRCs locate along the length of astral MTs, and depletion of γ-TuRC-specific proteins increases MT dynamics and causes the plus-end tracking protein EB1 to redistribute along MTs. Moreover, suppression of MT dynamics through drug treatment or EB1 down-regulation rescues spindle orientation defects induced by γ-TuRC depletion. Therefore, we propose a role for γ-TuRCs in regulating spindle positioning by controlling the stability of astral MTs. PMID:24421324

  18. An Overview of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Status in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, José Henrique; Silva, Patrícia Manuela; Reis, Rita Margarida; Moura, Inês Moranguinho; Marques, Sandra; Fonseca, Joana; Monteiro, Luís Silva; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal chromosome number, or aneuploidy, is a common feature of human solid tumors, including oral cancer. Deregulated spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is thought as one of the mechanisms that drive aneuploidy. In normal cells, SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes are correctly aligned at the metaphase plate thereby ensuring genomic stability. Significantly, the activity of this checkpoint is compromised in many cancers. While mutations are rather rare, many tumors show altered expression levels of SAC components. Genomic alterations such as aneuploidy indicate a high risk of oral cancer and cancer-related mortality, and the molecular basis of these alterations is largely unknown. Yet, our knowledge on the status of SAC components in oral cancer remains sparse. In this review, we address the state of our knowledge regarding the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in oral cancer, and discuss their therapeutic relevance, focusing our analysis on the core components of SAC and its target Cdc20. PMID:24995269

  19. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters.

    PubMed

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Ujma, Péter P; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ) with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males) with an age range of 15-22 years (mean: 18 years) and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test). Slow spindles (SSs) and fast spindles (FSs) were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method (IAM). A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = 0.57; p = 0.005) was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = 0.43; p = 0.04) and amplitude (r = 0.41; p = 0.049). The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = 0.80 (p = 0.002) and r = 0.67 (p = 0.012), for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = 0.60, p = 0.04). Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unraveling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps

  20. Distribution of caveolin in the muscle spindles of human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peikert, Kevin; Kasper, Michael; May, Christian Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the location of the different members of the caveolin (cav) family in human muscle spindles. Twenty spindles of three human muscles (vastus medialis, ischiocavernosus, bulbospongiosus) from 12 cadavers were immunohistochemically stained for cav-1, cav-2, and cav-3, and the equatorial and polar regions evaluated. All layers of the outer and inner spindle capsule and all blood vessels within the spindle stained for cav-1 and cav-2. In the muscle spindle, intrafusal muscle fibres stained selectively for cav-3, but with a patchy appearance. Caveolinopathies may therefore also include changes in muscle spindle function. PMID:24660982

  1. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  2. Testing a Low-Influence Spindle Drive Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L; Wulff, T; Sedgewick, J

    2003-11-05

    Precision spindles used for diamond turning and other applications requiring low error motion generally require a drive system that ideally applies a pure torque to the rotating spindle. Frequently a frameless motor, that is, one without its own bearings, is directly coupled to the spindle to make a compact and simple system having high resonant frequencies. Although in addition to delivering drive torque, asymmetries in the motor cause it to generate disturbance loads (forces and moments) which influence the spindle error motion of the directly coupled system. This paper describes the tests and results for a particular frameless, brushless DC motor that was originally developed for military and space applications requiring very low torque ripple. Because the construction of the motor should also lead to very low disturbance loads, it was selected for use on a new diamond turning and grinding machine under developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The level of influence for this motor-spindle combination is expected to be of order one nanometer for radial and axial error motion.

  3. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Nguyen, Phuong A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  4. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Groen, Aaron C; Nguyen, Phuong A; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-10-15

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  5. Chromosome Movement in Mitosis Requires Microtubule Anchorage at Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael B.; Howard, Louisa; Compton, Duane A.

    2001-01-01

    Anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles has been proposed to bear the load of poleward forces exerted by kinetochore-associated motors so that chromosomes move toward the poles rather than the poles toward the chromosomes. To test this hypothesis, we monitored chromosome movement during mitosis after perturbation of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) and the human homologue of the KIN C motor family (HSET), two noncentrosomal proteins involved in spindle pole organization in animal cells. Perturbation of NuMA alone disrupts spindle pole organization and delays anaphase onset, but does not alter the velocity of oscillatory chromosome movement in prometaphase. Perturbation of HSET alone increases the duration of prometaphase, but does not alter the velocity of chromosome movement in prometaphase or anaphase. In contrast, simultaneous perturbation of both HSET and NuMA severely suppresses directed chromosome movement in prometaphase. Chromosomes coalesce near the center of these cells on bi-oriented spindles that lack organized poles. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy verify microtubule attachment to sister kinetochores, but this attachment fails to generate proper tension across sister kinetochores. These results demonstrate that anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles mediated by overlapping mechanisms involving both NuMA and HSET is essential for chromosome movement during mitosis. PMID:11157972

  6. A nuclear-derived proteinaceous matrix embeds the microtubule spindle apparatus during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Changfu; Rath, Uttama; Maiato, Helder; Sharp, David; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Kristen M.; Johansen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a spindle matrix has long been proposed. Whether such a structure exists, however, and what its molecular and structural composition are have remained controversial. In this study, using a live-imaging approach in Drosophila syncytial embryos, we demonstrate that nuclear proteins reorganize during mitosis to form a highly dynamic, viscous spindle matrix that embeds the microtubule spindle apparatus, stretching from pole to pole. We show that this “internal” matrix is a distinct structure from the microtubule spindle and from a lamin B–containing spindle envelope. By injection of 2000-kDa dextran, we show that the disassembling nuclear envelope does not present a diffusion barrier. Furthermore, when microtubules are depolymerized with colchicine just before metaphase the spindle matrix contracts and coalesces around the chromosomes, suggesting that microtubules act as “struts” stretching the spindle matrix. In addition, we demonstrate that the spindle matrix protein Megator requires its coiled-coil amino-terminal domain for spindle matrix localization, suggesting that specific interactions between spindle matrix molecules are necessary for them to form a complex confined to the spindle region. The demonstration of an embedding spindle matrix lays the groundwork for a more complete understanding of microtubule dynamics and of the viscoelastic properties of the spindle during cell division. PMID:22855526

  7. Self-assembly and sorting of acentrosomal microtubules by TACC3 facilitate kinetochore capture during the mitotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenxiang; Chen, Hao; Wang, Gang; Luo, Jia; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Xin, Guangwei; Xu, Nan; Guo, Xiao; Lei, Jun; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2013-09-17

    Kinetochore capture by dynamic kinetochore microtubule fibers (K fibers) is essential for proper chromosome alignment and accurate distribution of the replicated genome during cell division. Although this capture process has been extensively studied, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of this process and the proper formation of the K fibers remain largely unknown. Here we show that transforming acidic coiled-coil-containing protein 3 (TACC3) is essential for kinetochore capture and proper K-fiber formation in HeLa cells. To observe the assembly of acentrosomal microtubules more clearly, the cells were released from higher concentrations of nocodazole into zero or lower concentrations. We find that small acentrosomal TACC3-microtubule aster formation near the kinetochores and binding of the asters with the kinetochores are the initial steps of the kinetochore capture by the acentrosomal microtubules, and that the sorting of kinetochore-captured acentrosomal microtubules with centrosomal microtubules leads to the capture of kinetochore by centrosomal microtubules from both spindle poles. We demonstrate that the sorting of the TACC3-associated microtubules with the centrosomal microtubules is a crucial process for spindle assembly and chromosome movement. These findings, which are also supported in the unperturbed mitosis without nocodazole, reveal a critical TACC3-dependent acentrosomal microtubule nucleation and sorting process to regulate kinetochore-microtubule connections and provide deep insight into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome alignment. PMID:24003142

  8. CDK5RAP2 is required for spindle checkpoint function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongyun; Lv, Shuang; Wang, Haibo; Zhong, Xueyan; Liu, Bo; Wang, Bo; Liao, Ji; Li, Jing; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Xu, Xingzhi

    2009-04-15

    The combination of paclitaxel and doxorubicin is among the most successful chemotherapy regimens in cancer treatment. CDK5RAP2, when mutated, causes primary microcephaly. We show here that inhibition of CDK5RAP2 expression causes chromosome mis-segregation, fails to maintain the spindle checkpoint, and is associated with reduced expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins BUBR1 and MAD2 and an increase in chromatin-associated CDC20. CDK5RAP2 resides on the BUBR1 and MAD2 promoters and regulates their transcription. Furthermore, CDK5RAP2-knockdown cells have increased resistance to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, and this resistance is partially rescued upon restoration of CDK5RAP2 expression. Cancer cells cultured in the presence of paclitaxel or doxorubicin exhibit dramatically decreased CDK5RAP2 levels. These results suggest that CDK5RAP2 is required for spindle checkpoint function and is a common target in paclitaxel and doxorubicin resistance. PMID:19282672

  9. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur (TVS) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia.

  10. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  11. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature.

  12. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  13. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  14. A versatile multivariate image analysis pipeline reveals features of Xenopus extract spindles.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Crowder, Marina E; Helmke, Kara J; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Heald, Rebecca

    2016-04-11

    Imaging datasets are rich in quantitative information. However, few cell biologists possess the tools necessary to analyze them. Here, we present a large dataset ofXenopusextract spindle images together with an analysis pipeline designed to assess spindle morphology across a range of experimental conditions. Our analysis of different spindle types illustrates how kinetochore microtubules amplify spindle microtubule density. Extract mixing experiments reveal that some spindle features titrate, while others undergo switch-like transitions, and multivariate analysis shows the pleiotropic morphological effects of modulating the levels of TPX2, a key spindle assembly factor. We also apply our pipeline to analyze nuclear morphology in human cell culture, showing the general utility of the segmentation approach. Our analyses provide new insight into the diversity of spindle types and suggest areas for future study. The approaches outlined can be applied by other researchers studying spindle morphology and adapted with minimal modification to other experimental systems. PMID:27044897

  15. An inhibitor of the kinesin spindle protein activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway independently of p53 and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J; Diehl, Ronald E; Davide, Joseph P; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E; Arrington, Kenneth L; Lobell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors. PMID:17101792

  16. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  17. Drosophila Aurora-A kinase inhibits neuroblast self-renewal by regulating aPKC/Numb cortical polarity and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yu; Andersen, Ryan O.; Cabernard, Clemens; Manning, Laurina; Tran, Khoa D.; Lanskey, Marcus J.; Bashirullah, Arash; Doe, Chris Q.

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation is critical for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Drosophila larval neuroblasts divide asymmetrically to self-renew, and are a model system for studying stem cell self-renewal. Here we identify three mutations showing increased brain neuroblast numbers that map to the aurora-A gene, which encodes a conserved kinase implicated in human cancer. Clonal analysis and time-lapse imaging in aurora-A mutants show single neuroblasts generate multiple neuroblasts (ectopic self-renewal). This phenotype is due to two independent neuroblast defects: abnormal atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)/Numb cortical polarity and failure to align the mitotic spindle with the cortical polarity axis. numb mutant clones have ectopic neuroblasts, and Numb overexpression partially suppresses aurora-A neuroblast overgrowth (but not spindle misalignment). Conversely, mutations that disrupt spindle alignment but not cortical polarity have increased neuroblasts. We conclude that Aurora-A and Numb are novel inhibitors of neuroblast self-renewal and that spindle orientation regulates neuroblast self-renewal. PMID:17182871

  18. Sleep spindles in humans: insights from intracranial EEG and unit recordings

    PubMed Central

    Andrillon, Thomas; Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio; Fried, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Sleep spindles are an electroencephalographic (EEG) hallmark of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and are believed to mediate many sleep-related functions, from memory consolidation to cortical development. Spindles differ in location, frequency, and association with slow waves, but whether this heterogeneity may reflect different physiological processes and potentially serve different functional roles remains unclear. Here we utilized a unique opportunity to record intracranial depth EEG and single-unit activity in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients to better characterize spindle activity in human sleep. We find that spindles occur across multiple neocortical regions, and less frequently also in the parahippocampal gyrus and hippocampus. Most spindles are spatially restricted to specific brain regions. In addition, spindle frequency is topographically organized with a sharp transition around the supplementary motor area between fast (13-15Hz) centroparietal spindles often occurring with slow wave up-states, and slow (9-12Hz) frontal spindles occurring 200ms later on average. Spindle variability across regions may reflect the underlying thalamocortical projections. We also find that during individual spindles, frequency decreases within and between regions. In addition, deeper sleep is associated with a reduction in spindle occurrence and spindle frequency. Frequency changes between regions, during individual spindles, and across sleep may reflect the same phenomenon, the underlying level of thalamocortical hyperpolarization. Finally, during spindles neuronal firing rates are not consistently modulated, although some neurons exhibit phase-locked discharges. Overall, anatomical considerations can account well for regional spindle characteristics, while variable hyperpolarization levels can explain differences in spindle frequency. PMID:22159098

  19. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Ian J.; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M.; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10–16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  20. Using a quadratic parameter sinusoid model to characterize the structure of EEG sleep spindles

    PubMed Central

    Palliyali, Abdul J.; Ahmed, Mohammad N.; Ahmed, Beena

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are essentially non-stationary signals that display time and frequency-varying characteristics within their envelope, which makes it difficult to accurately identify its instantaneous frequency and amplitude. To allow a better parameterization of the structure of spindle, we propose modeling spindles using a Quadratic Parameter Sinusoid (QPS). The QPS is well suited to model spindle activity as it utilizes a quadratic representation to capture the inherent duration and frequency variations within spindles. The effectiveness of our proposed model and estimation technique was quantitatively evaluated in parameter determination experiments using simulated spindle-like signals and real spindles in the presence of background EEG. We used the QPS parameters to predict the energy and frequency of spindles with a mean accuracy of 92.34 and 97.73% respectively. We also show that the QPS parameters provide a quantification of the amplitude and frequency variations occurring within sleep spindles that can be observed visually and related to their characteristic “waxing and waning” shape. We analyze the variations in the parameters values to present how they can be used to understand the inter- and intra-participant variations in spindle structure. Finally, we present a comparison of the QPS parameters of spindles and non-spindles, which shows a substantial difference in parameter values between the two classes. PMID:25999833

  1. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-04-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule-mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  2. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  3. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  4. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    McClain, Ian J; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10-16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  5. Parietal Fast Sleep Spindle Density Decrease in Alzheimer's Disease and Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; Lauri, Giulia; Truglia, Ilaria; Cordone, Susanna; Sarasso, Simone; Scarpelli, Serena; Mangiaruga, Anastasia; D'Atri, Aurora; Tempesta, Daniela; Ferrara, Michele; Marra, Camillo; Rossini, Paolo Maria; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have identified two types of sleep spindles: fast (13–15 Hz) centroparietal and slow (11–13 Hz) frontal spindles. Alterations in spindle activity have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Only few studies have separately assessed fast and slow spindles in these patients showing a reduction of fast spindle count, but the possible local specificity of this phenomenon and its relation to cognitive decline severity are not clear. Moreover, fast and slow spindle density have never been assessed in AD/MCI. We have assessed fast and slow spindles in 15 AD patients, 15 amnesic MCI patients, and 15 healthy elderly controls (HC). Participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recording (19 cortical derivations). Spindles during nonrapid eye movements sleep were automatically detected, and spindle densities of the three groups were compared in the derivations where fast and slow spindles exhibited their maximum expression (parietal and frontal, resp.). AD and MCI patients showed a significant parietal fast spindle density decrease, positively correlated with Minimental State Examination scores. Our results suggest that AD-related changes in spindle density are specific for frequency and location, are related to cognitive decline severity, and may have an early onset in the pathology development. PMID:27066274

  6. Directly probing the mechanical properties of the spindle and its matrix

    PubMed Central

    Matov, Alexandre; Danuser, Gaudenz; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Salmon, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent models for spindle length regulation propose an elastic pole to pole spindle matrix that is sufficiently strong to bear or antagonize forces generated by microtubules and microtubule motors. We tested this hypothesis using microneedles to skewer metaphase spindles in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. Microneedle tips inserted into a spindle just outside the metaphase plate resulted in spindle movement along the interpolar axis at a velocity slightly slower than microtubule poleward flux, bringing the nearest pole toward the needle. Spindle velocity decreased near the pole, which often split apart slowly, eventually letting the spindle move completely off the needle. When two needles were inserted on either side of the metaphase plate and rapidly moved apart, there was minimal spindle deformation until they reached the poles. In contrast, needle separation in the equatorial direction rapidly increased spindle width as constant length spindle fibers pulled the poles together. These observations indicate that an isotropic spindle matrix does not make a significant mechanical contribution to metaphase spindle length determination. PMID:20176922

  7. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  8. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  9. Transient Structure Associated with the Spindle Pole Body Directs Meiotic Microtubule Reorganization in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Funaya, Charlotta; Samarasinghe, Shivanthi; Pruggnaller, Sabine; Ohta, Midori; Connolly, Yvonne; Müller, Jan; Murakami, Hiroshi; Grallert, Agnes; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Smith, Duncan; Antony, Claude; Tanaka, Kayoko

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Vigorous chromosome movements driven by cytoskeletal assemblies are a widely conserved feature of sexual differentiation to facilitate meiotic recombination. In fission yeast, this process involves the dramatic conversion of arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules (MTs), generated from multiple MT organizing centers (MTOCs), into a single radial MT (rMT) array associated with the spindle pole body (SPB), the major MTOC during meiotic prophase. The rMT is then dissolved upon the onset of meiosis I when a bipolar spindle emerges to conduct chromosome segregation. Structural features and molecular mechanisms that govern these dynamic MT rearrangements are poorly understood. Results Electron tomography of the SPBs showed that the rMT emanates from a newly recognized amorphous structure, which we term the rMTOC. The rMTOC, which resides at the cytoplasmic side of the SPB, is highly enriched in γ-tubulin reminiscent of the pericentriolar material of higher eukaryotic centrosomes. Formation of the rMTOC depends on Hrs1/Mcp6, a meiosis-specific SPB component that is located at the rMTOC. At the onset of meiosis I, Hrs1/Mcp6 is subject to strict downregulation by both proteasome-dependent degradation and phosphorylation leading to complete inactivation of the rMTOC. This ensures rMT dissolution and bipolar spindle formation. Conclusions Our study reveals the molecular basis for the transient generation of a novel MTOC, which triggers a program of MT rearrangement that is required for meiotic differentiation. PMID:22425159

  10. Potato spindle tuber viroid: the simplicity paradox resolved?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taxonomy: Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type species of the genus Posipiviroid, family Pospiviroidae. An absence of hammerhead ribozymes and the presence of a 'central conserved region' distinguish PSTVd and related viroids from members of a second viroid family, the Avsunviroidae. ...

  11. Muscle spindle activity in man during voluntary fast alternating movements.

    PubMed Central

    Hagbarth, K E; Wallen, G; Löfstedt, L

    1975-01-01

    Single unit activity in primary spindle afferent nerve fibres from finger and foot flexors was recorded with tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median and peroneal nerves of healthy subjects. During voluntary fast alternating finger and foot movements, simulating the tremor of Parkinsonism, two types of discharges were seen in the Ia afferent fibres: (1) stretch responses occurring during the flexor relaxation phases, and (2) discharges occurring during the flexor contraction phases. Contrary to the stretch responses the spindle contraction discharges could be eliminated by a partial lidocaine block of the muscle nerve proximal to the recording site, indicating that they resulted from fusimotor activation of intrafusal fibres. On the basis of the temporal relations between the beginning and end of individual EMG-bursts, the start of the spindle contraction discharges and the latency of the stretch reflex in the muscles concerned, the following conclusions were drawn: the recurrent extrafusal contractions in movements of this type are initiated by the fast direct alpha route, but individual contraction phases generally last long enough to be influenced subsequently by the coactivated fusimotor loop through the spindles. It is postulated that this gamma loop influence during alternating movements helps to keep flexor and extensor muscles working in a regular reciprocal fashion with contractions adjusted in strength to the external loads. Images PMID:125782

  12. Teaching Reading--Vision vs. the Muscle Spindles (The Proprioceptors).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caukins, Sivan Eugene, Jr.

    Literature is reviewed which discusses the role of proprioceptors in basic perceptual and motoric functions. The author cites research on the functions of the muscle spindles in controlling muscles which in turn provide energy, stimulation, and activation of the central nervous system. Research on the relation of motor functions to language…

  13. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Oren M.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed. PMID:27034850

  14. Hsp110 is required for spindle length control

    PubMed Central

    Makhnevych, Taras; Wong, Philip; Pogoutse, Oxana; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Systematic affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry analysis of N- and C-tagged cytoplasmic Hsp70/Hsp110 chaperones was used to identify new roles of Hsp70/Hsp110 in the cell. This allowed the mapping of a chaperone–protein network consisting of 1,227 unique interactions between the 9 chaperones and 473 proteins and highlighted roles for Hsp70/Hsp110 in 14 broad biological processes. Using this information, we uncovered an essential role for Hsp110 in spindle assembly and, more specifically, in modulating the activity of the widely conserved kinesin-5 motor Cin8. The role of Hsp110 Sse1 as a nucleotide exchange factor for the Hsp70 chaperones Ssa1/Ssa2 was found to be required for maintaining the proper distribution of kinesin-5 motors within the spindle, which was subsequently required for bipolar spindle assembly in S phase. These data suggest a model whereby the Hsp70–Hsp110 chaperone complex antagonizes Cin8 plus-end motility and prevents premature spindle elongation in S phase. PMID:22908312

  15. Screening tomato germplasm for resistance to potato spindle tuber viroid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, several outbreaks of a potentially devastating viroid disease on tomato in North America have caused serious concerns to tomato growers and vegetable seed industry. Several closely related viroids in the genus Pospiviroid have been identified on tomato. Among them, Potato spindle t...

  16. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Oren M; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed. PMID:27034850

  17. Primary cardiac spindle cell tumor in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Midori G.; Ames, Marisa K.; Kim, Yongbaek

    2013-01-01

    An adult Labrador retriever dog was presented with respiratory signs and heart murmur. Echocardiography and thoracic radiographs revealed a heart base mass infiltrating the left atrial wall. Microscopically, neoplastic tissues consisted of spindle cells and abundant extracellular matrix. Based on histochemical stain and immunohistochemistry, a diagnosis of primary cardiac sarcoma was made. PMID:24155460

  18. COTTON QUALITY AS AFFECTED BY CHANGES IN THE SPINDLE PICKER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 - ...

  19. Cotton quality as affected by changes in spindle speed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 to...

  20. Modelling muscle spindle dynamics for a proprioceptive prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Muscle spindles are found throughout our skeletal muscle tissue and continuously provide us with a sense of our limbs' position and motion (proprioception). This paper advances a model for generating artificial muscle spindle signals for a prosthetic limb, with the aim of one day providing amputees with a sense of feeling in their artificial limb. By utilising the Opensim biomechanical modelling package the relationship between a joint's angle and the length of surrounding muscles is estimated for a prosthetic limb. This is then applied to the established Mileusnic model to determine the associated muscle spindle firing pattern. This complete system model is then reduced to allow for a computationally efficient hardware implementation. This reduction is achieved with minimal impact on accuracy by selecting key mono-articular muscles and fitting equations to relate joint angle to muscle length. Parameter values fitting the Mileusnic model to human spindles are then proposed and validated against previously published human neural recordings. Finally, a model for fusimotor signals is also proposed based on data previously recorded from reduced animal experiments. PMID:24110089

  1. Molecular mechanisms of kinetochore capture by spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kozo; Mukae, Naomi; Dewar, Hilary; van Breugel, Mark; James, Euan K; Prescott, Alan R; Antony, Claude; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2005-04-21

    For high-fidelity chromosome segregation, kinetochores must be properly captured by spindle microtubules, but the mechanisms underlying initial kinetochore capture have remained elusive. Here we visualized individual kinetochore-microtubule interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by regulating the activity of a centromere. Kinetochores are captured by the side of microtubules extending from spindle poles, and are subsequently transported poleward along them. The microtubule extension from spindle poles requires microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins and the Ran GDP/GTP exchange factor. Distinct kinetochore components are used for kinetochore capture by microtubules and for ensuring subsequent sister kinetochore bi-orientation on the spindle. Kar3, a kinesin-14 family member, is one of the regulators that promote transport of captured kinetochores along microtubules. During such transport, kinetochores ensure that they do not slide off their associated microtubules by facilitating the conversion of microtubule dynamics from shrinkage to growth at the plus ends. This conversion is promoted by the transport of Stu2 from the captured kinetochores to the plus ends of microtubules. PMID:15846338

  2. Self-organization mechanisms in the assembly and maintenance of bipolar spindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, Kendra Stewart

    Anastral, meiotic spindles are thought to be organized differently from astral, mitotic spindles, but the field has lacked basic structural information required to describe and model them, including the location of microtubule nucleating sites and minus ends. How the various components of spindles act together to establish and maintain the dynamic bipolar structure of spindles is not understood. We measure the distributions of oriented microtubules (MTs) in metaphase anastral spindles in Xenopus extracts by fluorescence speckle microscopy and cross-correlation analysis. We localized plus ends by tubulin incorporation and combined this with the orientation data to infer the localization of minus ends. We find that minus ends are localized throughout the spindle, sparsely at the equator and at higher concentrations near the poles. This dads to the surprising conclusion that spindles contained many short MTs, not connected to the spindle poles. Based on these data, we propose a slide-and-cluster model based on four known molecular activities: MT nucleation near chromosomes, the sliding of MTs by a plus-enddirected motor, the clustering of their minus ends by a minus-end-directed motor, and the loss of MTs by dynamic instability. This work demonstrates how the interplay between two types of motors together with continual nucleation of MTs by chromosomes could organize the MTs into spindles. Our model applies to overlapping, nonkinetochore MTs in anastral spindles, and perhaps also to interpolar MTs in astral spindles. We show mathematically that the slide-and-cluster mechanism robustly forms bipolar spindles a stable steady-state length, sometimes with sharp poles. This model accounts for several experimental observations that were difficult to explain with existing models, and is the first self contained model for anastral spindle assembly, MT sliding (known as poleward flux), and spindle bistability. Our experimental results support the slide-and-cluster scenario

  3. Physical limits on kinesin-5–mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Kelsey M.; Tubman, Emily S.; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro­tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end–tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5–mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to

  4. Physical limits on kinesin-5-mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kelsey M; Tubman, Emily S; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O'Toole, Eileen T; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J

    2015-11-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro-tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end-tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5-mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to this

  5. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to silence the spindle assembly checkpoint in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tauchman, Eric C.; Boehm, Frederick J.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, duplicated sister chromatids attach to microtubules emanating from opposing sides of the bipolar spindle through large protein complexes called kinetochores. In the absence of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments, a cell surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) produces an inhibitory signal that prevents anaphase onset. Precisely how the inhibitory SAC signal is extinguished in response to microtubule attachment remains unresolved. To address this, we induced formation of hyper-stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments in human cells using a non-phosphorylatable version of the protein Hec1, a core component of the attachment machinery. We find that stable attachments are sufficient to silence the SAC in the absence of sister kinetochore bi-orientation and strikingly in the absence of detectable microtubule pulling forces or tension. Furthermore, we find that SAC satisfaction occurs despite the absence of large changes in intra-kinetochore distance, suggesting that substantial kinetochore stretching is not required for quenching the SAC signal. PMID:26620470

  7. Dissecting the roles of human BUB1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Hoek, Tim A; Tromer, Eelco; Sliedrecht, Tale; Groenewold, Vincent; Omerzu, Manja; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-08-15

    Mitotic chromosome segregation is initiated by the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and its co-activator CDC20 (forming APC/C(CDC20)). APC/C(CDC20) is inhibited by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) when chromosomes have not attached to spindle microtubules. Unattached kinetochores catalyze the formation of a diffusible APC/C(CDC20) inhibitor that comprises BUBR1 (also known as BUB1B), BUB3, MAD2 (also known as MAD2L1) and a second molecule of CDC20. Recruitment of these proteins to the kinetochore, as well as SAC activation, rely on the mitotic kinase BUB1, but the molecular mechanism by which BUB1 accomplishes this in human cells is unknown. We show that kinetochore recruitment of BUBR1 and BUB3 by BUB1 is dispensable for SAC activation. Unlike its yeast and nematode orthologs, human BUB1 does not associate stably with the MAD2 activator MAD1 (also known as MAD1L1) and, although required for accelerating the loading of MAD1 onto kinetochores, BUB1 is dispensable for the maintenance of steady-state levels of MAD1 there. Instead, we identify a 50-amino-acid segment that harbors the recently reported ABBA motif close to a KEN box as being crucial for the role of BUB1 in SAC signaling. The presence of this segment correlates with SAC activity and efficient binding of CDC20 but not of MAD1 to kinetochores. PMID:26148513

  8. A Novel Role of the Budding Yeast Separin Esp1 in Anaphase Spindle Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sanne; Segal, Marisa; Clarke, Duncan J.; Reed, Steven I.

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the metaphase–anaphase transition is initiated by the anaphase-promoting complex–dependent degradation of Pds1, whereby Esp1 is activated to promote sister chromatid separation. Although this is a fundamental step in the cell cycle, little is known about the regulation of Esp1 and how loss of cohesion is coordinated with movement of the anaphase spindle. Here, we show that Esp1 has a novel role in promoting anaphase spindle elongation. The localization of Esp1 to the spindle apparatus, analyzed by live cell imaging, is regulated in a manner consistent with a function during anaphase B. The protein accumulates in the nucleus in G2 and is mobilized onto the spindle pole bodies and spindle midzone at anaphase onset, where it persists into midanaphase. Association with Pds1 occurs during S phase and is required for efficient nuclear targeting of Esp1. Spindle association is not fully restored in pds1 mutants expressing an Esp1-nuclear localization sequence fusion protein, suggesting that Pds1 is also required to promote Esp1 spindle binding. In agreement, Pds1 interacts with the spindle at the metaphase–anaphase transition and a fraction remains at the spindle pole bodies and the spindle midzone in anaphase cells. Finally, mutational analysis reveals that the conserved COOH-terminal region of Esp1 is important for spindle interaction. PMID:11149918

  9. Comprehensive measurement and evaluation system of high-speed motorized spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dashuai; Wu, Liangsheng; Xiao, Yichuan

    2011-06-01

    Reducing the manufacturing time is the trend of high-precision manufacturing, and the precision of a work-piece is very important for manufacturing industry. The high-speed motorized spindle is the most critical part and becoming more widely used in the machine tool at present, and its precision may affect the overall performance of high-speed cutting. Most of the studies on high-speed cutting are focused on the cutting force, the vibration of the spindle and effects of the spindle's thermal deformations; hence, how to roundly measure and objectively evaluate high-speed spindle is an imminence question of it because the comprehensive dynamic properties and evaluation system of spindles directly affect the cutting ability of the whole machine tool before they are manufactured. This paper presents a comprehensive measurement and evaluation system of high-speed motorized spindle, which reflects the overall performance of motorized spindle and bases on international standard.

  10. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Maquet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way. PMID:27478649

  11. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  12. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods.

    PubMed

    Wallant, Dorothée Coppieters 't; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way. PMID:27478649

  13. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  14. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  15. A comparison of two sleep spindle detection methods based on all night averages: individually adjusted vs. fixed frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Ujma, Péter Przemyslaw; Gombos, Ferenc; Genzel, Lisa; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Simor, Péter; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin; Bódizs, Róbert

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are frequently studied for their relationship with state and trait cognitive variables, and they are thought to play an important role in sleep-related memory consolidation. Due to their frequent occurrence in NREM sleep, the detection of sleep spindles is only feasible using automatic algorithms, of which a large number is available. We compared subject averages of the spindle parameters computed by a fixed frequency (FixF) (11–13 Hz for slow spindles, 13–15 Hz for fast spindles) automatic detection algorithm and the individual adjustment method (IAM), which uses individual frequency bands for sleep spindle detection. Fast spindle duration and amplitude are strongly correlated in the two algorithms, but there is little overlap in fast spindle density and slow spindle parameters in general. The agreement between fixed and manually determined sleep spindle frequencies is limited, especially in case of slow spindles. This is the most likely reason for the poor agreement between the two detection methods in case of slow spindle parameters. Our results suggest that while various algorithms may reliably detect fast spindles, a more sophisticated algorithm primed to individual spindle frequencies is necessary for the detection of slow spindles as well as individual variations in the number of spindles in general. PMID:25741264

  16. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  17. RBM14 prevents assembly of centriolar protein complexes and maintains mitotic spindle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ashikawa, Tomoko; Hamada, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a new centriole adjacent to a pre-existing centriole occurs only once per cell cycle. Despite being crucial for genome integrity, the mechanisms controlling centriole biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we identify RBM14 as a novel suppressor of assembly of centriolar protein complexes. Depletion of RBM14 in human cells induces ectopic formation of centriolar protein complexes through function of the STIL/CPAP complex. Intriguingly, the formation of such structures seems not to require the cartwheel structure that normally acts as a scaffold for centriole formation, whereas they can retain pericentriolar material and microtubule nucleation activity. Moreover, we find that, upon RBM14 depletion, a part of the ectopic centriolar protein complexes in turn assemble into structures more akin to centrioles, presumably by incorporating HsSAS-6, a cartwheel component, and cause multipolar spindle formation. We further demonstrate that such structures assemble in the cytoplasm even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles. This study sheds light on the possibility that ectopic formation of aberrant structures related to centrioles may contribute to genome instability and tumorigenesis. PMID:25385835

  18. Attachment issues: kinetochore transformations and spindle checkpoint silencing.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kops, Geert J P L

    2016-04-01

    Cell division culminates in the segregation of duplicated chromosomes in opposite directions prior to cellular fission. This process is guarded by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents the anaphase of cell division until stable connections between spindle microtubules and the kinetochores of all chromosomes are established. The anaphase inhibitor is generated at unattached kinetochores and inhibitor production is prevented when microtubules are captured. Understanding the molecular changes in the kinetochore that are evoked by microtubule attachments is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of SAC signaling and silencing. Here, we highlight the most recent findings on these events, pinpoint some remaining mysteries, and argue for incorporating holistic views of kinetochore dynamics in order to understand SAC silencing. PMID:26947988

  19. Primary Spindle Cell Malignant Melanoma of Esophagus: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    Rawandale, Nirmalkumar A.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of esophagus is usually a metastatic tumour rather than a primary tumour. Primary malignant melanoma accounts for less than 0.2% of all esophageal neoplasm. We report a case of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus in a 69-year-old male who presented with history of dysphagia since 1 month. Radiological examinations revealed polypoidal growth at lateral aspect of esophagus. Biopsy was reported as grade III squamous cell carcinoma. Video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry gave confirmed diagnosis of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus. Though a rare entity, due to its aggressive nature and poor prognosis primary malignant melanoma should be one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with polypoidal esophageal mass lesion. Despite radical surgical treatment prognosis is extremely poor. PMID:27042502

  20. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  1. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (<1 Hz) oscillation between up and down states in cortical neurons. It is unknown whether slow oscillations are synchronous across the majority or the minority of brain regions—are they a global or local phenomenon? To examine this, we recorded simultaneously scalp EEG, intracerebral EEG, and unit firing in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients. We find that most sleep slow waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  2. Micromechanics of the Vertebrate Meiotic Spindle Examined by Stretching along the Pole-to-Pole Axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M.; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2014-01-01

    The meiotic spindle is a bipolar molecular machine that is designed to segregate duplicated chromosomes toward the opposite poles of the cell. The size and shape of the spindle are considered to be maintained by a balance of forces produced by molecular motors and microtubule assembly dynamics. Several studies have probed how mechanical perturbations of the force balance affect the spindle structure. However, the spindle’s response to a stretching force acting at the spindle pole and along its long axis, i.e., the direction in which chromosomes are segregated, has not been examined. Here, we describe a method to apply a stretching force to the metaphase spindle assembled in Xenopus egg extracts and measure the relationship between the force and the three-dimensional deformation of the spindle. We found that the spindle behaves as a Zener-type viscoelastic body when forces are applied at the spindle pole, generating a restoring force for several minutes. In addition, both the volume of the spindle and the tubulin density are conserved under the stretching force. These results provide insight into how the spindle size is maintained at metaphase. PMID:24507614

  3. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  4. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Collins, Josie K; Lane, Simon I R; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule-kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  5. Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  6. Mechanism and Regulation of Kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  7. Lanthanide co-doped paramagnetic spindle-like mesocrystals for imaging and autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Lin, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhong, Sheng-Liang; Wang, Lei; Dong, Liang; Wu, Ya-Dong; Peng, Jun; Zhang, Li; Pan, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yang; Wen, Long-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-07-21

    We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27346838

  8. An astral simulacrum of the central spindle accounts for normal, spindle-less, and anucleate cytokinesis in echinoderm embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuan-Chung; Bement, William M; Petronczki, Mark; von Dassow, George

    2014-12-15

    Cytokinesis in animal cells depends on spindle-derived spatial cues that culminate in Rho activation, and thereby actomyosin assembly, in a narrow equatorial band. Although the nature, origin, and variety of such cues have long been obscure, one component is certainly the Rho activator Ect2. Here we describe the behavior and function of Ect2 in echinoderm embryos, showing that Ect2 migrates from spindle midzone to astral microtubules in anaphase and that Ect2 shapes the pattern of Rho activation in incipient furrows. Our key finding is that Ect2 and its binding partner Cyk4 accumulate not only at normal furrows, but also at furrows that form in the absence of associated spindle, midzone, or chromosomes. In all these cases, the cell assembles essentially the same cytokinetic signaling ensemble—opposed astral microtubules decorated with Ect2 and Cyk4. We conclude that if multiple signals contribute to furrow induction in echinoderm embryos, they likely converge on the same signaling ensemble on an analogous cytoskeletal scaffold. PMID:25298401

  9. Lanthanide co-doped paramagnetic spindle-like mesocrystals for imaging and autophagy induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Lin, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhong, Sheng-Liang; Wang, Lei; Dong, Liang; Wu, Ya-Dong; Peng, Jun; Zhang, Li; Pan, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yang; Wen, Long-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy.We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Size distribution, HRTEM image and additional cellular data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03171d

  10. A three-step MTOC fragmentation mechanism facilitates bipolar spindle assembly in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Clift, Dean; Schuh, Melina

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of a bipolar microtubule spindle is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. In somatic cells, spindle bipolarity is determined by the presence of exactly two centrosomes. Remarkably, mammalian oocytes do not contain canonical centrosomes. This study reveals that mouse oocytes assemble a bipolar spindle by fragmenting multiple acentriolar microtubule-organizing centres (MTOCs) into a high number of small MTOCs to be able to then regroup and merge them into two equal spindle poles. We show that MTOCs are fragmented in a three-step process. First, PLK1 triggers a decondensation of the MTOC structure. Second, BicD2-anchored dynein stretches the MTOCs into fragmented ribbons along the nuclear envelope. Third, KIF11 further fragments the MTOCs following nuclear envelope breakdown so that they can be evenly distributed towards the two spindle poles. Failure to fragment MTOCs leads to defects in spindle assembly, which delay chromosome individualization and congression, putting the oocyte at risk of aneuploidy. PMID:26147444

  11. Live imaging of spindle pole disorganization in docetaxel-treated multicolor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaushi, Shinji . E-mail: ssaka@biochem.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Nishida, Kumi; Minamikawa, Harumi; Fukada, Takashi; Oka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Kenji

    2007-06-08

    Treatment of cells with docetaxel at low concentrations induces aberrant bipolar spindles of which two centrosomes stay at only one pole, and also induces multipolar spindles. To gain insight into the relations between centrosome impairment and structural defects of the spindle, live-cell imaging was performed on a human MDA Auro/imp/H3 cell line in which centrosomes/mitotic spindles, nuclear membrane and chromatin were simultaneously visualized by fluorescent proteins. In the presence of docetaxel at IC{sub 50} concentration, the centrosomes did not segregate, and multiple aster-like structures ectopically arose around the disappearing nuclear membrane. Those ectopic structures formed an acentrosomal pole opposing to the two-centrosomes-containing pole. In late metaphase, one pole often fragmented into multiple spindle poles, leading multipolar division. These results suggest that spindle pole fragility may be induced by centrosome impairment, and collapse of the pole may contribute to induction of aneuploid daughter cells.

  12. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  15. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  16. Large Tailed Spindle Viruses of Archaea: a New Way of Doing Viral Business

    PubMed Central

    Hochstein, Rebecca; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Engelhardt, Harald; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Viruses of Archaea continue to surprise us. Archaeal viruses have revealed new morphologies, protein folds, and gene content. This is especially true for large spindle viruses, which infect only Archaea. We present a comparison of particle morphologies, major coat protein structures, and gene content among the five characterized large spindle viruses to elucidate defining characteristics. Structural similarities and a core set of genes support the grouping of the large spindle viruses into a new superfamily. PMID:26085149

  17. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  18. Ongoing Network State Controls the Length of Sleep Spindles via Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Mátyás, Ferenc; Faradzs-Zade, Lejla; Ulbert, István; Harris, Kenneth D.; Acsády, László

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep spindles are major transient oscillations of the mammalian brain. Spindles are generated in the thalamus; however, what determines their duration is presently unclear. Here, we measured somatic activity of excitatory thalamocortical (TC) cells together with axonal activity of reciprocally coupled inhibitory reticular thalamic cells (nRTs) and quantified cycle-by-cycle alterations in their firing in vivo. We found that spindles with different durations were paralleled by distinct nRT activity, and nRT firing sharply dropped before the termination of all spindles. Both initial nRT and TC activity was correlated with spindle length, but nRT correlation was more robust. Analysis of spindles evoked by optogenetic activation of nRT showed that spindle probability, but not spindle length, was determined by the strength of the light stimulus. Our data indicate that during natural sleep a dynamically fluctuating thalamocortical network controls the duration of sleep spindles via the major inhibitory element of the circuits, the nRT. PMID:24945776

  19. Cortical dynein and asymmetric membrane elongation coordinately position the spindle in anaphase

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Cheeseman, Iain M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitotic spindle position defines the cell cleavage site during cytokinesis. However, the mechanisms that control spindle positioning to generate equal-sized daughter cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that two mechanisms act coordinately to center the spindle during anaphase in symmetrically dividing human cells. First, the spindle is positioned directly by the microtubule-based motor dynein, which we demonstrate is targeted to the cell cortex by two distinct pathways: a Gαi/LGN/NuMA-dependent pathway, and a 4.1G/R and NuMA-dependent anaphase-specific pathway. Second, we find that asymmetric plasma membrane elongation occurs in response to spindle mis-positioning to alter the cellular boundaries relative to the spindle. Asymmetric membrane elongation is promoted by chromosome-derived Ran-GTP signals that locally reduce Anillin at the growing cell cortex. In asymmetrically elongating cells, dynein-dependent spindle anchoring at the stationary cell cortex ensures proper spindle positioning. Our results reveal the anaphase-specific spindle centering systems that achieve equal-sized cell division. PMID:23870127

  20. Spindle Cell Carcinoma of the Mandibular Gingiva – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sangeeta R.; Bhandare, Prachi R.; Tripathi, Nidhi; Sridharan, Gokul

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a malignancy of epithelial origin often mimicking its mesenchymal counterpart thus posing a diagnostic challenge. It is a rare biphasic malignant tumour mostly encountered in the upper aerodigestive tract. The chief differential diagnoses of spindle cell carcinoma are true superficial sarcomas and they especially need to be differentiated from fibrosarcoma. This presentation reports a spindle cell carcinoma of the gingiva and highlights the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis. It also emphasizes the importance of accurate and thorough diagnosis of malignant spindle cell lesions to determine the appropriate therapeutic modality. PMID:27042594

  1. TCTP regulates spindle microtubule dynamics by stabilizing polar microtubules during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; You, Seung Yeop; Park, Yong Seok; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in spindle structure and function are essential for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle. Spindle dynamics are highly dependent on several microtubule-associated proteins that coordinate the dynamic behavior of microtubules, including microtubule assembly, stability and organization. Here, we show that translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a novel microtubule-associated protein that regulates spindle dynamics during meiotic maturation. TCTP was expressed and widely distributed in the cytoplasm with strong enrichment at the spindle microtubules during meiosis. TCTP was found to be phosphorylated during meiotic maturation, and was exclusively localized to the spindle poles. Knockdown of TCTP impaired spindle organization without affecting chromosome alignment. These spindle defects were mostly due to the destabilization of the polar microtubules. However, the stability of kinetochore microtubules attached to chromosomes was not affected by TCTP knockdown. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylable mutant of TCTP disturbed meiotic maturation, stabilizing the spindle microtubules. In addition, Plk1 was decreased by TCTP knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TCTP is a microtubule-associating protein required to regulate spindle microtubule dynamics during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:26802898

  2. Spindle Cell Lipoma Occurring in the Buccal Mucosa: An Unusual Location of This Benign Lipomatous Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Milhan, Noala Vicensoto Moreira; Cavalcante, Ana Sueli Rodrigues; Marques, Yonara Maria Freire Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma is a benign lipomatous neoplasm, which rarely occurs in the oral cavity. The aims of this paper are to report a case of spindle cell lipoma located in buccal mucosa and discuss the main clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical findings of this entity. Thus, we report a 4-year history of an asymptomatic smooth surface nodule in an elderly Caucasian man with clinical hypothesis of fibroma. The histopathological examination showed spindle cells, mature adipose tissue, and many mast cells in a stroma of connective tissue presenting ropey collagen fibers bundles. After immunohistochemical analysis, the final diagnosis was spindle cell lipoma. PMID:26491592

  3. Thirty years of search and capture: The complex simplicity of mitotic spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is enacted by a microtubule-based, self-assembling macromolecular machine known as the mitotic spindle. In 1986, Kirschner and Mitchison proposed that by undergoing dynamic cycles of growth and disassembly, microtubules search for chromosomes. Capture of microtubules by the kinetochores progressively connects chromosomes to the bipolar spindle. 30 years later, “search and capture” remains the cornerstone of spindle assembly. However, a variety of facilitating mechanisms such as regulation of microtubule dynamics by diffusible gradients, spatially selective motor activities, and adaptive changes in chromosome architecture have been discovered. We discuss how these mechanisms ensure that the spindle assembles rapidly and with a minimal number of errors. PMID:26668328

  4. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients. PMID:26041532

  5. Abnormal ferrite in hyper-eutectoid steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chairuangsri, T.; Edmonds, D.V.

    2000-04-19

    The microstructural characteristics of ultra-high carbon hyper-eutectoid Fe-C and Fe-C-Cu experimental steels have been examined after isothermal transformation in a range just beneath the eutectoid temperature. Particular attention was paid to the formation of so-called abnormal ferrite, which refers to coarse ferrite grains which can form, in hyper-eutectoid compositions, on the pro-eutectoid cementite before the pearlite reaction occurs. Thus it is confirmed that the abnormal ferrite is not a result of pearlite coarsening, but of austenite decomposition before the conditions for coupled growth of pearlite are established. The abnormal ferrite formed on both allotriomorphic and Widmanstaetten forms of pro-eutectoid cementite, and significantly, it was observed that the pro-eutectoid cementite continued to grow, despite being enclosed by the abnormal ferrite. Under certain conditions this could lead to the eventual formation of substantially reduced amounts of pearlite. Thus, a model for carbon redistribution that allows the proeutectoid cementite to thicken concurrently with the abnormal ferrite is presented. The orientation relationships between the abnormal ferrite and pro-eutectoid cementite were also determined and found to be close to those which have been reported between pearlitic ferrite and pearlitic cementite.

  6. Synergistic role of fission yeast Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1MOZART1 in γ-tubulin complex recruitment to mitotic spindle pole bodies and spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Toda, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In fission yeast, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC)-specific components Gfh1(GCP4), Mod21(GCP5), and Alp16(GCP6) are nonessential for cell growth. Of these deletion mutants, only alp16Δ shows synthetic lethality with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mzt1(MOZART1), a component of the γTuRC required for recruitment of the complex to microtubule-organizing centers. γ-Tubulin small complex levels at mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs, the centrosome equivalent in fungi) and microtubule levels for preanaphase spindles are significantly reduced in alp16Δ cells but not in gfh1Δ or mod21Δ cells. Furthermore, alp16Δ cells often form monopolar spindles and frequently lose a minichromosome when the spindle assembly checkpoint is inactivated. Alp16(GCP6) promotes Mzt1-dependent γTuRC recruitment to mitotic SPBs and enhances spindle microtubule assembly in a manner dependent on its expression levels. Gfh1(GCP4) and Mod21(GCP5) are not required for Alp16(GCP6)-dependent γTuRC recruitment. Mzt1 has an additional role in the activation of the γTuRC for spindle microtubule assembly. The ratio of Mzt1 to γTuRC levels for preanaphase spindles is higher than at other stages of the cell cycle. Mzt1 overproduction enhances spindle microtubule assembly without affecting γTuRC levels at mitotic SPBs. We propose that Alp16(GCP6) and Mzt1 act synergistically for efficient bipolar spindle assembly to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27053664

  7. Synergistic role of fission yeast Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1MOZART1 in γ-tubulin complex recruitment to mitotic spindle pole bodies and spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Toda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In fission yeast, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC)–specific components Gfh1GCP4, Mod21GCP5, and Alp16GCP6 are nonessential for cell growth. Of these deletion mutants, only alp16Δ shows synthetic lethality with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mzt1MOZART1, a component of the γTuRC required for recruitment of the complex to microtubule-organizing centers. γ-Tubulin small complex levels at mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs, the centrosome equivalent in fungi) and microtubule levels for preanaphase spindles are significantly reduced in alp16Δ cells but not in gfh1Δ or mod21Δ cells. Furthermore, alp16Δ cells often form monopolar spindles and frequently lose a minichromosome when the spindle assembly checkpoint is inactivated. Alp16GCP6 promotes Mzt1-dependent γTuRC recruitment to mitotic SPBs and enhances spindle microtubule assembly in a manner dependent on its expression levels. Gfh1GCP4 and Mod21GCP5 are not required for Alp16GCP6-dependent γTuRC recruitment. Mzt1 has an additional role in the activation of the γTuRC for spindle microtubule assembly. The ratio of Mzt1 to γTuRC levels for preanaphase spindles is higher than at other stages of the cell cycle. Mzt1 overproduction enhances spindle microtubule assembly without affecting γTuRC levels at mitotic SPBs. We propose that Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1 act synergistically for efficient bipolar spindle assembly to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27053664

  8. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  9. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy. PMID:20718440

  10. Unmanned Turning Force Control Based on the Spindle Drive Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Pak, Changho

    While the rough turning process is machining a workpiece at various cutting depth, the feedrate is usually selected based on the maximum depth of cut. Even if this selection can avoid power saturation or tool breakage, it is very conservative compared to the capacity of machine tools and can reduce the productivity significantly. Many adaptive control techniques have been reported that can adjust the feedrate to maintain the constant cutting force. However, these controllers are not very widely used in manufacturing industry because of the limitations in measuring the cutting force signals and selecting the appropriate cutting force level. In this paper, an unmanned turning process control system is proposed based on the spindle drive characteristics. A synthesized cutting force monitor is introduced to estimate the cutting force as accurately as a dynamometer does. The reference cutting force level as well as the feed-rate is selected considering the spindle motor characteristics. Because the cutting process is highly nonlinear, a fuzzy logic controller is applied to maintain the desired cutting force level. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system can be easily realized in CNC lathe with requiring little additional hardware.

  11. Microcystin-LR induces abnormal root development by altering microtubule organization in tissue-cultured common reed (Phragmites australis) plantlets.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Csaba; Beyer, Dániel; Erdodi, Ferenc; Serfozo, Zoltán; Székvölgyi, Lóránt; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jámbrik, Katalin; Gonda, Sándor; Kiss, Andrea; Szigeti, Zsuzsa M; Surányi, Gyula

    2009-05-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a heptapeptide cyanotoxin, known to be a potent inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases in eukaryotes. Our aim was to investigate the effect of MC-LR on the organization of microtubules and mitotic chromatin in relation to its possible effects on cell and whole organ morphology in roots of common reed (Phragmites australis). P. australis is a widespread freshwater and brackish water aquatic macrophyte, frequently exposed to phytotoxins in eutrophic waters. Reed plantlets regenerated from embryogenic calli were treated with 0.001-40 microg ml(-1) (0.001-40.2 microM) MC-LR for 2-20 days. At 0.5 microg ml(-1) MC-LR and at higher cyanotoxin concentrations, the inhibition of protein phosphatase activity by MC-LR induced alterations in reed root growth and morphology, including abnormal lateral root development and the radial swelling of cells in the elongation zone of primary and lateral roots. Both short-term (2-5 days) and long-term (10-20 days) of cyanotoxin treatment induced microtubule disruption in meristems and in the elongation and differentiation zones. Microtubule disruption was accompanied by root cell shape alteration. At concentrations of 0.5-5 microg ml(-1), MC-LR increased mitotic index at long-term exposure and induced the increase of the percentage of meristematic cells in prophase as well as telophase and cytokinesis of late mitosis. High cyanotoxin concentrations (10-40 microg ml(-1)) inhibited mitosis at as short as 2 days of exposure. The alteration of microtubule organization was observed in mitotic cells at all exposure periods studied, at cyanotoxin concentrations of 0.5-40 microg ml(-1). MC-LR induced spindle anomalies at the metaphase-anaphase transition, the formation of asymmetric anaphase spindles and abnormal sister chromatid separation. This paper reports for the first time that MC-LR induces cytoskeletal changes that lead to alterations of root architecture and development in common reed and generally, in

  12. Scalp spindles are associated with widespread intracranial activity with unexpectedly low synchrony.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-01-15

    In humans, the knowledge of intracranial correlates of spindles is mainly gathered from noninvasive neurophysiologic and functional imaging studies which provide an indirect estimate of neuronal intracranial activity. This potential limitation can be overcome by intracranial electroencephalography used in presurgical epilepsy evaluation. We investigated the intracranial correlates of scalp spindles using combined scalp and intracerebral depth electrodes covering the frontal, parietal and temporal neocortex, and the scalp and intracranial correlates of hippocampal and insula spindles in 35 pre-surgical epilepsy patients. Spindles in the scalp were accompanied by widespread cortical increases in sigma band energy (10-16 Hz): the highest percentages were observed in the frontoparietal lateral and mesial cortex, whereas in temporal lateral and mesial structures only a low or no simultaneous increase was present. This intracranial involvement during scalp spindles showed no consistent pattern, and exhibited unexpectedly low synchrony across brain regions. Hippocampal spindles were shorter and spatially restricted with a low synchrony even within the temporal lobe. Similar results were found for the insula. We suggest that the generation of spindles is under a high local cortical influence contributing to the concept of sleep as a local phenomenon and challenging the notion of spindles as widespread synchronous oscillations. PMID:25450108

  13. An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in mammalian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Banks, R W

    2006-06-01

    An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in relation to muscle mass in mammalian (mouse, rat, guinea-pig, cat, human) skeletal muscles is presented. It is shown that the trend to increasing number as muscle mass increases follows an isometric (length) relationship between species, whereas within a species, at least for the only essentially complete sample (human), the number of spindles scales, on average, with the square root rather than the cube root of muscle mass. An attempt is made to reconcile these apparently discrepant relationships. Use of the widely accepted spindle density (number of spindles g(-1) of muscle) as a measure of relative abundance of spindles in different muscles is shown to be grossly misleading. It is replaced with the residuals of the linear regression of ln spindle number against ln muscle mass. Significant differences in relative spindle abundance as measured by residuals were found between regional groups of muscles: the greatest abundance is in axial muscles, including those concerned with head position, whereas the least is in muscles of the shoulder girdle. No differences were found between large and small muscles operating in parallel, or between antigravity and non-antigravity muscles. For proximal vs. distal muscles, spindles were significantly less abundant in the hand than the arm, but there was no difference between the foot and the leg. PMID:16761976

  14. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  15. Accurate measurement of poleward microtubule flux in the spindle of Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Munzarova, Alina; Popova, Julia; Razuvaeva, Alena; Shloma, Victor; Gatti, Maurizio; Omelyanchuk, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    The spindle microtubule (MT) flux is the continuous translocation of MTs toward the spindle poles caused by MT polymerization at plus ends coupled to depolymerization at minus ends. Poleward flux is observed in both mitotic and meiotic spindles; it is evolutionarily conserved and contributes to the regulation of spindle length and anaphase chromosome movement. MT photobleaching is a tool frequently used to measure poleward flux. Spindles containing fluorescently tagged tubulin are photobleached to generate a non-fluorescent stripe, which moves toward the spindle poles allowing a measure of the flux. However, this method only permits rapid measurements of the flux, because the fluorescence of the bleached stripe recovers rapidly due to the spindle MT turnover. Here, we describe a modification of the current photobleaching-based method for flux measurement. We photobleached two large areas at the opposite sides of the metaphase plate in spindles of Drosophila S2 cells expressing Cherry-tagged tubulin, leaving unbleached only the area near the chromosomes. We then measured the speed with which the fluorescent MTs move toward the poles. We found that this method allows a measure of the flux over a two- to threefold longer time than the "single stripe" method, providing a reliable evaluation of the flux rate. PMID:27317357

  16. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception.

    PubMed

    Normand, Marie-Pier; St-Hilaire, Patrick; Bastien, Célyne H

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  17. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Suzanna L; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  18. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  19. Sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit)-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yu; Li, Qiuyu; Yu, Min

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile hydrothermal method for the synthesis of uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors with the assistance of sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit). - Highlights: • Well-crystallized spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors have been synthesized. • The influence of the reaction temperature and reaction time were clearly shown. • The dosage of Na{sub 3}Cit has a strong effect on the spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors. • The growth mechanism for the formation of final samples was proposed. - Abstract: Highly uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors have been prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit) as the chelating reagent. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to characterize the resulting samples. The dosage of sodium citrate, reaction temperature and reaction time play key roles in the formation of the final samples. The possible formation mechanism for SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors has been proposed. Upon excitation by ultraviolet radiation, the as-synthesized SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors show the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 1, 2, 3, 4) emission lines with red emission {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub 2} (613 nm) as the most prominent group.

  20. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 regulates the proliferation of oral adenosquamous carcinoma CAL-27 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma is very poor due to local recurrence and metastasis. This study explores the molecular events involved in oral carcinoma with the goal of developing novel therapeutic strategies. The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for the accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is a microtubule-binding subcomplex of the outer kinetochore that is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In recent years, much attention has been focused on determining how SKA proteins interact with each other, as well as their biological role in cancer cells. However, the precise role of SKA1 in oral carcinoma remains unknown. Methods In order to investigate the role of SKA1 in oral cancer, we employed lentivirus-mediated shRNA to silence SKA1 expression in the CAL-27 human oral adenosquamous carcinoma cell line. Results Depletion of SKA1 in CAL-27 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation, as determined by MTT and colony formation assays. These results strongly demonstrate that reduced SKA1 protein levels may cause inhibition of tumor formation. The shRNA-mediated depletion of SKA1 also led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Conclusion This is the first report to show that SKA1 plays an important role in the progression of oral adenosqamous carcinoma. Thus, silencing of SKA1 by RNAi might be a potential therapy for this disease. PMID:23962337

  1. Multiple spindle cell lipomas: a report of 7 familial and 11 nonfamilial cases.

    PubMed

    Fanburg-Smith, J C; Devaney, K O; Miettinen, M; Weiss, S W

    1998-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma, a variant of a benign lipoma, usually occurs as a solitary, subcutaneous, circumscribed lesion in the posterior back, neck, or shoulders of older men. Multiple lesions are exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, there have been no previous series reported of patients with multiple subcutaneous spindle cell lipomas. We examine the clinicopathologic findings of a group of patients with multiple spindle cell lipomas, including seven with a familial occurrence of this disease. The Soft Tissue Registry of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and the consultation files of one of the authors (S.W.W.) from the Department of Pathology at the University of Michigan were searched for patients with multiple spindle cell lipomas. All patients' records, clinical history, and pathology were reviewed. All patients had a minimum of two tumors that met strict morphologic criteria for spindle cell lipoma. Pleomorphic cells, typical of pleomorphic lipoma, were observed in some cases and were acceptable as part of the spectrum of spindle cell lipomas. Associated lesions, family history, ethnic background, daily habits, and natural progression of disease were recorded and compared. Eighteen patients in our files met the criteria for multiple spindle cell lipomas; 4 of the 18 patients were from the same family. Three additional patients had a family history of multiple spindle cell lipomas. The ratio of patients with multiple spindle cell lipomas to all patients with spindle cell lipoma in the two consultation files was 0.5 and 3%, respectively. All of the patients in our study were male; three had a family history of females with less severe disease (fewer and smaller spindle cell lipomas); however, no material from these female patients was available for review. All but four patients presented in their sixth through eighth decades of life; yet, several older patients stated that their first lesion occurred in their fifth decade. Patients had between 2 and >220

  2. Minimizing Thermal Deformation of Aerostatic Spindle System by Temperature Control of Supply Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hayato; Matsumura, Shimpei; Hashizume, Hitoshi; Shinno, Hidenori

    Aerostatic spindle systems have been widely used in many machine tools due to their low heat generation and high-speed capability. To meet industrial demands for higher accuracy and higher productivity, such spindle systems have recently become important as the kernel component in an ultraprecision machine tool. In this study, therefore, thermal deformation control for aerostatic spindle systems has been proposed considering heat balance in an objective spindle bearing system. In the proposed method, the temperature of supply air is controlled by monitoring that of exhaust air to minimize the thermal deformation of the spindle. The performance of the thermal deformation control system developed has been evaluated through a series of actual experiments.

  3. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  4. Drosophila parthenogenesis: A tool to decipher centrosomal vs acentrosomal spindle assembly pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano

    2008-04-15

    Development of unfertilized eggs in the parthenogenetic strain K23-O-im of Drosophila mercatorum requires the stochastic interactions of self-assembled centrosomes with the female chromatin. In a portion of the unfertilized eggs that do not assemble centrosomes, microtubules organize a bipolar anastral mitotic spindle around the chromatin like the one formed during the first female meiosis, suggesting that similar pathways may be operative. In the cytoplasm of eggs in which centrosomes do form, monastral and biastral spindles are found. Analysis by laser scanning confocal microscopy suggests that these spindles are derived from the stochastic interaction of astral microtubules directly with kinetochore regions or indirectly with kinetochore microtubules. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic spindle assembly requires both acentrosomal and centrosomal pathways, strengthening the hypothesis that astral microtubules can dictate the organization of the spindle by capturing kinetochore microtubules.

  5. Evaluating the use of line length for automatic sleep spindle detection.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are transient waveforms observed on the electroencephalogram (EEG) during the N2 stage of sleep. In this paper we evaluate the use of line length, an efficient and low-complexity time domain feature, for automatic detection of sleep spindles. We use this feature with a simple algorithm to detect spindles achieving sensitivity of 83.6% and specificity of 87.9%. We also present a comparison of these results with other spindle detection methods evaluated on the same dataset. Further, we implemented the algorithm on a MSP430 microcontroller achieving a power consumption of 56.7 μW. The overall detection performance, combined with the low power consumption show that line length could be a useful feature for detecting sleep spindles in wearable and resource-constrained systems. PMID:25571121

  6. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  7. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division. PMID:27230381

  8. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  9. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura B; Sockeel, Stéphane; Soon, Melissa; Bore, Arnaud; Myhr, Ayako; Stojanoski, Bobby; Cusack, Rhodri; Owen, Adrian M; Doyon, Julien; Fogel, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    A spindle detection method was developed that: (1) extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma) relative to ongoing "background" sigma activity using complex demodulation, (2) accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and (3) employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60 s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile). Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11-16 Hz) filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles. PMID:26441604

  10. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Laura B.; Sockeel, Stéphane; Soon, Melissa; Bore, Arnaud; Myhr, Ayako; Stojanoski, Bobby; Cusack, Rhodri; Owen, Adrian M.; Doyon, Julien; Fogel, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    A spindle detection method was developed that: (1) extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma) relative to ongoing “background” sigma activity using complex demodulation, (2) accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and (3) employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60 s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile). Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11–16 Hz) filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles. PMID:26441604

  11. The regularity of primary and secondary muscle spindle afferent discharges

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P. B. C.; Stein, R. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. The patterns of nerve impulses in the afferent fibres from muscle spindles have been studied using the soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat. Impulses from up to five single units were recorded simultaneously on magnetic tape, while the muscle was stretched to a series of different lengths. Various statistics were later determined by computer analysis. 2. After the ventral roots were cut to eliminate any motor outflow to the muscle spindles, both primary and secondary spindle endings discharged very regularly. At frequencies around 30 impulses/sec the coefficient of variation of the interspike interval distributions had a mean value of only 0·02 for the secondary endings and 0·058 for the primary endings. The values obtained for the two kinds of ending did not overlap. 3. When the ventral roots were intact, the `spontaneous' fusimotor activity considerably increased the variability of both kinds of endings. Secondary endings still discharged much more regularly than primary endings, even when the fusimotor activity increased the frequency of firing equally for the two kinds of endings. At frequencies around 30/sec the average coefficient of variation of the interval distributions was then 0·064 for the secondary endings and 0·25 for the primary endings. 4. When the ventral roots were intact there was usually an inverse relation between the values of successive interspike intervals. The first serial correlation coefficient often had values down to - 0·6 for both kinds of ending. Higher order serial correlation coefficients were also computed. 5. Approximate calculations, based on the variability observed when the ventral roots were intact, suggested that when the length of the muscle was constant an observer analysing a 1 sec period of discharge from a single primary ending would only be able to distinguish about six different lengths of the muscle. The corresponding figure for a secondary ending was twenty-five lengths. 6. The increase in variability with

  12. Modal identification of spindle-tool unit in high-speed machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnol, Vincent; Le, Thien-Phu; Ray, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    The accurate knowledge of high-speed motorised spindle dynamic behaviour during machining is important in order to ensure the reliability of machine tools in service and the quality of machined parts. More specifically, the prediction of stable cutting regions, which is a critical requirement for high-speed milling operations, requires the accurate estimation of tool/holder/spindle set dynamic modal parameters. These estimations are generally obtained through Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements of the non-rotating spindle. However, significant changes in modal parameters are expected to occur during operation, due to high-speed spindle rotation. The spindle's modal variations are highlighted through an integrated finite element model of the dynamic high-speed spindle-bearing system, taking into account rotor dynamics effects. The dependency of dynamic behaviour on speed range is then investigated and determined with accuracy. The objective of the proposed paper is to validate these numerical results through an experiment-based approach. Hence, an experimental setup is elaborated to measure rotating tool vibration during the machining operation in order to determine the spindle's modal frequency variation with respect to spindle speed in an industrial environment. The identification of natural frequencies of the spindle under rotating conditions is challenging, due to the low number of sensors and the presence of many harmonics in the measured signals. In order to overcome these issues and to extract the characteristics of the system, the spindle modes are determined through a 3-step procedure. First, spindle modes are highlighted using the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique, with a new formulation at the considered rotating speed. These extracted modes are then analysed through the value of their respective damping ratios in order to separate the harmonics component from structural spindle natural frequencies. Finally, the stochastic

  13. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  15. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  16. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  17. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  18. Effect of opiates on the caudate spindle in the cat.

    PubMed

    Janicki, P K; Libich, J; Gumulka, W S

    1981-01-01

    The effect of opiate drugs on the caudate spindle (CS) in the cat was observed following both systemic and intracaudal administration. Systemic administration of morphine, pentazocine and pethidine inhibited the CS. The inhibitory effects of opiates were antagonized by lysergide and methysergide but not by naloxone, chlorpromazine, dehydrobenzperidol, amphetamine and atropine. Contrary to their systemic administration, the investigated opiates morphine, pentazocine, pethidine and Met5-Enkephaline enhanced the CS, when injected into the caudate nucleus close to the site of stimulation. Those facilitating effects of opiates on the CS were completely blocked by naloxone. The results suggest that serotoninergic mechanisms might be involved in the action of opiates on the neuronal activity of the caudate nucleus. PMID:6273943

  19. Mimicking Ndc80 phosphorylation triggers spindle assembly checkpoint signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Stefan; Stach, Manuel; Knapp, Maria; Ortiz, Jennifer; Pfannstiel, Jens; Ruppert, Thomas; Lechner, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase Mps1 is, among others, essential for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mps1 interacts physically with the N-terminal domain of Ndc80 (Ndc801−257), a constituent of the Ndc80 kinetochore complex. Furthermore, Mps1 effectively phosphorylates Ndc801−257 in vitro and facilitates Ndc80 phosphorylation in vivo. Mutating 14 of the phosphorylation sites to alanine results in compromised checkpoint signalling upon nocodazole treatment of mutants. Mutating the identical sites to aspartate (to simulate constitutive phosphorylation) causes a metaphase arrest with wild-type-like bipolar kinetochore–microtubule attachment. This arrest is due to a constitutively active SAC and consequently the inviable aspartate mutant can be rescued by disrupting SAC signalling. Therefore, we conclude that a putative Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of Ndc80 is important for SAC activation at kinetochores. PMID:19300438

  20. Behavior of some sealing arrangements for machine tool spindles

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, M.L.; Colton, M.W.; Cusano, C.

    1995-09-01

    A test stand has been built and instrumented to simulate conditions in the spindle cavity of production machine tools, such as high-speed transfer machines, machining centers, milling machines, etc. The purpose of the simulation is to better understand causes of premature support rolling element bearing failures due to grease degradation and corrosion, from the ingress of coolant vapor. Performance characteristics based on coolant vapor in the test chamber, as measured by relative humidity, chamber temperature and chamber pressure relative to the lab atmosphere were obtained for a radial double-lip seal, labyrinth seal, viscoseal/face seal combination and a mechanical face seal. For the operating conditions considered, the best performance was obtained from the viscoseal/face combination followed by the labyrinth seal. 14 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse

    PubMed Central

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-01-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres. PMID:21208206

  2. Targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sandra; Fonseca, Joana; Silva, Patrícia M A; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. As in other malignancies, aneuploidy is a common feature of breast cancer and influences its behavior. Aneuploidy has been linked to inappropriate activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a surveillance mechanism that, in normal cells, prevents anaphase onset until correct alignment of all chromosomes at the metaphase is achieved. Interestingly, the widely used anti-microtubule drugs, vinca alkaloids and taxanes, kill cancer cells through chronic arrest in mitosis as a consequence of chronic SAC activation. Deregulated SAC has been reported in breast cancer in many reports and presents an attractive therapeutic strategy. We present here a review of the current knowledge on the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in breast cancer, and discuss the potential of SAC components as targets for breast cancer therapies. PMID:25731686

  3. On the evolution of ac machines for spindle drive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fratta, A.; Vagati, A.; Villata, F. )

    1992-10-01

    In the field of ac spindle drives, the induction motor is widely adopted. Synchronous solutions (reluctance, interior permanent magnets) are often suggested to overcome some drawbacks of the induction motor. This paper compares the different options by considering the machine torque-density and the inverter power size needed for a given constant-power speed range. It is shown that an axially laminated reluctance motor gives more torque density than the induction motor but nearly requires the same inverter size. By adding a proper quantity of permanent magnets, the inverter size can be greatly reduced. A comprehensive discussion is made on this subject, aiming to point out a design solution that is 'optimal' for the whole drive.

  4. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  5. Aurora A kinase regulates proper spindle positioning in C. elegans and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kotak, Sachin; Afshar, Katayon; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Accurate spindle positioning is essential for error-free cell division. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven instrumental for dissecting mechanisms governing spindle positioning. Despite important progress, how the cortical forces that act on astral microtubules to properly position the spindle are modulated is incompletely understood. Here, we report that the PP6 phosphatase PPH-6 and its associated subunit SAPS-1, which positively regulate pulling forces acting on spindle poles, associate with the Aurora A kinase AIR-1 in C. elegans embryos. We show that acute inactivation of AIR-1 during mitosis results in excess pulling forces on astral microtubules. Furthermore, we uncover that AIR-1 acts downstream of PPH-6-SAPS-1 in modulating spindle positioning, and that PPH-6-SAPS-1 negatively regulates AIR-1 localization at the cell cortex. Moreover, we show that Aurora A and the PP6 phosphatase subunit PPP6C are also necessary for spindle positioning in human cells. There, Aurora A is needed for the cortical localization of NuMA and dynein during mitosis. Overall, our work demonstrates that Aurora A kinases and PP6 phosphatases have an ancient function in modulating spindle positioning, thus contributing to faithful cell division. PMID:27335426

  6. A new method to measure circular runout of end-milling spindle based on cutting mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianlai; Liu, Shuchun

    2008-12-01

    A practical method is introduced to measure the circular runout of a end-milling spindle system at high speed rotations without the need of a reference sphere. A workpiece is held on a linear slide which moves along the axial direction of the spindle. The spindle is then programmed to run at a specific speed. A very sharp edge cutter must be used and the depth of cut will be very shallow in order to keep the cutting force very small. The workpiece is then fed into the end mill in order to make a cutting mark of teens μm in depth. The cutting marks are circular, and their diameters are related to the circular runout of the spindle system. The cutting mark that is generated at a specific speed is expected to contain information about the spindle circular runout at this speed. In practice the cutting marks are not perfectly circular. Therefore, a best-fit circle of a cutting mark is needed to determine its diameter. A high-resolution edge detector machine is used for this purpose. Quantitative precision analysis was carried out to confirm the accuracy and repeatability of this new measurement technique. It is demonstrated that this technique for the measurement of spindle circular runout is an effective tool in verifying the actual running accuracy of spindles at their actual operating speeds and can be accomplished without the need for a reference sphere.

  7. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  8. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  9. An Assessment of Six Muscle Spindle Models for Predicting Sensory Information during Human Wrist Movements

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Puja; Jabakhanji, Nuha; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The muscle spindle is an important sensory organ for proprioceptive information, yet there have been few attempts to use Shannon information theory to quantify the capacity of human muscle spindles to encode sensory input. Methods: Computer simulations linked kinematics, to biomechanics, to six muscle spindle models that generated predictions of firing rate. The predicted firing rates were compared to firing rates of human muscle spindles recorded during a step-tracking (center-out) task to validate their use. The models were then used to predict firing rates during random movements with statistical properties matched to the ergonomics of human wrist movements. The data were analyzed for entropy and mutual information. Results: Three of the six models produced predictions that approximated the firing rate of human spindles during the step-tracking task. For simulated random movements these models predicted mean rates of 16.0 ± 4.1 imp/s (mean ± SD), peak firing rates <50 imp/s and zero firing rate during an average of 25% of the movement. The average entropy of the neural response was 4.1 ± 0.3 bits and is an estimate of the maximum information that could be carried by muscles spindles during ecologically valid movements. The information about tendon displacement preserved in the neural response was 0.10 ± 0.05 bits per symbol; whereas 1.25 ± 0.30 bits per symbol of velocity input were preserved in the neural response of the spindle models. Conclusions: Muscle spindle models, originally based on cat experiments, have predictive value for modeling responses of human muscle spindles with minimal parameter optimization. These models predict more than 10-fold more velocity over length information encoding during ecologically valid movements. These results establish theoretical parameters for developing neuroprostheses for proprioceptive function. PMID:26834618

  10. Automatic sleep spindle detection: benchmarking with fine temporal resolution using open science tools

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Christian; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindle properties index cognitive faculties such as memory consolidation and diseases such as major depression. For this reason, scoring sleep spindle properties in polysomnographic recordings has become an important activity in both research and clinical settings. The tediousness of this manual task has motivated efforts for its automation. Although some progress has been made, increasing the temporal accuracy of spindle scoring and improving the performance assessment methodology are two aspects needing more attention. In this paper, four open-access automated spindle detectors with fine temporal resolution are proposed and tested against expert scoring of two proprietary and two open-access databases. Results highlight several findings: (1) that expert scoring and polysomnographic databases are important confounders when comparing the performance of spindle detectors tested using different databases or scorings; (2) because spindles are sparse events, specificity estimates are potentially misleading for assessing automated detector performance; (3) reporting the performance of spindle detectors exclusively with sensitivity and specificity estimates, as is often seen in the literature, is insufficient; including sensitivity, precision and a more comprehensive statistic such as Matthew's correlation coefficient, F1-score, or Cohen's κ is necessary for adequate evaluation; (4) reporting statistics for some reasonable range of decision thresholds provides a much more complete and useful benchmarking; (5) performance differences between tested automated detectors were found to be similar to those between available expert scorings; (6) much more development is needed to effectively compare the performance of spindle detectors developed by different research teams. Finally, this work clarifies a long-standing but only seldomly posed question regarding whether expert scoring truly is a reliable gold standard for sleep spindle assessment. PMID:26157375

  11. Slow Sleep Spindle Activity, Declarative Memory, and General Cognitive Abilities in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hoedlmoser, Kerstin; Heib, Dominik P.J.; Roell, Judith; Peigneux, Philippe; Sadeh, Avi; Gruber, Georg; Schabus, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Functional interactions between sleep spindle activity, declarative memory consolidation, and general cognitive abilities in school-aged children. Design: Healthy, prepubertal children (n = 63; mean age 9.56 ± 0.76 y); ambulatory all-night polysomnography (2 nights); investigating the effect of prior learning (word pair association task; experimental night) versus nonlearning (baseline night) on sleep spindle activity; general cognitive abilities assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). Measurements and Results: Analysis of spindle activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep (N2 and N3) evidenced predominant peaks in the slow (11-13 Hz) but not in the fast (13-15 Hz) sleep spindle frequency range (baseline and experimental night). Analyses were restricted to slow sleep spindles. Changes in spindle activity from the baseline to the experimental night were not associated with the overnight change in the number of recalled words reflecting declarative memory consolidation. Children with higher sleep spindle activity as measured at frontal, central, parietal, and occipital sites during both baseline and experimental nights exhibited higher general cognitive abilities (WISC-IV) and declarative learning efficiency (i.e., number of recalled words before and after sleep). Conclusions: Slow sleep spindles (11-13 Hz) in children age 8–11 y are associated with inter-individual differences in general cognitive abilities and learning efficiency. Citation: Hoedlmoser K, Heib DPJ, Roell J, Peigneux P, Sadeh A, Gruber G, Schabus M. Slow sleep spindle activity, declarative memory, and general cognitive abilities in children. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1501-1512. PMID:25142558

  12. The Bub1–Plk1 kinase complex promotes spindle checkpoint signalling through Cdc20 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint senses unattached kinetochores and inhibits the Cdc20-bound anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), to delay anaphase, thereby preventing aneuploidy. A critical checkpoint inhibitor of APC/CCdc20 is the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). It is unclear whether MCC suffices to inhibit all cellular APC/C. Here we show that human checkpoint kinase Bub1 not only directly phosphorylates Cdc20, but also scaffolds Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of Cdc20 by Bub1–Plk1 inhibits APC/CCdc20 in vitro and is required for checkpoint signalling in human cells. Bub1–Plk1-dependent Cdc20 phosphorylation is regulated by upstream checkpoint signals and is dispensable for MCC assembly. A phospho-mimicking Cdc20 mutant restores nocodazole-induced mitotic arrest in cells depleted of Mad2 or BubR1. Thus, Bub1–Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20 constitutes an APC/C-inhibitory mechanism that is parallel, but not redundant, to MCC formation. Both mechanisms are required to sustain mitotic arrest in response to spindle defects. PMID:26912231

  13. Rediscovery of the nucleolinus, a dynamic RNA-rich organelle associated with the nucleolus, spindle, and centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alliegro, Mary Anne; Henry, Jonathan J.; Alliegro, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleolinus is an RNA-rich compartment, closely apposed to or embedded within the nucleolus. Discovered over 150 y ago, fewer than two dozen articles have been published on the nucleolinus, probably because complex histochemical stains are required for its visualization in the great majority of cells. The nucleolinus has been reported in invertebrate oocytes, mammalian and amphibian epithelial cells, neurons, and several transformed cell lines. A prominent nucleolinus, clearly visible with transmitted light microscopes at 10× magnification, is present in each oocyte of the surf clam, Spisula solidissima. We observed a consistent relationship between the nucleolinus and the developing meiotic apparatus following Spisula oocyte activation. Through sonication and sucrose gradient fractionation of purified oocyte nuclei, we isolated nucleolini, extracted their RNA, and prepared an in situ riboprobe (NLi-1), which is associated specifically with the nucleolinus, confirming its unique composition. Other in situ observations revealed a NLi-1 and nucleolinar association with the developing spindle and centrosomes. Laser microsurgery that targeted the nucleolinus resulted in failed meiotic cell division in parthenogenetically activated oocytes and failed mitosis in fertilized oocytes. Although the nucleolinus may be a forgotten organelle, its demonstrated role in spindle formation suggests it deserves renewed attention. PMID:20643950

  14. Bisphenol A disrupts microtubules and induces multipolar spindles in dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    The effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine chemical disruptor extensively used in the plastic and epoxy resin industry, on dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica Loudon were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after tubulin and endoplasmic reticulum immunolocalization and DNA staining. Microtubule arrays of all mitotic stages were disrupted within a few hours of treatment: preprophase bands exhibited asymmetric width; prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase spindles appeared sharply pointed, sigmoid or multipolar; phragmoplast microtubules were elongated and occasionally bended toward the daughter nuclei. Depending on the mitotic stage, the chromosomes appeared condensed at prophase, as a compact mass at metaphase and anaphase, unsegregated or bridged at telophase. Endoplasmic reticulum patterns were also affected, reflecting those of the respective microtubule arrays. Recovery of the microtubules after oryzalin treatment was more effective in a BPA solution than in water. It is concluded that the plant mitotic apparatus microtubules are very sensitive to BPA, the effect of which depends on the specific cell cycle stage. The formation of multipolar spindles is reminiscent of animal cells and is ascribed to the induction of multiple microtubule nucleation sites, deriving from the centrosomal properties of gymnosperms. PMID:26855225

  15. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  17. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    CpG‐island methylator phenotype (CIMP)‐positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole‐exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two‐dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP‐negative and 14 CIMP‐positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non‐cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule‐associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non‐synonymous single‐nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP‐positive RCCs, whereas CIMP‐negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP‐positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the “The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10−6),” “Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10−6)” and “Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10−6)” pathways. Quantitative RT‐PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP‐positive than in CIMP‐negative RCCs. All CIMP‐positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential

  18. Self-Organization of Anastral Spindles by Synergy of Dynamic Instability, Autocatalytic Microtubule Production, and a Spatial Signaling Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Thomas; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Assembly of the mitotic spindle is a classic example of macromolecular self-organization. During spindle assembly, microtubules (MTs) accumulate around chromatin. In centrosomal spindles, centrosomes at the spindle poles are the dominating source of MT production. However, many systems assemble anastral spindles, i.e., spindles without centrosomes at the poles. How anastral spindles produce and maintain a high concentration of MTs in the absence of centrosome-catalyzed MT production is unknown. With a combined biochemistry-computer simulation approach, we show that the concerted activity of three components can efficiently concentrate microtubules (MTs) at chromatin: (1) an external stimulus in form of a RanGTP gradient centered on chromatin, (2) a feed-back loop where MTs induce production of new MTs, and (3) continuous re-organization of MT structures by dynamic instability. The mechanism proposed here can generate and maintain a dissipative MT super-structure within a RanGTP gradient. PMID:17330139

  19. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  20. The Catastrophe-promoting Activity of Ectopic Op18/Stathmin Is Required for Disruption of Mitotic Spindles But Not Interphase Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Per; Larsson, Niklas; Segerman, Bo; Howell, Bonnie; Morabito, Justin; Cassimeris, Lynne; Gullberg, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Oncoprotein18/stathmin (Op18) is a microtubule (MT) destabilizing protein that is inactivated during mitosis by phosphorylation at four Ser-residues. Op18 has at least two functions; the N-terminal region is required for catastrophe-promotion (i.e., transition from elongation to shortening), while the C-terminal region is required to inhibit MT-polymerization rate in vitro. We show here that a “pseudophosphorylation” derivative of Op18 (i.e., four Ser- to Glu-substitutions at phosphorylation sites) exhibits a selective loss of catastrophe-promoting activity. This is contrasted to authentic phosphorylation, which efficiently attenuates all activities except tubulin binding. In intact cells, overexpression of pseudophosphorylated Op18, which is not phosphorylated by endogenous kinases, is shown to destabilize interphase MTs but to leave spindle formation untouched. To test if the mitotic spindle is sensitive only to the catastrophe-promoting activity of Op18 and resistant to C-terminally associated activities, N- and C-terminal truncations with defined activity-profiles were employed. The cell-cycle phenotypes of nonphosphorylatable mutants (i.e., four Ser- to Ala-substitutions) of these truncation derivatives demonstrated that catastrophe promotion is required for interference with the mitotic spindle, while the C-terminally associated activities are sufficient to destabilize interphase MTs. These results demonstrate that specific Op18 derivatives with defined activity-profiles can be used as probes to distinguish interphase and mitotic MTs. PMID:11160824

  1. Formation of the tetraploid intermediate is associated with the development of cells with more than four centrioles in the elastase-simian virus 40 tumor antigen transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, D S; Sanchez, C A; Rabinovitch, P S; Reid, B J

    1991-01-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer in transgenic mice expressing the simian virus 40 tumor antigen placed under controlling regions of the elastase I gene is characterized by the sequential appearance of tetraploid and then multiple aneuploid cell populations. Pancreatic tissues from such transgenic mice were studied between 8 and 32 days of age. Virtually 100% of acinar cell nuclei had immunohistochemically detectable tumor antigen by 18 days. Tetraploid cells were demonstrated by DNA content flow cytometry by 20 days and were associated with the appearance of interphase cells that had 5-11 centrioles per cell in single thin sections of pancreatic tissue examined by electron microscopy. Mitotic cells also were observed that had 5 or more centrioles per cell that were incorporated into the poles of bipolar or at least tripolar spindle apparatuses. These observations indicate that formation of the tetraploid intermediate in the diploid----tetraploid----aneuploid sequence of pancreatic tumor formation in elastase-simian virus 40 tumor antigen transgenic mice is accompanied by the development of cells with 5 or more centrioles that can be incorporated into the poles of abnormal mitotic spindles. We speculate that cells with more than 4 centrioles are predisposed to the formation of multipolar mitoses that may yield daughter cells with chromosomal gains and losses, resulting in the subsequent development of aneuploid tumors. Images PMID:1650467

  2. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Matković, Ivana; Federico, Giuseppina; Sun, Tianliang; Franz, Timo; Brakebusch, Cord H; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Friedel, Roland H; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central regulatory mechanism of mitotic spindle orientation necessary for the alignment of epithelial cell divisions with the epithelial plane. PMID:25892012

  3. A ligand-independent integrin β1 mechanosensory complex guides spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Petridou, Nicoletta I; Skourides, Paris A

    2016-01-01

    Control of spindle orientation is a fundamental process for embryonic development, morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, while defects are associated with tumorigenesis and other diseases. Force sensing is one of the mechanisms through which division orientation is determined. Here we show that integrin β1 plays a critical role in this process, becoming activated at the lateral regions of the cell cortex in a ligand-independent manner. This activation is force dependent and polar, correlating with the spindle capture sites. Inhibition of integrin β1 activation on the cortex and disruption of its asymmetric distribution leads to spindle misorientation, even when cell adhesion is β1 independent. Examining downstream targets reveals that a cortical mechanosensory complex forms on active β1, and regulates spindle orientation irrespective of cell context. We propose that ligand-independent integrin β1 activation is a conserved mechanism that allows cell responses to external stimuli. PMID:26952307

  4. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  5. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  6. Mitotic noncoding RNA processing promotes kinetochore and spindle assembly in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Heald, Rebecca; Strzelecka, Magdalena

    2016-07-18

    Transcription at the centromere of chromosomes plays an important role in kinetochore assembly in many eukaryotes, and noncoding RNAs contribute to activation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B. However, little is known about how mitotic RNA processing contributes to spindle assembly. We found that inhibition of transcription initiation or RNA splicing, but not translation, leads to spindle defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Spliceosome inhibition resulted in the accumulation of high molecular weight centromeric transcripts, concomitant with decreased recruitment of the centromere and kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, and NDC80 to mitotic chromosomes. In addition, blocking transcript synthesis or processing during mitosis caused accumulation of MCAK, a microtubule depolymerase, on the spindle, indicating misregulation of Aurora B. These findings suggest that co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA processing machinery to nascent mitotic transcripts is an important step in kinetochore and spindle assembly and challenge the idea that RNA processing is globally repressed during mitosis. PMID:27402954

  7. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  8. A ligand-independent integrin β1 mechanosensory complex guides spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Petridou, Nicoletta I.; Skourides, Paris A.

    2016-01-01

    Control of spindle orientation is a fundamental process for embryonic development, morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, while defects are associated with tumorigenesis and other diseases. Force sensing is one of the mechanisms through which division orientation is determined. Here we show that integrin β1 plays a critical role in this process, becoming activated at the lateral regions of the cell cortex in a ligand-independent manner. This activation is force dependent and polar, correlating with the spindle capture sites. Inhibition of integrin β1 activation on the cortex and disruption of its asymmetric distribution leads to spindle misorientation, even when cell adhesion is β1 independent. Examining downstream targets reveals that a cortical mechanosensory complex forms on active β1, and regulates spindle orientation irrespective of cell context. We propose that ligand-independent integrin β1 activation is a conserved mechanism that allows cell responses to external stimuli. PMID:26952307

  9. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established. PMID:24077015

  10. A splicing alteration of 4.1R pre-mRNA generates 2 protein isoforms with distinct assembly to spindle poles in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Delhommeau, François; Vasseur-Godbillon, Corinne; Leclerc, Philippe; Schischmanoff, Pierre-Olivier; Croisille, Laure; Rince, Patricia; Morinière, Madeleine; Benz, Edward J; Tchernia, Gil; Tamagnini, Gabriel; Ribeiro, Leticia; Delaunay, Jean; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2002-10-01

    The C-terminal region of erythroid cytoskeletal protein 4.1R, encoded by exons 20 and 21, contains a binding site for nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a protein needed for the formation and stabilization of the mitotic spindle. We have previously described a splicing mutation of 4.1R that yields 2 isoforms: One, CO.1, lacks most of exon 20-encoded peptide and carries a missense C-terminal sequence. The other, CO.2, lacks exon 20-encoded C-terminal sequence, but retains the normal exon 21-encoded C-terminal sequence. Knowing that both shortened proteins are expressed in red cells and assemble to the membrane skeleton, we asked whether they would ensure 4.1R mitotic function in dividing cells. We show here that CO.2, but not CO.1, assembles to spindle poles, and colocalizes with NuMA in erythroid and lymphoid mutated cells, but none of these isoforms interact with NuMA in vitro. In microtubule-destabilizing conditions, again only CO.2 localizes to the centrosomes. These data suggest that the stability of 4.1R association with centrosomes requires an intact C-terminal end, either for a proper conformation of the protein, for a direct binding to an unknown centrosome-cytoskeletal network, or for both. We also found that 4.1G, a ubiquitous homolog of 4.1R, is present in mutated as well as control cells and that its C-terminal region binds efficiently to NuMA, suggesting that in fact mitotic spindles host a mixture of the two 4.1 family members. These findings led to the postulate that the coexpression at the spindle poles of 2 related proteins, 4.1R and 4.1G, might reflect a functional redundancy in mitotic cells. PMID:12239178

  11. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-03-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  12. Neural networks with dynamical synapses: From mixed-mode oscillations and spindles to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Goltsev, A. V.; Lopes, M. A.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of short-term synaptic depression (STSD) and other forms of synaptic plasticity is a topical problem in neuroscience. Here we study the role of STSD in the formation of complex patterns of brain rhythms. We use a cortical circuit model of neural networks composed of irregular spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons having type 1 and 2 excitability and stochastic dynamics. In the model, neurons form a sparsely connected network and their spontaneous activity is driven by random spikes representing synaptic noise. Using simulations and analytical calculations, we found that if the STSD is absent, the neural network shows either asynchronous behavior or regular network oscillations depending on the noise level. In networks with STSD, changing parameters of synaptic plasticity and the noise level, we observed transitions to complex patters of collective activity: mixed-mode and spindle oscillations, bursts of collective activity, and chaotic behavior. Interestingly, these patterns are stable in a certain range of the parameters and separated by critical boundaries. Thus, the parameters of synaptic plasticity can play a role of control parameters or switchers between different network states. However, changes of the parameters caused by a disease may lead to dramatic impairment of ongoing neural activity. We analyze the chaotic neural activity by use of the 0-1 test for chaos (Gottwald, G. & Melbourne, I., 2004) and show that it has a collective nature.

  13. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  14. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection. PMID:26937634

  15. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Konstantina; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Bryan, Glenn J; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection. PMID:26937634

  16. Pancreatic cancer cells retain the epithelial-related phenotype and modify mitotic spindle microtubules after the administration of ukrain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Volpari, Tatiana; Clerici, Marco; Pettinari, Letizia; Barajon, Isabella; Portinaro, Nicola; Colombo, Graziano; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Martinelli, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the phenotype of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and determine whether ukrain, an anticancer drug based on the alkaloids extracted from greater celandine, modulates in vitro the malignant behavior of PDAC cells in order to extend our understanding of its therapeutic potential. Three cell lines (HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45) were treated with ukrain (5, 10, and 20 μmol/l) for 48 h or left untreated (control). Cell proliferation was assessed by growth curves. Apoptosis was determined by Hoechst nuclear staining and by cytochrome c and caspase-8 expressions. The EMT markers E-cadherin, β-catenin, and vimentin, as well as actin and tubulin cytoskeletons, were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Interphase and mitotic microtubules as well as abnormal mitotic figures were studied by fluorescence microscopy after tubulin immunolabeling. Ukrain strongly suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis possibly through an extrinsic pathway as cytochrome c immunoreactivity suggested that the integrity of the mitochondria was not affected. Tubulin expression indicated an antiproliferative effect of ukrain on the basis of alterations in mitotic spindle microtubule dynamics, leading to abnormal mitosis. Membranous E-cadherin/β-catenin immunoreactivity was similarly expressed in control-treated and ukrain-treated cells, although the drug upregulated E-cadherin in cell lysates. Our results suggest that ukrain exerts its chemotherapeutic action on PDAC cells targeting mitotic spindle microtubules, leading to abnormal mitosis and apoptosis, and favoring cell cohesiveness. The differentiated epithelial phenotype of HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 cell lines concomitant with a highly invasive potential suggests that further experiments will be necessary to definitively clarify the role of EMT in PDAC progression. PMID:22700003

  17. Somatic and intramuscular distribution of muscle spindles and their relation to muscular angiotypes.

    PubMed

    Kokkorogiannis, Theodoros

    2004-07-21

    The distribution pattern of muscle spindles in the skeletal musculature has been reviewed in a large number of muscles (using the literature data especially from cat and man), and the relation of spindle content to muscle mass was quantitatively examined in 36 cat and 140 human muscles. In both species, the number of spindles increases with increasing muscle mass in a power law fashion of the form y=bx+a, whereby y denotes the logarithm of spindle content within a muscle, and x is the logarithm of muscle mass. For the cat, slope b and intercept a were estimated as 0.39 and 1.53, and for man as 0.48 and 1.33, respectively. The results show that the spindle content of a muscle may be related to its mass, confirming a similar analysis made previously by Banks and Stacey (Mechano receptors, Plenum Press, New York, 1988, pp. 263-269) in a different data set. With regard to the histological profile of muscle fibers, (as it is already well documented by many groups) muscle spindles tend to be located in deeper muscle regions where oxidative fibers predominate, and are far scarcer in superficial and flat muscle regions where glycolytic fibers predominate. These discrete muscle regions differ also in the properties of the vessel tree supplying them, for which the term oxidative and glycolytic "angiotype" has been used. The results from these three aspects of analysis (relation to muscle mass, relation to muscle regions with high oxidative index and relation to muscle regions with dense vascular supply) were combined with histological findings showing that spindles may be in systematic anatomical contact to intramuscular vessels. Based on these data a hypothesis is proposed according to which, both the number and intramuscular placement of muscle spindles are related to the oxidative angiotype supplying the muscle territories rich in oxidative fibers. The hypothesis is discussed. PMID:15207480

  18. Slow sleep spindle and procedural memory consolidation in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Masaki; Nakashima, Yusaku; Nishikawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence has accumulated, which indicates that, in healthy individuals, sleep enhances procedural memory consolidation, and that sleep spindle activity modulates this process. However, whether sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation occurs in patients medicated for major depressive disorder remains unclear, as are the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms that underlie this process. Methods Healthy control participants (n=17) and patients medicated for major depressive disorder (n=11) were recruited and subjected to a finger-tapping motor sequence test (MST; nondominant hand) paradigm to compare the averaged scores of different learning phases (presleep, postsleep, and overnight improvement). Participants’ brain activity was recorded during sleep with 16 electroencephalography channels (between MSTs). Sleep scoring and frequency analyses were performed on the electroencephalography data. Additionally, we evaluated sleep spindle activity, which divided the spindles into fast-frequency spindle activity (12.5–16 Hz) and slow-frequency spindle activity (10.5–12.5 Hz). Result Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in patients with depression was impaired in comparison with that in control participants. In patients with depression, age correlated negatively with overnight improvement. The duration of slow-wave sleep correlated with the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in patients with depression, but not in healthy controls. Slow-frequency spindle activity was associated with reduction in the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in both groups. Conclusion Because the changes in slow-frequency spindle activity affected the thalamocortical network dysfunction in patients medicated for depression, dysregulated spindle generation may impair sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Our findings may help to elucidate the cognitive deficits that occur in patients with major depression both in the waking state and during sleep. PMID

  19. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  20. PAR-4 and anillin regulate myosin to coordinate spindle and furrow position during asymmetric division

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Perrine; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Michaux, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    During asymmetric cell division, the mitotic spindle and polarized myosin can both determine the position of the cytokinetic furrow. However, how cells coordinate signals from the spindle and myosin to ensure that cleavage occurs through the spindle midzone is unknown. Here, we identify a novel pathway that is essential to inhibit myosin and coordinate furrow and spindle positions during asymmetric division. In Caenorhabditis elegans one-cell embryos, myosin localizes at the anterior cortex whereas the mitotic spindle localizes toward the posterior. We find that PAR-4/LKB1 impinges on myosin via two pathways, an anillin-dependent pathway that also responds to the cullin CUL-5 and an anillin-independent pathway involving the kinase PIG-1/MELK. In the absence of both PIG-1/MELK and the anillin ANI-1, myosin accumulates at the anterior cortex and induces a strong displacement of the furrow toward the anterior, which can lead to DNA segregation defects. Regulation of asymmetrically localized myosin is thus critical to ensure that furrow and spindle midzone positions coincide throughout cytokinesis. PMID:26416962

  1. The STARD9/Kif16a Kinesin Associates With Mitotic Microtubules and Regulates Spindle Pole Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge Z.; Summers, Matthew K.; Peterson, David; Brauer, Matthew J.; Lee, James; Senese, Silvia; Gholkar, Ankur A.; Lo, Yu-Chen; Lei, Xingye; Jung, Kenneth; Anderson, David C.; Davis, David P.; Belmont, Lisa; Jackson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During cell division cells form the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, a highly specialized and dynamic structure that mediates proper chromosome transmission to daughter cells. Cancer cells can show perturbed mitotic spindles and an approach in cancer treatment has been to trigger cell killing by targeting microtubule dynamics or spindle assembly. To identify and characterize proteins necessary for spindle assembly, and potential antimitotic targets, we performed a proteomic and genetic analysis of 592 mitotic microtubule co-purifying proteins (MMCPs). Screening for regulators that affect both mitosis and apoptosis, we report the identification and characterization of STARD9, a kinesin-3 family member, which localizes to centrosomes and stabilizes the pericentriolar material (PCM). STARD9-depleted cells have fragmented PCM, form multipolar spindles, activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), arrest in mitosis, and undergo apoptosis. Interestingly, STARD9-depletion synergizes with the chemotherapeutic agent taxol to increase mitotic death, demonstrating that STARD9 is a mitotic kinesin and a potential anti-mitotic target. PMID:22153075

  2. The Contribution of Thalamocortical Core and Matrix Pathways to Sleep Spindles.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles arise from the interaction of thalamic and cortical neurons. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) inhibit thalamocortical neurons, which in turn excite the TRN and cortical neurons. A fundamental principle of anatomical organization of the thalamocortical projections is the presence of two pathways: the diffuse matrix pathway and the spatially selective core pathway. Cortical layers are differentially targeted by these two pathways with matrix projections synapsing in superficial layers and core projections impinging on middle layers. Based on this anatomical observation, we propose that spindles can be classified into two classes, those arising from the core pathway and those arising from the matrix pathway, although this does not exclude the fact that some spindles might combine both pathways at the same time. We find evidence for this hypothesis in EEG/MEG studies, intracranial recordings, and computational models that incorporate this difference. This distinction will prove useful in accounting for the multiple functions attributed to spindles, in that spindles of different types might act on local and widespread spatial scales. Because spindle mechanisms are often hijacked in epilepsy and schizophrenia, the classification proposed in this review might provide valuable information in defining which pathways have gone awry in these neurological disorders. PMID:27144033

  3. Structural basis for the enhancement of virulence by viral spindles and their in vivo crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Elaine; Hijnen, Marcel; Bunker, Richard D.; Boudes, Marion; Rajendran, Chitra; Aizel, Kaheina; Oliéric, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Young, Vivienne; Ward, Vernon K.; Bergoin, Max; Metcalf, Peter; Coulibaly, Fasséli

    2015-01-01

    The great benefits that chemical pesticides have brought to agriculture are partly offset by widespread environmental damage to nontarget species and threats to human health. Microbial bioinsecticides are considered safe and highly specific alternatives but generally lack potency. Spindles produced by insect poxviruses are crystals of the fusolin protein that considerably boost not only the virulence of these viruses but also, in cofeeding experiments, the insecticidal activity of unrelated pathogens. However, the mechanisms by which spindles assemble into ultra-stable crystals and enhance virulence are unknown. Here we describe the structure of viral spindles determined by X-ray microcrystallography from in vivo crystals purified from infected insects. We found that a C-terminal molecular arm of fusolin mediates the assembly of a globular domain, which has the hallmarks of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases of chitinovorous bacteria. Explaining their unique stability, a 3D network of disulfide bonds between fusolin dimers covalently crosslinks the entire crystalline matrix of spindles. However, upon ingestion by a new host, removal of the molecular arm abolishes this stabilizing network leading to the dissolution of spindles. The released monooxygenase domain is then free to disrupt the chitin-rich peritrophic matrix that protects insects against oral infections. The mode of action revealed here may guide the design of potent spindles as synergetic additives to bioinsecticides. PMID:25787255

  4. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner. PMID:27475601

  5. SLK-dependent activation of ERMs controls LGN–NuMA localization and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Machicoane, Mickael; de Frutos, Cristina A.; Fink, Jenny; Rocancourt, Murielle; Lombardi, Yannis; Garel, Sonia; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation relies on a complex dialog between the spindle microtubules and the cell cortex, in which F-actin has been recently implicated. Here, we report that the membrane–actin linkers ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERMs) are strongly and directly activated by the Ste20-like kinase at mitotic entry in mammalian cells. Using microfabricated adhesive substrates to control the axis of cell division, we found that the activation of ERMs plays a key role in guiding the orientation of the mitotic spindle. Accordingly, impairing ERM activation in apical progenitors of the mouse embryonic neocortex severely disturbed spindle orientation in vivo. At the molecular level, ERM activation promotes the polarized association at the mitotic cortex of leucine-glycine-asparagine repeat protein (LGN) and nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein, two essential factors for spindle orientation. We propose that activated ERMs, together with Gαi, are critical for the correct localization of LGN–NuMA force generator complexes and hence for proper spindle orientation. PMID:24958772

  6. The far C-terminus of MCAK regulates its conformation and spindle pole focusing

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Hailing; Carnes, Stephanie K.; Moe, Christina; Walczak, Claire E.; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure proper spindle assembly, microtubule (MT) dynamics needs to be spatially regulated within the cell. The kinesin-13 MCAK is a potent MT depolymerase with a complex subcellular localization, yet how MCAK spatial regulation contributes to spindle assembly is not understood. Here we show that the far C-terminus of MCAK plays a critical role in regulating MCAK conformation, subspindle localization, and spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Alteration of MCAK conformation by the point mutation E715A/E716A in the far C-terminus increased MCAK targeting to the poles and reduced MT lifetimes, which induced spindles with unfocused poles. These effects were phenocopied by the Aurora A phosphomimetic mutation, S719E. Furthermore, addition of the kinesin-14 XCTK2 to spindle assembly reactions rescued the unfocused-pole phenotype. Collectively our work shows how the regional targeting of MCAK regulates MT dynamics, highlighting the idea that multiple phosphorylation pathways of MCAK cooperate to spatially control MT dynamics to maintain spindle architecture. PMID:26941326

  7. Fission yeast pkl1 is a kinesin-related protein involved in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, A L; LeDizet, M; Cande, W Z

    1996-01-01

    We have used anti-peptide antibodies raised against highly conserved regions of the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesin-related proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the identification of a new kinesin-related protein, which we have named pkl1. Sequence homology and domain organization place pkl1 in the Kar3/ncd subfamily of kinesin-related proteins. Bacterially expressed pkl1 fusion proteins display microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity, nucleotide-sensitive binding, and bundling of microtubules. Immunofluorescence studies with affinity-purified antibodies indicate that the pkl1 protein localizes to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle. Pkl1 null mutants are viable but have increased sensitivity to microtubule-disrupting drugs. Disruption of pkl1+ suppresses mutations in another kinesin-related protein, cut7, which is known to act in the spindle. Overexpression of pkl1 to very high levels causes a similar phenotype to that seen in cut7 mutants: V-shaped and star-shaped microtubule structures are observed, which we interpret to be spindles with unseparated spindle poles. These observations suggest that pkl1 and cut7 provide opposing forces in the spindle. We propose that pkl1 functions as a microtubule-dependent motor that is involved in microtubule organization in the mitotic spindle. Images PMID:8898367

  8. Cep55 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocyte.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Guo, Lei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Cep55 is a relatively novel member of the centrosomal protein family. Here, we show that Cep55 is expressed in mouse oocytes from the germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages. Immuostaining and confocal microscopy as well as time lapse live imaging after injection of mRNA encoding fusion protein of Cep55 and GFP identified that Cep55 was localized to the meiotic spindle, especially to the spindle poles at metaphase, while it was concentrated at the midbody in telophase in meiotic oocytes. Knockdown of Cep55 by specific siRNA injection caused the dissociation of γ-tubulin from the spindle poles, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, leading to metaphase I arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Correspondingly, cyclin B accumulation and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation were observed in Cep55 knockdown oocytes. Our results suggest that Cep55 may act as an MTOC-associated protein regulating spindle organization, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:26582107

  9. The Contribution of Thalamocortical Core and Matrix Pathways to Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles arise from the interaction of thalamic and cortical neurons. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) inhibit thalamocortical neurons, which in turn excite the TRN and cortical neurons. A fundamental principle of anatomical organization of the thalamocortical projections is the presence of two pathways: the diffuse matrix pathway and the spatially selective core pathway. Cortical layers are differentially targeted by these two pathways with matrix projections synapsing in superficial layers and core projections impinging on middle layers. Based on this anatomical observation, we propose that spindles can be classified into two classes, those arising from the core pathway and those arising from the matrix pathway, although this does not exclude the fact that some spindles might combine both pathways at the same time. We find evidence for this hypothesis in EEG/MEG studies, intracranial recordings, and computational models that incorporate this difference. This distinction will prove useful in accounting for the multiple functions attributed to spindles, in that spindles of different types might act on local and widespread spatial scales. Because spindle mechanisms are often hijacked in epilepsy and schizophrenia, the classification proposed in this review might provide valuable information in defining which pathways have gone awry in these neurological disorders. PMID:27144033

  10. Cep55 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Guo, Lei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Cep55 is a relatively novel member of the centrosomal protein family. Here, we show that Cep55 is expressed in mouse oocytes from the germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages. Immuostaining and confocal microscopy as well as time lapse live imaging after injection of mRNA encoding fusion protein of Cep55 and GFP identified that Cep55 was localized to the meiotic spindle, especially to the spindle poles at metaphase, while it was concentrated at the midbody in telophase in meiotic oocytes. Knockdown of Cep55 by specific siRNA injection caused the dissociation of γ-tubulin from the spindle poles, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, leading to metaphase I arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Correspondingly, cyclin B accumulation and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation were observed in Cep55 knockdown oocytes. Our results suggest that Cep55 may act as an MTOC-associated protein regulating spindle organization, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:26582107

  11. The far C-terminus of MCAK regulates its conformation and spindle pole focusing.

    PubMed

    Zong, Hailing; Carnes, Stephanie K; Moe, Christina; Walczak, Claire E; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C

    2016-05-01

    To ensure proper spindle assembly, microtubule (MT) dynamics needs to be spatially regulated within the cell. The kinesin-13 MCAK is a potent MT depolymerase with a complex subcellular localization, yet how MCAK spatial regulation contributes to spindle assembly is not understood. Here we show that the far C-terminus of MCAK plays a critical role in regulating MCAK conformation, subspindle localization, and spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Alteration of MCAK conformation by the point mutation E715A/E716A in the far C-terminus increased MCAK targeting to the poles and reduced MT lifetimes, which induced spindles with unfocused poles. These effects were phenocopied by the Aurora A phosphomimetic mutation, S719E. Furthermore, addition of the kinesin-14 XCTK2 to spindle assembly reactions rescued the unfocused-pole phenotype. Collectively our work shows how the regional targeting of MCAK regulates MT dynamics, highlighting the idea that multiple phosphorylation pathways of MCAK cooperate to spatially control MT dynamics to maintain spindle architecture. PMID:26941326

  12. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M.; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  13. PAR-4 and anillin regulate myosin to coordinate spindle and furrow position during asymmetric division.

    PubMed

    Pacquelet, Anne; Uhart, Perrine; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Michaux, Grégoire

    2015-09-28

    During asymmetric cell division, the mitotic spindle and polarized myosin can both determine the position of the cytokinetic furrow. However, how cells coordinate signals from the spindle and myosin to ensure that cleavage occurs through the spindle midzone is unknown. Here, we identify a novel pathway that is essential to inhibit myosin and coordinate furrow and spindle positions during asymmetric division. In Caenorhabditis elegans one-cell embryos, myosin localizes at the anterior cortex whereas the mitotic spindle localizes toward the posterior. We find that PAR-4/LKB1 impinges on myosin via two pathways, an anillin-dependent pathway that also responds to the cullin CUL-5 and an anillin-independent pathway involving the kinase PIG-1/MELK. In the absence of both PIG-1/MELK and the anillin ANI-1, myosin accumulates at the anterior cortex and induces a strong displacement of the furrow toward the anterior, which can lead to DNA segregation defects. Regulation of asymmetrically localized myosin is thus critical to ensure that furrow and spindle midzone positions coincide throughout cytokinesis. PMID:26416962

  14. Density of muscle spindles in prosimian shoulder muscles reflects locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the density of muscle spindles in shoulder muscles and the locomotor mode in three species of prosimian primates: the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), Garnett's galago (Otolemur garnettii), and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The shoulder muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, teres minor, and subscapularis) were embedded in celloidin and cut into transverse serial thin sections (40 microm); then, every tenth section was stained using the Azan staining technique. The relative muscle weights and the density of the muscle spindles were determined. The slow loris muscles were heavier and had sparser muscle spindles, as compared to Garnett's galago. These features suggest that the shoulder muscles of the slow loris are more adapted to generating propulsive force and stabilizing the shoulder joint during locomotion and play a less controlling role in forelimb movements. In contrast, Garnett's galago possessed smaller shoulder muscles with denser spindles that are suitable for the control of more rapid locomotor movements. The mean relative weight and the mean spindle density in the shoulder muscles of the ring-tailed lemur were between those of the other primates, suggesting that the spindle density is not simply a consequence of taxonomic status. PMID:17361082

  15. Spindle Checkpoint Protein Xmad1 Recruits Xmad2 to Unattached Kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rey-Huei; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew W.

    1998-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint prevents the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells containing defects in the mitotic spindle or in chromosome attachment to the spindle. When the checkpoint protein Xmad2 is depleted from Xenopus egg extracts, adding Xmad2 to its endogenous concentration fails to restore the checkpoint, suggesting that other checkpoint component(s) were depleted from the extract through their association with Xmad2. Mass spectrometry provided peptide sequences from an 85-kD protein that coimmunoprecipitates with Xmad2 from egg extracts. This information was used to clone XMAD1, which encodes a homologue of the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) checkpoint protein Mad1. Xmad1 is essential for establishing and maintaining the spindle checkpoint in egg extracts. Like Xmad2, Xmad1 localizes to the nuclear envelope and the nucleus during interphase, and to those kinetochores that are not bound to spindle microtubules during mitosis. Adding an anti-Xmad1 antibody to egg extracts inactivates the checkpoint and prevents Xmad2 from localizing to unbound kinetochores. In the presence of excess Xmad2, neither chromosomes nor Xmad1 are required to activate the spindle checkpoint, suggesting that the physiological role of Xmad1 is to recruit Xmad2 to kinetochores that have not bound microtubules. PMID:9786942

  16. Structural basis for the enhancement of virulence by viral spindles and their in vivo crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Elaine; Hijnen, Marcel; Bunker, Richard D; Boudes, Marion; Rajendran, Chitra; Aizel, Kaheina; Oliéric, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Young, Vivienne; Ward, Vernon K; Bergoin, Max; Metcalf, Peter; Coulibaly, Fasséli

    2015-03-31

    The great benefits that chemical pesticides have brought to agriculture are partly offset by widespread environmental damage to nontarget species and threats to human health. Microbial bioinsecticides are considered safe and highly specific alternatives but generally lack potency. Spindles produced by insect poxviruses are crystals of the fusolin protein that considerably boost not only the virulence of these viruses but also, in cofeeding experiments, the insecticidal activity of unrelated pathogens. However, the mechanisms by which spindles assemble into ultra-stable crystals and enhance virulence are unknown. Here we describe the structure of viral spindles determined by X-ray microcrystallography from in vivo crystals purified from infected insects. We found that a C-terminal molecular arm of fusolin mediates the assembly of a globular domain, which has the hallmarks of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases of chitinovorous bacteria. Explaining their unique stability, a 3D network of disulfide bonds between fusolin dimers covalently crosslinks the entire crystalline matrix of spindles. However, upon ingestion by a new host, removal of the molecular arm abolishes this stabilizing network leading to the dissolution of spindles. The released monooxygenase domain is then free to disrupt the chitin-rich peritrophic matrix that protects insects against oral infections. The mode of action revealed here may guide the design of potent spindles as synergetic additives to bioinsecticides. PMID:25787255

  17. Uncovering the molecular machinery of the human spindle--an integration of wet and dry systems biology.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ana M; Santamaria, Anna; Malik, Rainer; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Körner, Roman; Morilla, Ian; de Juan, David; Krallinger, Martin; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Hoffmann, Robert; Lees, Jonathan; Reid, Adam; Yeats, Corin; Wehner, Anja; Elowe, Sabine; Clegg, Andrew B; Brunak, Søren; Nigg, Erich A; Orengo, Christine; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A G

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted relations connecting known and putative spindle proteins. The subsequent experimental validation of a number of predicted novel proteins confirmed not only their association with the spindle apparatus but also their role in mitosis. We found that 75% of our tested proteins are localizing to the spindle apparatus compared to a success rate of 35% when expert knowledge alone was used. We compare our results to the previously published MitoCheck study and see that our approach does validate some findings by this consortium. Further, we predict so-called "hidden spindle hub", proteins whose network of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network. Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system. PMID:22427808

  18. Katanin maintains meiotic metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle structure in vivo and has multiple effects on microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    McNally, Karen; Berg, Evan; Cortes, Daniel B; Hernandez, Veronica; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles requires both MEI-1 and MEI-2 subunits of the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. Strong loss-of-function mutants assemble apolar intersecting microtubule arrays, whereas weaker mutants assemble bipolar meiotic spindles that are longer than wild type. To determine whether katanin is also required for spindle maintenance, we monitored metaphase I spindles after a fast-acting mei-1(ts) mutant was shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Within 4 min of temperature shift, bivalents moved off the metaphase plate, and microtubule bundles within the spindle lengthened and developed a high degree of curvature. Spindles eventually lost bipolar structure. Immunofluorescence of embryos fixed at increasing temperature indicated that MEI-1 was lost from spindle microtubules before loss of ASPM-1, indicating that MEI-1 and ASPM-1 act independently at spindle poles. We quantified the microtubule-severing activity of purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes corresponding to six different point mutations and found a linear relationship between microtubule disassembly rate and meiotic spindle length. Previous work showed that katanin is required for severing at points where two microtubules intersect in vivo. We show that purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes preferentially sever at intersections between two microtubules and directly bundle microtubules in vitro. These activities could promote parallel/antiparallel microtubule organization in meiotic spindles. PMID:24501424

  19. Age-related changes in sleep spindles characteristics during daytime recovery following a 25-hour sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosinvil, T.; Lafortune, M.; Sekerovic, Z.; Bouchard, M.; Dubé, J.; Latulipe-Loiselle, A.; Martin, N.; Lina, J. M.; Carrier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11–15 Hz; >0.5 s) help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g., daytime), even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups. Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 y ± 5.0) and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1) healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artifact-free Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min), amplitude (μV), frequency (Hz), and duration (s) were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears) derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure modulates spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep. PMID

  20. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Julie A. E.; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.; Koch, Henriette; Zoetmulder, Marielle; Frandsen, Rune; Moghadam, Keivan K.; Sorensen, Helge B. D.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Jennum, Poul J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score, and by using a group consensus rule, 901 SS were identified and characterized by their (1) duration, (2) oscillation frequency, (3) maximum peak-to-peak amplitude, (4) percent-to-peak amplitude, and (5) density. Between-group comparisons were made for all SS characteristics computed, and significant changes for PD patients vs. control subjects were found for duration, oscillation frequency, maximum peak-to-peak amplitude and density. Specifically, SS density was lower, duration was longer, oscillation frequency slower and maximum peak-to-peak amplitude higher in patients vs. controls. We also computed inter-expert reliability in SS scoring and found a significantly lower reliability in scoring definite SS in patients when compared to controls. How neurodegeneration in PD could influence SS characteristics is discussed. We also note that the SS morphological changes observed here may affect automatic detection of SS in patients with PD or other neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). PMID:25983685

  1. Robust control of mitotic spindle orientation in the developing epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor cells must balance self-amplification and production of differentiated progeny during development and homeostasis. In the epidermis, progenitors divide symmetrically to increase surface area and asymmetrically to promote stratification. In this study, we show that individual epidermal cells can undergo both types of division, and therefore, the balance is provided by the sum of individual cells’ choices. In addition, we define two control points for determining a cell’s mode of division. First is the expression of the mouse Inscuteable gene, which is sufficient to drive asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, there is robust control of division orientation as excessive ACDs are prevented by a change in the localization of NuMA, an effector of spindle orientation. Finally, we show that p63, a transcriptional regulator of stratification, does not control either of these processes. These data have uncovered two important regulatory points controlling ACD in the epidermis and allow a framework for analysis of how external cues control this important choice. PMID:21098114

  2. Ion pump using cylindrically symmetric spindle magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    For all accelerators and many research and industries, excellent vacuum conditions are required and the highest possible pumping rates are necessary. For most applications the standard ion sputtering pump (ISP) meets these requirements and is optimal for financial point of view also. The physical principle of the ISP is well known and many companies manufacture variety of ISP. Most of them use dipole magnetic field produced by permanent magnet and electric dipole field between the electrodes in which tenuous plasma is created because of interaction of between the relatively fast electrons slow residual gas atoms. Performance of an ISP depends basically on the electron cloud density in between the titanium electrodes but in the available present configurations no consideration has been given to electron confinement which needs a mirror magnetic field. If this is incorporated it will make a robust ISP surely; furthermore, the requirement of constant feeding of high voltage to electrodes for supplying sufficient number of electrons will be reduced too. A study has been performed to create sufficient rotationally symmetric spindle magnetic field (SMF) with inherent presence of magnetic mirror effect to electron motion to confine them for longer time for enhancing the density of electron cloud between the electrodes. It will lessen the electric power feeding the electrodes and lengthen their life-time. Construction of further compact and robust ISP is envisaged herein. The field simulation using the commercially available permanent magnet together with simulation of electron motion in such field will be presented and discussed in the paper.

  3. Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kurdziel, Laura; Duclos, Kasey; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2013-10-22

    Despite the fact that midday naps are characteristic of early childhood, very little is understood about the structure and function of these sleep bouts. Given that sleep benefits memory in young adults, it is possible that naps serve a similar function for young children. However, children transition from biphasic to monophasic sleep patterns in early childhood, eliminating the nap from their daily sleep schedule. As such, naps may contain mostly light sleep stages and serve little function for learning and memory during this transitional age. Lacking scientific understanding of the function of naps in early childhood, policy makers may eliminate preschool classroom nap opportunities due to increasing curriculum demands. Here we show evidence that classroom naps support learning in preschool children by enhancing memories acquired earlier in the day compared with equivalent intervals spent awake. This nap benefit is greatest for children who nap habitually, regardless of age. Performance losses when nap-deprived are not recovered during subsequent overnight sleep. Physiological recordings of naps support a role of sleep spindles in memory performance. These results suggest that distributed sleep is critical in early learning; when short-term memory stores are limited, memory consolidation must take place frequently. PMID:24062429

  4. Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Kurdziel, Laura; Duclos, Kasey; Spencer, Rebecca M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that midday naps are characteristic of early childhood, very little is understood about the structure and function of these sleep bouts. Given that sleep benefits memory in young adults, it is possible that naps serve a similar function for young children. However, children transition from biphasic to monophasic sleep patterns in early childhood, eliminating the nap from their daily sleep schedule. As such, naps may contain mostly light sleep stages and serve little function for learning and memory during this transitional age. Lacking scientific understanding of the function of naps in early childhood, policy makers may eliminate preschool classroom nap opportunities due to increasing curriculum demands. Here we show evidence that classroom naps support learning in preschool children by enhancing memories acquired earlier in the day compared with equivalent intervals spent awake. This nap benefit is greatest for children who nap habitually, regardless of age. Performance losses when nap-deprived are not recovered during subsequent overnight sleep. Physiological recordings of naps support a role of sleep spindles in memory performance. These results suggest that distributed sleep is critical in early learning; when short-term memory stores are limited, memory consolidation must take place frequently. PMID:24062429

  5. Disturbance Rejection Control of an Electromagnetic Bearing Spindle

    SciTech Connect

    PETTEYS,REBECCA; PARKER,GORDON

    2000-08-31

    The force exerted on the rotor by an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is determined by the current flow in the magnet coils. This force can be controlled very precisely, making magnetic bearings a potential benefit for grinding, where cutting forces act as external disturbances on the shaft, resulting in degraded part finish. It is possible to achieve precise shaft positioning, reduce vibration of the shaft caused by external disturbances, and even damp out resonant modes. Adaptive control is an appealing approach for these systems because the controller can tune itself to account for an unknown periodic disturbance, such as cutting or grinding forces, injected into the system. In this paper the authors show how one adaptive control algorithm can be applied to an AMB system with a periodic disturbance applied to the rotor. An adaptive algorithm was developed and implemented in both simulation and hardware, yielding significant reductions in rotor displacement in the presence of an external excitation. Ultimately, this type of algorithm could be applied to a magnetic bearing grinder to reduce unwanted motion of the spindle which leads to poor part finish and chatter.

  6. Noise reduction on multi-spindle automatic lathes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, P.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to define the major noise emitting sources in multi-spindle automatic lathes during machining and indexing operations. Noise levels as specified by the working ordinance (Arbeitsstattenverordnung) are to be obtained or reduce by secondary and predominantly primary actions. The following actions will lead towards considerable noise level reductions to obtain the above targets: (1) by boxing-in actions as additional and supplementary means for existing workshop places. Depending on the actions taken a noise level reduction of between 6 to 11 dB(A) will result; (2) by modifications in the design of head stock and gear boxes according to the principle of assignment division together with boxing-in actions of integrated parts. A comparable late model machine shows an improvement of a minimum of 6 dB(A) even after doubling the operating speed; (3) by design and manufacturing modification of machine parts as gears, clutches, cams and indexing devices. Improvement of the mostly impulse type noise peaks by approximately 1 to 4 dB (impulse sound).

  7. Expression analysis of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast carcinoma: role of NDC80/HEC1 in early breast tumorigenicity, and a two-gene signature for aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN) are common abnormalities in human cancer. Alterations of the mitotic spindle checkpoint are likely to contribute to these phenotypes, but little is known about somatic alterations of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast cancer. Methods To obtain further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in breast cancer, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of 76 selected mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in a large panel of breast tumor samples. Results The expression of 49 (64.5%) of the 76 genes was significantly dysregulated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissues: 40 genes were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of these changes in gene expression during malignant transformation were observed in epithelial cells. Alterations of nine of these genes, and particularly NDC80, were also detected in benign breast tumors, indicating that they may be involved in pre-neoplastic processes. We also identified a two-gene expression signature (PLK1 + AURKA) which discriminated between DNA aneuploid and DNA diploid breast tumor samples. Interestingly, some DNA tetraploid tumor samples failed to cluster with DNA aneuploid breast tumors. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of previously characterized genes and identifies novel candidate genes that could be activated for aneuploidy to occur. Further functional analyses are required to clearly confirm the role of these new identified genes in the molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer aneuploidy. The novel genes identified here, and/or the two-gene expression signature, might serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers and form the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21352579

  8. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Régis E.; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiotic entry, liberating chromosomes to begin homologous pairing. Surprisingly, most chromosome pairs were found to begin their spindle interactions with incorrect kMT attachments. Ipl1 released these improper connections while Mps1 triggered the formation of new force-generating microtubule attachments. This microtubule release and reattachment cycle can prevent catastrophic chromosome segregation errors in meiosis. PMID:23371552

  9. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  11. Medroxyprogesterone acetate is associated with increased sleep spindles during non-rapid eye movement sleep in women referred for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep spindles are characteristic electroencephalographic waveforms that may play functionally significant roles in sleep-dependent memory consolidation, cortical development, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Circumstantial evidence has connected endogenous progesterone and its metabolites to the production of sleep spindles, however, the effects of exogenous progestins on sleep spindles have not been described in women. We examined differences in sleep spindle frequency and morphology in a clinical sample of women (n=21) referred for polysomnography taking depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), relative to a matched comparison group. Consistent with our hypotheses, women taking MPA demonstrated significantly higher sleep spindle density and maximal amplitude relative to comparison patients. Our results suggest that progestins potentiate the generation of sleep spindles, which may have significant implications for research that examines the role of these waveforms in learning, development, and mental illness. PMID:24054762

  12. Use of abnormal preprophase bands to decipher division plane determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C.; Cyr, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many premitotic plant cells possess a cortical preprophase band of microtubules and actin filaments that encircles the nucleus. In vacuolated cells, the preprophase band is visibly connected to the nucleus by a cytoplasmic raft of actin filaments and microtubules termed the phragmosome. Typically, the location of the preprophase band and phragmosome corresponds to, and thus is thought to influence, the location of the cell division plane. To better understand the function of the preprophase band and phragmosome in orienting division, we used a green fluorescent protein-based microtubule reporter protein to observe mitosis in living tobacco bright yellow 2 cells possessing unusual preprophase bands. Observations of mitosis in these unusual cells support the involvement of the preprophase band/phragmosome in properly positioning the preprophase nucleus, influencing spindle orientation such that the cytokinetic phragmoplast initially grows in an appropriate direction, and delineating a region in the cell cortex that attracts microtubules and directs later stages of phragmoplast growth. Thus, the preprophase band/phragmosome appears to perform several interrelated functions to orient the division plane. However, functional information associated with the preprophase band is not always used or needed and there appears to be an age or distance-dependent character to the information. Cells treated with the anti-actin drug, latrunculin B, are still able to position the preprophase nucleus suggesting that microtubules may play a dominant role in premitotic positioning. Furthermore, in treated cells, spindle location and phragmoplast insertion are frequently abnormal suggesting that actin plays a significant role in nuclear anchoring and phragmoplast guidance. Thus, the microtubule and actin components of the preprophase band/phragmosome execute complementary activities to ensure proper orientation of the division plane.

  13. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley–Day syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    The Riley–Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10–30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  14. Accuracy analysis and design of A3 parallel spindle head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yanbing; Zhang, Biao; Sun, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    As functional components of machine tools, parallel mechanisms are widely used in high efficiency machining of aviation components, and accuracy is one of the critical technical indexes. Lots of researchers have focused on the accuracy problem of parallel mechanisms, but in terms of controlling the errors and improving the accuracy in the stage of design and manufacturing, further efforts are required. Aiming at the accuracy design of a 3-DOF parallel spindle head(A3 head), its error model, sensitivity analysis and tolerance allocation are investigated. Based on the inverse kinematic analysis, the error model of A3 head is established by using the first-order perturbation theory and vector chain method. According to the mapping property of motion and constraint Jacobian matrix, the compensatable and uncompensatable error sources which affect the accuracy in the end-effector are separated. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is performed on the uncompensatable error sources. The sensitivity probabilistic model is established and the global sensitivity index is proposed to analyze the influence of the uncompensatable error sources on the accuracy in the end-effector of the mechanism. The results show that orientation error sources have bigger effect on the accuracy in the end-effector. Based upon the sensitivity analysis results, the tolerance design is converted into the issue of nonlinearly constrained optimization with the manufacturing cost minimum being the optimization objective. By utilizing the genetic algorithm, the allocation of the tolerances on each component is finally determined. According to the tolerance allocation results, the tolerance ranges of ten kinds of geometric error sources are obtained. These research achievements can provide fundamental guidelines for component manufacturing and assembly of this kind of parallel mechanisms.

  15. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  16. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA's MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. PMID:26765568

  17. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA’s MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12504.001 PMID:26765568

  18. Cytoplasmic Determination of Meiotic Spindle Size Revealed by a Unique Inter-Species Germinal Vesicle Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong-Wei; Zhang, Guang-Li; Schatten, Heide; Carroll, John; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Spindle sizes are different in diverse species and cell types. In frogs, the meiotic spindle size is positively correlated with the egg cell volume. Across species, relatively small mouse oocytes (70–80 μm) have a relatively large spindle while larger pig oocytes (about 120 μm) have a considerably smaller spindle. In this study we investigated whether species-specific oocyte spindle size was determined by cytoplasmic or nuclear factors. By exchanging the germinal vesicle between mouse and pig oocytes, we obtained two kinds of reconstructed oocytes: one with mouse ooplasm and pig GV (mCy-pGV oocyte), and the other with pig ooplasm and mouse GV (pCy-mGV oocyte). We show that the MII spindle size of the mCy-pGV oocyte is similar to that of the mouse meiotic spindle and significantly larger than that of the pig meiotic spindle. The timing of oocyte maturation also followed that of the species from which the oocyte cytoplasm arose, although some impact of the origin of the GV was observed. These data suggest that spindle size and the timing of meiotic progression are governed by cytoplasmic components rather than cytoplasmic volume and GV materials. PMID:26813698

  19. Feedback-Controlled Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Reveals a Functional Role of Sleep Spindles in Motor Memory Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Mellin, Juliann M; Vaughn, Bradley V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2016-08-22

    Transient episodes of brain oscillations are a common feature of both the waking and the sleeping brain. Sleep spindles represent a prominent example of a poorly understood transient brain oscillation that is impaired in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, the causal role of these bouts of thalamo-cortical oscillations remains unknown. Demonstrating a functional role of sleep spindles in cognitive processes has, so far, been hindered by the lack of a tool to target transient brain oscillations in real time. Here, we show, for the first time, selective enhancement of sleep spindles with non-invasive brain stimulation in humans. We developed a system that detects sleep spindles in real time and applies oscillatory stimulation. Our stimulation selectively enhanced spindle activity as determined by increased sigma activity after transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) application. This targeted modulation caused significant enhancement of motor memory consolidation that correlated with the stimulation-induced change in fast spindle activity. Strikingly, we found a similar correlation between motor memory and spindle characteristics during the sham night for the same spindle frequencies and electrode locations. Therefore, our results directly demonstrate a functional relationship between oscillatory spindle activity and cognition. PMID:27476602

  20. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  1. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  2. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  3. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1-LGN-NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  4. Xorbit/CLASP links dynamic microtubules to chromosomes in the Xenopus meiotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hannak, Eva; Heald, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    A family of microtubule (MT)-binding proteins, Orbit/multiple asters/cytoplasmic linker protein–associated protein, has emerged as an important player during mitosis, but their functional mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we used meiotic egg extracts to gain insight into the role of the Xenopus laevis homologue Xorbit in spindle assembly and function. Xorbit immunodepletion or its inhibition by a dominant-negative fragment resulted in chromosome alignment defects and aberrant MT structures, including monopolar and small spindles. Xorbit-depleted extracts failed to nucleate MTs around chromatin-coated beads, indicating its essential requirement for spindle assembly in the absence of centrosomes and kinetochores. Xorbit's MT stabilizing effect was most apparent during anaphase, when spindle MTs depolymerized rapidly upon Xorbit inhibition. Biochemical interaction between a COOH-terminal Xorbit fragment and the kinetochore-associated kinesin centromeric protein E may contribute to Xorbit's role in chromosome congression. We propose that Xorbit tethers dynamic MT plus ends to kinetochores and chromatin, providing a stabilizing activity that is crucial for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:16390996

  5. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CANINE GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS COMPARED TO OTHER GASTROINTESTINAL SPINDLE CELL TUMORS.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Joshua; Sutherland-Smith, James; Penninck, Dominique; Jennings, Samuel; Barber, Lisa; Barton, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Canine gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a recent subtype of gastrointestinal spindle cell tumor recognized with the increasing use of immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, no imaging features have been described in immunostochemically confirmed canine GISTs. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe ultrasonographic features of canine GISTs compared with other spindle cell tumors. Thirty-seven dogs with an ultrasonographically visible gastrointestinal mass and a histopathologic diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasia were examined. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed for retrieved tissue samples to further differentiate the tumor type and each sample was interpreted by a single veterinary pathologist. Ultrasonographic features recorded examined included mass echogenicity, homogeneity, presence of cavitation, layer of origin, bowel wall symmetry, and loss of wall layering, location, size, vascularity, and evidence of perforation or ulceration. Tumor types included 19 GISTs, eight leiomyosarcomas, six leiomyomas, and four nonspecified sarcomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors were significantly more likely to be associated (P < 0.03) with abdominal effusion than other tumor types. There was overlap between the anatomical locations of all tumors types with the exception of the cecum where all eight tumors identified were GISTs. Besides location, there were no unique ultrasound features of GISTs that would allow distinction from other gastrointestinal spindle cell tumors. Similar to previous studies, GISTs appeared to be the most common spindle cell tumor associated with the cecum in our sample of dogs. The high frequency of abdominal effusion with GIST's was of unknown etiology could possibly have been due to septic peritonitis. PMID:25846814

  6. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  7. Regulation of a Spindle Positioning Factor at Kinetochores by SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Schweiggert, Jörg; Stevermann, Lea; Panigada, Davide; Kammerer, Daniel; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-02-22

    Correct function of the mitotic spindle requires balanced interplay of kinetochore and astral microtubules that mediate chromosome segregation and spindle positioning, respectively. Errors therein can cause severe defects ranging from aneuploidy to developmental disorders. Here, we describe a protein degradation pathway that functionally links astral microtubules to kinetochores via regulation of a microtubule-associated factor. We show that the yeast spindle positioning protein Kar9 localizes not only to astral but also to kinetochore microtubules, where it becomes targeted for proteasomal degradation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) Slx5-Slx8. Intriguingly, this process does not depend on preceding sumoylation of Kar9 but rather requires SUMO-dependent recruitment of STUbLs to kinetochores. Failure to degrade Kar9 leads to defects in both chromosome segregation and spindle positioning. We propose that kinetochores serve as platforms to recruit STUbLs in a SUMO-dependent manner in order to ensure correct spindle function by regulating levels of microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:26906737

  8. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1–LGN–NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  9. Manual characterization of sleep spindle index in patients with narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Delrosso, Lourdes M; Chesson, Andrew L; Hoque, Romy

    2014-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of PSG data from 8 narcolepsy patients and 8 idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) patients, evaluating electrophysiologic differences between these two central hypersomnias. Spindles were identified according to the AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events; and counted per epoch in the first 50 epochs of N2 sleep and the last 50 epochs of N2 sleep in each patient's PSG. Spindle count data (mean ± standard deviation) per 30 second-epoch (spindle index) in the 8 narcolepsy patients was as follows: 0.37 ± 0.73 for the first 50 epochs of N2; 0.65 ± 1.09 for the last 50 epochs of N2; and 0.51 ± 0.93 for all 100 epochs of N2. Spindle index data in the 8 IH patients was as follows: 2.31 ± 2.23 for the first 50 epochs of N2; 2.84 ± 2.43 for the last 50 epochs of N2; and 2.57 ± 2.35 for all 100 epochs of N2. Intergroup differences in spindle count in the first 50 N2 epochs, the last 50 N2 epochs, and all 100 epochs of scored N2 were significant (P < 0.01) as were the intragroup differences between the first 50 N2 epochs and the last 50 N2 epochs. PMID:24800086

  10. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. PMID:27075540

  11. Microtubules are the only structural constituent of the spindle apparatus required for induction of cell cleavage.

    PubMed

    Alsop, G Bradley; Zhang, Dahong

    2003-08-01

    Structural constituents of the spindle apparatus essential for cleavage induction remain undefined. Findings from various cell types using different approaches suggest the importance of all structural constituents, including asters, the central spindle, and chromosomes. In this study, we systematically dissected the role of each constituent in cleavage induction in grasshopper spermatocytes and narrowed the essential one down to bundled microtubules. Using micromanipulation, we produced "cells" containing only asters, a truncated central spindle lacking both asters and chromosomes, or microtubules alone. We show that furrow induction occurs under all circumstances, so long as sufficient microtubules are present. Microtubules, as the only spindle structural constituent, undergo dramatic, stage-specific reorganizations, radiating toward cell cortex in "metaphase," disassembling in "anaphase," and bundling into arrays in "telophase." Furrow induction usually occurs at multisites around microtubule bundles, but only those induced by sustained bundles ingress. We suggest that microtubules, regardless of source, are the only structural constituent of the spindle apparatus essential for cleavage furrow induction. PMID:12900392

  12. Direct kinetochore–spindle pole connections are not required for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Magidson, Valentin; Steinman, Jonathan B.; He, Jie; Le Berre, Maël; Tikhonenko, Irina; Ault, Jeffrey G.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Chen, James K.; Sui, Haixin; Piel, Matthieu; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of genetic material occurs when chromosomes move to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This movement depends on K-fibers, specialized microtubule (MT) bundles attached to the chromosomes′ kinetochores. A long-standing assumption is that continuous K-fibers connect every kinetochore to a spindle pole and the force for chromosome movement is produced at the kinetochore and coupled with MT depolymerization. However, we found that chromosomes still maintained their position at the spindle equator during metaphase and segregated properly during anaphase when one of their K-fibers was severed near the kinetochore with a laser microbeam. We also found that, in normal fully assembled spindles, K-fibers of some chromosomes did not extend to the spindle pole. These K-fibers connected to adjacent K-fibers and/or nonkinetochore MTs. Poleward movement of chromosomes with short K-fibers was uncoupled from MT depolymerization at the kinetochore. Instead, these chromosomes moved by dynein-mediated transport of the entire K-fiber/kinetochore assembly. Thus, at least two distinct parallel mechanisms drive chromosome segregation in mammalian cells. PMID:25023516

  13. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  14. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc

    PubMed Central

    Lovegrove, Holly E.; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S.; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  15. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2013-03-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  16. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  17. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination. PMID:25122889

  18. Sleep spindle detection: crowdsourcing and evaluating performance of experts, non-experts, and automated methods

    PubMed Central

    Warby, Simon C.; Wendt, Sabrina L.; Welinder, Peter; Munk, Emil G.S.; Carrillo, Oscar; Sorensen, Helge B.D.; Jennum, Poul; Peppard, Paul E.; Perona, Pietro; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are discrete, intermittent patterns of brain activity that arise as a result of interactions of several circuits in the brain. Increasingly, these oscillations are of biological and clinical interest because of their role in development, learning, and neurological disorders. We used an internet interface to ‘crowdsource’ spindle identification from human experts and non-experts, and compared performance with 6 automated detection algorithms in middle-to-older aged subjects from the general population. We also developed a method for forming group consensus, and refined methods of evaluating the performance of event detectors in physiological data such as polysomnography. Compared to the gold standard, the highest performance was by individual experts and the non-expert group consensus, followed by automated spindle detectors. Crowdsourcing the scoring of sleep data is an efficient method to collect large datasets, even for difficult tasks such as spindle identification. Further refinements to automated sleep spindle algorithms are needed for middle-to-older aged subjects. PMID:24562424

  19. Voluntary activation of spindle endings in human muscles temporarily paralysed by nerve pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D; Hagbarth, K E; Skuse, N F

    1979-01-01

    1. In normal human subjects, the afferent activity from muscle spindle endings in the pretibial muscles was recorded while a pressure block was applied to the peroneal nerve proximally in the popliteal fossa. 2. In five of ten blocks, spindle activity increased in attempted isometric voluntary contractions when the receptor-bearing muscles were completely paralysed. In the remaining five blocks, voluntary effort still increased spindle activity when maximum voluntary power was reduced by more than 90%, but the ability to activate spindles voluntarily was lost with or slightly before block of the last motor units. When the ability to activate spindle endings in an attempted voluntary contraction was lost sympathetic efferent fibres remained unblocked. 3. It is concluded that the fusimotor effects seen during a voluntary contraction are mediated by myelinated fibres of small calibre which probably innervate intrafusal structures exclusively (gamma fusimotor fibres). There is no necessity to postulate that skeleto-fusimotor (beta) fibres are responsible for the tight 'alpha-gamma co-activation' seen in man during voluntary contractions. PMID:155158

  20. Pattern Recognition With Adaptive-Thresholds For Sleep Spindle In High Density EEG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Gemignani, Jessica; Agrimi, Jacopo; Cheli, Enrico; Gemignani, Angelo; Laurino, Marco; Allegrini, Paolo; Landi, Alberto; Menicucci, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are electroencephalographic oscillations peculiar of non-REM sleep, related to neuronal mechanisms underlying sleep restoration and learning consolidation. Based on their very singular morphology, sleep spindles can be visually recognized and detected, even though this approach can lead to significant mis-detections. For this reason, many efforts have been put in developing a reliable algorithm for spindle automatic detection, and a number of methods, based on different techniques, have been tested via visual validation. This work aims at improving current pattern recognition procedures for sleep spindles detection by taking into account their physiological sources of variability. We provide a method as a synthesis of the current state of art that, improving dynamic threshold adaptation, is able to follow modification of spindle characteristics as a function of sleep depth and inter-subjects variability. The algorithm has been applied to physiological data recorded by a high density EEG in order to perform a validation based on visual inspection and on evaluation of expected results from normal night sleep in healthy subjects. PMID:26736332