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Sample records for abnormal spindle formation

  1. A single internal telomere tract ensures meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Kazunori; Bez, Cécile; Fennell, Alex; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2013-01-01

    Contact between telomeres and the fission yeast spindle pole body during meiotic prophase is crucial for subsequent spindle assembly, but the feature of telomeres that confers their ability to promote spindle formation remains mysterious. Here we show that while strains harbouring circular chromosomes devoid of telomere repeat tracts undergo aberrant meiosis with defective spindles, the insertion of a single internal telomere repeat stretch rescues the spindle defects. Moreover, the telomeric overhang-binding protein Pot1 is dispensable for rescue of spindle formation. Hence, an inherent feature of the double-strand telomeric region endows telomeres with the capacity to promote spindle formation. PMID:23295325

  2. Sleep Spindles as Facilitators of Memory Formation and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of sleep spindle generation. At the same time a physiological role of sleep spindles is starting to be revealed. Behavioural studies in humans and animals have found significant correlations between the recall performance in different learning tasks and the amount of sleep spindles in the intervening sleep. Concomitant neurophysiological experiments showed a close relationship between sleep spindles and other sleep related EEG rhythms as well as a relationship between sleep spindles and synaptic plasticity. Together, there is growing evidence from several disciplines in neuroscience for a participation of sleep spindles in memory formation and learning. PMID:27119026

  3. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived NT3

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, Neil A.; Mentis, George Z.; Schustak, Joshua; O’Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest (~30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by ~80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections, but not their initial formation or their specificity. PMID:19369542

  4. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  5. Rae1 interaction with NuMA is required for bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Richard W.; Blobel, Günter; Coutavas, Elias

    2006-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the faithful segregation of daughter chromosomes during cell division depends on formation of a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle apparatus. The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (NuMA) is recruited from interphase nuclei to spindle MTs during mitosis. The carboxy terminal domain of NuMA binds MTs, allowing a NuMA dimer to function as a “divalent” crosslinker that bundles MTs. The messenger RNA export factor, Rae1, also binds to MTs. Lowering Rae1 or increasing NuMA levels in cells results in spindle abnormalities. We have identified a mitotic-specific interaction between Rae1 and NuMA and have explored the relationship between Rae1 and NuMA in spindle formation. We have mapped a specific binding site for Rae1 on NuMA that would convert a NuMA dimer to a “tetravalent” crosslinker of MTs. In mitosis, reducing Rae1 or increasing NuMA concentration would be expected to alter the valency of NuMA toward MTs; the “density” of NuMA-MT crosslinks in these conditions would be diminished, even though a threshold number of crosslinks sufficient to stabilize aberrant multipolar spindles may form. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that coupling NuMA overexpression to Rae1 overexpression or coupling Rae1 depletion to NuMA depletion prevented the formation of aberrant spindles. Likewise, we found that overexpression of the specific Rae1-binding domain of NuMA in HeLa cells led to aberrant spindle formation. These data point to the Rae1–NuMA interaction as a critical element for normal spindle formation in mitosis. PMID:17172455

  6. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  7. Spindle

    2013-04-04

    Spindle is software infrastructure that solves file system scalabiltiy problems associated with starting dynamically linked applications in HPC environments. When an HPC applications starts up thousands of pricesses at once, and those processes simultaneously access a shared file system to look for shared libraries, it can cause significant performance problems for both the application and other users. Spindle scalably coordinates the distribution of shared libraries to an application to avoid hammering the shared file system.

  8. Csi1p recruits alp7p/TACC to the spindle pole bodies for bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Tianpeng; Jin, Dong-yan; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Scheffler, Kathleen; Tran, Phong T.; Fu, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires timely bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. The transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) family proteins and the ch-TOG family proteins are key players in bipolar spindle formation. They form a complex to stabilize spindle microtubules, mainly dependent on their localization to the centrosome (the spindle pole body [SPB] in yeast). The molecular mechanism underlying the targeting of the TACC–ch-TOG complex to the centrosome remains unclear. Here we show that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe TACC orthologue alp7p is recruited to the SPB by csi1p. The csi1p-interacting region lies within the conserved TACC domain of alp7p, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of csi1p is responsible for interacting with alp7p. Compromised interaction between csi1p and alp7p impairs the localization of alp7p to the SPB during mitosis, thus delaying bipolar spindle formation and leading to anaphase B lagging chromosomes. Hence our study establishes that csi1p serves as a linking molecule tethering spindle-stabilizing factors to the SPB for promoting bipolar spindle assembly. PMID:25057016

  9. Chapter 24: Computational modeling of self-organized spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Stuart C; José, Jorge V

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a derivation and computational details of a biophysical model we introduced to describe the self-organized mitotic spindle formation properties in the chromosome dominated pathway studied in Xenopus meiotic extracts. The mitotic spindle is a biological structure composed of microtubules. This structure forms the scaffold on which mitosis and cytokinesis occurs. Despite the seeming mechanical simplicity of the spindle itself, its formation and the way in which it is used in mitosis and cytokinesis is complex and not fully understood. Biophysical modeling of a system as complex as mitosis requires contributions from biologists, biochemists, mathematicians, physicists, and software engineers. This chapter is written for biologists and biochemists who wish to understand how biophysical modeling can complement a program of biological experimentation. It is also written for a physicist, computer scientist, or mathematician unfamiliar with this class of biological physics model. We will describe how we built such a mathematical model and its numerical simulator to obtain results that agree with many of the results found experimentally. The components of this system are large enough to be described in terms of coarse-grained approximations. We will discuss how to properly model such systems and will suggest effective tradeoffs between reliability, simulation speed, and accuracy. At all times we have in mind the realistic biophysical properties of the system we are trying to model. PMID:19118693

  10. Spindle Formation in the Mouse Embryo Requires Plk4 in the Absence of Centrioles

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Sharif, Bedra; Riparbelli, Maria G.; Fu, Jingyan; Callaini, Giuliano; Glover, David M.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Summary During the first five rounds of cell division in the mouse embryo, spindles assemble in the absence of centrioles. Spindle formation initiates around chromosomes, but the microtubule nucleating process remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Plk4, a protein kinase known as a master regulator of centriole formation, is also essential for spindle assembly in the absence of centrioles. Depletion of maternal Plk4 prevents nucleation and growth of microtubules and results in monopolar spindle formation. This leads to cytokinesis failure and, consequently, developmental arrest. We show that Plk4 function depends on its kinase activity and its partner protein, Cep152. Moreover, tethering Cep152 to cellular membranes sequesters Plk4 and is sufficient to trigger spindle assembly from ectopic membranous sites. Thus, the Plk4-Cep152 complex has an unexpected role in promoting microtubule nucleation in the vicinity of chromosomes to mediate bipolar spindle formation in the absence of centrioles. PMID:24268700

  11. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  12. Synergy between Multiple Microtubule-Generating Pathways Confers Robustness to Centrosome-Driven Mitotic Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Daniel; Metz, Jeremy; Pellacani, Claudia; Wakefield, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mitotic spindle is defined by its organized, bipolar mass of microtubules, which drive chromosome alignment and segregation. Although different cells have been shown to use different molecular pathways to generate the microtubules required for spindle formation, how these pathways are coordinated within a single cell is poorly understood. We have tested the limits within which the Drosophila embryonic spindle forms, disrupting the inherent temporal control that overlays mitotic microtubule generation, interfering with the molecular mechanism that generates new microtubules from preexisting ones, and disrupting the spatial relationship between microtubule nucleation and the usually dominant centrosome. Our work uncovers the possible routes to spindle formation in embryos and establishes the central role of Augmin in all microtubule-generating pathways. It also demonstrates that the contributions of each pathway to spindle formation are integrated, highlighting the remarkable flexibility with which cells can respond to perturbations that limit their capacity to generate microtubules. PMID:24389063

  13. Skeletor, a Novel Chromosomal Protein That Redistributes during Mitosis Provides Evidence for the Formation of a Spindle Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Diana L.; Wang, Dong; Jin, Ye; Rath, Uttama; Wang, Yanming; Johansen, Jørgen; Johansen, Kristen M.

    2000-01-01

    A spindle matrix has been proposed to help organize and stabilize the microtubule spindle during mitosis, though molecular evidence corroborating its existence has been elusive. In Drosophila, we have cloned and characterized a novel nuclear protein, skeletor, that we propose is part of a macromolecular complex forming such a spindle matrix. Skeletor antibody staining shows that skeletor is associated with the chromosomes at interphase, but redistributes into a true fusiform spindle structure at prophase, which precedes microtubule spindle formation. During metaphase, the spindle, defined by skeletor antibody labeling, and the microtubule spindles are coaligned. We find that the skeletor-defined spindle maintains its fusiform spindle structure from end to end across the metaphase plate during anaphase when the chromosomes segregate. Consequently, the properties of the skeletor-defined spindle make it an ideal substrate for providing structural support stabilizing microtubules and counterbalancing force production. Furthermore, skeletor metaphase spindles persist in the absence of microtubule spindles, strongly implying that the existence of the skeletor-defined spindle does not require polymerized microtubules. Thus, the identification and characterization of skeletor represents the first direct molecular evidence for the existence of a complete spindle matrix that forms within the nucleus before microtubule spindle formation. PMID:11134070

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase is required for the formation of spindle microtubules in female meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Eisuke; Fukata, Yuma; Namai, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Asako

    2015-01-01

    In many animals, female meiotic spindles are assembled in the absence of centrosomes, the major microtubule (MT)-organizing centers. How MTs are formed and organized into meiotic spindles is poorly understood. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, Aurora A kinase/AIR-1 is required for the formation of spindle microtubules during female meiosis. When AIR-1 was depleted or its kinase activity was inhibited in C. elegans oocytes, although MTs were formed around chromosomes at germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), they were decreased during meiotic prometaphase and failed to form a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were not separated into two masses. Whereas AIR-1 protein was detected on and around meiotic spindles, its kinase-active form was concentrated on chromosomes at prometaphase and on interchromosomal MTs during late anaphase and telophase. We also found that AIR-1 is involved in the assembly of short, dynamic MTs in the meiotic cytoplasm, and these short MTs were actively incorporated into meiotic spindles. Collectively our results suggest that, after GVBD, the kinase activity of AIR-1 is continuously required for the assembly and/or stabilization of female meiotic spindle MTs. PMID:26378257

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase is required for the formation of spindle microtubules in female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Eisuke; Fukata, Yuma; Namai, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Asako

    2015-11-15

    In many animals, female meiotic spindles are assembled in the absence of centrosomes, the major microtubule (MT)-organizing centers. How MTs are formed and organized into meiotic spindles is poorly understood. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, Aurora A kinase/AIR-1 is required for the formation of spindle microtubules during female meiosis. When AIR-1 was depleted or its kinase activity was inhibited in C. elegans oocytes, although MTs were formed around chromosomes at germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), they were decreased during meiotic prometaphase and failed to form a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were not separated into two masses. Whereas AIR-1 protein was detected on and around meiotic spindles, its kinase-active form was concentrated on chromosomes at prometaphase and on interchromosomal MTs during late anaphase and telophase. We also found that AIR-1 is involved in the assembly of short, dynamic MTs in the meiotic cytoplasm, and these short MTs were actively incorporated into meiotic spindles. Collectively our results suggest that, after GVBD, the kinase activity of AIR-1 is continuously required for the assembly and/or stabilization of female meiotic spindle MTs.

  16. Mitotic rounding alters cell geometry to ensure efficient bipolar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Oscar M; Le Berre, Maël; Dimitracopoulos, Andrea; Bonazzi, Daria; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Picone, Remigio; Duke, Thomas; Piel, Matthieu; Baum, Buzz

    2013-05-13

    Accurate animal cell division requires precise coordination of changes in the structure of the microtubule-based spindle and the actin-based cell cortex. Here, we use a series of perturbation experiments to dissect the relative roles of actin, cortical mechanics, and cell shape in spindle formation. We find that, whereas the actin cortex is largely dispensable for rounding and timely mitotic progression in isolated cells, it is needed to drive rounding to enable unperturbed spindle morphogenesis under conditions of confinement. Using different methods to limit mitotic cell height, we show that a failure to round up causes defects in spindle assembly, pole splitting, and a delay in mitotic progression. These defects can be rescued by increasing microtubule lengths and therefore appear to be a direct consequence of the limited reach of mitotic centrosome-nucleated microtubules. These findings help to explain why most animal cells round up as they enter mitosis.

  17. The nucleoporin ALADIN regulates Aurora A localization to ensure robust mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhal, Sara; Ribeiro, Susana Abreu; Arocena, Miguel; Kasciukovic, Taciana; Temme, Achim; Koehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Griffis, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the mitotic spindle is a complex process that requires massive cellular reorganization. Regulation by mitotic kinases controls this entire process. One of these mitotic controllers is Aurora A kinase, which is itself highly regulated. In this study, we show that the nuclear pore protein ALADIN is a novel spatial regulator of Aurora A. Without ALADIN, Aurora A spreads from centrosomes onto spindle microtubules, which affects the distribution of a subset of microtubule regulators and slows spindle assembly and chromosome alignment. ALADIN interacts with inactive Aurora A and is recruited to the spindle pole after Aurora A inhibition. Of interest, mutations in ALADIN cause triple A syndrome. We find that some of the mitotic phenotypes that we observe after ALADIN depletion also occur in cells from triple A syndrome patients, which raises the possibility that mitotic errors may underlie part of the etiology of this syndrome. PMID:26246606

  18. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  19. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought.

  20. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  1. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  2. Intranuclear membranes and the formation of the first meiotic spindle in Xenos peckii (Acroschismus wheeleri) oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The ultrastructure of spindle formation during the first meiotic division in oocytes of the Strepsipteran insect Xenos peckii Kirby (Acroschismus wheeleri Pierce) was examined in serial thick (0.25- micron) and thin sections. During late prophase the nuclear envelope became extremely convoluted and fenestrated. At this time vesicular and tubular membrane elements permeated the nucleoplasm and formed a thin fusiform sheath, 5-7 micron in length, around each of the randomly oriented and condensing tetrads. These membrane elements appeared to arise from the nuclear envelope and/or in association with annulate lamellae in the nuclear region. All of the individual tetrads and their associated fusiform sheaths became aligned within the nucleus subsequent to the breakdown of the nuclear envelope. Microtubules (MTs) were found associated with membranes of the meiotic apparatus only after the nuclear envelope had broken down. Kinetochores, with associated MTs, were first recognizable as electron-opaque patches on the chromosomes at this time. The fully formed metaphase arrested Xenos oocyte meiotic apparatus contained an abundance of membranes and had diffuse poles that lacked distinct polar MT organizing centers. From these observations we conclude that the apparent individual chromosomal spindles--seen in the light microscope to form around each Xenos tetrad during "intranuclear prometaphase" (Hughes-Schrader, S., 1924, J. Morphol. 39:157-197)--actually form during late prophase, lack MTs, and are therefore not complete miniature bipolar spindles, as had been commonly assumed. Thus, the unique mode of spindle formation in Xenos oocytes cannot be used to support the hypothesis that chromosomes (kinetochores) induce the polymerization of their associated MTs. Our observation that MTs appeared in association with and parallel to tubular membrane components of the Xenos meiotic apparatus after these membranes became oriented with respect to the tetrads, is consistent with the

  3. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells. PMID:22696268

  4. Abnormal mitotic spindle assembly and cytokinesis induced by D-Limonene in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Irene; Naselli, Flores; Sciandrello, Giulia; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    D-Limonene is found widely in citrus and many other plant species; it is a major constituent of many essential oils and is used as a solvent for commercial purposes. With the discovery of its chemotherapeutic properties against cancer, it is important to investigate the biological effects of the exposure to D-Limonene and elucidate its, as yet unknown, mechanism of action. We reported here that D-Limonene is toxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, to determine the cellular target of D-Limonene, we performed morphological observations and immunocytochemical analysis and we showed that this drug has a direct effect on dividing cells preventing assembly of mitotic spindle microtubules. This affects both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, resulting in aneuploidy that in turn can lead to cell death or genomic instability. PMID:23913329

  5. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  6. RhoA-mediated FMNL1 regulates GM130 for actin assembly and phosphorylates MAPK for spindle formation in mouse oocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Liang; Duan, Xing; Zhang, Guang-Li; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Formin-like 1 (FMNL1) is a member of Formin family proteins which are the actin nucleators. Although FMNL1 activities have been shown to be essential for cell adhesion, cytokinesis, cell polarization and migration in mitosis, the functional roles of mammalian FMNL1 during oocyte meiosis remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the functions of FMNL1 in mouse oocytes using specific morpholino (MO) microinjection and live cell imaging. Immunofluorescent staining showed that in addition to its cytoplasmic distribution, FMNL1 was primarily localized at the spindle poles after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). FMNL1 knockdown caused the low rate of polar body extrusion and resulted in large polar bodies. Time-lapse microscopic and immunofluorescence intensity analysis indicated that this might be due to the aberrant actin expression levels. Cortical polarity was disrupted as shown by a loss of actin cap and cortical granule free domain (CGFD) formation, which was confirmed by a failure of meiotic spindle positioning. And this might be the reason for the large polar body formation. Spindle formation was also disrupted, which might be due to the abnormal localization of p-MAPK. These results indicated that FMNL1 affected both actin dynamics and spindle formation for the oocyte polar body extrusion. Moreover, FMNL1 depletion resulted in aberrant localization and expression patterns of a cis-Golgi marker protein, GM130. Finally, we found that the small GTPase RhoA might be the upstream regulator of FMNL1. Taken together, our data indicate that FMNL1 is required for spindle organization and actin assembly through a RhoA-FMNL1-GM130 pathway during mouse oocyte meiosis. PMID:26083584

  7. RhoA-mediated FMNL1 regulates GM130 for actin assembly and phosphorylates MAPK for spindle formation in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Liang; Duan, Xing; Zhang, Guang-Li; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Formin-like 1 (FMNL1) is a member of Formin family proteins which are the actin nucleators. Although FMNL1 activities have been shown to be essential for cell adhesion, cytokinesis, cell polarization and migration in mitosis, the functional roles of mammalian FMNL1 during oocyte meiosis remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the functions of FMNL1 in mouse oocytes using specific morpholino (MO) microinjection and live cell imaging. Immunofluorescent staining showed that in addition to its cytoplasmic distribution, FMNL1 was primarily localized at the spindle poles after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). FMNL1 knockdown caused the low rate of polar body extrusion and resulted in large polar bodies. Time-lapse microscopic and immunofluorescence intensity analysis indicated that this might be due to the aberrant actin expression levels. Cortical polarity was disrupted as shown by a loss of actin cap and cortical granule free domain (CGFD) formation, which was confirmed by a failure of meiotic spindle positioning. And this might be the reason for the large polar body formation. Spindle formation was also disrupted, which might be due to the abnormal localization of p-MAPK. These results indicated that FMNL1 affected both actin dynamics and spindle formation for the oocyte polar body extrusion. Moreover, FMNL1 depletion resulted in aberrant localization and expression patterns of a cis-Golgi marker protein, GM130. Finally, we found that the small GTPase RhoA might be the upstream regulator of FMNL1. Taken together, our data indicate that FMNL1 is required for spindle organization and actin assembly through a RhoA-FMNL1-GM130 pathway during mouse oocyte meiosis. PMID:26083584

  8. Regulation of mitotic spindle formation by the RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF10

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Takuji; Ueda, Shuji; Kataoka, Tohru; Satoh, Takaya

    2009-01-01

    Background The Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF10 was originally identified as the product of the gene associated with slowed nerve-conduction velocities of peripheral nerves. However, the function of ARHGEF10 in mammalian cells is totally unknown at a molecular level. ARHGEF10 contains no distinctive functional domains except for tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology and putative transmembrane domains. Results Here we show that RhoA is a substrate for ARHGEF10. In both G1/S and M phases, ARHGEF10 was localized in the centrosome in adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-based knockdown of ARHGEF10 resulted in multipolar spindle formation in M phase. Each spindle pole seems to contain a centrosome consisting of two centrioles and the pericentriolar material. Downregulation of RhoA elicited similar phenotypes, and aberrant mitotic spindle formation following ARHGEF10 knockdown was rescued by ectopic expression of constitutively activated RhoA. Multinucleated cells were not increased upon ARHGEF10 knockdown in contrast to treatment with Y-27632, a specific pharmacological inhibitor for the RhoA effector kinase ROCK, which induced not only multipolar spindle formation, but also multinucleation. Therefore, unregulated centrosome duplication rather than aberration in cytokinesis may be responsible for ARHGEF10 knockdown-dependent multipolar spindle formation. We further isolated the kinesin-like motor protein KIF3B as a binding partner of ARHGEF10. Knockdown of KIF3B again caused multipolar spindle phenotypes. The supernumerary centrosome phenotype was also observed in S phase-arrested osteosarcoma U2OS cells when the expression of ARHGEF10, RhoA or KIF3B was abrogated by RNA interference. Conclusion Collectively, our results suggest that a novel RhoA-dependent signaling pathway under the control of ARHGEF10 has a pivotal role in the regulation of the cell division cycle. This pathway is not involved in the regulation of

  9. The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Is Required for the Formation of Robust Spindles Formed in CSF Xenopus ExtractsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Newton, Ian P.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein occur early in colon cancer and correlate with chromosomal instability. Here, we show that depletion of APC from cystostatic factor (CSF) Xenopus extracts leads to a decrease in microtubule density and changes in tubulin distribution in spindles and asters formed in such extracts. Addition of full-length APC protein or a large, N-terminally truncated APC fragment to APC-depleted extracts restored normal spindle morphology and the intact microtubule-binding site of APC was necessary for this rescue. These data indicate that the APC protein plays a role in the formation of spindles that is dependent on its effect on microtubules. Spindles formed in cycled extracts were not sensitive to APC depletion. In CSF extracts, spindles predominantly formed from aster-like intermediates, whereas in cycled extracts chromatin was the major site of initial microtubule polymerization. These data suggest that APC is important for centrosomally driven spindle formation, which was confirmed by our finding that APC depletion reduced the size of asters nucleated from isolated centrosomes. We propose that lack of microtubule binding in cancer-associated mutations of APC may contribute to defects in the assembly of mitotic spindles and lead to missegregation of chromosomes. PMID:15075372

  10. Inhibition of the Binding between RGS2 and β-Tubulin Interferes with Spindle Formation and Chromosome Segregation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao-Gui; Zhang, Zhi; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    RGS2 is a negative regulator of G protein signaling that contains a GTPase-activating domain and a β-tubulin binding region. This study aimed to determine the localization and function of RGS2 during mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that RGS2 was widely expressed in the cytoplasm with a greater abundance on both meiotic spindles and first/second polar bodies from the fully-grown germinal vesicle (GV) stage to the MII stages. Co-expression of RGS2 and β-tubulin could also be detected in the spindle and polar body of mouse oocytes at the MI, AI, and MII stages. Inhibition of the binding site between RGS2 and β-tubulin was accomplished by injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into GV-stage oocytes, which could result in oocytes arrest at the MI or AI stage during in vitro maturation, but it did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown. Moreover, injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into oocytes resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of first polar body extrusion and abnormal spindle formation. Additionally, levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2 were significantly reduced in anti-RGS2 antibody injected oocytes compared with control oocytes. These findings suggest that RGS2 might play a critical role in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by affecting β-tubulin polymerization and chromosome segregation. PMID:27463806

  11. Spindle assembly checkpoint inactivation fails to suppress neuroblast tumour formation in aurA mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Romé, Pierre; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Karess, Roger; Giet, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires accurate control of cell proliferation, differentiation and chromosome segregation. Drosophila sas-4 and aurA mutants present brain tumours with extra neuroblasts (NBs), defective mitotic spindle assembly and delayed mitosis due to activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here we inactivate the SAC in aurA and sas-4 mutants to determine whether the generation of aneuploidy compromises NB proliferation. Inactivation of the SAC in the sas-4 mutant impairs NB proliferation and disrupts euploidy. By contrast, disrupting the SAC in the aurA mutant does not prevent NB amplification, tumour formation or chromosome segregation. The monitoring of Mad2 and cyclin B dynamics in live aurA NBs reveals that SAC satisfaction is not coupled to cyclin B degradation. Thus, the NBs of aurA mutants present delayed mitosis, with accurate chromosome segregation occurring in a SAC-independent manner. We report here the existence of an Aurora A-dependent mechanism promoting efficient, timed cyclin B degradation. PMID:26568519

  12. Misregulation of the Kinesin-like Protein Subito Induces Meiotic Spindle Formation in the Absence of Chromosomes and Centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Janet K.; Rahman, Taslima; Kober, Vanessa S.; Cesario, Jeffry; McKim, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar spindles assemble in the absence of centrosomes in the oocytes of many species. In Drosophila melanogaster oocytes, the chromosomes have been proposed to initiate spindle assembly by nucleating or capturing microtubules, although the mechanism is not understood. An important contributor to this process is Subito, which is a kinesin-6 protein that is required for bundling interpolar microtubules located within the central spindle at metaphase I. We have characterized the domains of Subito that regulate its activity and its specificity for antiparallel microtubules. This analysis has revealed that the C-terminal domain may interact independently with microtubules while the motor domain is required for maintaining the interaction with the antiparallel microtubules. Surprisingly, deletion of the N-terminal domain resulted in a Subito protein capable of promoting the assembly of bipolar spindles that do not include centrosomes or chromosomes. Bipolar acentrosomal spindle formation during meiosis in oocytes may be driven by the bundling of antiparallel microtubules. Furthermore, these experiments have revealed evidence of a nuclear- or chromosome-based signal that acts at a distance to activate Subito. Instead of the chromosomes directly capturing microtubules, signals released upon nuclear envelope breakdown may activate proteins like Subito, which in turn bundles together microtubules. PMID:17660552

  13. High frequency stimulation of the STN restored the abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and the globus pallidus of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Jue-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-05-19

    Many studies showed that abnormal oscillations in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to the well-studied beta synchronization, high-voltage spindles (HVSs), another type of abnormal oscillation observed in PD, are neglected. To explore the role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in HVSs regulation, we simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in the globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in the primary motor cortex(M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats before, during, and after STN-DBS. Consistent with our previous study, HVSs occurrence, duration, and relative power and coherence between the M1 cortex and GP increased in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We found that high but not low frequency stimulation restored the abnormal HVSs activity and motor deficit. These results suggest that the STN is involved in the abnormal oscillation between the M1 cortex and GP.

  14. CEP215 is involved in the dynein-dependent accumulation of pericentriolar matrix proteins for spindle pole formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongju; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2010-02-15

    CEP 215 is a human orthologue of Drosophila centrosomin which is a core centrosome component for the pericentriolar matrix protein recruitment. Recent investigations revealed that CEP 215 is required for centrosome cohesion, centrosomal attachment of the gamma-TuRC, and microtubule dynamics. However, it remains obscure how CEP 215 functions for recruitment of the centrosomal proteins during the centrosome cycle. Here, we investigated a role of CEP 215 during mitosis. Knockdown of CEP 215 resulted in characteristic mitotic phenotypes, including monopolar spindle formation, a decrease in distance between the spindle pole pair, and detachment of the centrosomes from the spindle poles. We noticed that CEP 215 is critical for centrosomal localization of dynein throughout the cell cycle. As a consequence, the selective centrosomal proteins were not recruited to the centrosome properly. Finally, the centrosomal localization of CEP 215 also depends on the dynein-dynactin complex. Based on the results, we propose that CEP 215 regulates a dynein-dependent transport of the pericentriolar matrix proteins during the centrosome maturation. PMID:20139723

  15. Decreased HCN2 expression in STN contributes to abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and globus pallidus of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Ju-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-08-27

    Abnormal oscillation in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. High-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the main type abnormal oscillations in Parkinson's disease, are regulated by dopamine D2-like receptors but not D1-like receptors. However, little is known about how dopamine D2-like receptors regulate HVSs and the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated2 (HCN2) in HVSs regulation. We simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in primary motor cortex (M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats. The expression of HCN2 and dopamine D2 receptor in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was examined by immunochemical staining and Western blotting. We also tested the role of HCN2 in HVSs regulation by using pharmacological and shRNA methodology. We found that dopamine D2-like receptor agonists suppressed the increased HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. HCN2 was co-expressed with dopamine D2 receptor in the STN, and dopamine depletion decreased the expression of HCN2 as well as dopamine D2 receptor which contribute to the regulation of HVSs. HCN2 was down regulated by HCN2 shRNA, which thereby led to an increase in the HVSs in naïve rats while HCN2 agonist reduced the HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results suggest that HCN2 in the STN is involved in abnormal oscillation regulation between M1 cortex and GP.

  16. The Mother Centriole Appendage Protein Cenexin Modulates Lumen Formation through Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    Establishing apical-basal polarity is instrumental in the functional shaping of a solitary lumen within an acinus. By exploiting micropatterned slides, wound healing assays, and three-dimensional culture systems, we identified a mother centriole subdistal appendage protein, cenexin, as a critical player in symmetric lumen expansion through the control of microtubule organization. In this regard, cenexin was required for both centrosome positioning in interphase cells and proper spindle orientation during mitosis. In contrast, the essential mother centriole distal appendage protein CEP164 did not play a role in either process, demonstrating the specificity of subdistal appendages for these events. Importantly, upon closer examination we found that cenexin depletion decreased astral microtubule length, disrupted astral microtubule minus-end organization, and increased levels of the polarity protein NuMA at the cell cortex. Interestingly, spindle misorientation and NuMA mislocalization were reversed by treatment with a low dose of the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Taken together, these results suggest that cenexin modulates microtubule organization and stability to mediate spindle orientation. PMID:26948879

  17. CENP-W Plays a Role in Maintaining Bipolar Spindle Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2014-01-01

    The CENP-W/T complex was previously reported to be required for mitosis. HeLa cells depleted of CENP-W displayed profound mitotic defects, with mitotic timing delay, disorganized prometaphases and multipolar spindles as major phenotypic consequences. In this study, we examined the process of multipolar spindle formation induced by CENP-W depletion. Depletion of CENP-W in HeLa cells labeled with histone H2B and tubulin fluorescent proteins induced rapid fragmentation of originally bipolar spindles in a high proportion of cells. CENP-W depletion was associated with depletion of Hec1 at kinetochores. The possibility of promiscuous centrosomal duplication was ruled out by immunofluorescent examination of centrioles. However, centrioles were frequently observed to be abnormally split. In addition, a large proportion of the supernumerary poles lacked centrioles, but were positively stained with different centrosomal markers. These observations suggested that perturbation in spindle force distribution caused by defective kinetochores could contribute to a mechanical mechanism for spindle pole disruption. ‘Spindle free’ nocodazole arrested cells did not exhibit pole fragmentation after CENP-W depletion, showing that pole fragmentation is microtubule dependent. Inhibition of centrosome separation by monastrol reduced the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, indicating that Eg5 plays a role in spindle pole disruption. Surprisingly, CENP-W depletion rescued the monopolar spindle phenotype of monastrol treatment, with an increased frequency of bipolar spindles observed after CENP-W RNAi. We overexpressed the microtubule cross-linking protein TPX2 to create spindle poles stabilized by the microtubule cross-linking activity of TPX2. Spindle pole fragmentation was suppressed in a TPX2-dependent fashion. We propose that CENP-W, by influencing proper kinetochore assembly, particularly microtubule docking sites, can confer spindle pole resistance to traction forces exerted

  18. Msd1/SSX2IP-dependent microtubule anchorage ensures spindle orientation and primary cilia formation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Ikebe, Chiho; Tada, Masazumi; Toda, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Anchoring microtubules to the centrosome is critical for cell geometry and polarity, yet the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that the conserved human Msd1/SSX2IP is required for microtubule anchoring. hMsd1/SSX2IP is delivered to the centrosome in a centriolar satellite-dependent manner and binds the microtubule-nucleator γ-tubulin complex. hMsd1/SSX2IP depletion leads to disorganised interphase microtubules and misoriented mitotic spindles with reduced length and intensity. Furthermore, hMsd1/SSX2IP is essential for ciliogenesis, and during zebrafish embryogenesis, knockdown of its orthologue results in ciliary defects and disturbs left-right asymmetry. We propose that the Msd1 family comprises conserved microtubule-anchoring proteins.

  19. Formation of cholinergic synapse-like specializations at developing murine muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yina; Wesolowski, Marta; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Witzemann, Veit; Kröger, Stephan

    2014-09-15

    Muscle spindles are complex stretch-sensitive mechanoreceptors. They consist of specialized skeletal muscle fibers, called intrafusal fibers, which are innervated in the central (equatorial) region by afferent sensory axons and in both polar regions by efferent γ-motoneurons. We show that AChRs are concentrated at the γ-motoneuron endplate as well as in the equatorial region where they colocalize with the sensory nerve ending. In addition to the AChRs, the contact site between sensory nerve ending and intrafusal muscle fiber contains a high concentration of choline acetyltransferase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter and the AChR-associated protein rapsyn. Moreover, bassoon, a component of the presynaptic cytomatrix involved in synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is present in γ-motoneuron endplates but also in the sensory nerve terminal. Finally, we demonstrate that during postnatal development of the γ-motoneuron endplate, the AChR subunit stoichiometry changes from the γ-subunit-containing fetal AChRs to the ε-subunit-containing adult AChRs, similar and approximately in parallel to the postnatal subunit maturation at the neuromuscular junction. In contrast, despite the onset of ε-subunit expression during postnatal development the γ-subunit remains detectable in the equatorial region by subunit-specific antibodies as well as by analysis of muscle spindles from mice with genetically-labeled AChR γ-subunits. These results demonstrate an unusual maturation of the AChR subunit composition at the annulospiral endings and suggest that in addition to the recently described glutamatergic secretory system, the sensory nerve terminals are also specialized for cholinergic synaptic transmission, synaptic vesicle storage and exocytosis.

  20. TPPP/p25 promotes tubulin assemblies and blocks mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tirián, L.; Hlavanda, E.; Oláh, J.; Horváth, I.; Orosz, F.; Szabó, B.; Kovács, J.; Szabad, J.; Ovádi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we isolated from bovine brain a protein, TPPP/p25 and identified as p25, a brain-specific protein that induced aberrant tubulin assemblies. The primary sequence of this protein differs from that of other proteins identified so far; however, it shows high homology with p25-like hypothetical proteins sought via blast. Here, we characterized the binding of TPPP/p25 to tubulin by means of surface plasmon resonance; the kinetic parameters are as follows: kon, 2.4 × 104 M–1·s–1; koff, 5.4 × 10–3 s–1; and Kd, 2.3 × 10–7 M. This protein at substoichometric concentration promotes the polymerization of tubulin into double-walled tubules and polymorphic aggregates or bundles paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules as judged by quantitative data of electron and atomic force microscopies. Injection of bovine TPPP/p25 into cleavage Drosophila embryos expressing tubulin–GFP fusion protein reveals that TPPP/p25 inhibits mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope breakdown without affecting other cellular events like centrosome replication and separation, microtubule nucleation by the centrosomes, and nuclear growth. GTP counteracts TPPP/p25 both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14623963

  1. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  2. Bimodal Interaction of Mammalian Polo-Like Kinase 1 and a Centrosomal Scaffold, Cep192, in the Regulation of Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingjun; Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Tae-Sung; Lee, Eun Hye; Park, Suk-Youl; Zhou, Ming; Bang, Jeong K.

    2015-01-01

    Serving as microtubule-organizing centers, centrosomes play a key role in forming bipolar spindles. The mechanism of how centrosomes promote bipolar spindle assembly in various organisms remains largely unknown. A recent study with Xenopus laevis egg extracts suggested that the Plk1 ortholog Plx1 interacts with the phospho-T46 (p-T46) motif of Xenopus Cep192 (xCep192) to form an xCep192-mediated xAurA-Plx1 cascade that is critical for bipolar spindle formation. Here, we demonstrated that in cultured human cells, Cep192 recruits AurA and Plk1 in a cooperative manner, and this event is important for the reciprocal activation of AurA and Plk1. Strikingly, Plk1 interacted with Cep192 through either the p-T44 (analogous to Xenopus p-T46) or the newly identified p-S995 motif via its C-terminal noncatalytic polo-box domain. The interaction between Plk1 and the p-T44 motif was prevalent in the presence of Cep192-bound AurA, whereas the interaction of Plk1 with the p-T995 motif was preferred in the absence of AurA binding. Notably, the loss of p-T44- and p-S995-dependent Cep192-Plk1 interactions induced an additive defect in recruiting Plk1 and γ-tubulin to centrosomes, which ultimately led to a failure in proper bipolar spindle formation and mitotic progression. Thus, we propose that Plk1 promotes centrosome-based bipolar spindle formation by forming two functionally nonredundant complexes with Cep192. PMID:26012549

  3. Mei-1, a Gene Required for Meiotic Spindle Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Is a Member of a Family of ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Maguire, S.; Mains, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    Meiotic spindle formation in the female germline of Caenorhabditis elegans requires expression of the gene mei-1. We have cloned mei-1 by transformation rescue and found that it resides near a hot spot for recombination, in an area of high gene density. The highest levels of mei-1 mRNA accumulate in the female germline of adult hermaphrodites as well as in fertilized embryos. The message persists for several hours after the protein functions in embryos, implying the need for post-transcriptional regulation. Two alternatively spliced messages are made that would result in proteins that differ internally by three amino acids; the larger of the two mRNAs is preferentially enriched in the female germline. The sequence of mei-1 shows that it is a member of a newly described family of ATPases that share a highly conserved nucleotide-binding site; four dominant-negative mutations of mei-1 are found at or near this region. Divergent roles ascribed to this family include membrane function, proteolysis, transcription and cell cycle regulation. PMID:8150281

  4. Spatiotemporal control of spindle midzone formation by PRC1 in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Lau, Eric; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella; Jiang, Wei

    2006-04-18

    We have examined the role of PRC1, a midzone-associated, microtubule bundling, Cdk substrate protein, in regulating the spatiotemporal formation of the midzone in HeLa cells. Cdk-mediated phosphorylation of PRC1 in early mitosis holds PRC1 in an inactive monomeric state. During the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, PRC1 is dephosphorylated, promoting PRC1 oligomerization. Using time-lapse video microscopy, RNA interference, 3D immunofluorescence reconstruction imaging, and rescue experiments, we demonstrate that the dephosphorylated form of PRC1 is essential for bundling antiparallel, nonkinetochore, interdigitating microtubules to establish the midzone that is necessary for cytokinesis. Our results thus indicate that PRC1 is an essential factor in controlling the spatiotemporal formation of the midzone in human cells. PMID:16603632

  5. Identification and characterization of INMAP, a novel interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus protein that is involved in spindle formation and cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Enzhi; Lei, Yan; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yanbo; Song, Chunqing; Marc, Jan; Wang, Yongchao; Sun, Le; Liang, Qianjin

    2009-04-15

    A novel protein that associates with interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus (INMAP) was identified by screening HeLa cDNA expression library with an autoimmune serum followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Its complete cDNA sequence of 1.818 kb encodes 343 amino acids with predicted molecular mass of 38.2 kDa and numerous phosphorylation sites. The sequence is identical with nucleotides 1-1800 bp of an unnamed gene (GenBank accession no. (7022388)) and highly homologous with the 3'-terminal sequence of POLR3B. A monoclonal antibody against INMAP reacted with similar proteins in S. cerevisiae, Mel and HeLa cells, suggesting that it is a conserved protein. Confocal microscopy using either GFP-INMAP fusion protein or labeling with the monoclonal antibody revealed that the protein localizes as distinct dots in the interphase nucleus, but during mitosis associates closely with the spindle. Double immunolabeling using specific antibodies showed that the INMAP co-localizes with {alpha}-tubulin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA. INMAP also co-immunoprecipitated with these proteins in their native state. Stable overexpression of INMAP in HeLa cell lines leads to defects in the spindle, mitotic arrest, formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, inhibition of growth, and apoptosis. We propose that INMAP is a novel protein that plays essential role in spindle formation and cell-cycle progression.

  6. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} mouse model of core myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-04-24

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed.

  7. Loss of BubR1 acetylation causes defects in spindle assembly checkpoint signaling and promotes tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inai; Lee, Hae-ock; Choi, Eunhee; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; Kwon, Mi-Sun; Min, Jaewon; Park, Pil-Gu; Lee, Seonju; Kong, Young-Yun; Gong, Gyungyub

    2013-01-01

    BubR1 acetylation is essential in mitosis. Mice heterozygous for the acetylation-deficient BubR1 allele (K243R/+) spontaneously developed tumors with massive chromosome missegregations. K243R/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibited a weakened spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) with shortened mitotic timing. The generation of the SAC signal was intact, as Mad2 localization to the unattached kinetochore (KT) was unaltered; however, because of the premature degradation of K243R-BubR1, the mitotic checkpoint complex disassociated prematurely in the nocodazole-treated condition, suggesting that maintenance of the SAC is compromised. BubR1 acetylation was also required to counteract excessive Aurora B activity at the KT for stable chromosome–spindle attachments. The association of acetylation-deficient BubR1 with PP2A-B56α phosphatase was reduced, and the phosphorylated Ndc80 at the KT was elevated in K243R/+ MEFs. In relation, there was a marked increase of micronuclei and p53 mutation was frequently detected in primary tumors of K243R/+ mice. Collectively, the combined effects of failure in chromosome–spindle attachment and weakened SAC cause genetic instability and cancer in K243R/+ mice. PMID:23878276

  8. Origin of abnormal formation of pearlite in medium-carbon steel under nonequilibrium conditions of heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, D. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Urtsev, V. N.; Degtyarev, V. N.; Shmakov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and kinetics of the formation of austenite in medium-carbon steel during shortterm heating above the temperature Ac 1 followed by accelerated cooling are analyzed. It has been shown that the abnormal formation of pearlite in steel results from the concentrational and structural inhomogeneity of austenite, as well as the presence of carbide particles in ferrite areas.

  9. Nek9 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiosis and its location in early embryo mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shang-Wu; Gao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Song, Ya-Li; Zhu, Jin-Liang; Qi, Shu-Tao; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Wang, Zhong-Wei; Lin, Fei; Huang, Hao; Xing, Fu-Qi; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Nek9 (also known as Nercc1), a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis A) family of protein kinases, regulates spindle formation, chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Here, we showed that Nek9 protein was expressed from germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages in mouse oocytes with no detectable changes. Confocal microscopy identified that Nek9 was localized to the spindle poles at the metaphase stages and associated with the midbody at anaphase or telophase stage in both meiotic oocytes and the first mitotic embyros. Depletion of Nek9 by specific morpholino injection resulted in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes with significant pro-MI/MI arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Knockdown of Nek9 also impaired the spindle-pole localization of γ-tubulin and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Bub3 at the kinetochores even after 10 h of culture. Live-cell imaging analysis also confirmed that knockdown of Nek9 resulted in oocyte arrest at the pro-MI/MI stage with abnormal spindles, misaligned chromosomes and failed polar body emission. Taken together, our results suggest that Nek9 may act as a MTOC-associated protein regulating microtubule nucleation, spindle organization and, thus, cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation, fertilization and early embryo cleavage. PMID:23159858

  10. Formation of a thermodynamically metastable structure containing hairpin II is critical for infectivity of potato spindle tuber viroid RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Loss, P; Schmitz, M; Steger, G; Riesner, D

    1991-01-01

    The functional relevance of a hairpin II-containing structure of viroid RNA was studied by site-directed mutagenesis, thermodynamic calculations, experimental denaturation curves and infectivity tests. Hairpin II is formed during thermal denaturation of circular viroids or as part of a metastable structure during synthesis of viroid replication intermediates. In potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), eight single-site mutations were generated in the segments which form hairpin II. From the mutated viroid cDNA clones, linear RNA transcripts of PSTVd unit length were synthesized. The relevance of hairpin II for the mechanism of denaturation was confirmed quantitatively by optical denaturation curves and temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis. Infectivity tests showed that the mutations in the core region of hairpin II reverted to the wild type sequence whereas the mutations in the peripheral regions of hairpin II remained genetically stable. These data are in accordance with the natural variance of hairpin II in other viroids of the PSTVd class. Thus, the integrity of the core of hairpin II is critical for infectivity. Hairpin II exhibits a strong similarity in sequence as well as in three-dimensional structure to certain DNA GC-clusters found in the 5'-upstream regions of some genes in man, animals, viruses and plants. A hypothesis about a function of hairpin II as a binding site for host cell transcription factors is proposed. Images PMID:2001685

  11. The kinesinlike protein Subito contributes to central spindle assembly and organization of the meiotic spindle in Drosophila oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jang, J K; Rahman, T; McKim, K S

    2005-10-01

    In the oocytes of many species, bipolar spindles form in the absence of centrosomes. Drosophila melanogaster oocyte chromosomes have a major role in nucleating microtubules, which precedes the bundling and assembly of these microtubules into a bipolar spindle. Here we present evidence that a region similar to the anaphase central spindle functions to organize acentrosomal spindles. Subito mutants are characterized by the formation of tripolar or monopolar spindles and nondisjunction of homologous chromosomes at meiosis I. Subito encodes a kinesinlike protein and associates with the meiotic central spindle, consistent with its classification in the Kinesin 6/MKLP1 family. This class of proteins is known to be required for cytokinesis, but our results suggest a new function in spindle formation. The meiotic central spindle appears during prometaphase and includes passenger complex proteins such as AurB and Incenp. Unlike mitotic cells, the passenger proteins do not associate with centromeres before anaphase. In the absence of Subito, central spindle formation is defective and AurB and Incenp fail to properly localize. We propose that Subito is required for establishing and/or maintaining the central spindle in Drosophila oocytes, and this substitutes for the role of centrosomes in organizing the bipolar spindle. PMID:16055508

  12. Effects of expected-value information and display format on recognition of aircraft subsystem abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Abbott, Kathy H.

    1994-01-01

    This study identifies improved methods to present system parameter information for detecting abnormal conditions and to identify system status. Two workstation experiments were conducted. The first experiment determined if including expected-value-range information in traditional parameter display formats affected subject performance. The second experiment determined if using a nontraditional parameter display format, which presented relative deviation from expected value, was better than traditional formats with expected-value ranges included. The inclusion of expected-value-range information onto traditional parameter formats was found to have essentially no effect. However, subjective results indicated support for including this information. The nontraditional column deviation parameter display format resulted in significantly fewer errors compared with traditional formats with expected-value-ranges included. In addition, error rates for the column deviation parameter display format remained stable as the scenario complexity increased, whereas error rates for the traditional parameter display formats with expected-value ranges increased. Subjective results also indicated that the subjects preferred this new format and thought that their performance was better with it. The column deviation parameter display format is recommended for display applications that require rapid recognition of out-of-tolerance conditions, especially for a large number of parameters.

  13. A unique set of centrosome proteins requires Pericentrin for spindle-pole localization and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Debby; Zheng, Guoqiang; Redick, Sambra D.; Hung, Hui-Fang; Samtani, Rajeev; Jurczyk, Agata; Akbarian, Schahram; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew; Bober, Michael; Guo, Yin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Majewski Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is caused by mutations in the centrosome gene pericentrin (PCNT) which lead to severe pre- and post-natal growth retardation[1]. As in MOPDII patients, disruption of pericentrin (Pcnt) in mice caused a number of abnormalities including microcephaly, aberrant hemodynamics analyzed by in utero echocardiography and cardiovascular anomalies; the latter being associated with mortality, as in the human condition[1]. To identify the mechanisms underlying these defects, we tested for changes in cell and molecular function. All Pcnt−/− mouse tissues and cells examined showed spindle misorientation. This mouse phenotype was associated with misdirected ventricular septal growth in the heart, decreased proliferative symmetric divisions in brain neural progenitors and increased misoriented divisions in fibroblasts; the same phenotype was seen in fibroblasts from three MOPDII individuals. Misoriented spindles were associated with disrupted astral microtubules and near complete loss of a unique set of centrosome proteins from spindle poles (ninein, Cep215, centriolin). All these proteins appear to be crucial for microtubule anchoring and all interacted with Pcnt, suggesting that Pcnt serves as a molecular scaffold for this functionally-linked set of spindle pole proteins. Importantly, Pcnt disruption had no detectable effect on localization of proteins involved in the cortical polarity pathway (NuMA, p150glued, aPKC). Not only do these data reveal a spindle-pole-localized complex for spindle orientation, but they identify key spindle symmetry proteins involved in the pathogenesis of MOPDII. PMID:25220058

  14. A unique set of centrosome proteins requires pericentrin for spindle-pole localization and spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ting; Hehnly, Heidi; Yu, Qing; Farkas, Debby; Zheng, Guoqiang; Redick, Sambra D; Hung, Hui-Fang; Samtani, Rajeev; Jurczyk, Agata; Akbarian, Schahram; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew; Bober, Michael; Guo, Yin; Lo, Cecilia; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is caused by mutations in the centrosome gene pericentrin (PCNT) that lead to severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. As in MOPDII patients, disruption of pericentrin (Pcnt) in mice caused a number of abnormalities including microcephaly, aberrant hemodynamics analyzed by in utero echocardiography, and cardiovascular anomalies; the latter being associated with mortality, as in the human condition. To identify the mechanisms underlying these defects, we tested for changes in cell and molecular function. All Pcnt(-/-) mouse tissues and cells examined showed spindle misorientation. This mouse phenotype was associated with misdirected ventricular septal growth in the heart, decreased proliferative symmetric divisions in brain neural progenitors, and increased misoriented divisions in fibroblasts; the same phenotype was seen in fibroblasts from three MOPDII individuals. Misoriented spindles were associated with disrupted astral microtubules and near complete loss of a unique set of centrosome proteins from spindle poles (ninein, Cep215, centriolin). All these proteins appear to be crucial for microtubule anchoring and all interacted with Pcnt, suggesting that Pcnt serves as a molecular scaffold for this functionally linked set of spindle pole proteins. Importantly, Pcnt disruption had no detectable effect on localization of proteins involved in the cortical polarity pathway (NuMA, p150(glued), aPKC). Not only do these data reveal a spindle-pole-localized complex for spindle orientation, but they identify key spindle symmetry proteins involved in the pathogenesis of MOPDII. PMID:25220058

  15. Kinetochore Fibers Are Not Involved in the Formation of the First Meiotic Spindle in Mouse Oocytes, but Control the Exit from the First Meiotic M Phase

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Stéphane; Maria, Angélica Santa; Guillaud, Philippe; Dujardin, Denis; Kubiak, Jacek Z.; Maro, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    During meiosis, two successive divisions occur without any intermediate S phase to produce haploid gametes. The first meiotic division is unique in that homologous chromosomes are segregated while the cohesion between sister chromatids is maintained, resulting in a reductional division. Moreover, the duration of the first meiotic M phase is usually prolonged when compared with mitotic M phases lasting 8 h in mouse oocytes. We investigated the spindle assembly pathway and its role in the progression of the first meiotic M phase in mouse oocytes. During the first 4 h, a bipolar spindle forms and the chromosomes congress near the equatorial plane of the spindle without stable kinetochore– microtubule end interactions. This late prometaphase spindle is then maintained for 4 h with chromosomes oscillating in the central region of the spindle. The kinetochore–microtubule end interactions are set up at the end of the first meiotic M phase (8 h after entry into M phase). This event allows the final alignment of the chromosomes and exit from metaphase. The continuous presence of the prometaphase spindle is not required for progression of the first meiotic M phase. Finally, the ability of kinetochores to interact with microtubules is acquired at the end of the first meiotic M phase and determines the timing of polar body extrusion. PMID:10402455

  16. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  17. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  18. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  19. Targeting Alp7/TACC to the spindle pole body is essential for mitotic spindle assembly in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ngang Heok; Okada, Naoyuki; Fong, Chii Shyang; Arai, Kunio; Sato, Masamitsu; Toda, Takashi

    2014-08-25

    The conserved TACC protein family localises to the centrosome (the spindle pole body, SPB in fungi) and mitotic spindles, thereby playing a crucial role in bipolar spindle assembly. However, it remains elusive how TACC proteins are recruited to the centrosome/SPB. Here, using fission yeast Alp7/TACC, we have determined clustered five amino acid residues within the TACC domain required for SPB localisation. Critically, these sequences are essential for the functions of Alp7, including proper spindle formation and mitotic progression. Moreover, we have identified pericentrin-like Pcp1 as a loading factor to the mitotic SPB, although Pcp1 is not a sole platform.

  20. Targeting Alp7/TACC to the spindle pole body is essential for mitotic spindle assembly in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ngang Heok; Okada, Naoyuki; Fong, Chii Shyang; Arai, Kunio; Sato, Masamitsu; Toda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The conserved TACC protein family localises to the centrosome (the spindle pole body, SPB in fungi) and mitotic spindles, thereby playing a crucial role in bipolar spindle assembly. However, it remains elusive how TACC proteins are recruited to the centrosome/SPB. Here, using fission yeast Alp7/TACC, we have determined clustered five amino acid residues within the TACC domain required for SPB localisation. Critically, these sequences are essential for the functions of Alp7, including proper spindle formation and mitotic progression. Moreover, we have identified pericentrin-like Pcp1 as a loading factor to the mitotic SPB, although Pcp1 is not a sole platform. PMID:24937146

  1. Effect of change in spindle structure on proliferation inhibition of osteosarcoma cells and osteoblast under simulated microgravity during incubation in rotating bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lijun; Diao, Yan; Qi, Jing; Khokhlov, Alexander; Feng, Hui; Yan, Xing; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effect of microgravity on the proliferation of mammalian osteosarcoma cells and osteoblasts, the changes in cell proliferation, spindle structure, expression of MAD2 or BUB1, and effect of MAD2 or BUB1 on the inhibition of cell proliferation is investigated by keeping mammalian osteosarcoma cells and osteoblasts under simulated microgravity in a rotating wall vessel (2D-RWVS) bioreactor. Experimental results indicate that the effect of microgravity on proliferation inhibition, incidence of multipolar spindles, and expression of MAD2 or BUB1 increases with the extension of treatment time. And multipolar cells enter mitosis after MAD2 or BUB1 is knocked down, which leads to the decrease in DNA content, and decrease the accumulation of cells within multipolar spindles. It can therefore be concluded that simulated microgravity can alter the structure of spindle microtubules, and stimulate the formation of multipolar spindles together with multicentrosomes, which causes the overexpression of SAC proteins to block the abnormal cells in metaphase, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation. By clarifying the relationship between cell proliferation inhibition, spindle structure and SAC changes under simulated microgravity, the molecular mechanism and morphology basis of proliferation inhibition induced by microgravity is revealed, which will give experiment and theoretical evidence for the mechanism of space bone loss and some other space medicine problems.

  2. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  3. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2016-08-15

    In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

  4. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  5. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  6. Constitutive Notch Signaling Causes Abnormal Development of the Oviducts, Abnormal Angiogenesis, and Cyst Formation in Mouse Female Reproductive Tract.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lydia; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Manresa, Carmen; Barbara, Agustin M; Poppiti, Robert J; Tan, Yingchun; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critical for the differentiation of many tissues and organs in the embryo. To study the consequences of Notch1 gain-of-function signaling on female reproductive tract development, we used a cre-loxP strategy and Amhr2-cre transgene to generate mice with conditionally activated Notch1 (Rosa(Notch1)). The Amhr2-cre transgene is expressed in the mesenchyme of developing female reproductive tract and in granulosa cells in the ovary. Double transgenic Amhr2-cre, Rosa(Notch1) females were infertile, whereas control Rosa(Notch1) mice had normal fertility. All female reproductive organs in mutants showed hemorrhaging of blood vessels progressing with age. The mutant oviducts did not develop coiling, and were instead looped around the ovary. There were multiple blockages in the lumen along the oviduct length, creating a barrier for sperm or oocyte passage. Mutant females demonstrated inflamed uteri with increased vascularization and an influx of inflammatory cells. Additionally, older females developed ovarian, oviductal, and uterine cysts. The significant change in gene expression was detected in the mutant oviduct expression of Wnt4, essential for female reproductive tract development. Similar oviductal phenotypes have been detected previously in mice with activated Smo and in beta-catenin, Wnt4, Wnt7a, and Dicer conditional knockouts, indicating a common regulatory pathway disrupted by these genetic abnormalities. PMID:26843448

  7. Abnormal Anatomical Variations of Extra-Hepatic Biliary Tract, and Their Relation to Biliary Tract Injuries and Stones Formation

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, Meiaad F.; Al-Amoodi, Munaser S.; Aldaqal, Saleh M.; Sibiany, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the most common abnormal anatomical variations of extra-hepatic biliary tract (EHBT), and their relation to biliary tract injuries and stones formation. Methods This is a retrospective review of 120 patients, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and/or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP), between July 2011 and June 2013. The patients’ ERCP and MRCP images were reviewed and evaluated for the anatomy of EHBT; the medical records were reviewed for demographic data, biliary tracts injuries and stones formation. Results Out of 120 patients, 50 were males (41.7%) and 70 were females (58.3%). The mean age was 54 years old (range 20 - 88). Abnormal anatomy was reported in 30% (n = 36). Short cystic duct (CD) was found in 20% (n = 24), left CD insertion in 5% (n = 6), CD inserted into the right hepatic duct (RHD) in 1.7% (n = 2), duct of Luschka in 3.33% (n = 4) and accessory hepatic duct in also 3.33% (n = 4). Biliary tract injuries were reported in 15% (n = 18) and stones in 71.7% (n = 86). Biliary tract injuries were higher in abnormal anatomy (P = 0.04), but there was no relation between abnormal anatomy and stones formation. Conclusion Abnormal anatomy of EHBT was found to be 30%. The most common abnormality is short CD followed by left CD insertion. Surgeons should be aware of these common abnormalities in our patients, hence avoiding injuries to the biliary tract during surgery. The abnormal anatomy was associated with high incidence of biliary tract injury but has no relation to biliary stone formation.

  8. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients.

  9. Abnormal tuning of saccade-related cells in pontine reticular formation of strabismic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mustari, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus is a common disorder, characterized by a chronic misalignment of the eyes and numerous visual and oculomotor abnormalities. For example, saccades are often highly disconjugate. For humans with pattern strabismus, the horizontal and vertical disconjugacies vary with eye position. In monkeys, manipulations that disturb binocular vision during the first several weeks of life result in a chronic strabismus with characteristics that closely match those in human patients. Early onset strabismus is associated with altered binocular sensitivity of neurons in visual cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that brain stem circuits specific to saccadic eye movements are abnormal. We targeted the pontine paramedian reticular formation, a structure that directly projects to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus. In normal animals, neurons in this structure are characterized by a high-frequency burst of spikes associated with ipsiversive saccades. We recorded single-unit activity from 84 neurons from four monkeys (two normal, one exotrope, and one esotrope), while they made saccades to a visual target on a tangent screen. All 24 neurons recorded from the normal animals had preferred directions within 30° of pure horizontal. For the strabismic animals, the distribution of preferred directions was normal on one side of the brain, but highly variable on the other. In fact, 12/60 neurons recorded from the strabismic animals preferred vertical saccades. Many also had unusually weak or strong bursts. These data suggest that the loss of corresponding binocular vision during infancy impairs the development of normal tuning characteristics for saccade-related neurons in brain stem. PMID:26063778

  10. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  11. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization.

  12. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  13. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  14. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  15. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-05

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission.

  16. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin.

  17. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin. PMID:26088160

  18. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin. PMID:26088160

  19. The Microtubule-Associated Protein ASPM Regulates Spindle Assembly and Meiotic Progression in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Ma, Wei; Zhu, Yu-Bo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Bing-Yuan; An, Na; An, Lei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Zhong-Hong; Tian, Jian-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated) plays an important role in spindle organization and cell division in mitosis and meiosis in lower animals, but its function in mouse oocyte meiosis has not been investigated. In this study, we characterized the localization and expression dynamics of ASPM during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and analyzed the effects of the downregulation of ASPM expression on meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that ASPM localized to the entire spindle at metaphase I (MI) and metaphase II (MII), colocalizing with the spindle microtubule protein acetylated tubulin (Ac-tubulin). In taxol-treated oocytes, ASPM colocalized with Ac-tubulin on the excessively polymerized microtubule fibers of enlarged spindles and the numerous asters in the cytoplasm. Nocodazole treatment induced the gradual disassembly of microtubule fibers, during which ASPM remained colocalized with the dynamic Ac-tubulin. The downregulation of ASPM expression by a gene-specific morpholino resulted in an abnormal meiotic spindle and inhibited meiotic progression; most of the treated oocytes were blocked in the MI stage with elongated meiotic spindles. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry and western blot analysis revealed that ASPM interacted with calmodulin in MI oocytes and that these proteins colocalized at the spindle. Our results provide strong evidence that ASPM plays a critical role in meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes. PMID:23152892

  20. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  1. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1(Ser137) involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210)) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1(Ser137) with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1(Thr210) was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1(Ser137) was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1(Thr210) was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1(Ser137) accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210), as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1(Thr210), were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1(Ser137) is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  2. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  3. Mitotic spindle assembly on chromatin patterns made with deep UV photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tarnawska, Katarzyna; Pugieux, Céline; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    We provide a detailed method to generate arrays of mitotic spindles in vitro. Spindles are formed in extract prepared from unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs, which contain all the molecular ingredients of mitotic spindles. The method is based on using deep UV photochemistry to attach chromatin-coated beads on a glass surface according to a pattern of interest. The immobilized beads act as artificial chromosomes, and induce the formation of mitotic spindles in their immediate vicinity. To perform the experiment, a chamber is assembled over the chromatin pattern, Xenopus egg extract is flowed in and after incubation the spindles are imaged with a confocal microscope. PMID:24484654

  4. Mitotic spindle assembly on chromatin patterns made with deep UV photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tarnawska, Katarzyna; Pugieux, Céline; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    We provide a detailed method to generate arrays of mitotic spindles in vitro. Spindles are formed in extract prepared from unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs, which contain all the molecular ingredients of mitotic spindles. The method is based on using deep UV photochemistry to attach chromatin-coated beads on a glass surface according to a pattern of interest. The immobilized beads act as artificial chromosomes, and induce the formation of mitotic spindles in their immediate vicinity. To perform the experiment, a chamber is assembled over the chromatin pattern, Xenopus egg extract is flowed in and after incubation the spindles are imaged with a confocal microscope.

  5. Axin-1 Regulates Meiotic Spindle Organization in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Shen, Yu-Ting; Xu, Lin; Chen, Ming-Huang; Wang, Ya-Long; Xu, Bai-Hui; Yang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Hai-Long

    2016-01-01

    Axin-1, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, is a versatile scaffold protein involved in centrosome separation and spindle assembly in mitosis, but its function in mammalian oogenesis remains unknown. Here we examined the localization and function of Axin-1 during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Axin-1 was localized around the spindle. Knockdown of the Axin1 gene by microinjection of specific short interfering (si)RNA into the oocyte cytoplasm resulted in severely defective spindles, misaligned chromosomes, failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion, and impaired pronuclear formation. However, supplementing the culture medium with the Wnt pathway activator LiCl improved spindle morphology and pronuclear formation. Downregulation of Axin1 gene expression also impaired the spindle pole localization of γ-tubulin/Nek9 and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 at kinetochores after 8.5 h of culture. Our results suggest that Axin-1 is critical for spindle organization and cell cycle progression during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:27284927

  6. Abnormal fiber end migration in Royal College of Surgeons rats during posterior subcapsular cataract formation

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anita; Al-Ghoul, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    lenses showed the expected peripheral pattern of labeling at all ages. Dystrophic RCS lenses at 2 weeks were comparable to controls, however by 3–4 weeks they displayed scattered foci of F-actin within the BMC. At all time points thereafter, F-actin was rearranged into a ‘rosette’ pattern of prominent foci at cell vertices. Conclusions The data are consistent with the hypothesis that migration of basal fiber ends is altered in a two stage process wherein initially, migration patterns undergo a rapid shift resulting in abnormal suture sub-branch formation. Subsequent cytological alterations are consistent with an eventual cessation of migration, precluding proper targeting of basal ends to their sutural destinations and leading to cataract plaque formation. PMID:20806082

  7. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Perturbs Cell Cycle Progression and Spindle Organization in Porcine Meiotic Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wang, Yan-Kui; Song, Zhi-Qiang; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic maturation of mammalian oocytes is a precisely orchestrated and complex process. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widely used solvent, drug, and cryoprotectant, is capable of disturbing asymmetric cytokinesis of oocyte meiosis in mice. However, in pigs, DMSO’s effect on oocyte meiosis still remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate if DMSO treatment will affect porcine oocyte meiosis and the underlying molecular changes as well. Interestingly, we did not observe the formation of the large first polar body and symmetric division for porcine oocytes treated with DMSO, contrary to findings reported in mice. 3% DMSO treatment could inhibit cumulus expansion, increase nuclear abnormality, disturb spindle organization, decrease reactive oxygen species level, and elevate mitochondrial membrane potential of porcine oocytes. There was no effect on germinal vesicle breakdown rate regardless of DMSO concentration. 3% DMSO treatment did not affect expression of genes involved in spindle organization (Bub1 and Mad2) and apoptosis (NF-κB, Pten, Bcl2, Caspase3 and Caspase9), however, it significantly decreased expression levels of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Sox2 and Lin28) in mature oocytes. Therefore, we demonstrated that disturbed cumulus expansion, chromosome alignment, spindle organization and pluripotency gene expression could be responsible for DMSO-induced porcine oocyte meiotic arrest and the lower capacity of subsequent embryo development. Our results provide new insights on DMSO’s effect on porcine oocyte meiosis and raise safety concerns over DMSO’s usage on female reproduction in both farm animals and humans. PMID:27348312

  8. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  9. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  10. Formation of metastable RNA structures by sequential folding during transcription: time-resolved structural analysis of potato spindle tuber viroid (-)-stranded RNA by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Repsilber, D; Wiese, S; Rachen, M; Schröder, A W; Riesner, D; Steger, G

    1999-01-01

    A model of functional elements critical for replication and infectivity of the potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) was proposed earlier: a thermodynamically metastable structure containing a specific hairpin (HP II) in the (-)-strand replication intermediate is essential for template activity during (+)-strand synthesis. We present here a detailed kinetic analysis on how PSTVd (-)-strands fold during synthesis by sequential folding into a variety of metastable structures that rearrange only slowly into the structure distribution of the thermodynamic equilibrium. Synthesis of PSTVd (-)-strands was performed by T7-RNA-polymerase; the rate of synthesis was varied by altering the concentration of nucleoside triphosphates to mimic the in vivo synthesis rate of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. With dependence on rate and duration of the synthesis, the structure distributions were analyzed by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Metastable structures are generated preferentially at low transcription rates--similar to in vivo rates--or at short transcription times at higher rates. Higher transcription rates or longer transcription times lead to metastable structures in low or undetectable amounts. Instead different structures do gradually appear having a more rod-like shape and higher thermodynamic stability, and the thermodynamically optimal rod-like structure dominates finally. It is concluded that viroids are able to use metastable as well as stable structures for their biological functions. PMID:10199573

  11. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  12. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Basu, S; Paul, R

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed. PMID:26565279

  13. Reduced Sleep Spindles in Schizophrenia: A Treatable Endophenotype That Links Risk Genes to Impaired Cognition?

    PubMed

    Manoach, Dara S; Pan, Jen Q; Purcell, Shaun M; Stickgold, Robert

    2016-10-15

    Although schizophrenia (SZ) is defined by waking phenomena, abnormal sleep is a common feature. In particular, there is accumulating evidence of a sleep spindle deficit. Sleep spindles, a defining thalamocortical oscillation of non-rapid eye movement stage 2 sleep, correlate with IQ and are thought to promote long-term potentiation and enhance memory consolidation. We review evidence that reduced spindle activity in SZ is an endophenotype that impairs sleep-dependent memory consolidation, contributes to symptoms, and is a novel treatment biomarker. Studies showing that spindles can be pharmacologically enhanced in SZ and that increasing spindles improves memory in healthy individuals suggest that treating spindle deficits in patients with SZ may improve cognition. Spindle activity is highly heritable, and recent large-scale genome-wide association studies have identified SZ risk genes that may contribute to spindle deficits and illuminate their mechanisms. For example, the SZ risk gene CACNA1I encodes a calcium channel that is abundantly expressed in the thalamic spindle generator and plays a critical role in spindle activity based on a mouse knockout. Future genetic studies of animals and humans can delineate the role of this and other genes in spindles. Such cross-disciplinary research, by forging empirical links in causal chains from risk genes to proteins and cellular functions to endophenotypes, cognitive impairments, symptoms, and diagnosis, has the potential to advance the mechanistic understanding, treatment, and prevention of SZ. This review highlights the importance of deficient sleep-dependent memory consolidation among the cognitive deficits of SZ and implicates reduced sleep spindles as a potentially treatable mechanism.

  14. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Christoph; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H.; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L.

    2016-01-01

    Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs) and adult sleep spindles (ASSs) show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research. PMID:27293903

  15. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization.

    PubMed

    Higgins, David M; Nannas, Natalie J; Dawe, R Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  16. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  17. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation.

  18. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Florencia; Echard, Arnaud; Morin, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is essential for cell fate decisions, epithelial maintenance, and tissue morphogenesis. In most animal cell types, the dynein motor complex is anchored at the cell cortex and exerts pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the spindle. Early studies identified the evolutionarily conserved Gαi/LGN/NuMA complex as a key regulator that polarizes cortical force generators. In recent years, a combination of genetics, biochemistry, modeling, and live imaging has contributed to decipher the mechanisms of spindle orientation. Here, we highlight the dynamic nature of the assembly of this complex and discuss the molecular regulation of its localization. Remarkably, a number of LGN-independent mechanisms were described recently, whereas NuMA remains central in most pathways involved in recruiting force generators at the cell cortex. We also describe the emerging role of the actin cortex in spindle orientation and discuss how dynamic astral microtubule formation is involved. We further give an overview on instructive external signals that control spindle orientation in tissues. Finally, we discuss the influence of cell geometry and mechanical forces on spindle orientation. PMID:27432284

  19. Identification of Abnormal Phase and its Formation Mechanism in Synthesizing Chalcogenide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kegao; Ji, Nianjing; Xu, Yong; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Chalcogenide films can be used in thin-film solar cells due to their high photoelectric conversion efficiencies. It was difficult to identify one abnormal phase with high X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensity and preferred orientation in the samples for preparing chalcogenide films by spin-coating and co-reduction on soda-lime glass (Na2OṡCaOṡ6SiO2) substrates. The raw materials and reductant are metal chlorides and hydrazine hydrate respectively. In order to identify this phase, a series of experiments were done under different conditions. The phases of obtained products were analyzed by XRD and the size and morphology were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the experimental results, first it was proved that the abnormal phase was water-soluble by water immersion experiment, then it was identified as NaCl crystal through XRD, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and SEM. The cubic NaCl crystals have high crystallinity with size lengths of about 0.5-2μm and show a <100> preferred orientation. The reaction mechanism of NaCl crystal was proposed as follows: The NaCl crystal was formed by reaction of Na2O and HCl in a certain experimental conditions.

  20. Spindle assembly and cytokinesis in the absence of chromosomes during Drosophila male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Bucciarelli, Elisabetta; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Gatti, Maurizio

    2003-03-31

    A large body of work indicates that chromosomes play a key role in the assembly of both a centrosomal and centrosome-containing spindles. In animal systems, the absence of chromosomes either prevents spindle formation or allows the assembly of a metaphase-like spindle that fails to evolve into an ana-telophase spindle. Here, we show that Drosophila secondary spermatocytes can assemble morphologically normal spindles in the absence of chromosomes. The Drosophila mutants fusolo and solofuso are severely defective in chromosome segregation and produce secondary spermatocytes that are devoid of chromosomes. The centrosomes of these anucleated cells form robust asters that give rise to bipolar spindles that undergo the same ana-telophase morphological transformations that characterize normal spindles. The cells containing chromosome-free spindles are also able to assemble regular cytokinetic structures and cleave normally. In addition, chromosome-free spindles normally accumulate the Aurora B kinase at their midzones. This suggests that the association of Aurora B with chromosomes is not a prerequisite for its accumulation at the central spindle, or for its function during cytokinesis.

  1. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  2. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  3. The elegans of spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Greenan, Garrett; O’Toole, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans one-cell embryo is a powerful system in which to study microtubule organization because this large cell assembles both meiotic and mitotic spindles within the same cytoplasm over the course of 1 h in a stereotypical manner. The fertilized oocyte assembles two consecutive acentrosomal meiotic spindles that function to reduce the replicated maternal diploid set of chromosomes to a single-copy haploid set. The resulting maternal DNA then unites with the paternal DNA to form a zygotic diploid complement, around which a centrosome-based mitotic spindle forms. The early C. elegans embryo is amenable to live-cell imaging and electron tomography, permitting a detailed structural comparison of the meiotic and mitotic modes of spindle assembly. PMID:20339898

  4. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  5. Using theories of delusion formation to explain abnormal beliefs in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD).

    PubMed

    Rossell, Susan L; Labuschagne, Izelle; Dunai, Judy; Kyrios, Michael; Castle, David J

    2014-03-30

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterised by overvalued or delusional beliefs of 'imagined ugliness'. Delusional beliefs have been explained by a number of cognitive theories, including faulty perceptions, biases in attention, and corruption of semantic memory. Atypical aesthetics may also influence beliefs in BDD. In fourteen BDD patients, compared to controls (n=14), we examined these theories of beliefs in a cognitive test battery consisting of perceptual organisation and visual affect perception tasks, a Stroop task using body words, a sentence verification task, a fluency task, and an attractiveness task. BDD patients performed similar to controls on tasks measuring information (bias) processing and aesthetics. However, BDD showed abnormal abilities on semantic processing involving sentence verification and category fluency. There was only a trend finding of impaired performance on perceptual processing tasks in BDD. The findings suggest that the delusional beliefs in BDD may be explained by impaired semantic processing.

  6. The Structure of the Mitotic Spindle and Nucleolus during Mitosis in the Amebo-Flagellate Naegleria

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitosis in the amebo-flagellate Naegleria pringsheimi is acentrosomal and closed (the nuclear membrane does not break down). The large central nucleolus, which occupies about 20% of the nuclear volume, persists throughout the cell cycle. At mitosis, the nucleolus divides and moves to the poles in association with the chromosomes. The structure of the mitotic spindle and its relationship to the nucleolus are unknown. To identify the origin and structure of the mitotic spindle, its relationship to the nucleolus and to further understand the influence of persistent nucleoli on cellular division in acentriolar organisms like Naegleria, three-dimensional reconstructions of the mitotic spindle and nucleolus were carried out using confocal microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies against three different nucleolar regions and α-tubulin were used to image the nucleolus and mitotic spindle. Microtubules were restricted to the nucleolus beginning with the earliest prophase spindle microtubules. Early spindle microtubules were seen as short rods on the surface of the nucleolus. Elongation of the spindle microtubules resulted in a rough cage of microtubules surrounding the nucleolus. At metaphase, the mitotic spindle formed a broad band completely embedded within the nucleolus. The nucleolus separated into two discreet masses connected by a dense band of microtubules as the spindle elongated. At telophase, the distal ends of the mitotic spindle were still completely embedded within the daughter nucleoli. Pixel by pixel comparison of tubulin and nucleolar protein fluorescence showed 70% or more of tubulin co-localized with nucleolar proteins by early prophase. These observations suggest a model in which specific nucleolar binding sites for microtubules allow mitotic spindle formation and attachment. The fact that a significant mass of nucleolar material precedes the chromosomes as the mitotic spindle elongates suggests that spindle elongation drives nucleolar division. PMID:22493714

  7. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Yeong, Foong May

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS) formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR) constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p) neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit. PMID:27447488

  8. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis of elongating mitotic spindles reactivated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a simple procedure for isolating mitotic spindles from the diatom Stephanopyxis turris and have shown that they undergo anaphase spindle elongation in vitro upon addition of ATP. The isolated central spindle is a barrel-shaped structure with a prominent zone of microtubule overlap. After ATP addition greater than 75% of the spindle population undergoes distinct structural rearrangements: the spindles on average are longer and the two half-spindles are separated by a distinct gap traversed by only a small number of microtubules, the phase-dense material in the overlap zone is gone, and the peripheral microtubule arrays have depolymerized. At the ultrastructural level, we examined serial cross-sections of spindles after 1-, 5-, and 10-min incubations in reactivation medium. Microtubule depolymerization distal to the poles is confirmed by the increased number of incomplete, i.e., c-microtubule profiles specifically located in the region of overlap. After 10 min we see areas of reduced microtubule number which correspond to the gaps seen in the light microscope and an overall reduction in the number of half-spindle microtubules to about one-third the original number. The changes in spindle structure are highly specific for ATP, are dose-dependent, and do not occur with nonhydrolyzable nucleotide analogues. Spindle elongation and gap formation are blocked by 10 microM vanadate, equimolar mixtures of ATP and AMPPNP, and by sulfhydryl reagents. This process is not affected by nocodazole, erythro-9-[3-(2-hydroxynonyl)]adenine, cytochalasin D, and phalloidin. In the presence of taxol, the extent of spindle elongation is increased; however, distinct gaps still form between the two half- spindles. These results show that the response of isolated spindles to ATP is a complex process consisting of several discrete steps including initiation events, spindle elongation mechanochemistry, controlled central spindle microtubule plus-end depolymerization, and loss

  9. 50 ways to build a spindle: the complexity of microtubule generation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Tommy; Wakefield, James G

    2011-04-01

    The accurate segregation of duplicated chromosomes, essential for the development and viability of a eukaryotic organism, requires the formation of a robust microtubule (MT)-based spindle apparatus. Entry into mitosis or meiosis precipitates a cascade of signalling events which result in the activation of pathways responsible for a dramatic reorganisation of the MT cytoskeleton: through changes in the properties of MT-associated proteins, local concentrations of free tubulin dimer and through enhanced MT nucleation. The latter is generally thought to be driven by localisation and activation of γ-tubulin-containing complexes (γ-TuSC and γ-TuRC) at specific subcellular locations. For example, upon entering mitosis, animal cells concentrate γ-tubulin at centrosomes to tenfold the normal level during interphase, resulting in an aster-driven search and capture of chromosomes and bipolar mitotic spindle formation. Thus, in these cells, centrosomes have traditionally been perceived as the primary microtubule organising centre during spindle formation. However, studies in meiotic cells, plants and cell-free extracts have revealed the existence of complementary mechanisms of spindle formation, mitotic chromatin, kinetochores and nucleation from existing MTs or the cytoplasm can all contribute to a bipolar spindle apparatus. Here, we outline the individual known mechanisms responsible for spindle formation and formulate ideas regarding the relationship between them in assembling a functional spindle apparatus. PMID:21484448

  10. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  11. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Ujma, Péter P.; Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Stintzing, Johannes; Konrad, Boris N.; Genzel, Lisa; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a circadian rhythm, however the association between spindles and intelligence has not been investigated in daytime nap sleep so far. In a sample of 86 healthy male human subjects, we investigated the correlation between fluid intelligence and sleep spindle parameters in an afternoon nap of 100 minutes. Mean sleep spindle length, amplitude and density were computed for each subject and for each derivation for both slow and fast spindles. A positive association was found between intelligence and slow spindle duration, but not any other sleep spindle parameter. As a positive correlation between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in full-night polysomnography has only been reported in females but not males, our results suggest that the association between intelligence and sleep spindles is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26607963

  12. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Stintzing, Johannes; Konrad, Boris N; Genzel, Lisa; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2015-11-26

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a circadian rhythm, however the association between spindles and intelligence has not been investigated in daytime nap sleep so far. In a sample of 86 healthy male human subjects, we investigated the correlation between fluid intelligence and sleep spindle parameters in an afternoon nap of 100 minutes. Mean sleep spindle length, amplitude and density were computed for each subject and for each derivation for both slow and fast spindles. A positive association was found between intelligence and slow spindle duration, but not any other sleep spindle parameter. As a positive correlation between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in full-night polysomnography has only been reported in females but not males, our results suggest that the association between intelligence and sleep spindles is more complex than previously assumed.

  13. The GTPase Gem and its partner Kif9 are required for chromosome alignment, spindle length control, and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2012-12-01

    Within the Ras superfamily, Gem is a small GTP-binding protein that plays a role in regulating Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal remodeling in interphase cells. Here, we report for the first time that Gem is a spindle-associated protein and is required for proper mitotic progression. Functionally, loss of Gem leads to misaligned chromosomes and prometaphase delay. On the basis of different experimental approaches, we demonstrate that loss of Gem by RNA interference induces spindle elongation, while its enforced expression results in spindle shortening. The spindle length phenotype is generated through deregulation of spindle dynamics on Gem depletion and requires the expression of its downstream effector, the kinesin Kif9. Loss of Kif9 induces spindle abnormalities similar to those observed when Gem expression is repressed by siRNA. We further identify Kif9 as a new regulator of spindle dynamics. Kif9 depletion increases the steady-state levels of spindle α-tubulin by increasing the rate of microtubule polymerization. Overall, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which Gem contributes to the mitotic progression by maintaining correct spindle length through the kinesin Kif9.

  14. Synchronization and Propagation of Global Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rafael Toledo Fernandes; Gerhardt, Günther Johannes Lewczuk; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles occur thousands of times during normal sleep and can be easily detected by visual inspection of EEG signals. These characteristics make spindles one of the most studied EEG structures in mammalian sleep. In this work we considered global spindles, which are spindles that are observed simultaneously in all EEG channels. We propose a methodology that investigates both the signal envelope and phase/frequency of each global spindle. By analysing the global spindle phase we showed that 90% of spindles synchronize with an average latency time of 0.1 s. We also measured the frequency modulation (chirp) of global spindles and found that global spindle chirp and synchronization are not correlated. By investigating the signal envelopes and implementing a homogeneous and isotropic propagation model, we could estimate both the signal origin and velocity in global spindles. Our results indicate that this simple and non-invasive approach could determine with reasonable precision the spindle origin, and allowed us to estimate a signal speed of 0.12 m/s. Finally, we consider whether synchronization might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. PMID:26963102

  15. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  16. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  17. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes. PMID:25994126

  18. Expression of B-RAF V600E in Type II Pneumocytes Causes Abnormalities in Alveolar Formation, Airspace Enlargement and Tumor Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zanucco, Emanuele; Götz, Rudolf; Potapenko, Tamara; Carraretto, Irene; Ceteci, Semra; Ceteci, Fatih; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2011-01-01

    Growth factor induced signaling cascades are key regulatory elements in tissue development, maintenance and regeneration. Perturbations of these cascades have severe consequences, leading to developmental disorders and neoplastic diseases. As a major function in signal transduction, activating mutations in RAF family kinases are the cause of human tumorigenesis, where B-RAF V600E has been identified as the prevalent mutant. In order to address the oncogenic function of B-RAF V600E, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the activated oncogene specifically in lung alveolar epithelial type II cells. Constitutive expression of B-RAF V600E caused abnormalities in alveolar epithelium formation that led to airspace enlargements. These lung lesions showed signs of tissue remodeling and were often associated with chronic inflammation and low incidence of lung tumors. The inflammatory cell infiltration did not precede the formation of the lung lesions but was rather accompanied with late tumor development. These data support a model where the continuous regenerative process initiated by oncogenic B-RAF-driven alveolar disruption provides a tumor-promoting environment associated with chronic inflammation. PMID:22194995

  19. Phase Transitions of Spindle-Associated Protein Regulate Spindle Apparatus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  20. Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Atrazine and Ametrine Induce Micronuclei Formation and Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Fish.

    PubMed

    Botelho, R G; Monteiro, S H; Christofoletti, C A; Moura-Andrade, G C R; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry triple quadrupole direct aqueous injection for analysis of atrazine and ametrine herbicides in surface waters was developed. According to the validation method, water samples from six different locations in the Piracicaba River were collected monthly from February 2011 to January 2012 and injected into a liquid chromatographer/dual mass spectrometer without the need for sample extraction. The method was validated and shown to be precise and accurate; limits of detection and quantification were 0.07 and 0.10 µg L(-1) for atrazine and 0.09 and 0.14 µg L(-1) for ametrine. During the sampling period, concentrations of atrazine ranged from 0.11 to 1.92 µg L(-1) and ametrine from 0.25 to 1.44 µg L(-1). After analysis of the herbicides, Danio rerio were exposed a range of concentrations found in the river water to check the induction of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in erythrocytes. Concentrations of atrazine and ametrine >1.0 and 1.5 µg L(-1), respectively, induced MN formation in D. rerio. Ametrine was shown to be more genotoxic to D. rerio because a greater incidence of NAs was observed compared with atrazine. Therefore, environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine and ametrine found in the Piracicaba River are dangerous to the aquatic biota. PMID:26081367

  1. Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Atrazine and Ametrine Induce Micronuclei Formation and Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Fish.

    PubMed

    Botelho, R G; Monteiro, S H; Christofoletti, C A; Moura-Andrade, G C R; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry triple quadrupole direct aqueous injection for analysis of atrazine and ametrine herbicides in surface waters was developed. According to the validation method, water samples from six different locations in the Piracicaba River were collected monthly from February 2011 to January 2012 and injected into a liquid chromatographer/dual mass spectrometer without the need for sample extraction. The method was validated and shown to be precise and accurate; limits of detection and quantification were 0.07 and 0.10 µg L(-1) for atrazine and 0.09 and 0.14 µg L(-1) for ametrine. During the sampling period, concentrations of atrazine ranged from 0.11 to 1.92 µg L(-1) and ametrine from 0.25 to 1.44 µg L(-1). After analysis of the herbicides, Danio rerio were exposed a range of concentrations found in the river water to check the induction of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in erythrocytes. Concentrations of atrazine and ametrine >1.0 and 1.5 µg L(-1), respectively, induced MN formation in D. rerio. Ametrine was shown to be more genotoxic to D. rerio because a greater incidence of NAs was observed compared with atrazine. Therefore, environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine and ametrine found in the Piracicaba River are dangerous to the aquatic biota.

  2. Effects of in-vitro or in-vivo matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenhui; Li, Tao; Zeng, Yanhong; Hong, Pingping; Xu, Yanwen; Zhou, Canquan

    2014-12-01

    To study the effects of in-vitro matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex (SCC) on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes, reciprocal spindle transfer was conducted between in-vivo and in-vitro matured oocytes. The reconstructed oocytes were divided into four groups according to their different ooplasm sources and SCC, artificially activated and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Oocyte survival, activation and embryo development after spindle transfer manipulation were compared between groups. Survival, activation, and cleavage rates of reconstructed oocytes after spindle transfer manipulation did not differ significantly among the four groups. The eight-cell stage embryo formation rates on day 3 and the blastocyst formation rate on day 6 were not significantly different between the in-vitro and in-vivo matured SCC groups when they were transplanted into in-vivo matured ooplasm. The rate of eight-cell stage embryo formation with in-vitro matured ooplasm was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of embryos with in-vivo matured ooplasm, and none of the embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Therefore, SCC matured in vitro effectively supported the in-vitro development of reconstructed oocytes. Ooplasm matured in vitro, however, could not support the development of reconstructed oocytes, and may not be an appropriate source of ooplasm donation for spindle transfer.

  3. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  4. DDA3 targets Cep290 into the centrosome to regulate spindle positioning.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyu; Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Chang-Young

    The centrosome is an important cellular organelle which nucleates microtubules (MTs) to form the cytoskeleton during interphase and the mitotic spindle during mitosis. The Cep290 is one of the centrosomal proteins and functions in cilia formation. Even-though it is in the centrosome, the function of Cep290 in mitosis had not yet been evaluated. In this study, we report a novel function of Cep290 that is involved in spindle positioning. Cep290 was identified as an interacting partner of DDA3, and we confirmed that Cep290 specifically localizes in the mitotic centrosome. Depletion of Cep290 caused a reduction of the astral spindle, leading to misorientation of the mitotic spindle. MT polymerization also decreased in Cep290-depleted cells, suggesting that Cep290 is involved in spindle nucleation. Furthermore, DDA3 stabilizes and transports Cep290 to the centrosome. Therefore, we concluded that DDA3 controls astral spindle formation and spindle positioning by targeting Cep290 to the centrosome. PMID:25998387

  5. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Jay P.; Payne, Scott W. T.; Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were conducted

  6. Posttraumatic spindle cell nodule of the buccal mucosa. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Zellers, R A; Bicket, W J; Parker, M G

    1992-08-01

    A benign posttraumatic spindle cell proliferation arising at a site of laceration in the buccal mucosa of a 19-year old man is described. This lesion, which histologically mimicked a leiomyosarcoma, appears to represent a reactive process similar to that described as postoperative spindle cell nodules of the genitourinary tract. Reexcision of the area 1 month after biopsy revealed only scar formation and mild chronic inflammation. Recognition of this type of benign spindle cell proliferation at traumatized sites in the oral cavity is important if misdiagnosis and subsequent aggressive therapy is to be avoided.

  7. In-situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry of the Cu Deposition Process from Supercritical Fluids: Evidence of an Abnormal Surface Layer Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Tamegai, Yukihiro; Ueno, Takahiro; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Jin, Lianhua; Kondoh, Eiichi

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we report in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry of Cu deposition from supercritical carbon dioxide fluids. The motivations of this work were 1) to perform a detailed observation of Cu growth with precision optical metrology, 2) to study substrate dependence on Cu growth, particularly for Ru and TiN substrates in the present case, and 3) to demonstrate the possibility and usefulness of ellipsometry for diagnosing supercritical fluid processing. The Cu deposition was carried out through hydrogen reduction of a Cu β-diketonate precursor at 160-180 °C. During growth, a very large deviation of ellipsometric parameters (Ψ and Δ) from a single-layer model prediction was observed; this deviation was much larger than that expected from island formation which has been frequently reported in in-situ ellipsometric observation of the vapor growth of thin films. From model analyses, it was found that an abnormal dielectric layer having a high refractive index and a thickness of 10-50 nm is present on the growing Cu surface. The refractive index of this layer was (1.5-2) + (0.2-0.3)i and from this, we concluded that this layer is the condensed precursor. The condensed layer develops prior to Cu nucleation. As for the substrate dependence on Cu growth, both layers develop faster on Ru than on TiN. This corresponds to the fact that chemisorption occurs more easily on Ru. The deposition kinetics under the presence of the condensed layer are also discussed.

  8. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-12-18

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This 'pushing' mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length.

  9. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This ‘pushing’ mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03398.001 PMID:25521247

  10. Reduced Sleep Spindle Activity in Early-Onset and Elevated Risk for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than…

  11. Cohesin subunit SMC1 associates with mitotic microtubules at the spindle pole

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Richard W.; Blobel, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Accurate mitotic chromosome segregation depends on the formation of a microtubule-based bipolar spindle apparatus. We report that the cohesin subunit structural maintenance of chromosomes subunit 1 (SMC1) is recruited to microtubule-bound RNA export factor 1 (Rae1) at the mitotic spindle pole. We locate the Rae1-binding site to a 21-residue-long region, SMC1947-967 and provide several lines of evidence that phosphorylation of Ser957 and Ser966 of SMC1 stimulates binding to Rae1. Imbalances in these assembly pathways caused formation of multipolar spindles. Our data suggest that cohesin's known bundling function for chromatids in mitotic and interphase cells extends to microtubules at the spindle pole. PMID:18832153

  12. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Merrill S.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and “off-line” processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population. PMID:27478646

  13. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-09-25

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division.

  14. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin−/− mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09384.001 PMID:26406118

  15. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  16. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reut; Wise, Merrill S

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and "off-line" processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population. PMID:27478646

  17. Spindle Size Scaling Contributes to Robust Silencing of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis hinges on proper assembly of the microtubule spindle that establishes bipolar attachment to each chromosome. Experiments demonstrate allometry of mitotic spindles and a universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size across metazoans, which indicates a conserved principle of spindle assembly at play during evolution. However, the nature of this principle is currently unknown. Researchers have focused on deriving the mechanistic underpinning of the size scaling from the mechanical aspects of the spindle assembly process. In this work we take a different standpoint and ask: What is the size scaling for? We address this question from the functional perspectives of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is the critical surveillance mechanism that prevents premature chromosome segregation in the presence of unattached or misattached chromosomes. The SAC signal gets silenced after and only after the last chromosome-spindle attachment in mitosis. We previously established a model that explains the robustness of SAC silencing based on spindle-mediated spatiotemporal regulation of SAC proteins. Here, we refine the previous model, and find that robust and timely SAC silencing entails proper size scaling of mitotic spindle. This finding provides, to our knowledge, a novel, function-oriented angle toward understanding the observed spindle allometry, and the universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size in metazoans. In a broad sense, the functional requirement of robust SAC silencing could have helped shape the spindle assembly mechanism in evolution. PMID:27602734

  18. Spatial regulation of kinetochore microtubule attachments by destabilization at spindle poles in meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Chmátal, Lukáš; Yang, Karren; Schultz, Richard M.; Lampson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To ensure accurate chromosome segregation in cell division, erroneous kinetochore-microtubule (MT) attachments are recognized and destabilized [1]. Improper attachments typically lack tension between kinetochores and are positioned off-center on the spindle. Low tension is a widely accepted mechanism for recognizing errors [2], but whether chromosome position regulates MT attachments has been difficult to test. We exploited a meiotic system in which kinetochores attached to opposite spindle poles differ in their interactions with microtubules, and therefore position and tension can be uncoupled. In this system homologous chromosomes are positioned off-center on the spindle in oocytes in meiosis I, while under normal tension, as a result of crossing mouse strains with different centromere strengths, manifested by unequal kinetochore protein levels [3]. We show that proximity to spindle poles destabilizes kinetochore-MTs, and that stable attachments are restored by inhibiting Aurora A kinase at spindle poles. During the correction of attachment errors, kinetochore MTs detach near spindle poles to allow formation of correct attachments. We propose that chromosome position on the spindle provides spatial cues for the fidelity of cell division. PMID:26166779

  19. Aurora A Phosphorylates MCAK to Control Ran-dependent Spindle Bipolarity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.

    2008-01-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity. PMID:18434591

  20. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that upon mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally-observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores. PMID:26258631

  1. Dual roles of Incenp crucial to the assembly of the acentrosomal metaphase spindle in female meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Nathalie; Cullen, C. Fiona; Brittle, Amy L.; Jang, Janet K.; Earnshaw, William C.; Carmena, Mar; McKim, Kim; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Spindle formation in female meiosis differs from mitosis in many animals, as it takes place independently from centrosomes, and the molecular requirements of this pathway remain to be understood. Here we report two crucial roles of Incenp, an essential subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (the Aurora B complex), in centrosome-independent spindle formation in Drosophila female meiosis. Firstly, the initial assembly of spindle microtubules is drastically delayed in an incenp mutant. This clearly demonstrates, for the first time, a crucial role for Incenp in chromosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in living oocytes. Additionally, Incenp is necessary to stabilise the equatorial region of the metaphase I spindle, in contrast to mitosis, where the equivalent function becomes prominent after anaphase onset. Our analysis suggests that Subito, a kinesin-6 protein, cooperates with Incenp for this latter function, but not microtubule assembly. We propose that the two functions of Incenp are part of the mechanisms that compensate for the lack of centrosomes during meiotic spindle formation. PMID:18755775

  2. Ionic effects on spindle adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Husmark, I.; Ottoson, D.

    1971-01-01

    1. Effects of changes in ionic environment on the receptor potential were studied in isolated frog spindle. Particular attention was focused on the action of potassium removal on the early adaptive decline of the response. 2. Removal of potassium caused a reduction and final disappearance of the dynamic overshoot of the receptor potential. The static phase of the response was also reduced although to less extent. The repolarization phase of the response following release of phasic or maintained stretch was greatly prolonged. 3. Increased potassium concentration caused a reduction of the response, but did not change its general time course. The amount of reduction was related to the potassium concentration. 4. Removal of sodium caused a marked diminution of the response, the static phase being in general more affected than the dynamic phase. 5. It is suggested that the effects of potassium removal are caused by a delay in sodium inactivation and a partial depolarization of the endings. It is concluded that the greater part of the early adaptation of the spindle proper may be attributed to ionic mechanisms in the transducer membrane. PMID:4256546

  3. CDK-1 inhibits meiotic spindle shortening and dynein-dependent spindle rotation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, Marina L; McNally, Francis J

    2011-06-27

    In animals, the female meiotic spindle is positioned at the egg cortex in a perpendicular orientation to facilitate the disposal of half of the chromosomes into a polar body. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the metaphase spindle lies parallel to the cortex, dynein is dispersed on the spindle, and the dynein activators ASPM-1 and LIN-5 are concentrated at spindle poles. Anaphase-promoting complex (APC) activation results in dynein accumulation at spindle poles and dynein-dependent rotation of one spindle pole to the cortex, resulting in perpendicular orientation. To test whether the APC initiates spindle rotation through cyclin B-CDK-1 inactivation, separase activation, or degradation of an unknown dynein inhibitor, CDK-1 was inhibited with purvalanol A in metaphase-I-arrested, APC-depleted embryos. CDK-1 inhibition resulted in the accumulation of dynein at spindle poles and dynein-dependent spindle rotation without chromosome separation. These results suggest that CDK-1 blocks rotation by inhibiting dynein association with microtubules and with LIN-5-ASPM-1 at meiotic spindle poles and that the APC promotes spindle rotation by inhibiting CDK-1.

  4. Genes involved in centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Moutinho-Pereira, Sara; Stuurman, Nico; Afonso, Olga; Hornsveld, Marten; Aguiar, Paulo; Goshima, Gohta; Vale, Ronald D; Maiato, Helder

    2013-12-01

    Animal mitotic spindle assembly relies on centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent mechanisms, but their relative contributions remain unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of the centrosome-independent spindle assembly pathway by performing a whole-genome RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells lacking functional centrosomes. This screen identified 197 genes involved in acentrosomal spindle assembly, eight of which had no previously described mitotic phenotypes and produced defective and/or short spindles. All 197 genes also produced RNAi phenotypes when centrosomes were present, indicating that none were entirely selective for the acentrosomal pathway. However, a subset of genes produced a selective defect in pole focusing when centrosomes were absent, suggesting that centrosomes compensate for this shape defect. Another subset of genes was specifically associated with the formation of multipolar spindles only when centrosomes were present. We further show that the chromosomal passenger complex orchestrates multiple centrosome-independent processes required for mitotic spindle assembly/maintenance. On the other hand, despite the formation of a chromosome-enriched RanGTP gradient, S2 cells depleted of RCC1, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Ran on chromosomes, established functional bipolar spindles. Finally, we show that cells without functional centrosomes have a delay in chromosome congression and anaphase onset, which can be explained by the lack of polar ejection forces. Overall, these findings establish the constitutive nature of a centrosome-independent spindle assembly program and how this program is adapted to the presence/absence of centrosomes in animal somatic cells.

  5. Chromosome misalignments induce spindle-positioning defects.

    PubMed

    Tame, Mihoko A; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; Afanasyev, Pavel; Medema, René H

    2016-03-01

    Cortical pulling forces on astral microtubules are essential to position the spindle. These forces are generated by cortical dynein, a minus-end directed motor. Previously, another dynein regulator termed Spindly was proposed to regulate dynein-dependent spindle positioning. However, the mechanism of how Spindly regulates spindle positioning has remained elusive. Here, we find that the misalignment of chromosomes caused by Spindly depletion is directly provoking spindle misorientation. Chromosome misalignments induced by CLIP-170 or CENP-E depletion or by noscapine treatment are similarly accompanied by severe spindle-positioning defects. We find that cortical LGN is actively displaced from the cortex when misaligned chromosomes are in close proximity. Preventing the KT recruitment of Plk1 by the depletion of PBIP1 rescues cortical LGN enrichment near misaligned chromosomes and re-establishes proper spindle orientation. Hence, KT-enriched Plk1 is responsible for the negative regulation of cortical LGN localization. In summary, we uncovered a compelling molecular link between chromosome alignment and spindle orientation defects, both of which are implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:26882550

  6. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  7. Characterization of Ring-Like F-Actin Structure as a Mechanical Partner for Spindle Positioning in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  8. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huan; Zhao, Qun; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  9. The nucleoporin Nup153 affects spindle checkpoint activity due to an association with Mad1

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The nucleoporin Nup153 is known to play pivotal roles in nuclear import and export in interphase cells and as the cell transitions into mitosis, Nup153 is involved in nuclear envelope breakdown. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of Nup153 with the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad1 is important in the regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Overexpression of human Nup153 in HeLa cells leads to the appearance of multinucleated cells and induces the formation of multipolar spindles. Importantly, it causes inactivation of the spindle checkpoint due to hypophosphorylation of Mad1. Depletion of Nup153 using RNA interference results in the decline of Mad1 at nuclear pores during interphase and more significantly causes a delayed dissociation of Mad1 from kinetochores in metaphase and an increase in the number of unresolved midbodies. In the absence of Nup153 the spindle checkpoint remains active. In vitro studies indicate direct binding of Mad1 to the N-terminal domain of Nup153. Importantly, Nup153 binding to Mad1 affects Mad1's phosphorylation status, but not its ability to interact with Mad2. Our data suggest that Nup153 levels regulate the localization of Mad1 during the metaphase/anaphase transition thereby affecting its phoshorylation status and in turn spindle checkpoint activity and mitotic exit. PMID:21327106

  10. Assays to Study Mitotic Centrosome and Spindle Pole Assembly and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C; De Nicolo, Arcangela

    2016-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during cell division requires proper bipolar spindle assembly and critically depends on spindle pole integrity. In most animal cells, spindle poles form as the result of the concerted action of various factors operating in two independent pathways of microtubule assembly mediated by chromatin/RanGTP and by centrosomes. Mutation or deregulation of a number of spindle pole-organizing proteins has been linked to human diseases, including cancer and microcephaly. Our knowledge on how the spindle pole-organizing factors function at the molecular level and cooperate with one another is still quite limited. As the list of these factors expands, so does the need for the development of experimental approaches to study their function. Cell-free extracts from Xenopus laevis eggs have played an instrumental role in the dissection of the mechanisms of bipolar spindle assembly and have recently allowed the reconstitution of the key steps of the centrosome-driven microtubule nucleation pathway (Joukov et al., Mol Cell 55:578-591, 2014). Here we describe assays to study both centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent spindle pole formation in Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide experimental procedures for the use of artificial centrosomes, such as microbeads coated with an anti-Aurora A antibody or a recombinant fragment of the Cep192 protein, to model and study centrosome maturation in egg extract. In addition, we detail the protocol for a microtubule regrowth assay that allows assessment of the centrosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27193852

  11. [Spindle-shaped hemangioma: an unusual location].

    PubMed

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Baghad, Bouchra; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma, formerly known as spindle cell hemangioendothelioma, was described by Weiss and Enzinger in 1986. Since the advent of immunohistochemical studies it is no longer considered as low grade angiosarcoma. It is a benign vascular tumor It almost exclusively affects the dermis at the distal ends. We report the first case of a patient with spindle cell hemangioma located in the scapular, breast, thighs and mandibular area. According to the literature, only 9 cases located in the head and neck were reported. We report a new case of this rare and poorly understood entity that can be confused with malignant tumors. Our patient suffered from spindle cell hemangioma located in the scapular, breast, thighs and mandibular area. He underwent excisional biopsy. The evolution was favorable with 6-month follow up, without relapse. PMID:27642429

  12. Lipoma of the Thumb: Spindle Cell Subtype

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Johnny; Bou Sader, Roula; Saliba, Elie

    2016-01-01

    We report hereby the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with a soft-tissue swelling on the palmar aspect of the thumb. A detailed clinical examination followed by ultrasonography and excisional biopsy confirmed a spindle cell lipoma. Lipomas are rare in the hand and exceptional in the fingers, and we report, to our knowledge, the first spindle cell lipoma in the thumb to help in the differential diagnosis of a similar swelling. PMID:27088022

  13. Tipping the spindle into the right position.

    PubMed

    Akhmanova, Anna; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-05-01

    The position of the mitotic spindle determines the cleavage plane in animal cells, but what controls spindle positioning? Kern et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201510117) demonstrate that the microtubule plus end-associated SKAP/Astrin complex participates in this process, possibly by affecting dynein-dependent pulling forces exerted on the tips of astral microtubules. PMID:27138251

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part I-Evolution of Precipitates and Formation of Abnormal Al2Cu Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Frankel, G. S.; Huang, I. Wen; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed on AA2219-T8 plates with 6.31 wt pct Cu. The thermal cycles were measured in different regions of the joint during welding. Differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to analyze the evolution of precipitates in the joint. The relationships between welding peak temperature, precipitate evolution, and microhardness distribution are discussed. The temperature in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) ranged from 453 K to 653 K (180 °C to 380 °C). The θ″ and some θ' phases redissolved into the HAZ matrix, while the rest of the θ' phases coarsened. In the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ), the temperature range was from 653 K to 673 K (380 °C to 400 °C), causing both θ″ phase and θ' phase to redissolve. In the weld nugget zone (WNZ), all the θ″, θ', and some of the θ phase (Al2Cu) redissolved. Abnormal θ particles were observed in the WNZ, including agglomerated θ with sizes around 100 to 1000 µm and a ring-shaped distribution of normal size θ particles. The formation of abnormal θ particles resulted from metal plastic flow during welding and the high content of Cu in AA2219. No abnormal θ particles were observed in joints of another AA2219 plate, which had a lower Cu content of 5.83 wt pct.

  15. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  16. Cytochalasin J affects chromosome congression and spindle microtubule organization in PtK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J A; Cohen, L

    1995-01-01

    if the spindle were multipolar. Chromosomes were arranged near the periphery of the spindle which could be a result of abnormalities of kinetochore structure. Improper association of spindle MTs with kinetochores and, thus, changes in kinetochore position could account for these changes in spindle architecture.

  17. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C.; Tan, Chia H.; Pereira, Antonio J.; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end–directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  18. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  19. Mitosis: spindle evolution and the matrix model.

    PubMed

    Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy; Forer, Art

    2009-03-01

    Current spindle models explain "anaphase A" (movement of chromosomes to the poles) in terms of a motility system based solely on microtubules (MTs) and that functions in a manner unique to mitosis. We find both these propositions unlikely. An evolutionary perspective suggests that when the spindle evolved, it should have come to share not only components (e.g., microtubules) of the interphase cell but also the primitive motility systems available, including those using actin and myosin. Other systems also came to be involved in the additional types of motility that now accompany mitosis in extant spindles. The resultant functional redundancy built reliability into this critical and complex process. Such multiple mechanisms are also confusing to those who seek to understand how chromosomes move. Narrowing this commentary down to just anaphase A, we argue that the spindle matrix participates with MTs in anaphase A and that this matrix may contain actin and myosin. The diatom spindle illustrates how such a system could function. This matrix may be motile and work in association with the MT cytoskeleton, as it does with the actin cytoskeleton during cell ruffling and amoeboid movement. Instead of pulling the chromosome polewards, the kinetochore fibre's role might be to slow polewards movement to allow correct chromosome attachment to the spindle. Perhaps the earliest eukaryotic cell was a cytoplast organised around a radial MT cytoskeleton. For cell division, it separated into two cytoplasts via a spindle of overlapping MTs. Cytokinesis was actin-based cleavage. As chromosomes evolved into individual entities, their interaction with the dividing cytoplast developed into attachment of the kinetochore to radial (cytoplast) MTs. We believe it most likely that cytoplasmic motility systems participated in these events. PMID:19255823

  20. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  1. Chromosome segregation and spindle structure in crane fly spermatocytes following Colcemid treatment.

    PubMed

    LaFountain, J R

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in primary spermatocytes of the crane fly Nephrotoma suturalis was studied after exposure to Colcemid at doses that did not completely inhibit spindle formation. Colcemid was added either to the medium in which larvae were cultured or to Tricine buffer in which isolated testes were incubated. Patterns of chromosome segregation were analyzed in fixed, Feulgen-stained smears of testes from Colcemid-treated larvae and in living cell preparations. Anomalies observed during the first meiotic division at higher than normal frequencies in Colcemid-treated spermatocytes included anaphase lagging of autosomes, chromosomal strands, tripolar and tetrapolar divisions, and unequal distribution of chromosomes to secondary cells. Following those doses of Colcemid that induced the above anomalies, the length of the birefringent spindle in primary spermatocytes was shorter than normal. This effect on spindle length also was apparent in Giemsa-stained preparations of fixed cells, in which the two centrosomes at the spindle poles were differentiated from the rest of the cytoplasm. The results indicate a correlation between the inhibition of spindle formation and the induction of anomalous patterns of chromosome segregation.

  2. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Do All Dinoflagellates have an Extranuclear Spindle?

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunyoung; Nam, Seung Won; Shin, Woongghi; Park, Myung Gil; Coats, D Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The syndinean dinoflagellates are a diverse assemblage of alveolate endoparasites that branch basal to the core dinoflagellates. Because of their phylogenetic position, the syndineans are considered key model microorganisms in understanding early evolution in the dinoflagellates. Closed mitosis with an extranuclear spindle that traverses the nucleus in cytoplasmic grooves or tunnels is viewed as one of the morphological features shared by syndinean and core dinoflagellates. Here we describe nuclear morphology and mitosis in the syndinean dinoflagellate Amoebophrya sp. from Akashiwo sanguinea, a member of the A. ceratii complex, as revealed by protargol silver impregnation, DNA specific fluorochromes, and transmission electron microscopy. Our observations show that not all species classified as dinoflagellates have an extranuclear spindle. In Amoebophrya sp. from A. sanguinea, an extranuclear microtubule cylinder located in a depression in the nuclear surface during interphase moves into the nucleoplasm via sequential membrane fusion events and develops into an entirely intranuclear spindle. Results suggest that the intranuclear spindle of Amoebophrya spp. may have evolved from an ancestral extranuclear spindle and indicate the need for taxonomic revision of the Amoebophryidae. PMID:26491972

  4. Muscle spindle and fusimotor activity in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Peter H; Taylor, Anthony; Durbaba, Rade

    2015-08-01

    Mammals may exhibit different forms of locomotion even within a species. A particular form of locomotion (e.g. walk, run, bound) appears to be selected by supraspinal commands, but the precise pattern, i.e. phasing of limbs and muscles, is generated within the spinal cord by so-called central pattern generators. Peripheral sense organs, particularly the muscle spindle, play a crucial role in modulating the central pattern generator output. In turn, the feedback from muscle spindles is itself modulated by static and dynamic fusimotor (gamma) neurons. The activity of muscle spindle afferents and fusimotor neurons during locomotion in the cat is reviewed here. There is evidence for some alpha-gamma co-activation during locomotion involving static gamma motoneurons. However, both static and dynamic gamma motoneurons show patterns of modulation that are distinct from alpha motoneuron activity. It has been proposed that static gamma activity may drive muscle spindle secondary endings to signal the intended movement to the central nervous system. Dynamic gamma motoneuron drive appears to prime muscle spindle primary endings to signal transitions in phase of the locomotor cycle. These findings come largely from reduced animal preparations (decerebrate) and require confirmation in freely moving intact animals. PMID:26047022

  5. Muscle spindle and fusimotor activity in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Peter H; Taylor, Anthony; Durbaba, Rade

    2015-08-01

    Mammals may exhibit different forms of locomotion even within a species. A particular form of locomotion (e.g. walk, run, bound) appears to be selected by supraspinal commands, but the precise pattern, i.e. phasing of limbs and muscles, is generated within the spinal cord by so-called central pattern generators. Peripheral sense organs, particularly the muscle spindle, play a crucial role in modulating the central pattern generator output. In turn, the feedback from muscle spindles is itself modulated by static and dynamic fusimotor (gamma) neurons. The activity of muscle spindle afferents and fusimotor neurons during locomotion in the cat is reviewed here. There is evidence for some alpha-gamma co-activation during locomotion involving static gamma motoneurons. However, both static and dynamic gamma motoneurons show patterns of modulation that are distinct from alpha motoneuron activity. It has been proposed that static gamma activity may drive muscle spindle secondary endings to signal the intended movement to the central nervous system. Dynamic gamma motoneuron drive appears to prime muscle spindle primary endings to signal transitions in phase of the locomotor cycle. These findings come largely from reduced animal preparations (decerebrate) and require confirmation in freely moving intact animals.

  6. The novel murine calmodulin-binding protein Sha1 disrupts mitotic spindle and replication checkpoint functions in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Craig, R; Norbury, C

    1998-12-18

    Entry into mitosis is normally blocked in eukaryotic cells that have not completed replicative DNA synthesis; this 'S-M' checkpoint control is fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the S-M checkpoint fail to arrest the cell cycle when DNA replication is inhibited and hence attempt mitosis and cell division with unreplicated chromosomes, resulting in the 'cut' phenotype. In an attempt to identify conserved molecules involved in the S-M checkpoint we have screened a regulatable murine cDNA library in S. pombe and have identified cDNAs that induce the cut phenotype in cells arrested in S phase by hydroxyurea. One such cDNA encodes a novel protein with multiple calmodulin-binding motifs that, in addition to its effects on the S-M checkpoint, perturbed mitotic spindle functions, although spindle pole duplication was apparently normal. Both aspects of the phenotype induced by this cDNA product, which we term Sha1 (for spindle and hydroxyurea checkpoint abnormal), were suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of calmodulin. Sha1 is structurally related to the product of the Drosophila gene abnormal spindle (asp). These data suggest that calmodulin-binding protein(s) are important in the co-ordination of mitotic spindle functions with mitotic entry in fission yeast, and probably also in multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:9819352

  7. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter’s cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  8. Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Das, Arunika; Shah, Shital J; Fan, Bensen; Paik, Daniel; DiSanto, Daniel J; Hinman, Anna Maria; Cesario, Jeffry M; Battaglia, Rachel A; Demos, Nicole; McKim, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule-chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation.

  9. Use of abnormal and health psychology as topics in a classroom format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among college students at risk.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M

    2001-12-01

    This study was done to assess whether classes containing topics derived from two college courses, Abnormal Psychology and Health Psychology, could be used in a class room format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among at-risk college students. Topics covered included stress and stress management, alcohol and other drug use and abuse, chronic illnesses and psychological disorders that develop from an unhealthy lifestyle, and factors that play a role in good health and well-being. Students were enrolled in a semester-long course for college credit as an alternative to punitive sanctions for on-campus alcohol violations and other drug violations. The Midwest Institute on Drug Use Survey and the CORE Alcohol and Drug Survey were administered on the first and last days of class. Analysis indicated a significant self-reported reduction in drug use and associated negative symptoms and behavioral effects. Women were more likely to report reductions in drug use than men.

  10. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  11. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  12. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  13. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  14. Compartmentalized Toxoplasma EB1 bundles spindle microtubules to secure accurate chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Kelly, Megan; Leon, Jessica de; Nwagbara, Belinda; Ebbert, Patrick; Ferguson, David J P; Lowery, Laura Anne; Morrissette, Naomi; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-12-15

    Toxoplasma gondii replicates asexually by a unique internal budding process characterized by interwoven closed mitosis and cytokinesis. Although it is known that the centrosome coordinates these processes, the spatiotemporal organization of mitosis remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that centrosome positioning around the nucleus may signal spindle assembly: spindle microtubules (MTs) are first assembled when the centrosome moves to the basal side and become extensively acetylated after the duplicated centrosomes reposition to the apical side. We also tracked the spindle MTs using the MT plus end-binding protein TgEB1. Endowed by a C-terminal NLS, TgEB1 resides in the nucleoplasm in interphase and associates with the spindle MTs during mitosis. TgEB1 also associates with the subpellicular MTs at the growing end of daughter buds toward the completion of karyokinesis. Depletion of TgEB1 results in escalated disintegration of kinetochore clustering. Furthermore, we show that TgEB1's MT association in Toxoplasma and in a heterologous system (Xenopus) is based on the same principles. Finally, overexpression of a high-MT-affinity TgEB1 mutant promotes the formation of overstabilized MT bundles, resulting in avulsion of otherwise tightly clustered kinetochores. Overall we conclude that centrosome position controls spindle activity and that TgEB1 is critical for mitotic integrity. PMID:26466679

  15. The microtubules dance and the spindle poles swing.

    PubMed

    Munro, Edwin

    2007-05-01

    Using live imaging and computer simulation, Kozlowski et al. (2007) show that an interplay between spindle pole movements, microtubule dynamics, and microtubule bending contribute to asymmetric spindle placement in the C. elegans embryo. PMID:17482539

  16. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Marina E; Flynn, Jonathan R; McNally, Karen P; Cortes, Daniel B; Price, Kari L; Kuehnert, Paul A; Panzica, Michelle T; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A; McNally, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin.

  17. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Flynn, Jonathan R.; McNally, Karen P.; Cortes, Daniel B.; Price, Kari L.; Kuehnert, Paul A.; Panzica, Michelle T.; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A.; McNally, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  18. Abnormal Eu behavior at formation of H2O- and Cl-bearing fluids during degassing of granite magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    melt. The abnormal behavior of Eu shows itself the stronger, the lower fO2and, accordingly, the more fraction of Eu2+is present in melt. The work is supported of the Geosciences Department of the Russian Academy of Science (the program 2- 2010) and RFBR (grant 08-05-00022). References [1] Reed M.J., Candela Ph.A., Piccoli Ph.M. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 2000. V. 140. P. 251-262. [2] Lukanin O.A., Dernov-Pegarev V.F. Vestnik Otd. Nauk Zemle RAN, No 1(25)'2007 URL: http://www.scgis.ru/russian/cp1251/h_dgggms/1-2007/informbul-1_2007/term-30e.pdf [3] Drake M.J. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 1975. V. 39. P. 55-64. [4] Wilke M. Behrens H. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 1999. V. 137. P. 102-114. [5] Lukanin O.A. Vestnik Otd. Nauk o Zemle RAN, No 1(26)'2008. URL: http://www.scgis.ru/russian/cp1251/h_dgggms/1-2008/informbul-1_2008/magm-20e.pdf [6] Lukanin O.A., Dernov-Pegarev V.F. Geochemistry International, 2010 (in press)

  19. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  20. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  1. Radmis, a Novel Mitotic Spindle Protein that Functions in Cell Division of Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Takahito; Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Sugitani-Yoshida, Reiko; Ueda, Shuichi; Sakakibara, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dynamics of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) are crucial for embryonic and adult neurogenesis, but its regulatory factors are not fully understood. By differential subtractive screening with NSPCs versus their differentiated progenies, we identified the radmis (radial fiber and mitotic spindle)/ckap2l gene, a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP) enriched in NSPCs. Radmis is a putative substrate for the E3-ubiquitin ligase, anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), and is degraded via the KEN box. Radmis was highly expressed in regions of active neurogenesis throughout life, and its distribution was dynamically regulated during NSPC division. In embryonic and perinatal brains, radmis localized to bipolar mitotic spindles and radial fibers (basal processes) of dividing NSPCs. As central nervous system development proceeded, radmis expression was lost in most brain regions, except for several neurogenic regions. In adult brain, radmis expression persisted in the mitotic spindles of both slowly-dividing stem cells and rapid amplifying progenitors. Overexpression of radmis in vitro induced hyper-stabilization of microtubules, severe defects in mitotic spindle formation, and mitotic arrest. In vivo gain-of-function using in utero electroporation revealed that radmis directed a reduction in NSPC proliferation and a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, causing a reduction in the Tbr2-positive basal progenitor population and shrinkage of the embryonic subventricular zone. Besides, radmis loss-of-function by shRNAs induced the multipolar mitotic spindle structure, accompanied with the catastrophe of chromosome segregation including the long chromosome bridge between two separating daughter nuclei. These findings uncover the indispensable role of radmis in mitotic spindle formation and cell-cycle progression of NSPCs. PMID:24260314

  2. Sustaining the spindle assembly checkpoint to improve cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Roberta; Della Monica, Rosa; Grieco, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    To prevent chromosome segregation errors, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until proper spindle assembly. We found that the FCP1 phosphatase and its downstream target WEE1 kinase oppose the SAC, promoting mitosis exit despite malformed spindles. We further showed that targeting this pathway might be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:27308561

  3. Spindle Cell Sarcoma Presenting as Pancoast Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Aliena; Khan, Salman; Saeed, Usman

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a patient who presented with pancoast syndrome, secondary to spindle cell sarcoma of the lung. A 56-year man presented with dyspnea, engorged neck veins and bilateral upper limb pitting edema. The patient also had ptosis and miosis in the right eye. Right ulnar nerve palsy with atrophy of hand muscles was seen. His chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion with an opacity involving the apex of the right lung along with mediastinal widening. Echocardiography revealed a pericardial effusion which was drained. The patient's CTscan of chest strongly suspected a malignant mass in right upper lobe with extensive mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleural metastases and pericardial involvement. He was started on oxygen inhalation, dexamethasone, and clopidogrel. Bronchoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of spindle cell sarcoma. Meanwhile, he was advised radiotherapy. The tumour was not amenable to surgery. Spindle cell sarcoma is a rare connective tissue tumor that replicates rapidly. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it is hereby reported the first case of spindle cell sarcoma of the lung presenting as Pancoast syndrome. PMID:27504558

  4. Spinning Wool with a Hand Spindle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, Margo

    1982-01-01

    Describes an eight-week program in which 8- to 14-year-olds learned to spin raw wool into yarn. Students observed wool shearing at a sheep farm, learned to prepare wool for spinning, and spun their own yarn. Detail directions for carding and use of hand spindles are included. (AM)

  5. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  6. Pten regulates spindle pole movement through Dlg1-mediated recruitment of Eg5 to centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Ree, Janine H.; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Kanakkanthara, Arun; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (Pten) suppresses neoplastic growth by negatively regulating PI(3)K signalling through its phosphatase activity1. To gain insight into the actions of non-catalytic Pten domains in normal physiological processes and tumorigenesis2,3, we engineered mice lacking the PDZ-binding domain (PDZ-BD). Here, we show that the PDZ-BD regulates centrosome movement and that its heterozygous or homozygous deletion promotes aneuploidy and tumour formation. We found that Pten is recruited to pre-mitotic centrosomes in a Plk1-dependent fashion to create a docking site for protein complexes containing the PDZ-domain-containing protein Dlg1 (also known as Sap97) and Eg5 (also known as Kif11), a kinesin essential for centrosome movement and bipolar spindle formation4. Docking of Dlg1–Eg5 complexes to Pten depended on Eg5 phosphorylation by the Nek9–Nek6 mitotic kinase cascade and Cdk1. PDZ-BD deletion or Dlg1 ablation impaired loading of Eg5 onto centrosomes and spindle pole motility, yielding asymmetrical spindles that are prone to chromosome missegregation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Pten, through the Dlg1-binding ability of its PDZ-BD, accumulates phosphorylated Eg5 at duplicated centrosomes to establish symmetrical bipolar spindles that properly segregate chromosomes, and suggest that this function contributes to tumour suppression. PMID:27240320

  7. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  8. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  9. The human Ino80 binds to microtubule via the E-hook of tubulin: Implications for the role in spindle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Lee, Han-Sae; Lee, Shin-Ai; Kwon, Jongbum

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminal domain of hIno80 is important for binding to the spindle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hIno80 N-terminal domain binds to tubulin and microtubule in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E-hook of tubulin is critical for hIno80 binding to tubulin and microtubule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tip49a does not bind to microtubule and dispensable for spindle formation. -- Abstract: The human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, comprising the Ino80 ATPase (hIno80) and the associated proteins such as Tip49a, has been implicated in a variety of nuclear processes other than transcription. We previously have found that hIno80 interacts with tubulin and co-localizes with the mitotic spindle and is required for spindle formation. To better understand the role of hIno80 in spindle formation, we further investigated the interaction between hIno80 and microtubule. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain, dispensable for the nucleosome remodeling activity, is important for hIno80 to interact with tubulin and co-localize with the spindle. The hIno80 N-terminal domain binds to monomeric tubulin and polymerized microtubule in vitro, and the E-hook of tubulin, involved in the polymerization of microtubule, is critical for this binding. Tip49a, which has been reported to associate with the spindle, does not bind to microtubule in vitro and dispensable for spindle formation in vivo. These results suggest that hIno80 can play a direct role in the spindle assembly independent of its chromatin remodeling activity.

  10. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  11. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  12. Adaptive Spindle Balancing Using Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY,PATRICK S.; LAUFFER,JAMES P.; PETTEYS,REBECCA; REDMOND,JAMES M.; SULLIVAN,WILLIAM N.

    1999-09-20

    A technological break through for supporting rotating shafts is the active magnetic bearing (AMB). Active magnetic bearings offer some important advantages over conventional ball, roller or journal bearings such as reduced frictional drag, no physical contact in the bearing, no need for lubricants, compatibility with high vacuum and ultra-clean environments, and ability to control shaft position within the bearing. The disadvantages of the AMB system are the increased cost and complexity, reduced bearing stiffness and the need for a controller. Still, there are certain applications, such as high speed machining, biomedical devices, and gyroscopes, where the additional cost of an AMB system can be justified. The inherent actuator capabilities of the AMB offer the potential for active balancing of spindles and micro-shaping capabilities for machine tools, The work presented in this paper concentrates on an AMB test program that utilizes the actuator capability to dynamically balance a spindle. In this study, an unbalanced AMB spindle system was enhanced with an LMS (Least Mean Squares) algorithm combined with an existing PID (proportional, integral, differential) control. This enhanced controller significantly improved the concentricity of an intentionally unbalanced shaft. The study included dynamic system analysis, test validation, control design and simulation, as well as experimental implementation using a digital LMS controller.

  13. A Balance between Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Volumes Controls Spindle Length

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Lucia; Kovacovicova, Kristina; Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Sodek, Martin; Skultety, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Proper assembly of the spindle apparatus is crucially important for faithful chromosome segregation during anaphase. Thanks to the effort over the last decades, we have very detailed information about many events leading to spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, however we still do not understand certain aspects, including, for example, spindle length control. When tight regulation of spindle size is lost, chromosome segregation errors emerge. Currently, there are several hypotheses trying to explain the molecular mechanism of spindle length control. The number of kinetochores, activity of molecular rulers, intracellular gradients, cell size, limiting spindle components, and the balance of the spindle forces seem to contribute to spindle size regulation, however some of these mechanisms are likely specific to a particular cell type. In search for a general regulatory mechanism, in our study we focused on the role of cell size and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio in this process. To this end, we used relatively large cells isolated from 2-cell mouse embryos. Our results showed that the spindle size upper limit is not reached in these cells and suggest that accurate control of spindle length requires balanced ratio between nuclear and cytoplasmic volumes. PMID:26886125

  14. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  15. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males. PMID:25471574

  16. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males.

  17. Aurora-A-Dependent Control of TACC3 Influences the Rate of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nimesh; Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle; Pfuhl, Mark; Gergely, Fanni; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The essential mammalian gene TACC3 is frequently mutated and amplified in cancers and its fusion products exhibit oncogenic activity in glioblastomas. TACC3 functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In particular, phosphorylation on S558 by the mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, promotes spindle recruitment of TACC3 and triggers the formation of a complex with ch-TOG-clathrin that crosslinks and stabilises kinetochore microtubules. Here we map the Aurora-A-binding interface in TACC3 and show that TACC3 potently activates Aurora-A through a domain centered on F525. Vertebrate cells carrying homozygous F525A mutation in the endogenous TACC3 loci exhibit defects in TACC3 function, namely perturbed localization, reduced phosphorylation and weakened interaction with clathrin. The most striking feature of the F525A cells however is a marked shortening of mitosis, at least in part due to rapid spindle assembly. F525A cells do not exhibit chromosome missegregation, indicating that they undergo fast yet apparently faithful mitosis. By contrast, mutating the phosphorylation site S558 to alanine in TACC3 causes aneuploidy without a significant change in mitotic duration. Our work has therefore defined a regulatory role for the Aurora-A-TACC3 interaction beyond the act of phosphorylation at S558. We propose that the regulatory relationship between Aurora-A and TACC3 enables the transition from the microtubule-polymerase activity of TACC3-ch-TOG to the microtubule-crosslinking activity of TACC3-ch-TOG-clathrin complexes as mitosis progresses. Aurora-A-dependent control of TACC3 could determine the balance between these activities, thereby influencing not only spindle length and stability but also the speed of spindle formation with vital consequences for chromosome alignment and segregation. PMID:26134678

  18. The KASH protein Kms2 coordinates mitotic remodeling of the spindle pole body.

    PubMed

    Wälde, Sarah; King, Megan C

    2014-08-15

    Defects in the biogenesis of the spindle pole body (SPB), the yeast centrosome equivalent, can lead to monopolar spindles and mitotic catastrophe. The KASH domain protein Kms2 and the SUN domain protein Sad1 colocalize within the nuclear envelope at the site of SPB attachment during interphase and at the spindle poles during mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that Kms2 interacts with the essential SPB components Cut12 and Pcp1 and the Polo kinase Plo1. Depletion of Kms2 delays mitotic entry and leads to defects in the insertion of the SPB into the nuclear envelope, disrupting stable bipolar spindle formation. These effects are mediated in part by a delay in the recruitment of Plo1 to the SPB at mitotic entry. Plo1 activity supports mitotic SPB remodeling by driving a burst of incorporation of Cut12 and Pcp1. Thus, a fission yeast SUN-KASH complex plays an important role in supporting the remodeling of the SPB at mitotic entry.

  19. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  20. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  1. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  2. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were carried out in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis. PMID:25470754

  3. Self-Organization and Forces in the Mitotic Spindle.

    PubMed

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-07-01

    At the onset of division, the cell forms a spindle, a precise self-constructed micromachine composed of microtubules and the associated proteins, which divides the chromosomes between the two nascent daughter cells. The spindle arises from self-organization of microtubules and chromosomes, whose different types of motion help them explore the space and eventually approach and interact with each other. Once the interactions between the chromosomes and the microtubules have been established, the chromosomes are moved to the equatorial plane of the spindle and ultimately toward the opposite spindle poles. These transport processes rely on directed forces that are precisely regulated in space and time. In this review, we discuss how microtubule dynamics and their rotational movement drive spindle self-organization, as well as how the forces acting in the spindle are generated, balanced, and regulated. PMID:27145873

  4. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  5. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  6. Morphogenesis of the mitotic and meiotic spindle: Conclusions obtained from one system are not necessarily applicable to the other

    SciTech Connect

    Rieder, C.L.; Ault, J.G.; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U.; Sluder, G.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosome distribution during both mitosis and meiosis is effected by the {open_quotes}spindle{close_quotes}, a complex ensemble formed from an interaction between chromosomes and microtubules (MTs). One of the most important characteristics of the spindle is its bipolar structure, established as it forms during prometaphase, which ensures that the replicated chromosomes are segregated equivalently to two daughter cells. A major goal of cell division research is to understand the mechanism of spindle morphogenesis and how bipolarity is established. Because they are relatively flat and easily obtained year-round, spermatocytes, especially those from insects, have been a favored material for the study of animal cell division since the process was first described by Flemming in the late 1800`s. Like living cultured cells, spindle formation in spermatocytes can be detailed by all forms of light microscopy (LM), and cells followed in vivo can be fixed and processed for a subsequent analysis with the electron microscope (EM). Unfortunately, with the exception of a few marine organisms, the large size and opaque nature of most oocytes impedes a detailed analysis of their meiosis in vivo. As a result, information regarding spindle formation and function during meiosis in oocytes is typically derived from EM or immunofluorescent (IMF) studies of fixed cells or cell-free oocyte extracts.

  7. Form and Function of Sleep Spindles across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Brittany C.; Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of EEG recordings, sleep spindles have been identified as hallmarks of non-REM sleep. Despite a broad general understanding of mechanisms of spindle generation gleaned from animal studies, the mechanisms underlying certain features of spindles in the human brain, such as “global” versus “local” spindles, are largely unknown. Neither the topography nor the morphology of sleep spindles remains constant throughout the lifespan. It is likely that changes in spindle phenomenology during development and aging are the result of dramatic changes in brain structure and function. Across various developmental windows, spindle activity is correlated with general cognitive aptitude, learning, and memory; however, these correlations vary in strength, and even direction, depending on age and metrics used. Understanding these differences across the lifespan should further clarify how these oscillations are generated and their function under a variety of circumstances. We discuss these issues, and their translational implications for human cognitive function. Because sleep spindles are similarly affected in disorders of neurodevelopment (such as schizophrenia) and during aging (such as neurodegenerative conditions), both types of disorders may benefit from therapies based on a better understanding of spindle function. PMID:27190654

  8. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  9. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-03-18

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes.

  10. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  11. Spindle Cell Lipoma of the Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Hançer, Ahmet; Özbay, Can; Karaarslan, Serap; Balaban, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral spindle cell lipomas (SCL) are very rare and comprise ranging between 1.4%–9.8% of all intraoral lipomas. To our knowledge, no case of a SCL located on the soft palate has been reported in the English-language literature. A 31-year-old female was admitted with a swelling in her soft palate. On examination, a 3 cm sessile, nontender swelling was observed on her soft palate. After surgical excision, it was diagnosed as a SCL. PMID:25878917

  12. Nek2A destruction marks APC/C activation at the prophase-to-prometaphase transition by spindle-checkpoint-restricted Cdc20.

    PubMed

    Boekhout, Michiel; Wolthuis, Rob

    2015-04-15

    Nek2 isoform A (Nek2A) is a presumed substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome containing Cdc20 (APC/C(Cdc20)). Nek2A, like cyclin A, is degraded in mitosis while the spindle checkpoint is active. Cyclin A prevents spindle checkpoint proteins from binding to Cdc20 and is recruited to the APC/C in prometaphase. We found that Nek2A and cyclin A avoid being stabilized by the spindle checkpoint in different ways. First, enhancing mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) formation by nocodazole treatment inhibited the degradation of geminin and cyclin A, whereas Nek2A disappeared at a normal rate. Second, depleting Cdc20 effectively stabilized cyclin A but not Nek2A. Nevertheless, Nek2A destruction crucially depended on Cdc20 binding to the APC/C. Third, in contrast to cyclin A, Nek2A was recruited to the APC/C before the start of mitosis. Interestingly, the spindle checkpoint very effectively stabilized an APC/C-binding mutant of Nek2A, which required the Nek2A KEN box. Apparently, in cells, the spindle checkpoint primarily prevents Cdc20 from binding destruction motifs. Nek2A disappearance marks the prophase-to-prometaphase transition, when Cdc20, regardless of the spindle checkpoint, activates the APC/C. However, Mad2 depletion accelerated Nek2A destruction, showing that spindle checkpoint release further increases APC/C(Cdc20) catalytic activity. PMID:25673878

  13. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R, a Mature Centriole Protein, Disrupts Centrosomes, Alters Cell Cycle Progression, and Perturbs Mitotic Spindles and Anaphase▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R.; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I. M.; Go, Minjoung M.; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G1 accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  14. Reduced O-GlcNAcase expression promotes mitotic errors and spindle defects.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Chris; Tan, Ee Phie; Zhang, Zhen; Machacek, Miranda; Brinker, Amanda E; Azuma, Mizuki; Slawson, Chad

    2016-05-18

    Alterations in O-GlcNAc cycling, the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc, lead to mitotic defects and increased aneuploidy. Herein, we generated stable O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc) knockdown HeLa cell lines and characterized the effect of the reduction in OGA activity on cell cycle progression. After release from G1/S, the OGA knockdown cells progressed normally through S phase but demonstrated mitotic exit defects. Cyclin A was increased in the knockdown cells while Cyclin B and D expression was reduced. Retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation was also increased in the knockdown compared to control. At M phase, the knockdown cells showed more compact spindle chromatids than control cells and had a greater percentage of cells with multipolar spindles. Furthermore, the timing of the inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1) was altered in the OGA knockdown cells. Although expression and localization of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC) was unchanged, histone H3 threonine 3 phosphorylation was decreased in one of the OGA knockdown cell lines. The Ewing Sarcoma Breakpoint Region 1 Protein (EWS) participates in organizing the CPC at the spindle and is a known substrate for O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the enzyme that adds O-GlcNAc). EWS O-GlcNAcylation was significantly increased in the OGA knockdown cells promoting uneven localization of the mitotic midzone. Our data suggests that O-GlcNAc cycling is an essential mechanism for proper mitotic signaling and spindle formation, and alterations in the rate of O-GlcNAc cycling produces aberrant spindles and promotes aneuploidy.

  15. Reduced O-GlcNAcase expression promotes mitotic errors and spindle defects.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Chris; Tan, Ee Phie; Zhang, Zhen; Machacek, Miranda; Brinker, Amanda E; Azuma, Mizuki; Slawson, Chad

    2016-05-18

    Alterations in O-GlcNAc cycling, the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc, lead to mitotic defects and increased aneuploidy. Herein, we generated stable O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc) knockdown HeLa cell lines and characterized the effect of the reduction in OGA activity on cell cycle progression. After release from G1/S, the OGA knockdown cells progressed normally through S phase but demonstrated mitotic exit defects. Cyclin A was increased in the knockdown cells while Cyclin B and D expression was reduced. Retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation was also increased in the knockdown compared to control. At M phase, the knockdown cells showed more compact spindle chromatids than control cells and had a greater percentage of cells with multipolar spindles. Furthermore, the timing of the inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1) was altered in the OGA knockdown cells. Although expression and localization of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC) was unchanged, histone H3 threonine 3 phosphorylation was decreased in one of the OGA knockdown cell lines. The Ewing Sarcoma Breakpoint Region 1 Protein (EWS) participates in organizing the CPC at the spindle and is a known substrate for O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the enzyme that adds O-GlcNAc). EWS O-GlcNAcylation was significantly increased in the OGA knockdown cells promoting uneven localization of the mitotic midzone. Our data suggests that O-GlcNAc cycling is an essential mechanism for proper mitotic signaling and spindle formation, and alterations in the rate of O-GlcNAc cycling produces aberrant spindles and promotes aneuploidy. PMID:27070276

  16. Sleep Spindle Density Predicts the Effect of Prior Knowledge on Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Kempkes, Marleen; Cousins, James N.; Lewis, Penelope A.

    2016-01-01

    Information that relates to a prior knowledge schema is remembered better and consolidates more rapidly than information that does not. Another factor that influences memory consolidation is sleep and growing evidence suggests that sleep-related processing is important for integration with existing knowledge. Here, we perform an examination of how sleep-related mechanisms interact with schema-dependent memory advantage. Participants first established a schema over 2 weeks. Next, they encoded new facts, which were either related to the schema or completely unrelated. After a 24 h retention interval, including a night of sleep, which we monitored with polysomnography, participants encoded a second set of facts. Finally, memory for all facts was tested in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Behaviorally, sleep spindle density predicted an increase of the schema benefit to memory across the retention interval. Higher spindle densities were associated with reduced decay of schema-related memories. Functionally, spindle density predicted increased disengagement of the hippocampus across 24 h for schema-related memories only. Together, these results suggest that sleep spindle activity is associated with the effect of prior knowledge on memory consolidation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Episodic memories are gradually assimilated into long-term memory and this process is strongly influenced by sleep. The consolidation of new information is also influenced by its relationship to existing knowledge structures, or schemas, but the role of sleep in such schema-related consolidation is unknown. We show that sleep spindle density predicts the extent to which schemas influence the consolidation of related facts. This is the first evidence that sleep is associated with the interaction between prior knowledge and long-term memory formation. PMID:27030764

  17. Heterogeneity of spindle units in the cat tenuissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Walro, J M

    1987-03-01

    Three tandem spindles and their nerve supplies, reconstructed by light microscopy of serial transverse sections of the cat tenuissimus muscle, were compared to single spindle units. Each tandem spindle consisted of one large unit containing a dynamic bag1, a static bag2, and several static chain fibers (b1b2c unit) linked by the bag2 fiber to a small unit containing only a bag2 and chain fibers (b2c unit). Most features of primary afferents, secondary afferents, and motor neurons were qualitatively and quantitatively similar in both single and tandem b1b2c units. However, b1b2c units of tandem spindles had a lower density of skeletofusimotor innervation than did single b1b2c spindles. The b2c spindle units differed greatly from single or tandem b1b2c units. The b2c spindle units had fewer intrafusal fibers and incoming axons than either the tandem or single b1b2c units. The motor innervation of b2c units was typified by nonselective gamma axons that coinnervated both bag2 and chain fibers, in contrast to the regular occurrence of both selective and nonselective motor axons in b1b2c spindle units. The afferent located at the equator of b2c units differed in size, branching pattern, and intrafusal distribution of its ending from both the primary and secondary sensory axons of b1b2c units and, therefore, might represent a third category of spindle afferent. Thus, cat tenuissimus muscles contain three types of spindle units that differ in the number and organization of muscular and neural elements. These differences in structure and neural organization among tenuissimus spindle units may be a source for generation of different sensory signals in response to common mechanical or fusimotor stimuli.

  18. Egr3-Dependent Muscle Spindle Stretch Receptor Intrafusal Muscle Fiber Differentiation and Fusimotor Innervation Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These “spindle remnants” persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis. PMID:25855173

  19. Spindle assembly checkpoint: the third decade

    PubMed Central

    Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint controls cell cycle progression during mitosis, synchronizing it with the attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. After the discovery of the mitotic arrest deficient (MAD) and budding uninhibited by benzymidazole (BUB) genes as crucial checkpoint components in 1991, the second decade of checkpoint studies (2001–2010) witnessed crucial advances in the elucidation of the mechanism through which the checkpoint effector, the mitotic checkpoint complex, targets the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) to prevent progression into anaphase. Concomitantly, the discovery that the Ndc80 complex and other components of the microtubule-binding interface of kinetochores are essential for the checkpoint response finally asserted that kinetochores are crucial for the checkpoint response. Nevertheless, the relationship between kinetochores and checkpoint control remains poorly understood. Crucial advances in this area in the third decade of checkpoint studies (2011–2020) are likely to be brought about by the characterization of the mechanism of kinetochore recruitment, activation and inactivation of checkpoint proteins, which remains elusive for the majority of checkpoint components. Here, we take a molecular view on the main challenges hampering this task. PMID:22084386

  20. Correlations between adolescent processing speed and specific spindle frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Rebecca S.; Smith, Carlyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are waxing and waning thalamocortical oscillations with accepted frequencies of between 11 and 16 Hz and a minimum duration of 0.5 s. Our research has suggested that there is spindle activity in all of the sleep stages, and thus for the present analysis we examined the link between spindle activity (Stage 2, rapid eye movement (REM) and slow wave sleep (SWS)) and waking cognitive abilities in 32 healthy adolescents. After software was used to filter frequencies outside the desired range, slow spindles (11.00–13.50 Hz), fast spindles (13.51–16.00 Hz) and spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) were observed in Stage 2, SWS and REM sleep. Our analysis suggests that these specific EEG frequencies were significantly related to processing speed, which is one of the subscales of the intelligence score, in adolescents. The relationship was prominent in SWS and REM sleep. Further, the spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) that occurred during SWS was strongly related to processing speed. Results suggest that the ability of adolescents to respond to tasks in an accurate, efficient and timely manner is related to their sleep quality. These findings support earlier research reporting relationships between learning, learning potential and sleep spindle activity in adults and adolescents. PMID:25709575

  1. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust – yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design. PMID:20930139

  2. Kinetochore components are required for central spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Maton, Gilliane; Edwards, Frances; Lacroix, Benjamin; Stefanutti, Marine; Laband, Kimberley; Lieury, Tiffany; Kim, Taekyung; Espeut, Julien; Canman, Julie C.; Dumont, Julien

    2015-01-01

    A critical structure poised to coordinate chromosome segregation with division plane specification is the central spindle that forms between separating chromosomes after anaphase onset1, 2. The central spindle acts as a signaling center that concentrates proteins essential for division plane specification and contractile ring constriction3. However, the molecular mechanisms that control the initial stages of central spindle assembly remain elusive. Using Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes, we found that the microtubule bundling protein SPD-1PRC1 and the motor ZEN-4MKLP-1 are required for proper central spindle structure during its elongation4-9. By contrast, we found that the kinetochore controls the initiation of central spindle assembly. Specifically, central spindle microtubule assembly is dependent upon kinetochore recruitment of the scaffold protein KNL-1, as well as downstream partners BUB-1, HCP-1/2CENP-F, and CLS-2CLASP; and is negatively regulated by kinetochore-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity. This in turn promotes central spindle localization of CLS-2CLASP and initial central spindle microtubule assembly through its microtubule polymerase activity. Together, our results reveal an unexpected role for a conserved kinetochore protein network in coupling two critical events of cell division: chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. PMID:25866924

  3. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  4. Centrosomes and spindles in ascidian embryos and eggs.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Alex; Chenevert, Janet; Pruliere, Gerard; Costache, Vlad; Hebras, Celine; Salez, Gregory; Dumollard, Remi

    2015-01-01

    During embryonic development and maternal meiotic maturation, positioning of the mitotic/meiotic spindle is subject to control mechanisms that meet the needs of the particular cell type. Here we review the methods, molecular tools, and the ascidian model we use to study three different ways in which centrosomes or spindles are positioned in three different cellular contexts. First, we review unequal cleavage in the ascidian germ lineage. In the germ cell precursors, a large macromolecular structure termed the centrosome-attracting body causes three successive rounds of unequal cleavage from the 8- to the 64-cell stage. Next, we discuss spindle positioning underlying the invariant cleavage pattern. Ascidian embryos display an invariant cleavage pattern whereby the mitotic spindle aligns in a predetermined orientation in every blastomere up to the gastrula stage (composed of 112 cells). Finally, we review methods and approaches to study meiotic spindle positioning in eggs. PMID:26175446

  5. First observation of a muscle spindle in fish.

    PubMed

    Maeda, N; Miyoshi, S; Toh, H

    1983-03-01

    In many groups of vertebrates, the muscle spindle is a specialized sensory organ for the detection of muscle stretching. The structure of the spindle varies among vertebrate classes. Moreover, Barker has asserted that Amphibia are the most primitive vertebrates to possess muscle spindles. Extensive studies, made mainly on the locomotor myotome, seem to show that the muscle receptors of fish are less specialized than those of more advanced animals, and that muscle spindles are absent. However, little attention has been paid to the jaw-closing muscle. We report here our finding of a very simple muscle spindle with a single intrafusal fibre in the well-developed jaw-closing muscle, adductor mandibulae, in a primitive teleostean, Oncorhynchus masou (Brevoort).

  6. Cell Size Modulates Oscillation, Positioning and Length of Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle is the main subcellular structure that accomplishes the chromosome segregation between daughter cells during cell division. However, how mitotic spindles sense and control their size, position and movement inside the cell still remains unclear. In this paper, we focus on the size effects of mitotic spindles, i.e., how cell size controls various interesting phenomena in the metaphase, such as oscillation, positioning and size limit of mitotic spindles. We systematically studied the frequency doubling phenomenon during chromosome oscillation and found that cell size can regulate the period and amplitude of chromosome oscillation. We found that the relaxation time of the positioning process increases exponentially with cell size. We also showed that the stabler microtubule-kinetochore attachments alone can directly lead to an upper limit of spindle size. Our work not only explains the existing experimental observations, but also provides some interesting predictions that can be verified or rejected by further experiments. PMID:26015263

  7. Atypical spindle cell lipoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular study emphasizing its relationship to classical spindle cell lipoma.

    PubMed

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Savola, Suvi; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Mentzel, Thomas; Libbrecht, Louis

    2014-07-01

    We studied a series of spindle cell lipomas arising in atypical sites and showing unusual morphologic features (which we called atypical spindle cell lipoma) to assess if these lesions have the same chromosomal alterations as classical spindle cell lipoma but different from those found in atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. We investigated alterations of different genes in the 13q14 region and the amplification status of the MDM2 and CDK4 genes at 12q14-15 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. In the atypical spindle cell lipomas, MLPA revealed deletions in the two nearest flanking genes of RB1 (ITM2B and RCBTB2) and in multiple important exons of RB1. In contrast, in classical spindle cell lipomas, a less complex loss of RB1 exons was found but no deletion of ITM2B and RCBTB2. Moreover, MLPA identified a deletion of the DLEU1 gene, a finding which has not been reported earlier. We propose an immunohistochemical panel for lipomatous tumors which comprises of MDM2, CDK4, p16, Rb, which we have found useful in discriminating between atypical or classical spindle cell lipomas and other adipocytic neoplasms, especially atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. Our findings strengthen the link between atypical spindle cell lipoma and classical spindle cell lipoma, and differentiate them from atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma.

  8. Atypical spindle cell lipoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular study emphasizing its relationship to classical spindle cell lipoma.

    PubMed

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Savola, Suvi; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Mentzel, Thomas; Libbrecht, Louis

    2014-07-01

    We studied a series of spindle cell lipomas arising in atypical sites and showing unusual morphologic features (which we called atypical spindle cell lipoma) to assess if these lesions have the same chromosomal alterations as classical spindle cell lipoma but different from those found in atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. We investigated alterations of different genes in the 13q14 region and the amplification status of the MDM2 and CDK4 genes at 12q14-15 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. In the atypical spindle cell lipomas, MLPA revealed deletions in the two nearest flanking genes of RB1 (ITM2B and RCBTB2) and in multiple important exons of RB1. In contrast, in classical spindle cell lipomas, a less complex loss of RB1 exons was found but no deletion of ITM2B and RCBTB2. Moreover, MLPA identified a deletion of the DLEU1 gene, a finding which has not been reported earlier. We propose an immunohistochemical panel for lipomatous tumors which comprises of MDM2, CDK4, p16, Rb, which we have found useful in discriminating between atypical or classical spindle cell lipomas and other adipocytic neoplasms, especially atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. Our findings strengthen the link between atypical spindle cell lipoma and classical spindle cell lipoma, and differentiate them from atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. PMID:24659226

  9. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  10. Releasing the spindle assembly checkpoint without tension.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce F; Dong, Yimin

    2009-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that facilitates accurate genomic segregation during mitosis by delaying anaphase onset in response to errors in kinetochore microtubule attachment. In contrast to the well-studied molecular mechanism by which the SAC blocks anaphase onset, the events triggering SAC release are poorly understood. Papers in this issue by Uchida et al. (Uchida, K.S.K., K. Takagaki, K. Kumada, Y. Hirayama, T. Noda, and T. Hirota. 2009. J. Cell Biol. 184:383-390) and Maresca and Salmon (Maresca, T.J., and E.D. Salmon. 2009. J. Cell Biol. 184:373-381) make an important advance by demonstrating that SAC release depends on molecular rearrangements within the kinetochore rather than tension-produced stretch between sister kinetochores.

  11. Rare Occurrence of Lip Spindle Cell Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Sandra; Cheng, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a rare distinct variant of lipoma, which presents as a painless, circumscribed, slow-growing, superficial lesion on the lip and can mimic a minor salivary gland tumour. We present a slow growing lower lip lesion and its management. Case Report. A 38-year-old female gave an eight-year history of a slow-growing mass on her lower lip with intermittent change in size. She presented with a submucosal nodule and thin overlying mucosa adjacent to the vermilion border. Surgical excision was carried as the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Conclusion. Lip SCL is rare, and surgical excision is advocated in order to exclude underlying pathology and minor salivary gland tumours. PMID:25815220

  12. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment.

  13. A comparative analysis of spindle morphometrics across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Good, Matthew C.; von Dassow, George; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in all eukaryotes depends on function of the spindle, a microtubule-based structure that segregates chromosomes to generate daughter cells in mitosis or haploid gametes in meiosis. Spindle size adapts to changes in cell size and shape, which vary dramatically across species and within a multicellular organism, but the nature of scaling events and their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cell size variations are most pronounced in early animal development, as egg diameters range from tens of microns up to millimeters across animal phyla, and decrease several orders of magnitude during rapid reductive divisions. During early embryogenesis in the model organisms X. laevis and C. elegans, the spindle scales with cell size [1,2], a phenomenon regulated by molecules that modulate microtubule dynamics [3–6], as well as by limiting cytoplasmic volume [7,8]. However, it is not known to what extent spindle scaling is conserved across organisms and among different cell types. Here we show that in a range of metazoan phyla, mitotic spindle length decreased with cell size across a ~30 fold difference in zygote size. Maximum spindle length varied, but linear spindle scaling occurred similarly in all species once embryonic cell diameter reduced to 140 μm. In contrast, we find that the female meiotic spindle does not scale as closely to egg size, adopting a more uniform size across species that likely reflects its specialized function. Our analysis reveals that spindle morphometrics change abruptly, within one cell cycle, at the transition from meiosis to mitosis in most animals. PMID:26004761

  14. X-43A Rudder Spindle Fatigue Life Estimate and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.; Simonsen, Micah; Mason, Brian H.

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue life analyses were performed using a standard strain-life approach and a linear cumulative damage parameter to assess the effect of a single accidental overload on the fatigue life of the Haynes 230 nickel-base superalloy X-43A rudder spindle. Because of a limited amount of information available about the Haynes 230 material, a series of tests were conducted to replicate the overload and in-service conditions for the spindle and corroborate the analysis. Both the analytical and experimental results suggest that the spindle will survive the anticipated flight loads.

  15. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  16. CDC20 downregulation impairs spindle morphology and causes reduced first polar body emission during bovine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Yang, W L; Li, J; An, P; Lei, A M

    2014-03-01

    The cell division cycle protein 20 (CDC20) is an essential regulator of cell division, encoded by the CDC20 gene. However, the role of CDC20 in bovine oocyte maturation is unknown. In this study, CDC20 morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MOs) were microinjected into the cytoplasm of bovine oocytes to block the translation of CDC20 mRNA. CDC20 downregulation significantly reduced the rate of first polar body emission (PB1). Further analysis indicated that oocytes treated with CDC20 MO arrested before or at meiotic stage I with abnormal spindles. To further confirm the functions of CDC20 during oocyte meiotic division, CDC20 MOs were microinjected into oocytes together with a supplementary PB1. The results showed that newly synthesized CDC20 was not necessary at the meiosis II-to-anaphase II transition. Our data suggest that CDC20 is required for spindle assembly, chromosomal segregation, and PB1 extrusion during bovine oocyte maturation. PMID:24360405

  17. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  18. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  19. Microcystin-LR induces mitotic spindle assembly disorders in Vicia faba by protein phosphatase inhibition and not reactive oxygen species induction.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Tándor, Ildikó; Beyer, Dániel; Vasas, Gábor; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vereb, György; Papp, Georgina; Riba, Milán; M-Hamvas, Márta; Máthé, Csaba

    2016-07-20

    We aimed to reveal the mechanisms of mitotic spindle anomalies induced by microcystin-LR (MCY-LR), a cyanobacterial toxin in Vicia faba, a well-known model in plant cell and molecular biology. MCY-LR inhibits type 1 and 2A phosphoserine/threonine specific protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of the cyanotoxin during cytopathogenesis. Histochemical-immunohistochemical and biochemical methods were used. A significant number of MCY-LR induced spindle alterations are described for the first time. Disrupted, multipolar spindles and missing kinetochore fibers were detected both in metaphase and anaphase cells. Additional polar microtubule (MT) bundles, hyperbundling of spindle MTs, monopolar spindles, C-S- shaped, additional and asymmetric spindles were detected in metaphase, while midplane kinetochore fibers were detected in anaphase cells only. Several spindle anomalies induced mitotic disorders, i.e. they occurred concomitantly with altered sister chromatid separation. Alterations were dependent on the MCY-LR dose and exposure time. Under long-term (2 and mainly 6 days') exposure they were detected in the concentration range of 0.1-20μgmL(-1) MCY-LR that inhibited PP1 and PP2A significantly without significant ROS induction. Elevated peroxidase/catalase activities indicated that MCY-LR treated V. faba plants showed efficient defense against oxidative stress. Thus, although the elevation of ROS is known to induce cytoskeletal aberrations in general, this study shows that long-term protein phosphatase inhibition is the primary cause of MCY-LR induced spindle disorders. PMID:27186862

  20. The crack effect on instability in a machine tool spindle with gas bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo-Wun

    2005-09-01

    Gas-bearing spindles are required for increased spindle speed in precise machining. Due to manufacturing flaws or cyclic loading, cracks frequently appear in a rotating spindle systems. Cracks markedly affect the dynamic characteristics of rotating machinery. Hence, in this study, high-speed spindles with gas bearings and the crack effect on the instability dynamics are considered. Most investigations on dynamic characteristics of the spindle system were confined to ball-bearing-type spindles. This work examines the dynamic instability in a cracked rotating spindle system with gas bearings. A round Euler-Bernoulli beam is used to approximate the spindle. The Hamilton principle is applied to derive the equation of motion for the spindle system. The effects of crack depth, rotation speed and provided air pressure on the dynamic instability of a rotating spindle system are studied

  1. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  2. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  3. Spindle extraction method for ISAR image based on Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xia; Zheng, Sheng; Zeng, Xiangyun; Zhu, Daoyuan; Xu, Gaogui

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method of spindle extraction of target in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) image is proposed which depends on Radon Transform. Firstly, utilizing Radon Transform to detect all straight lines which are collinear with these line segments in image. Then, using Sobel operator to detect image contour. Finally, finding all intersections of each straight line and image contour, the two intersections which have maximum distance between them is the two ends of this line segment and the longest line segment of all line segments is spindle of target. According to the proposed spindle extraction method, one hundred simulated ISAR images which are respectively rotated 0 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees in counterclockwise are used to do experiment and the proposed method and the detection results are more close to the real spindle of target than the method based on Hough Transform .

  4. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  5. Aurora B regulates spindle bipolarity in meiosis in vertebrate oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hua; Ma, Chunqi; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Ruizhen; Miller, Ann L.; Bement, William M.; Liu, X. Johné

    2012-01-01

    Aurora B (Aur-B) plays multiple roles in mitosis, of which the best known are to ensure bi-orientation of sister chromatids by destabilizing incorrectly attached kinetochore microtubules and to participate in cytokinesis. Studies in Xenopus egg extracts, however, have indicated that Aur-B and the chromosome passenger complex play an important role in stabilizing chromosome-associated spindle microtubules. Aur-B stabilizes spindle microtubules in the egg extracts by inhibiting the catastrophe kinesin MCAK. Whether or not Aur-B plays a similar role in intact oocytes remains unknown. Here we have employed a dominant-negative Aur-B mutant (Aur-B122R, in which the ATP-binding lysine122 is replaced with arginine) to investigate the function of Aur-B in spindle assembly in Xenopus oocytes undergoing meiosis. Overexpression of Aur-B122R results in short bipolar spindles or monopolar spindles, with higher concentrations of Aur-B122R producing mostly the latter. Simultaneous inhibition of MCAK translation in oocytes overexpressing Aur-B122R results in suppression of monopolar phenotype, suggesting that Aur-B regulates spindle bipolarity by inhibiting MCAK. Furthermore, recombinant MCAK-4A protein, which lacks all four Aur-B phosphoryaltion sites and is therefore insensitive to Aur-B inhibition but not wild-type MCAK, recapitulated the monopolar phenotype in the oocytes. These results suggest that in vertebrate oocytes that lack centrosomes, one major function of Aur-B is to stabilize chromosome-associated spindle microtubules to ensure spindle bipolarity. PMID:22751439

  6. Relative contributions of chromatin and kinetochores to mitotic spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lončarek, Jadranka; Kaláb, Petr; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2009-01-01

    During mitosis and meiosis in animal cells, chromosomes actively participate in spindle assembly by generating a gradient of Ran guanosine triphosphate (RanGTP). A high concentration of RanGTP promotes microtubule nucleation and stabilization in the vicinity of chromatin. However, the relative contributions of chromosome arms and centromeres/kinetochores in this process are not known. In this study, we address this issue using cells undergoing mitosis with unreplicated genomes (MUG). During MUG, chromatin is rapidly separated from the forming spindle, and both centrosomal and noncentrosomal spindle assembly pathways are active. MUG chromatin is coated with RCC1 and establishes a RanGTP gradient. However, a robust spindle forms around kinetochores/centromeres outside of the gradient peak. When stable kinetochore microtubule attachment is prevented by Nuf2 depletion in both MUG and normal mitosis, chromatin attracts astral microtubules but cannot induce spindle assembly. These results support a model in which kinetochores play the dominant role in the chromosome-mediated pathway of mitotic spindle assembly. PMID:19805628

  7. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  8. Spindle microtubules and their mechanical associations after micromanipulation in anaphase.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, R B; Kubai, D F; Hays, T S

    1982-10-01

    Micromanipulation of living grasshopper spermatocytes in anaphase has been combined with electron microscopy to reveal otherwise obscure features of spindle organization. A chromosome is pushed laterally outside the spindle and stretched, and the cell is fixed with a novel, agar-treated glutaraldehyde solution. Two- and three-dimensional reconstructions from serial sections of seven cells show that kinetochore microtubules of the manipulated chromosome are shifted outside the confusing thicket of spindle microtubules and mechanical associations among microtubules are revealed by bent or shifted microtubules. These are the chief results: (a) The disposition of microtubules invariably is consistent with a skeletal role for spindle microtubules. (b) The kinetochore microtubule bundle is composed of short and long microtubules, with weak but recognizable mechanical associations among them. Some kinetochore microtubules are more tightly linked to one other microtubule within the bundle. (c) Microtubules of the kinetochore microtubule bundle are firmly connected to other spindle microtubules only near the pole, although some nonkinetochore microtubules of uncertain significance enter the bundle nearer to the kinetochore. (d) The kinetochore microtubules of adjacent chromosomes are mechanically linked, which provides an explanation for interdependent chromosome movement in "hinge anaphases." In the region of the spindle open to analysis after chromosome micromanipulation, microtubules may be linked mechanically by embedment in a gel, rather than by dynein or other specific, cross-bridging molecules.

  9. [A case of spindle cell carcinoma of the breast].

    PubMed

    Oshida, Sayuri; Hayashi, Keiko; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Nemoto, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 53-year-old woman in whom ultrasonography of the breast revealed a lobular mass, 14 mm in diameter, in the right AB region. Spindle cells were obtained on fine-needle aspiration biopsy, but it was not possible to diagnose whether the tumor was benign or malignant. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass with a cystic component that was darkly stained in the early phase. Needle biopsy showed a dense proliferation of atypical spindle cells with no distinct epithelial-like arrangement. The differential diagnosis included mesenchymal malignant tumors such as fibrosarcoma, some phyllodes tumors, and epithelial tumors with sarcomatoid differentiation. Immunostaining revealed that the tumor was cytokeratin (AE1/AE3)-negative, partially CAM 5.2-positive, p63-positive, S100-negative, SMA-positive, partially vimentin-positive, with a Ki-67 index of 80% and negativity for ER, PgR, and HER2. Spindle-cell carcinoma was thus diagnosed. A partial right mastectomy with sentinel lymph-node biopsy was performed. Immunostaining of the resected specimen confirmed spindle cell carcinoma. The General Rules for Clinical and Pathological Recording of Breast Cancer classify spindle cell carcinoma as a special type of invasive cancer with a sarcomatoid structure, consisting of spindle-shaped cancer cells. This type of carcinoma is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancers. PMID:25731380

  10. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon. PMID:27081680

  11. The spindle assembly checkpoint: More than just keeping track of the spindle

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Katherine S.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    Genome stability is essential for cell proliferation and survival. Consequently, genome integrity is monitored by two major checkpoints, the DNA damage response (DDR) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The DDR monitors DNA lesions in G1, S, and G2 stages of the cell cycle and the SAC ensures proper chromosome segregation in M phase. There have been extensive studies characterizing the roles of these checkpoints in response to the processes for which they are named; however, emerging evidence suggests significant crosstalk between the checkpoints. Here we review recent findings demonstrating overlapping roles for the SAC and DDR in metaphase, and in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle.

  12. Microcephaly protein Asp focuses the minus ends of spindle microtubules at the pole and within the spindle.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ami; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-12-01

    Depletion of Drosophila melanogaster Asp, an orthologue of microcephaly protein ASPM, causes spindle pole unfocusing during mitosis. However, it remains unclear how Asp contributes to pole focusing, a process that also requires the kinesin-14 motor Ncd. We show that Asp localizes to the minus ends of spindle microtubule (MT) bundles and focuses them to make the pole independent of Ncd. We identified a critical domain in Asp exhibiting MT cross-linking activity in vitro. Asp was also localized to, and focuses the minus ends of, intraspindle MTs that were nucleated in an augmin-dependent manner and translocated toward the poles by spindle MT flux. Ncd, in contrast, functioned as a global spindle coalescence factor not limited to MT ends. We propose a revised molecular model for spindle pole focusing in which Asp at the minus ends cross-links MTs at the pole and within the spindle. Additionally, this study provides new insight into the dynamics of intraspindle MTs by using Asp as a minus end marker.

  13. JAM-A regulates cortical dynein localization through Cdc42 to control planar spindle orientation during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Brinkmann, Benjamin F.; Steinbacher, Tim; Schürmann, Annika; Gerke, Volker; Iden, Sandra; Ebnet, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells depends on the precise localization of the dynein–dynactin motor protein complex at the lateral cortex. The contribution of cell adhesion molecules to the cortical localization of the dynein–dynactin complex is poorly understood. Here we find that junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates the planar orientation of the mitotic spindle during epithelial morphogenesis. During mitosis, JAM-A triggers a transient activation of Cdc42 and PI(3)K, generates a gradient of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at the cortex and regulates the formation of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of functional JAM-A, dynactin localization at the cortex is reduced, the mitotic spindle apparatus is misaligned and epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture is compromised. Our findings indicate that a PI(3)K- and cortical F-actin-dependent pathway of planar spindle orientation operates in polarized epithelial cells to regulate epithelial morphogenesis, and we identify JAM-A as a junctional regulator of this pathway. PMID:26306570

  14. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Chou, En-Ju; Hung, Liang-Yi; Tang, Chieh-Ju C; Hsu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Pao-Chi; Tang, Tang K

    2016-03-29

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  15. The innervation of tandem muscle spindles in the cat neck.

    PubMed

    Richmond, F J; Bakker, G J; Bakker, D A; Stacey, M J

    1986-03-22

    Patterns of innervation were examined in tandem muscle spindles teased from silver-stained muscles of the cat neck. Each tandem spindle was composed of two or more encapsulated receptors linked in series by a shared bag2 fiber. In most tandem spindles, two different types of encapsulation were identified according to differences in their intrafusal fiber content. One type, the b1b2c unit, contained typical bag1, bag2, and chain fibers and was structurally similar to single spindles described in other cat muscles. Each b1b2c unit contained a single primary sensory ending and 1-6 secondary endings. Fusimotor innervation was supplied by many axons. Some fusimotor axons ended in trail ramifications on bag2 and chain fibers, others ended in plates on the bag1 or long chain fiber. The other type of tandem encapsulation, the b2c unit, had only bag2 and chain fibers in its intrafusal fiber bundle. The b2c unit was usually supplied by only one sensory axon that ended on the nucleated part of the intrafusal fiber bundle. This single ending had a more variable terminal morphology than the primary ending in b1b2c units. A few b2c units (3/49) were also supplied by a secondary ending. The fusimotor innervation of the b2c unit was relatively simple. A single pole of the b2c unit was usually supplied by only one to three axons, all ending in trail ramifications. No plate endings were found in b2c units. These morphological specializations suggest that b1b2c and b2c units in tandem spindles differ in both their transductive and fusimotor mechanisms. Thus, the tandem spindle is a specialized structure that may provide additional proprioceptive information beyond that available from single muscle spindles.

  16. Myosin-10 and actin filaments are essential for mitotic spindle function

    PubMed Central

    Woolner, Sarah; O'Brien, Lori L.; Wiese, Christiane; Bement, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitotic spindles are microtubule-based structures responsible for chromosome partitioning during cell division. Although the roles of microtubules and microtubule-based motors in mitotic spindles are well established, whether or not actin filaments (F-actin) and F-actin–based motors (myosins) are required components of mitotic spindles has long been controversial. Based on the demonstration that myosin-10 (Myo10) is important for assembly of meiotic spindles, we assessed the role of this unconventional myosin, as well as F-actin, in mitotic spindles. We find that Myo10 localizes to mitotic spindle poles and is essential for proper spindle anchoring, normal spindle length, spindle pole integrity, and progression through metaphase. Furthermore, we show that F-actin localizes to mitotic spindles in dynamic cables that surround the spindle and extend between the spindle and the cortex. Remarkably, although proper anchoring depends on both F-actin and Myo10, the requirement for Myo10 in spindle pole integrity is F-actin independent, whereas F-actin and Myo10 actually play antagonistic roles in maintenance of spindle length. PMID:18606852

  17. A CEP215–HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Pavithra L.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R.; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215–HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome–spindle pole interface by the CEP215–HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  18. γ-Tubulin Ring Complexes and EB1 play antagonistic roles in microtubule dynamics and spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Bouissou, Anaїs; Vérollet, Christel; de Forges, Hélène; Haren, Laurence; Bellaїche, Yohanns; Perez, Franck; Merdes, Andreas; Raynaud-Messina, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    γ-Tubulin is critical for microtubule (MT) assembly and organization. In metazoa, this protein acts in multiprotein complexes called γ-Tubulin Ring Complexes (γ-TuRCs). While the subunits that constitute γ-Tubulin Small Complexes (γ-TuSCs), the core of the MT nucleation machinery, are essential, mutation of γ-TuRC-specific proteins in Drosophila causes sterility and morphological abnormalities via hitherto unidentified mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a role of γ-TuRCs in controlling spindle orientation independent of MT nucleation activity, both in cultured cells and in vivo, and examine a potential function for γ-TuRCs on astral MTs. γ-TuRCs locate along the length of astral MTs, and depletion of γ-TuRC-specific proteins increases MT dynamics and causes the plus-end tracking protein EB1 to redistribute along MTs. Moreover, suppression of MT dynamics through drug treatment or EB1 down-regulation rescues spindle orientation defects induced by γ-TuRC depletion. Therefore, we propose a role for γ-TuRCs in regulating spindle positioning by controlling the stability of astral MTs. PMID:24421324

  19. An Overview of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Status in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, José Henrique; Silva, Patrícia Manuela; Reis, Rita Margarida; Moura, Inês Moranguinho; Marques, Sandra; Fonseca, Joana; Monteiro, Luís Silva; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal chromosome number, or aneuploidy, is a common feature of human solid tumors, including oral cancer. Deregulated spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is thought as one of the mechanisms that drive aneuploidy. In normal cells, SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes are correctly aligned at the metaphase plate thereby ensuring genomic stability. Significantly, the activity of this checkpoint is compromised in many cancers. While mutations are rather rare, many tumors show altered expression levels of SAC components. Genomic alterations such as aneuploidy indicate a high risk of oral cancer and cancer-related mortality, and the molecular basis of these alterations is largely unknown. Yet, our knowledge on the status of SAC components in oral cancer remains sparse. In this review, we address the state of our knowledge regarding the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in oral cancer, and discuss their therapeutic relevance, focusing our analysis on the core components of SAC and its target Cdc20. PMID:24995269

  20. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters.

    PubMed

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Ujma, Péter P; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ) with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males) with an age range of 15-22 years (mean: 18 years) and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test). Slow spindles (SSs) and fast spindles (FSs) were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method (IAM). A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = 0.57; p = 0.005) was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = 0.43; p = 0.04) and amplitude (r = 0.41; p = 0.049). The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = 0.80 (p = 0.002) and r = 0.67 (p = 0.012), for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = 0.60, p = 0.04). Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unraveling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps

  1. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  2. Testing a Low-Influence Spindle Drive Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L; Wulff, T; Sedgewick, J

    2003-11-05

    Precision spindles used for diamond turning and other applications requiring low error motion generally require a drive system that ideally applies a pure torque to the rotating spindle. Frequently a frameless motor, that is, one without its own bearings, is directly coupled to the spindle to make a compact and simple system having high resonant frequencies. Although in addition to delivering drive torque, asymmetries in the motor cause it to generate disturbance loads (forces and moments) which influence the spindle error motion of the directly coupled system. This paper describes the tests and results for a particular frameless, brushless DC motor that was originally developed for military and space applications requiring very low torque ripple. Because the construction of the motor should also lead to very low disturbance loads, it was selected for use on a new diamond turning and grinding machine under developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The level of influence for this motor-spindle combination is expected to be of order one nanometer for radial and axial error motion.

  3. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Nguyen, Phuong A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  4. The role of actin and myosin in PtK2 spindle length changes induced by laser microbeam irradiations across the spindle.

    PubMed

    Sheykhani, Rozhan; Baker, Norman; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Shah, Jagesh; Berns, Michael W; Forer, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates spindle biomechanical properties to better understand how spindles function. In this report, laser microbeam cutting across mitotic spindles resulted in movement of spindle poles toward the spindle equator. The pole on the cut side moved first, the other pole moved later, resulting in a shorter but symmetric spindle. Intervening spindle microtubules bent and buckled during the equatorial movement of the poles. Because of this and because there were no detectable microtubules within the ablation zone, other cytoskeletal elements would seem to be involved in the equatorial movement of the poles. One possibility is actin and myosin since pharmacological poisoning of the actin-myosin system altered the equatorial movements of both irradiated and unirradiated poles. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that actin, myosin and monophosphorylated myosin are associated with spindle fibers and showed that some actin and monophosphorylated myosin remained in the irradiated regions. Overall, our experiments suggest that actin, myosin and microtubules interact to control spindle length. We suggest that actin and myosin, possibly in conjunction with the spindle matrix, cause the irradiated pole to move toward the equator and that cross-talk between the two half spindles causes the unirradiated pole to move toward the equator until a balanced length is obtained. PMID:23475753

  5. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur (TVS) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia.

  6. Two protein 4.1 domains essential for mitotic spindle and aster microtubule dynamics and organization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lee, Gloria; Chasis, Joel Anne; Mohandas, Narla; Heald, Rebecca

    2004-06-25

    Multifunctional structural proteins belonging to the 4.1 family are components of nuclei, spindles, and centrosomes in vertebrate cells. Here we report that 4.1 is critical for spindle assembly and the formation of centrosome-nucleated and motor-dependent self-organized microtubule asters in metaphase-arrested Xenopus egg extracts. Immunodepletion of 4.1 disrupted microtubule arrays and mislocalized the spindle pole protein NuMA. Remarkably, assembly was completely rescued by supplementation with a recombinant 4.1R isoform. We identified two 4.1 domains critical for its function in microtubule polymerization and organization utilizing dominant negative peptides. The 4.1 spectrin-actin binding domain or NuMA binding C-terminal domain peptides caused morphologically disorganized structures. Control peptides with low homology or variant spectrin-actin binding domain peptides that were incapable of binding actin had no deleterious effects. Unexpectedly, the addition of C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding caused severe microtubule destabilization in extracts, dramatically inhibiting aster and spindle assembly and also depolymerizing preformed structures. However, the mutant C-terminal peptides did not directly inhibit or destabilize microtubule polymerization from pure tubulin in a microtubule pelleting assay. Our data showing that 4.1 is a crucial factor for assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindles and self-organized and centrosome-nucleated microtubule asters indicates that 4.1 is involved in regulating both microtubule dynamics and organization. These investigations underscore an important functional context for protein 4.1 in microtubule morphogenesis and highlight a previously unappreciated role for 4.1 in cell division.

  7. Protein kinase CK2 is involved in G2 arrest and apoptosis following spindle damage in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sayed, M; Pelech, S; Wong, C; Marotta, A; Salh, B

    2001-10-25

    p53 undergoes phosphorylation on several residues in response to cellular stresses that include UV and ionizing radiation, however the influence of spindle damage on this parameter is relatively unclear. Consequently, the effect of nocodazole on serine 392 phosphorylation was examined in two epithelial cell lines. We show that this process is dependent upon the stepwise activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2). Furthermore, this activation correlated with the biochemical regulation of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF, cdc2/cyclin B), as both DRB and antisense depletion of CK2, as well as SB203580 were associated with an inhibition of its activation in response to nocodazole. Strikingly, when the cell cycle characteristics of nocodazole treated cells were examined, we observed that depletion or inhibition of the catalytic subunit of CK2, in the presence of microtubule inhibitors, resulted in a compromise of the G2 arrest (spindle checkpoint). Furthermore, CK2-depleted, nocodazole treated cells demonstrated a dramatic reduction in the apoptotic cell fraction, confirming that these cells had been endowed with oncogenic properties. These changes were observed in both HeLa cells and HCT116 cells. We also show that this effect is dependent on the presence of functional wild-type p53, as this phenomenon is not apparent in HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. Collectively, our results indicate two novel roles for CK2 in the spindle checkpoint arrest, in concert with p53. Firstly, to maintain increased cyclinB/cdc2 kinase activity, as a component of G2 arrest, and secondly, a role in p53-mediated apoptosis. These findings may have implications for an improved understanding of abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint in human cancers, which is a prerequisite for defining future therapies. PMID:11704824

  8. Spindle cell carcinoma of the mandible: Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayaty, Haytham; Balkaran, Ramaa L

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma, a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma, has propensity to occur in the upper aero digestive tract, including the oral mucosa. In this oral pathology communication, we report the occurrence of this neoplasm in the left mandible as a large fleshy growth with destruction of bone in a 73-year-old Afro-Trinidadian female. The distinction of this tumor from other malignant spindle cell mesenchymal tumors is important. Selective sampling of this specimen for possible transitional areas of squamous and spindle cell appearance, immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin, vimentin, and S-100 protein are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. According to the patient's insistence, debulking of the tumor was performed under general anesthesia. Eight months later the patient succumbed to the disease.

  9. CDK5RAP2 is required for spindle checkpoint function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongyun; Lv, Shuang; Wang, Haibo; Zhong, Xueyan; Liu, Bo; Wang, Bo; Liao, Ji; Li, Jing; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Xu, Xingzhi

    2009-04-15

    The combination of paclitaxel and doxorubicin is among the most successful chemotherapy regimens in cancer treatment. CDK5RAP2, when mutated, causes primary microcephaly. We show here that inhibition of CDK5RAP2 expression causes chromosome mis-segregation, fails to maintain the spindle checkpoint, and is associated with reduced expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins BUBR1 and MAD2 and an increase in chromatin-associated CDC20. CDK5RAP2 resides on the BUBR1 and MAD2 promoters and regulates their transcription. Furthermore, CDK5RAP2-knockdown cells have increased resistance to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, and this resistance is partially rescued upon restoration of CDK5RAP2 expression. Cancer cells cultured in the presence of paclitaxel or doxorubicin exhibit dramatically decreased CDK5RAP2 levels. These results suggest that CDK5RAP2 is required for spindle checkpoint function and is a common target in paclitaxel and doxorubicin resistance. PMID:19282672

  10. Xenopus oocyte meiosis lacks spindle assembly checkpoint control

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hua; Ma, Chunqi; Chen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) functions as a surveillance mechanism to detect chromosome misalignment and to delay anaphase until the errors are corrected. The SAC is thought to control mitosis and meiosis, including meiosis in mammalian eggs. However, it remains unknown if meiosis in the eggs of nonmammalian vertebrate species is also regulated by SAC. Using a novel karyotyping technique, we demonstrate that complete disruption of spindle microtubules in Xenopus laevis oocytes did not affect the bivalent-to-dyad transition at the time oocytes are undergoing anaphase I. These oocytes also acquired the ability to respond to parthenogenetic activation, which indicates proper metaphase II arrest. Similarly, oocytes exhibiting monopolar spindles, via inhibition of aurora B or Eg5 kinesin, underwent monopolar anaphase on time and without additional intervention. Therefore, the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in frog oocytes is not regulated by SAC. PMID:23569212

  11. Anaphase A Chromosome Movement and Poleward Spindle Microtubule Flux Occur At Similar Rates in Xenopus Extract Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arshad; Maddox, Paul S.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Salmon, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    We have used local fluorescence photoactivation to mark the lattice of spindle microtubules during anaphase A in Xenopus extract spindles. We find that both poleward spindle microtubule flux and anaphase A chromosome movement occur at similar rates (∼2 μm/min). This result suggests that poleward microtubule flux, coupled to microtubule depolymerization near the spindle poles, is the predominant mechanism for anaphase A in Xenopus egg extracts. In contrast, in vertebrate somatic cells a “Pacman” kinetochore mechanism, coupled to microtubule depolymerization near the kinetochore, predominates during anaphase A. Consistent with the conclusion from fluorescence photoactivation analysis, both anaphase A chromosome movement and poleward spindle microtubule flux respond similarly to pharmacological perturbations in Xenopus extracts. Furthermore, the pharmacological profile of anaphase A in Xenopus extracts differs from the previously established profile for anaphase A in vertebrate somatic cells. The difference between these profiles is consistent with poleward microtubule flux playing the predominant role in anaphase chromosome movement in Xenopus extracts, but not in vertebrate somatic cells. We discuss the possible biological implications of the existence of two distinct anaphase A mechanisms and their differential contributions to poleward chromosome movement in different cell types. PMID:9566970

  12. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Venkataramanaiah, Padmalatha Gundappanayakanahalli; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-07-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  13. Microtubule attachment and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling at the kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Emily A.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosome segregation during cell division is facilitated by the kinetochore, an assembly of proteins built on centromeric DNA. The kinetochore attaches chromosomes to spindle microtubules, modulates the stability of these attachments, and relays microtubule-binding status to the spindle assembly checkpoint, a cell cycle surveillance pathway that delays chromosome segregation in response to unattached kinetochores. Here, we discuss recent results that guide current thinking on how each of these kinetochore-centered processes is achieved, and how their integration ensures faithful chromosome segregation, focusing on the essential roles of kinase-phosphatase signaling and the microtubule-binding KMN protein network. PMID:23258294

  14. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  15. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature.

  16. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  17. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  18. Structure-activity relationships of carboline and carbazole derivatives as a novel class of ATP-competitive kinesin spindle protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tomoki; Oishi, Shinya; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ohno, Hiroaki; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Matsuno, Kenji; Asai, Akira; Asada, Naoya; Kitaura, Kazuo; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-07-14

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP) is a mitotic kinesin involved in the establishment of a functional bipolar mitotic spindle during cell division. It is considered to be an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy with reduced side effects. Based on natural product scaffold-derived fused indole-based inhibitors and known biphenyl-type KSP inhibitors, various carboline and carbazole derivatives were synthesized and biologically evaluated. β-Carboline and lactam-fused carbazole derivatives exhibited remarkably potent KSP inhibitory activity and mitotic arrest in prometaphase with formation of an irregular monopolar spindle. The planar tri- and tetracyclic analogs inhibited KSP ATPase in an ATP-competitive manner just like biphenyl-type inhibitors.

  19. CENP-E is essential for reliable bioriented spindle attachment, but chromosome alignment can be achieved via redundant mechanisms in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B F; Chan, G K; Zubrowski, B; Savoian, M S; Sauer, M T; Yen, T J

    2001-09-01

    CENP-E is a kinesin-like protein that when depleted from mammalian kinetochores leads to mitotic arrest with a mixture of aligned and unaligned chromosomes. In the present study, we used immunofluorescence, video, and electron microscopy to demonstrate that depletion of CENP-E from kinetochores via antibody microinjection reduces kinetochore microtubule binding by 23% at aligned chromosomes, and severely reduces microtubule binding at unaligned chromosomes. Disruption of CENP-E function also reduces tension across the centromere, increases the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, and results in monooriented chromosomes approaching abnormally close to the spindle pole. Nevertheless, chromosomes show typical patterns of congression, fast poleward motion, and oscillatory motions. Furthermore, kinetochores of aligned and unaligned chromosomes exhibit normal patterns of checkpoint protein localization. These data are explained by a model in which redundant mechanisms enable kinetochore microtubule binding and checkpoint monitoring in the absence of CENP-E at kinetochores, but where reduced microtubule-binding efficiency, exacerbated by poor positioning at the spindle poles, results in chronically monooriented chromosomes and mitotic arrest. Chromosome position within the spindle appears to be a critical determinant of CENP-E function at kinetochores.

  20. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  1. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  2. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  3. Parietal Fast Sleep Spindle Density Decrease in Alzheimer's Disease and Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; Lauri, Giulia; Truglia, Ilaria; Cordone, Susanna; Sarasso, Simone; Scarpelli, Serena; Mangiaruga, Anastasia; D'Atri, Aurora; Tempesta, Daniela; Ferrara, Michele; Marra, Camillo; Rossini, Paolo Maria; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have identified two types of sleep spindles: fast (13–15 Hz) centroparietal and slow (11–13 Hz) frontal spindles. Alterations in spindle activity have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Only few studies have separately assessed fast and slow spindles in these patients showing a reduction of fast spindle count, but the possible local specificity of this phenomenon and its relation to cognitive decline severity are not clear. Moreover, fast and slow spindle density have never been assessed in AD/MCI. We have assessed fast and slow spindles in 15 AD patients, 15 amnesic MCI patients, and 15 healthy elderly controls (HC). Participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recording (19 cortical derivations). Spindles during nonrapid eye movements sleep were automatically detected, and spindle densities of the three groups were compared in the derivations where fast and slow spindles exhibited their maximum expression (parietal and frontal, resp.). AD and MCI patients showed a significant parietal fast spindle density decrease, positively correlated with Minimental State Examination scores. Our results suggest that AD-related changes in spindle density are specific for frequency and location, are related to cognitive decline severity, and may have an early onset in the pathology development. PMID:27066274

  4. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-01-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule–mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  5. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-04-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule-mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  6. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    McClain, Ian J; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10-16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  7. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  8. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The three dimensional organization of microtubules in mitotic spindles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined by computer- aided reconstruction from electron micrographs of serially cross- sectioned spindles. Fifteen spindles ranging in length from 0.6-9.4 microns have been analyzed. Ordered microtubule packing is absent in spindles up to 0.8 micron, but the total number of microtubules is sufficient to allow one microtubule per kinetochore with a few additional microtubules that may form an interpolar spindle. An obvious bundle of about eight interpolar microtubules was found in spindles 1.3- 1.6 microns long, and we suggest that the approximately 32 remaining microtubules act as kinetochore fibers. The relative lengths of the microtubules in these spindles suggest that they may be in an early stage of anaphase, even though these spindles are all situated in the mother cell, not in the isthmus between mother and bud. None of the reconstructed spindles exhibited the uniform populations of kinetochore microtubules characteristic of metaphase. Long spindles (2.7-9.4 microns), presumably in anaphase B, contained short remnants of a few presumed kinetochore microtubules clustered near the poles and a few long microtubules extending from each pole toward the spindle midplane, where they interdigitated with their counterparts from the other pole. Interpretation of these reconstructed spindles offers some insights into the mechanisms of mitosis in this yeast. PMID:7790357

  9. Teaching Reading--Vision vs. the Muscle Spindles (The Proprioceptors).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caukins, Sivan Eugene, Jr.

    Literature is reviewed which discusses the role of proprioceptors in basic perceptual and motoric functions. The author cites research on the functions of the muscle spindles in controlling muscles which in turn provide energy, stimulation, and activation of the central nervous system. Research on the relation of motor functions to language…

  10. Modelling muscle spindle dynamics for a proprioceptive prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Muscle spindles are found throughout our skeletal muscle tissue and continuously provide us with a sense of our limbs' position and motion (proprioception). This paper advances a model for generating artificial muscle spindle signals for a prosthetic limb, with the aim of one day providing amputees with a sense of feeling in their artificial limb. By utilising the Opensim biomechanical modelling package the relationship between a joint's angle and the length of surrounding muscles is estimated for a prosthetic limb. This is then applied to the established Mileusnic model to determine the associated muscle spindle firing pattern. This complete system model is then reduced to allow for a computationally efficient hardware implementation. This reduction is achieved with minimal impact on accuracy by selecting key mono-articular muscles and fitting equations to relate joint angle to muscle length. Parameter values fitting the Mileusnic model to human spindles are then proposed and validated against previously published human neural recordings. Finally, a model for fusimotor signals is also proposed based on data previously recorded from reduced animal experiments.

  11. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Oren M; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed. PMID:27034850

  12. Potato spindle tuber viroid: the simplicity paradox resolved?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taxonomy: Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type species of the genus Posipiviroid, family Pospiviroidae. An absence of hammerhead ribozymes and the presence of a 'central conserved region' distinguish PSTVd and related viroids from members of a second viroid family, the Avsunviroidae. ...

  13. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Oren M.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed. PMID:27034850

  14. Primary hippocampal neurons, which lack four crucial extracellular matrix molecules, display abnormalities of synaptic structure and function and severe deficits in perineuronal net formation.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Maren; Gottschling, Christine; Aguado, Ainhara; Rauch, Uwe; Wetzel, Christian H; Hatt, Hanns; Faissner, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the brain plays crucial roles during the development, maturation, and regeneration of the CNS. In a subpopulation of neurons, the ECM condenses to superstructures called perineuronal nets (PNNs) that surround synapses. Camillo Golgi described PNNs a century ago, yet their biological functions remain elusive. Here, we studied a mouse mutant that lacks four ECM components highly enriched in the developing brain: the glycoproteins tenascin-C and tenascin-R and the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans brevican and neurocan. Primary embryonic hippocampal neurons and astrocytes were cultivated using a cell insert system that allows for co-culture of distinct cell populations in the absence of direct membrane contacts. The wild-type and knock-out cells were combined in the four possible permutations. Using this approach, neurons cultivated in the presence of mutant astrocytes displayed a transient increase of synapses after 2 weeks. However, after a period of 3 weeks or longer, synapse formation and stabilization were compromised when either neuron or astrocyte cell populations or both were of mutant origin. The development of PNN structures was observed, but their size was substantially reduced on knock-out neurons. The synaptic activity of both wild-type and knock-out neurons was monitored using whole-cell patch clamping. The salient observation was a reduced frequency of IPSCs and EPSCs, whereas the amplitudes were not modified. Remarkably, the knock-out neuron phenotypes could not be rescued by wild-type astrocytes. We conclude that the elimination of four ECM genes compromises neuronal function.

  15. Stages in the development of cat muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Milburn, A

    1984-08-01

    The structure of developing spindles has been examined in cat peroneal muscles by light and electron microscopy, beginning at the 34- to 38-day foetal stage. By this stage alpha motoneurons have formed end-plates on primary myotubes. Secondary extrafusal myotubes then develop beneath the basal lamina of primary myotubes, and are innervated by motor axons early in their assembly. First-series secondary myotubes separate from primary myotubes prior to the development of subsequent series. The assembly of extrafusal fibres is completed by birth. Intrafusal fibres assemble in a similar manner. At the 34- to 38-day foetal stage developing spindles consist of a single primary myotube containing a small accumulation of myonuclei beneath the terminals of the Ia afferent axon. Simple motor nerve terminals also innervate this myotube, which will ultimately become the bag2 fibre of the mature spindle. Secondary intrafusal myotubes then assemble beneath the basal lamina of the primary bag2 myotube, in the order presumptive bag1, long-chain, intermediate-chain and typical-chain fibres. Their assembly begins at the equator, beneath the sensory terminals, and spreads to the poles. The bag1 and long-chain myotubes separate from the bag2 in the spindle pole prior to the development of the other chain fibres. The assembly of intrafusal fibres is completed by birth. The periaxial space begins to develop in the first postnatal week. The development of tandem spindles containing b2c units is described. The role of sensory and motor innervation in the assembly and differentiation of mammalian intrafusal fibres is discussed.

  16. Physical limits on kinesin-5–mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Kelsey M.; Tubman, Emily S.; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro­tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end–tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5–mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to

  17. Self-organization mechanisms in the assembly and maintenance of bipolar spindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, Kendra Stewart

    Anastral, meiotic spindles are thought to be organized differently from astral, mitotic spindles, but the field has lacked basic structural information required to describe and model them, including the location of microtubule nucleating sites and minus ends. How the various components of spindles act together to establish and maintain the dynamic bipolar structure of spindles is not understood. We measure the distributions of oriented microtubules (MTs) in metaphase anastral spindles in Xenopus extracts by fluorescence speckle microscopy and cross-correlation analysis. We localized plus ends by tubulin incorporation and combined this with the orientation data to infer the localization of minus ends. We find that minus ends are localized throughout the spindle, sparsely at the equator and at higher concentrations near the poles. This dads to the surprising conclusion that spindles contained many short MTs, not connected to the spindle poles. Based on these data, we propose a slide-and-cluster model based on four known molecular activities: MT nucleation near chromosomes, the sliding of MTs by a plus-enddirected motor, the clustering of their minus ends by a minus-end-directed motor, and the loss of MTs by dynamic instability. This work demonstrates how the interplay between two types of motors together with continual nucleation of MTs by chromosomes could organize the MTs into spindles. Our model applies to overlapping, nonkinetochore MTs in anastral spindles, and perhaps also to interpolar MTs in astral spindles. We show mathematically that the slide-and-cluster mechanism robustly forms bipolar spindles a stable steady-state length, sometimes with sharp poles. This model accounts for several experimental observations that were difficult to explain with existing models, and is the first self contained model for anastral spindle assembly, MT sliding (known as poleward flux), and spindle bistability. Our experimental results support the slide-and-cluster scenario

  18. Identification of microtubule-associated proteins in the meiotic spindle of surf clam oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Meiotic spindles isolated from surf clam oocytes to morphological purity are biochemically complex, consisting of many polypeptides. These proteins fall into two classes: (a) polypeptides that are apparently cytoplasmic proteins and are not specifically associated with the spindle; and (b) polypeptides that are specifically associated with the spindle. A subset of the spindle-associated proteins, including a 250,000 mol wt component, remain with spindle tubulin through cycles of cold depolymerization and warm polymerization, showing that they are microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:7189754

  19. Stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to silence the spindle assembly checkpoint in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tauchman, Eric C.; Boehm, Frederick J.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, duplicated sister chromatids attach to microtubules emanating from opposing sides of the bipolar spindle through large protein complexes called kinetochores. In the absence of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments, a cell surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) produces an inhibitory signal that prevents anaphase onset. Precisely how the inhibitory SAC signal is extinguished in response to microtubule attachment remains unresolved. To address this, we induced formation of hyper-stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments in human cells using a non-phosphorylatable version of the protein Hec1, a core component of the attachment machinery. We find that stable attachments are sufficient to silence the SAC in the absence of sister kinetochore bi-orientation and strikingly in the absence of detectable microtubule pulling forces or tension. Furthermore, we find that SAC satisfaction occurs despite the absence of large changes in intra-kinetochore distance, suggesting that substantial kinetochore stretching is not required for quenching the SAC signal. PMID:26620470

  20. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  2. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Maquet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way. PMID:27478649

  3. Kinesin-5 Contributes to Spindle-length Scaling in the Evolution of Cancer toward Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Feng; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Chen, Wei-An; Liang, Kai-Wen; Pan, Cheng-Ju; Lai, Pei-Lun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Hsiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During natural evolution, the spindles often scale with cell sizes to orchestrate accurate chromosome segregation. Whether in cancer evolution, when the constraints on genome integrity are relaxed, cancer cells may evolve the spindle to confer other advantages has not been investigated. Using invasion as a selective pressure in vitro, we found that a highly metastatic cancer clone displays a lengthened metaphase spindle, with faster spindle elongation that correlates with transiently elevated speed of cell migration. We found that kinesin-5 is upregulated in this malignant clone, and weak inhibition of kinesin-5 activity could revert the spindle to a smaller aspect ratio, decrease the speed of spindle pole separation, and suppress post-mitotic cell migration. A correlation was found between high aspect ratio and strong metastatic potential in cancers that evolved and were selected in vivo, implicating that the spindle aspect ratio could serve as a promising cellular biomarker for metastatic cancer clones. PMID:27767194

  4. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods.

    PubMed

    Wallant, Dorothée Coppieters 't; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way. PMID:27478649

  5. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  6. Studies on the in vivo sensitivity of spindle microtubules to calcium ions and evidence for a vesicular calcium-sequestering system.

    PubMed

    Kiehart, D P

    1981-03-01

    I microinjected calcium ions into echinoderm eggs during mitosis to determine the calcium sensitivity of microtubules (Mts) in vivo. Spindle birefringence (BR), a measure of the number of aligned Mts in the spindle, is locally, rapidly, and reversibly abolished by small volumes of microinjected CaCl2 (1 mM). Rapid return of BR is followed by anaphase, and subsequent divisions are normal. Similar doses of MgCl2, BaCl2, KCl, NaCl, pH buffers, distilled water, or vegetable oil have no effect on spindle BR, whereas large doses of such agents sometimes cause slow, uniform loss in BR over the course of a minute or more. Of the ions tested, only Sr++ causes effects comparable to Ca++. Ca-EGTA buffers, containing greater than micromolar free Ca++, abolishes BR in a manner similar to millimolar concentrations of injected CaCl2. Caffeine, a potent uncoupler of the Ca++-pump/ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum, causes a local, transient depression in spindle BR in the injected region. Finally, injection of potassium oxalate results in the formation of small, highly BR crystals, presumably CA-oxalate, in Triton-sensitive compartments in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that spindle Mts are sensitive to levels of free Ca++ in the physiological range, provide evidence for the existence of a strong cytoplasmic Ca++-sequestering system, and support the notion that Mt assembly and disassembly in local regions of the spindle may be orchestrated by local changes in the cytoplasmic free Ca++ concentration during mitosis. An appendix offers the design of a new chamber for immobilizing echinoderm eggs for injection, a new method for determining the volume of the injected solution, and a description of the microinjection technique, which was designed, but never fully described, by Hiramoto (Y. Hiramoto, Exp. Cell. Res., 1962, 27:416-426.).

  7. Activation of ADF/cofilin by phosphorylation-regulated Slingshot phosphatase is required for the meiotic spindle assembly in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Shohei; Sato, Ryuhei; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Gevaert, Kris; Fujiki, Saburo; Tawada, Toshinobu; Kuchitsu, Miyako; Yamagishi, Yuka; Ono, Shoichiro; Abe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We identify Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its activator, Slingshot phosphatase (XSSH), as key regulators of actin dynamics essential for spindle microtubule assembly during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Phosphorylation of XSSH at multiple sites within the tail domain occurs just after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and is accompanied by dephosphorylation of XAC, which was mostly phosphorylated in immature oocytes. This XAC dephosphorylation after GVBD is completely suppressed by latrunculin B, an actin monomer–sequestering drug. On the other hand, jasplakinolide, an F-actin–stabilizing drug, induces dephosphorylation of XAC. Effects of latrunculin B and jasplakinolide are reconstituted in cytostatic factor–arrested extracts (CSF extracts), and XAC dephosphorylation is abolished by depletion of XSSH from CSF extracts, suggesting that XSSH functions as an actin filament sensor to facilitate actin filament dynamics via XAC activation. Injection of anti-XSSH antibody, which blocks full phosphorylation of XSSH after GVBD, inhibits both meiotic spindle formation and XAC dephosphorylation. Coinjection of constitutively active XAC with the antibody suppresses this phenotype. Treatment of oocytes with jasplakinolide also impairs spindle formation. These results strongly suggest that elevation of actin dynamics by XAC activation through XSSH phosphorylation is required for meiotic spindle assembly in Xenopus laevis. PMID:23615437

  8. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Ady3p links spindle pole body function to spore wall synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Nickas, Mark E; Neiman, Aaron M

    2002-01-01

    Spore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the de novo synthesis of prospore membranes and spore walls. Ady3p has been identified as an interaction partner for Mpc70p/Spo21p, a meiosis-specific component of the outer plaque of the spindle pole body (SPB) that is required for prospore membrane formation, and for Don1p, which forms a ring-like structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane during meiosis II. ADY3 expression has been shown to be induced in midsporulation. We report here that Ady3p interacts with additional components of the outer and central plaques of the SPB in the two-hybrid assay. Cells that lack ADY3 display a decrease in sporulation efficiency, and most ady3Delta/ady3Delta asci that do form contain fewer than four spores. The sporulation defect in ady3Delta/ady3Delta cells is due to a failure to synthesize spore wall polymers. Ady3p forms ring-like structures around meiosis II spindles that colocalize with those formed by Don1p, and Don1p rings are absent during meiosis II in ady3Delta/ady3Delta cells. In mpc70Delta/mpc70Delta cells, Ady3p remains associated with SPBs during meiosis II. Our results suggest that Ady3p mediates assembly of the Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with components of the SPB and that this structure is involved in spore wall formation. PMID:11973299

  10. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  11. Primary Spindle Cell Malignant Melanoma of Esophagus: An Unusual Finding.

    PubMed

    Rawandale, Nirmalkumar A; Suryawanshi, Kishor H

    2016-02-01

    Malignant melanoma of esophagus is usually a metastatic tumour rather than a primary tumour. Primary malignant melanoma accounts for less than 0.2% of all esophageal neoplasm. We report a case of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus in a 69-year-old male who presented with history of dysphagia since 1 month. Radiological examinations revealed polypoidal growth at lateral aspect of esophagus. Biopsy was reported as grade III squamous cell carcinoma. Video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry gave confirmed diagnosis of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus. Though a rare entity, due to its aggressive nature and poor prognosis primary malignant melanoma should be one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with polypoidal esophageal mass lesion. Despite radical surgical treatment prognosis is extremely poor. PMID:27042502

  12. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  13. Attachment issues: kinetochore transformations and spindle checkpoint silencing.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kops, Geert J P L

    2016-04-01

    Cell division culminates in the segregation of duplicated chromosomes in opposite directions prior to cellular fission. This process is guarded by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents the anaphase of cell division until stable connections between spindle microtubules and the kinetochores of all chromosomes are established. The anaphase inhibitor is generated at unattached kinetochores and inhibitor production is prevented when microtubules are captured. Understanding the molecular changes in the kinetochore that are evoked by microtubule attachments is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of SAC signaling and silencing. Here, we highlight the most recent findings on these events, pinpoint some remaining mysteries, and argue for incorporating holistic views of kinetochore dynamics in order to understand SAC silencing. PMID:26947988

  14. A spindle-cell myoepithelioma of the lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, J G; Hurwitz, J J; Dardick, I

    1990-08-01

    A middle-aged woman developed unilateral, painless proptosis that increased slowly over 1 year. A clinical diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma of the lacrimal gland was supported by computed tomographic scanning and the tumor was excised. On histological examination the tumor proved to be a benign, myxoid myoepithelioma of spindle-cell type. Although occasionally seen in the salivary glands, to our knowledge, this tumor has not previously been described in the lacrimal gland.

  15. Metaphase spindles rotate in the neuroepithelium of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Adams, R J

    1996-12-01

    Time-lapse confocal microscopy has been used to image cells in mitosis at the apical surface of neuroepithelium from the rat cerebral cortex during the period of neurogenesis. Staining with vital chromatin dyes reveals that mitotic spindles that are aligned parallel to the surface of the tissue are highly motile, rotating within the plane of the epithelium throughout metaphase, and come to rest only as anaphase begins. Spindles may make several complete turns, parallel to the epithelium, but only rarely tumble into an orientation perpendicular to the epithelial sheet. Analysis shows that spindles do not rotate randomly; rather, they spend most of their time aligned parallel or antiparallel to the direction in which they will later enter anaphase and undergo cell division. This conclusion is strongly supported by statistical analyses of the data. Stereotyped movements of this kind show that the direction of division is determined early in mitosis. This suggests the existence of intracellular and perhaps intercellular signals that define the polarity of the cell both in the apico-basal direction and within the plane of the epithelium. Such mechanisms may be important for maintaining the structure of the epithelium and cell-cell communication during development and may also provide a mechanism for the precise distribution of cytoplasmic determinants that might influence the fate of the daughter cells at a time when neuronal fate is being determined.

  16. MCAK and Paclitaxel Have Differential Effects on Spindle Microtubule Organization and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Rania S.; Bohannon, Kevin P.; Wetzel, Laura A.; Powers, James; Shaw, Sidney L.

    2009-01-01

    Within the mitotic spindle, there are multiple populations of microtubules with different turnover dynamics, but how these different dynamics are maintained is not fully understood. MCAK is a member of the kinesin-13 family of microtubule-destabilizing enzymes that is required for proper establishment and maintenance of the spindle. Using quantitative immunofluorescence and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we compared the differences in spindle organization caused by global suppression of microtubule dynamics, by treating cells with low levels of paclitaxel, versus specific perturbation of spindle microtubule subsets by MCAK inhibition. Paclitaxel treatment caused a disruption in spindle microtubule organization marked by a significant increase in microtubules near the poles and a reduction in K-fiber fluorescence intensity. This was correlated with a faster t1/2 of both spindle and K-fiber microtubules. In contrast, MCAK inhibition caused a dramatic reorganization of spindle microtubules with a significant increase in astral microtubules and reduction in K-fiber fluorescence intensity, which correlated with a slower t1/2 of K-fibers but no change in the t1/2 of spindle microtubules. Our data support the model that MCAK perturbs spindle organization by acting preferentially on a subset of microtubules, and they support the overall hypothesis that microtubule dynamics is differentially regulated in the spindle. PMID:19158381

  17. AMPK regulates mitotic spindle orientation through phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Thaiparambil, Jose T; Eggers, Carrie M; Marcus, Adam I

    2012-08-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine(172) phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine(19) phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLC(ser19)) and spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLC(ser19) spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments.

  18. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  19. Automatic Sleep Spindle Detection and Genetic Influence Estimation Using Continuous Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Marek; Genzel, Lisa; Dresler, Martin; Steiger, Axel; Friess, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence for the role of sleep spindles in neuroplasticity has led to an increased interest in these non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep oscillations. It has been hypothesized that fast and slow spindles might play a different role in memory processing. Here, we present a new sleep spindle detection algorithm utilizing a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and individual adjustment of slow and fast spindle frequency ranges. Eighteen nap recordings of ten subjects were used for algorithm validation. Our method was compared with both a human scorer and a commercially available SIESTA spindle detector. For the validation set, mean agreement between our detector and human scorer measured during sleep stage 2 using kappa coefficient was 0.45, whereas mean agreement between our detector and SIESTA algorithm was 0.62. Our algorithm was also applied to sleep-related memory consolidation data previously analyzed with a SIESTA detector and confirmed previous findings of significant correlation between spindle density and declarative memory consolidation. We then applied our method to a study in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, examining the genetic component of slow and fast sleep spindle parameters. Our analysis revealed strong genetic influence on variance of all slow spindle parameters, weaker genetic effect on fast spindles, and no effects on fast spindle density and number during stage 2 sleep. PMID:26635577

  20. Asymmetry of the Budding Yeast Tem1 GTPase at Spindle Poles Is Required for Spindle Positioning But Not for Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Venturetti, Marianna; Hotz, Manuel; Lengefeld, Jette; Barral, Yves; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetrically dividing yeast S. cerevisiae assembles a bipolar spindle well after establishing the future site of cell division (i.e., the bud neck) and the division axis (i.e., the mother-bud axis). A surveillance mechanism called spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly positioned relative to the mother-bud axis, thereby ensuring the correct ploidy of the progeny. SPOC relies on the heterodimeric GTPase-activating protein Bub2/Bfa1 that inhibits the small GTPase Tem1, in turn essential for activating the mitotic exit network (MEN) kinase cascade and cytokinesis. The Bub2/Bfa1 GAP and the Tem1 GTPase form a complex at spindle poles that undergoes a remarkable asymmetry during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned, with the complex accumulating on the bud-directed old spindle pole. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. The mechanism driving asymmetry of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 in mitosis is unclear. Furthermore, whether asymmetry is involved in timely mitotic exit is controversial. We investigated the mechanism by which the GAP Bub2/Bfa1 controls GTP hydrolysis on Tem1 and generated a series of mutants leading to constitutive Tem1 activation. These mutants are SPOC-defective and invariably lead to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 at spindle poles, indicating that GTP hydrolysis is essential for asymmetry. Constitutive tethering of Bub2 or Bfa1 to both spindle poles impairs SPOC response but does not impair mitotic exit. Rather, it facilitates mitotic exit of MEN mutants, likely by increasing the residence time of Tem1 at spindle poles where it gets active. Surprisingly, all mutant or chimeric proteins leading to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 lead to increased symmetry at spindle poles of the Kar9 protein that mediates spindle positioning and cause spindle misalignment. Thus, asymmetry of the Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 complex is

  1. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  2. Lanthanide co-doped paramagnetic spindle-like mesocrystals for imaging and autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Lin, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhong, Sheng-Liang; Wang, Lei; Dong, Liang; Wu, Ya-Dong; Peng, Jun; Zhang, Li; Pan, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yang; Wen, Long-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-07-21

    We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27346838

  3. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  4. Lanthanide co-doped paramagnetic spindle-like mesocrystals for imaging and autophagy induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Lin, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhong, Sheng-Liang; Wang, Lei; Dong, Liang; Wu, Ya-Dong; Peng, Jun; Zhang, Li; Pan, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yang; Wen, Long-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy.We synthesized two novel lanthanide doped spindle-like mesocrystals, YF3:Ce,Eu,Gd and YF3:Ce,Tb,Gd (abbreviated as YEG and YTG mesospindles, respectively). Both of them possess paramagnetic and fluorescent properties, and their excellent cyto-compatibility and low haemolysis are further confirmed. Therefore, they could act as dual mode contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, YEG and YTG mesospindles induce dose and time dependent autophagy by activating the PI3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by YEG and YTG mesocrystals is confirmed by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. This work is important to illustrate how rare-earth mesocrystals affect the autophagic pathway, indicating the potential of the YEG and YTG mesospindles in diagnosis and therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Size distribution, HRTEM image and additional cellular data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03171d

  5. Cutaneous CD34+ spindle cell neoplasms: Histopathologic features distinguish spindle cell lipoma, solitary fibrous tumor, and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lance; Fountaine, Thomas J; Rosamilia, Lorraine; Helm, Klaus F; Clarke, Loren E

    2010-12-01

    Spindle cell lipoma (SCL), dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP), and solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are cutaneous CD34+ spindle cell tumors that may exhibit histopathologic and immunophenotypic overlap. We sought ways to reliably distinguish among these lesions even in small or superficial biopsies. Ten morphologic characteristics were analyzed in a group of 5 SCLs, 6 cutaneous SFTs, and 12 DFSPs. SFT and DFSP exhibited extensive histopathologic overlap in small or partial biopsies. However, adnexal entrapment, defined as diffuse proliferation of tumor cells around pilosebaceous and eccrine structures with minimal disruption or expansion of the dermis, was a feature seen in 10 of the 12 DFSPs and in none of the SFTs or SCLs. Even when only superficial portions of a lesion were present, this feature was identifiable. Spindle cell lipomas posed little diagnostic difficulty, in part because excisional biopsies were performed in all cases of SCL. The number of samples included in the study is relatively small, in part due to the rarity of cutaneous solitary fibrous tumors. We conclude that careful attention to these histopathologic features enables reliable distinction among these tumors.

  6. An astral simulacrum of the central spindle accounts for normal, spindle-less, and anucleate cytokinesis in echinoderm embryos

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kuan-Chung; Bement, William M.; Petronczki, Mark; von Dassow, George

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animal cells depends on spindle-derived spatial cues that culminate in Rho activation, and thereby actomyosin assembly, in a narrow equatorial band. Although the nature, origin, and variety of such cues have long been obscure, one component is certainly the Rho activator Ect2. Here we describe the behavior and function of Ect2 in echinoderm embryos, showing that Ect2 migrates from spindle midzone to astral microtubules in anaphase and that Ect2 shapes the pattern of Rho activation in incipient furrows. Our key finding is that Ect2 and its binding partner Cyk4 accumulate not only at normal furrows, but also at furrows that form in the absence of associated spindle, midzone, or chromosomes. In all these cases, the cell assembles essentially the same cytokinetic signaling ensemble—opposed astral microtubules decorated with Ect2 and Cyk4. We conclude that if multiple signals contribute to furrow induction in echinoderm embryos, they likely converge on the same signaling ensemble on an analogous cytoskeletal scaffold. PMID:25298401

  7. An astral simulacrum of the central spindle accounts for normal, spindle-less, and anucleate cytokinesis in echinoderm embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuan-Chung; Bement, William M; Petronczki, Mark; von Dassow, George

    2014-12-15

    Cytokinesis in animal cells depends on spindle-derived spatial cues that culminate in Rho activation, and thereby actomyosin assembly, in a narrow equatorial band. Although the nature, origin, and variety of such cues have long been obscure, one component is certainly the Rho activator Ect2. Here we describe the behavior and function of Ect2 in echinoderm embryos, showing that Ect2 migrates from spindle midzone to astral microtubules in anaphase and that Ect2 shapes the pattern of Rho activation in incipient furrows. Our key finding is that Ect2 and its binding partner Cyk4 accumulate not only at normal furrows, but also at furrows that form in the absence of associated spindle, midzone, or chromosomes. In all these cases, the cell assembles essentially the same cytokinetic signaling ensemble—opposed astral microtubules decorated with Ect2 and Cyk4. We conclude that if multiple signals contribute to furrow induction in echinoderm embryos, they likely converge on the same signaling ensemble on an analogous cytoskeletal scaffold. PMID:25298401

  8. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  9. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  10. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  11. Effects of cryopreservation on meiotic spindles of oocytes and its dynamics after thawing: clinical implications in oocyte freezing--a review article.

    PubMed

    Chen, S U; Lien, Y R; Chao, K H; Ho, H N; Yang, Y S; Lee, T Y

    2003-04-28

    Embryo freezing has been a successful practice, but oocyte cryopreservation formerly achieved poorer results. This was mainly due to low rates of survival, fertilization, and development. The major dissimilarities for oocytes to embryos are the character of the plasma membrane, the presence of cortical granules, at the metaphase of meiosis II with the spindle system. In addition, the oocytes must be fertilized by sperm at the appropriate time. To improve the survival rate, a refined slow freezing method with increased sucrose concentration would dehydrate oocytes more sufficiently. Vitrification is another approach to prevent ice crystal formation. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection is used to overcome possible zona hardening from the release of cortical granules. The microtubules of meiotic spindles are vulnerable to the thermal changes and would depolymerize. Cryopreserved oocytes exhibited serious disturbances of the microtubules immediately after thawing. Fertilization of oocytes with disorganized spindles could lead to chromosomal aneuploidy, digyny, and arrest of cleavage. After incubation, the microtubules would repolymerize in a time-dependent way. Normal fertilization and development of cryopreserved oocytes improved after appropriate incubation and timing of insemination, compatible with recovery of the spindles. With the improvement of survival, fertilization, and cleavage, oocyte cryopreservation would gain an imperative role.

  12. miR-125b promotes cell death by targeting spindle assembly checkpoint gene MAD1 and modulating mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjya, S; Nath, S; Ghose, J; Maiti, G P; Biswas, N; Bandyopadhyay, S; Panda, C K; Bhattacharyya, N P; Roychoudhury, S

    2013-03-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a 'wait-anaphase' mechanism that has evolved in eukaryotic cells in response to the stochastic nature of chromosome-spindle attachments. In the recent past, different aspects of the SAC regulation have been described. However, the role of microRNAs in the SAC is vaguely understood. We report here that Mad1, a core SAC protein, is repressed by human miR-125b. Mad1 serves as an adaptor protein for Mad2 - which functions to inhibit anaphase entry till the chromosomal defects in metaphase are corrected. We show that exogenous expression of miR-125b, through downregulation of Mad1, delays cells at metaphase. As a result of this delay, cells proceed towards apoptotic death, which follows from elevated chromosomal abnormalities upon ectopic expression of miR-125b. Moreover, expressions of Mad1 and miR-125b are inversely correlated in a variety of cancer cell lines, as well as in primary head and neck tumour tissues. We conclude that increased expression of miR-125b inhibits cell proliferation by suppressing Mad1 and activating the SAC transiently. We hypothesize an optimum Mad1 level and thus, a properly scheduled SAC is maintained partly by miR-125b.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, María de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

  14. Surface shape control of the workpiece in a double-spindle triple-workstation wafer grinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianglong, Zhu; Renke, Kang; Zhigang, Dong; Guang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Double-spindle triple-workstation (DSTW) ultra precision grinders are mainly used in production lines for manufacturing and back thinning large diameter (>= 300 mm) silicon wafers for integrated circuits. It is important, but insufficiently studied, to control the wafer shape ground on a DSTW grinder by adjusting the inclination angles of the spindles and work tables. In this paper, the requirements of the inclination angle adjustment of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are analyzed. A reasonable configuration of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are proposed. Based on the proposed configuration, an adjustment method of the inclination angle of grinding spindles and work tables for DSTW wafer grinders is put forward. The mathematical models of wafer shape with the adjustment amount of inclination angles for both fine and rough grinding spindles are derived. The proposed grinder configuration and adjustment method will provide helpful instruction for DSTW wafer grinder design.

  15. The STARD9/Kif16a kinesin associates with mitotic microtubules and regulates spindle pole assembly.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jorge Z; Summers, Matthew K; Peterson, David; Brauer, Matthew J; Lee, James; Senese, Silvia; Gholkar, Ankur A; Lo, Yu-Chen; Lei, Xingye; Jung, Kenneth; Anderson, David C; Davis, David P; Belmont, Lisa; Jackson, Peter K

    2011-12-01

    During cell division, cells form the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, a highly specialized and dynamic structure that mediates proper chromosome transmission to daughter cells. Cancer cells can show perturbed mitotic spindles and an approach in cancer treatment has been to trigger cell killing by targeting microtubule dynamics or spindle assembly. To identify and characterize proteins necessary for spindle assembly, and potential antimitotic targets, we performed a proteomic and genetic analysis of 592 mitotic microtubule copurifying proteins (MMCPs). Screening for regulators that affect both mitosis and apoptosis, we report the identification and characterization of STARD9, a kinesin-3 family member, which localizes to centrosomes and stabilizes the pericentriolar material (PCM). STARD9-depleted cells have fragmented PCM, form multipolar spindles, activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), arrest in mitosis, and undergo apoptosis. Interestingly, STARD9-depletion synergizes with the chemotherapeutic agent taxol to increase mitotic death, demonstrating that STARD9 is a mitotic kinesin and a potential antimitotic target.

  16. Large Tailed Spindle Viruses of Archaea: a New Way of Doing Viral Business.

    PubMed

    Hochstein, Rebecca; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Engelhardt, Harald; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Viruses of Archaea continue to surprise us. Archaeal viruses have revealed new morphologies, protein folds, and gene content. This is especially true for large spindle viruses, which infect only Archaea. We present a comparison of particle morphologies, major coat protein structures, and gene content among the five characterized large spindle viruses to elucidate defining characteristics. Structural similarities and a core set of genes support the grouping of the large spindle viruses into a new superfamily.

  17. Individual differences in multiple-bag spindles of cat superficial lumbrical muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Decorte, L; Emonet-Dénand, F; Harker, D W; Laporte, Y

    1990-01-01

    A total of 791 spindle poles was analysed with regard to intrafusal fibre composition in the first and second superficial lumbrical muscles from the right and left hindfeet of 9 male and 5 female adult cats. Bag and chain muscle fibres were identified by their myofibrillar ATPase staining profile in the B region, after either acid or alkaline preincubation. A high proportion of the spindle pole population (43.2%) was observed to contain three or more (up to 5) bag fibres; those poles were classified as multiple-bag spindle poles. In the 334 muscle spindles in which both poles were studied, 42 bag fibres (12.6%) were found to be of the 'mixed' type, that is a fibre in which the two poles differ in their ATPase staining profile (either bag1/bag2 or bag/chain). The variability of the intrafusal fibre content observed in spindles of these muscles has been studied in relation to individual characteristics such as sex, weight and side of the animal. In general, multiple-bag spindles are more frequent in male than in female cats and in right as compared to left side muscles. Nearly all 'mixed' bag intrafusal fibres (38 out of 42) were observed in spindles containing 3 or more bag fibres. In 3-bag spindles the proportion of 'mixed' bag spindles is approximately the same in male and female cats. The ratio of 'dynamic' (mean polar bag1 content) to 'static' (mean polar bag2 plus chain fibre content) intrafusal effectors per muscle tends to increase in spindles of right side muscles and to decrease in the heaviest animals. The quantitative and qualitative differences in fibre content of spindles observed in first lumbrical muscles of different animals suggest that the spindle fibre composition, especially that of the 'dynamic' bag1 fibre, may be related to individual predetermined and/or acquired factors. Images Fig. 5 PMID:2143502

  18. Physiological properties of tandem muscle spindles in neck and hind-limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Price, R F; Dutia, M B

    1989-01-01

    Although tandem muscle spindle complexes are found in small but significant numbers in most muscles, experimental investigation of their properties has been problematic because of the difficulty of distinguishing their afferents from those of "normal" single spindles. Of particular interest are the afferents from b2c capsules of tandem spindles, which unlike normal spindles contain only a static b2 nuclear bag fibre and some nuclear chain fibres. The absence of a dynamic b1 nuclear bag fibre from b2c spindles has engendered much speculation as to their response properties and their possible role in motor control. We have recently developed a method for the identification of afferents from b2c spindles in electrophysiological experiments, using infusion or topical application of succinylcholine (SCh). SCh causes the contraction of the dynamic b1 and static b2 nuclear bag intrafusal fibres, and paralyses the nuclear chain fibres. Afferents from b2c spindles are characterized by a strong "biasing" of their discharge rate to about 100 impulses per second (i.p.s.) when activated by SCh (reflecting the contraction of the static b2 fibre), while primary afferents from normal b1b2c spindles show a large increase in dynamic sensitivity as well as "biasing" (reflecting the contraction of both dynamic b1 and static b2 bag fibres). Histological examination of tenuissimus spindles activated by SCh has confirmed this relationship between the pattern of activation by SCh and the number of intrafusal nuclear bag fibres in the spindle. In this paper we review the value of SCh as a means of testing spindle afferents for functional inputs from sensory terminals on the nuclear bag fibres, and discuss the properties of b2c afferents from tandem spindles in the context of their possible function.

  19. Thirty years of search and capture: The complex simplicity of mitotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Heald, Rebecca; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-12-21

    Cell division is enacted by a microtubule-based, self-assembling macromolecular machine known as the mitotic spindle. In 1986, Kirschner and Mitchison proposed that by undergoing dynamic cycles of growth and disassembly, microtubules search for chromosomes. Capture of microtubules by the kinetochores progressively connects chromosomes to the bipolar spindle. 30 years later, "search and capture" remains the cornerstone of spindle assembly. However, a variety of facilitating mechanisms such as regulation of microtubule dynamics by diffusible gradients, spatially selective motor activities, and adaptive changes in chromosome architecture have been discovered. We discuss how these mechanisms ensure that the spindle assembles rapidly and with a minimal number of errors. PMID:26668328

  20. TCTP regulates spindle microtubule dynamics by stabilizing polar microtubules during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; You, Seung Yeop; Park, Yong Seok; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in spindle structure and function are essential for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle. Spindle dynamics are highly dependent on several microtubule-associated proteins that coordinate the dynamic behavior of microtubules, including microtubule assembly, stability and organization. Here, we show that translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a novel microtubule-associated protein that regulates spindle dynamics during meiotic maturation. TCTP was expressed and widely distributed in the cytoplasm with strong enrichment at the spindle microtubules during meiosis. TCTP was found to be phosphorylated during meiotic maturation, and was exclusively localized to the spindle poles. Knockdown of TCTP impaired spindle organization without affecting chromosome alignment. These spindle defects were mostly due to the destabilization of the polar microtubules. However, the stability of kinetochore microtubules attached to chromosomes was not affected by TCTP knockdown. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylable mutant of TCTP disturbed meiotic maturation, stabilizing the spindle microtubules. In addition, Plk1 was decreased by TCTP knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TCTP is a microtubule-associating protein required to regulate spindle microtubule dynamics during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

  1. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  2. The Chromosomal Passenger Complex Is Required for Meiotic Acentrosomal Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Biorientation

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sarah J.; Jang, Janet K.; McKim, Kim S.

    2012-01-01

    DURING meiosis in the females of many species, spindle assembly occurs in the absence of the microtubule-organizing centers called centrosomes. In the absence of centrosomes, the nature of the chromosome-based signal that recruits microtubules to promote spindle assembly as well as how spindle bipolarity is established and the chromosomes orient correctly toward the poles is not known. To address these questions, we focused on the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). We have found that the CPC localizes in a ring around the meiotic chromosomes that is aligned with the axis of the spindle at all stages. Using new methods that dramatically increase the effectiveness of RNA interference in the germline, we show that the CPC interacts with Drosophila oocyte chromosomes and is required for the assembly of spindle microtubules. Furthermore, chromosome biorientation and the localization of the central spindle kinesin-6 protein Subito, which is required for spindle bipolarity, depend on the CPC components Aurora B and Incenp. Based on these data we propose that the ring of CPC around the chromosomes regulates multiple aspects of meiotic cell division including spindle assembly, the establishment of bipolarity, the recruitment of important spindle organization factors, and the biorientation of homologous chromosomes. PMID:22865736

  3. Regulation of Mitotic Spindle Disassembly by an Environmental Stress-Sensing Pathway in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pigula, Adrianne; Drubin, David G.; Barnes, Georjana

    2014-01-01

    Timely spindle disassembly is essential for coordination of mitotic exit with cytokinesis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the microtubule-associated protein She1 functions in one of at least three parallel pathways that promote spindle disassembly. She1 phosphorylation by the Aurora kinase Ipl1 facilitates a role for She1 in late anaphase, when She1 contributes to microtubule depolymerization and shrinkage of spindle halves. By examining the genetic interactions of known spindle disassembly genes, we identified three genes in the environmental stress-sensing HOG (high-osmolarity glycerol response) pathway, SHO1, PBS2, and HOG1, and found they are necessary for proper localization of She1 to the anaphase spindle and for proper spindle disassembly. HOG pathway mutants exhibited spindle disassembly defects, as well as mislocalization of anillin-related proteins Boi1 and Boi2 from the bud neck. Moreover, Boi2, but not Boi1, plays a role in spindle disassembly that places Boi2 in a pathway with Sho1, Pbs2, and Hog1. Together, our data identify a process by which cells monitor events at the spindle and bud neck and describe a novel role for the HOG pathway in mitotic signaling. PMID:25213170

  4. Ongoing Network State Controls the Length of Sleep Spindles via Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Mátyás, Ferenc; Faradzs-Zade, Lejla; Ulbert, István; Harris, Kenneth D.; Acsády, László

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep spindles are major transient oscillations of the mammalian brain. Spindles are generated in the thalamus; however, what determines their duration is presently unclear. Here, we measured somatic activity of excitatory thalamocortical (TC) cells together with axonal activity of reciprocally coupled inhibitory reticular thalamic cells (nRTs) and quantified cycle-by-cycle alterations in their firing in vivo. We found that spindles with different durations were paralleled by distinct nRT activity, and nRT firing sharply dropped before the termination of all spindles. Both initial nRT and TC activity was correlated with spindle length, but nRT correlation was more robust. Analysis of spindles evoked by optogenetic activation of nRT showed that spindle probability, but not spindle length, was determined by the strength of the light stimulus. Our data indicate that during natural sleep a dynamically fluctuating thalamocortical network controls the duration of sleep spindles via the major inhibitory element of the circuits, the nRT. PMID:24945776

  5. Spindle Cell Carcinoma of the Mandibular Gingiva – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sangeeta R.; Bhandare, Prachi R.; Tripathi, Nidhi; Sridharan, Gokul

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a malignancy of epithelial origin often mimicking its mesenchymal counterpart thus posing a diagnostic challenge. It is a rare biphasic malignant tumour mostly encountered in the upper aerodigestive tract. The chief differential diagnoses of spindle cell carcinoma are true superficial sarcomas and they especially need to be differentiated from fibrosarcoma. This presentation reports a spindle cell carcinoma of the gingiva and highlights the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis. It also emphasizes the importance of accurate and thorough diagnosis of malignant spindle cell lesions to determine the appropriate therapeutic modality. PMID:27042594

  6. Spindle Cell Lipoma Occurring in the Buccal Mucosa: An Unusual Location of This Benign Lipomatous Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Milhan, Noala Vicensoto Moreira; Cavalcante, Ana Sueli Rodrigues; Marques, Yonara Maria Freire Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell lipoma is a benign lipomatous neoplasm, which rarely occurs in the oral cavity. The aims of this paper are to report a case of spindle cell lipoma located in buccal mucosa and discuss the main clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical findings of this entity. Thus, we report a 4-year history of an asymptomatic smooth surface nodule in an elderly Caucasian man with clinical hypothesis of fibroma. The histopathological examination showed spindle cells, mature adipose tissue, and many mast cells in a stroma of connective tissue presenting ropey collagen fibers bundles. After immunohistochemical analysis, the final diagnosis was spindle cell lipoma. PMID:26491592

  7. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions--part I: an approach to compound naevoidal pattern lesions with spindle cell morphology and Spitzoid pattern lesions.

    PubMed

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-04-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes reveal a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional naevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may be either a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either because of its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion because of a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified. However, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions can reliably be resolved with this standard approach, problem areas do exist and cause no end of grief to the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. In this review, the authors present their algorithmic approach to spindle cell melanocytic lesions and discuss each entity in turn, in order to (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions, and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions that either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  8. EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by interacting with and stabilizing spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubRI

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yi; Lu, Danyu; Jiang, Hao; Chi, Xiaochun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) trimethylates histone H3 Lys 27 and plays key roles in a variety of biological processes. Stability of spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 is essential for mitosis in somatic cells and for meiosis in oocytes. However, the role of EZH2 in oocyte meiotic maturation was unknown. Here, we presented a mechanism underlying EZH2 control of BubR1 stability in the meiosis of mouse oocytes. We identified a methyltransferase activity-independent function of EZH2 by demonstrating that EZH2 regulates spindle assembly and the polar body I extrusion. EZH2 was increased with the oocyte progression from GVBD to MII, while EZH2 was concentrated on the chromosomes. Interestingly, inhibition of EZH2 methyltranferase activity by DZNep or GSK343 did not affect oocyte meiotic maturation. However, depletion of EZH2 by morpholino led to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. Furthermore, ectopic expression of EZH2 led to oocyte meiotic maturation arrested at the MI stage followed by chromosome misalignment and aneuploidy. Mechanistically, EZH2 directly interacted with and stabilized BubR1, an effect driving EZH2 into the concert of meiosis regulation. Collectively, we provided a paradigm that EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27226494

  9. The microtubule cross-linker Feo controls the midzone stability, motor composition, and elongation of the anaphase B spindle in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haifeng; Brust-Mascher, Ingrid; Scholey, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during anaphase depends on chromosome-to-pole motility and pole-to-pole separation. We propose that in Drosophila embryos, the latter process (anaphase B) depends on a persistent kinesin-5–generated interpolar (ip) microtubule (MT) sliding filament mechanism that “engages” to push apart the spindle poles when poleward flux is turned off. Here we investigated the contribution of the midzonal, antiparallel MT-cross-linking nonmotor MAP, Feo, to this “slide-and-flux-or-elongate” mechanism. Whereas Feo homologues in other systems enhance the midzone localization of the MT-MT cross-linking motors kinesin-4, -5 and -6, the midzone localization of these motors is respectively enhanced, reduced, and unaffected by Feo. Strikingly, kinesin-5 localizes all along ipMTs of the anaphase B spindle in the presence of Feo, including at the midzone, but the antibody-induced dissociation of Feo increases kinesin-5 association with the midzone, which becomes abnormally narrow, leading to impaired anaphase B and incomplete chromosome segregation. Thus, although Feo and kinesin-5 both preferentially cross-link MTs into antiparallel polarity patterns, kinesin-5 cannot substitute for loss of Feo function. We propose that Feo controls the organization, stability, and motor composition of antiparallel ipMTs at the midzone, thereby facilitating the kinesin-5–driven sliding filament mechanism underlying proper anaphase B spindle elongation and chromosome segregation. PMID:25694445

  10. Synergistic role of fission yeast Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1MOZART1 in γ-tubulin complex recruitment to mitotic spindle pole bodies and spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Toda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In fission yeast, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC)–specific components Gfh1GCP4, Mod21GCP5, and Alp16GCP6 are nonessential for cell growth. Of these deletion mutants, only alp16Δ shows synthetic lethality with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mzt1MOZART1, a component of the γTuRC required for recruitment of the complex to microtubule-organizing centers. γ-Tubulin small complex levels at mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs, the centrosome equivalent in fungi) and microtubule levels for preanaphase spindles are significantly reduced in alp16Δ cells but not in gfh1Δ or mod21Δ cells. Furthermore, alp16Δ cells often form monopolar spindles and frequently lose a minichromosome when the spindle assembly checkpoint is inactivated. Alp16GCP6 promotes Mzt1-dependent γTuRC recruitment to mitotic SPBs and enhances spindle microtubule assembly in a manner dependent on its expression levels. Gfh1GCP4 and Mod21GCP5 are not required for Alp16GCP6-dependent γTuRC recruitment. Mzt1 has an additional role in the activation of the γTuRC for spindle microtubule assembly. The ratio of Mzt1 to γTuRC levels for preanaphase spindles is higher than at other stages of the cell cycle. Mzt1 overproduction enhances spindle microtubule assembly without affecting γTuRC levels at mitotic SPBs. We propose that Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1 act synergistically for efficient bipolar spindle assembly to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27053664

  11. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  12. [Receptor adaptation of muscle spindles treated in different ways].

    PubMed

    Zalkind, V I; Rokotova, N A

    1978-11-01

    Comparison of the grades of 60 sensitive muscle spindle terminals on two actions: gradual stretch of the muscle and short intensive tetanization of the muscle nerve, showed that, irrespective of the mode of action, the character of adaptation remains the smae in majority of units. The speed of receptors adaptation depends not on the specific of testing precedures, but, apparently, on the means of connection of the sensitive terminals with different types of intrafusal muscle fibers with different elasticviscous properties. The possible reason for speedy adaptation of muscle receptors of elementary dynamic type, is discussed.

  13. Spindle cell hemangioma: Unusual presentation of an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Gbolahan, Olalere Omoyosola; Fasina, Oluyemi; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Fasola, Olubayo A

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is an uncommon tumor that usually presents as subcutaneous or deep dermal nodule affecting the extremities and is typically <2 cm in size. A few cases have been reported in the head and neck region. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of SCH occurring in the orbit in the English literature. We, therefore, report the case of a large SCH involving the right orbit of a healthy 9-year-old Nigerian girl. PMID:26980977

  14. Sec66-Dependent Regulation of Yeast Spindle-Pole Body Duplication Through Pom152

    PubMed Central

    Katta, Santharam S.; Chen, Jingjing; Gardner, Jennifer M.; Friederichs, Jennifer M.; Smith, Sarah E.; Gogol, Madelaine; Unruh, Jay R.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Jaspersen, Sue L.

    2015-01-01

    In closed mitotic systems such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nuclear envelope (NE) does not break down during mitosis, so microtubule-organizing centers such as the spindle-pole body (SPB) must be inserted into the NE to facilitate bipolar spindle formation and chromosome segregation. The mechanism of SPB insertion has been linked to NE insertion of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) through a series of genetic and physical interactions between NPCs and SPB components. To identify new genes involved in SPB duplication and NE insertion, we carried out genome-wide screens for suppressors of deletion alleles of SPB components, including Mps3 and Mps2. In addition to the nucleoporins POM152 and POM34, we found that elimination of SEC66/SEC71/KAR7 suppressed lethality of cells lacking MPS2 or MPS3. Sec66 is a nonessential subunit of the Sec63 complex that functions together with the Sec61 complex in import of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Cells lacking Sec66 have reduced levels of Pom152 protein but not Pom34 or Ndc1, a shared component of the NPC and SPB. The fact that Sec66 but not other subunits of the ER translocon bypass deletion mutants in SPB genes suggests a specific role for Sec66 in the control of Pom152 levels. Based on the observation that sec66∆ does not affect the distribution of Ndc1 on the NE or Ndc1 binding to the SPB, we propose that Sec66-mediated regulation of Pom152 plays an NPC-independent role in the control of SPB duplication. PMID:26510791

  15. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  16. Novel ATP-competitive kinesin spindle protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Cynthia A; Adams, Nicholas D; Auger, Kurt R; Burgess, Joelle L; Carson, Jeffrey D; Chaudhari, Amita M; Copeland, Robert A; Diamond, Melody A; Donatelli, Carla A; Duffy, Kevin J; Faucette, Leo F; Finer, Jeffrey T; Huffman, William F; Hugger, Erin D; Jackson, Jeffrey R; Knight, Steven D; Luo, Lusong; Moore, Michael L; Newlander, Ken A; Ridgers, Lance H; Sakowicz, Roman; Shaw, Antony N; Sung, Chiu-Mei M; Sutton, David; Wood, Kenneth W; Zhang, Shu-Yun; Zimmerman, Michael N; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2007-10-01

    Kinesin spindle protein (KSP), an ATPase responsible for spindle pole separation during mitosis that is present only in proliferating cells, has become a novel and attractive anticancer target with potential for reduced side effects compared to currently available therapies. We report herein the discovery of the first known ATP-competitive inhibitors of KSP, which display a unique activity profile as compared to the known loop 5 (L5) allosteric KSP inhibitors that are currently under clinical evaluation. Optimization of this series led to the identification of biphenyl sulfamide 20, a potent KSP inhibitor with in vitro antiproliferative activity against human cells with either wild-type KSP (HCT116) or mutant KSP (HCT116 D130V). In a murine xenograft model with HCT116 D130V tumors, 20 showed significant antitumor activity following intraperitoneal dosing, providing in vivo proof-of-principle of the efficacy of an ATP-competitive KSP inhibitor versus tumors that are resistant to the other known KSP inhibitors. PMID:17725339

  17. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception.

    PubMed

    Normand, Marie-Pier; St-Hilaire, Patrick; Bastien, Célyne H

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  18. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  19. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  20. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  1. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous “spindle envelope” confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function. PMID:26304726

  2. Giant meiotic spindles in males from Drosophila species with giant sperm tails.

    PubMed

    Lattao, Ramona; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Gatti, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    The spindle is a highly dynamic molecular machine that mediates precise chromosome segregation during cell division. Spindle size can vary dramatically, not only between species but also between different cells of the same organism. However, the reasons for spindle size variability are largely unknown. Here we show that variations in spindle size can be linked to a precise developmental requirement. Drosophila species have dramatically different sperm flagella that range in length from 0.3 mm in D. persimilis to 58.3 mm in D. bifurca. We found that males of different species exhibit striking variations in meiotic spindle size, which positively correlate with sperm length, with D. bifurca showing 30-fold larger spindles than D. persimilis. This suggests that primary spermatocytes of Drosophila species manufacture and store amounts of tubulin that are proportional to the axoneme length and use these tubulin pools for spindle assembly. These findings highlight an unsuspected plasticity of the meiotic spindle in response to the selective forces controlling sperm length.

  3. Follicular thyroid adenoma dominated by spindle cells: report of two unusual cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Agaimy; Thomas, Hahn; Josef, Schroeder; Afaf, Elhag

    2012-01-01

    Primary spindle cell neoplasms of the thyroid gland are quite rare. They encompass a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant lesions of mesenchymal and epithelial origin. We herein describe two unusual follicular thyroid adenomas dominated by spindle cells with occasional areas of colloid-forming follicular differentiation. The tumors affected a 77-year woman and a 70-year old man; both had a long-history of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). One tumor presented as a large cold thyroid nodule and the other was an autopsy finding. The tumors were predominantly composed of fibroblast-like spindled cells. One case showed prominent meningioma-like concentric perivascular arrangement and contained cytoplasmic melanin-like pigment. Stromal hyalinization was a prominent feature of both. By immunohistochemistry, the spindled cells expressed vimentin, pankeratin (KL1), thyroglobulin and TTF1 consistent with a follicular differentiation. They did not stain with calcitonin, CEA and other lineage-specific mesenchymal, neuroendocrine and melanocytic markers. There was no evidence of metastasis at autopsy (case 2) or at last follow-up 2 years after surgery (case 1). These cases demonstrate the diversity of follicular thyroid neoplasms and the unusual occurrence of extensive spindle cell metaplasia. These uncommon lesions need to be distinguished from spindle cell medullary carcinoma, paucicellular spindle cell anaplastic carcinoma, spindle cell foci in papillary and follicular carcinoma, solitary fibrous tumor and other rare benign and malignant mesenchymal lesions. PMID:22400075

  4. Sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit)-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yu; Li, Qiuyu; Yu, Min

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile hydrothermal method for the synthesis of uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors with the assistance of sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit). - Highlights: • Well-crystallized spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors have been synthesized. • The influence of the reaction temperature and reaction time were clearly shown. • The dosage of Na{sub 3}Cit has a strong effect on the spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors. • The growth mechanism for the formation of final samples was proposed. - Abstract: Highly uniform spindle-like SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors have been prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}Cit) as the chelating reagent. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to characterize the resulting samples. The dosage of sodium citrate, reaction temperature and reaction time play key roles in the formation of the final samples. The possible formation mechanism for SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors has been proposed. Upon excitation by ultraviolet radiation, the as-synthesized SrMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors show the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 1, 2, 3, 4) emission lines with red emission {sup 5}D{sub 0}–{sup 7}F{sub 2} (613 nm) as the most prominent group.

  5. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division. PMID:27230381

  6. Drosophila parthenogenesis: A tool to decipher centrosomal vs acentrosomal spindle assembly pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano

    2008-04-15

    Development of unfertilized eggs in the parthenogenetic strain K23-O-im of Drosophila mercatorum requires the stochastic interactions of self-assembled centrosomes with the female chromatin. In a portion of the unfertilized eggs that do not assemble centrosomes, microtubules organize a bipolar anastral mitotic spindle around the chromatin like the one formed during the first female meiosis, suggesting that similar pathways may be operative. In the cytoplasm of eggs in which centrosomes do form, monastral and biastral spindles are found. Analysis by laser scanning confocal microscopy suggests that these spindles are derived from the stochastic interaction of astral microtubules directly with kinetochore regions or indirectly with kinetochore microtubules. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic spindle assembly requires both acentrosomal and centrosomal pathways, strengthening the hypothesis that astral microtubules can dictate the organization of the spindle by capturing kinetochore microtubules.

  7. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  8. Evaluating the use of line length for automatic sleep spindle detection.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are transient waveforms observed on the electroencephalogram (EEG) during the N2 stage of sleep. In this paper we evaluate the use of line length, an efficient and low-complexity time domain feature, for automatic detection of sleep spindles. We use this feature with a simple algorithm to detect spindles achieving sensitivity of 83.6% and specificity of 87.9%. We also present a comparison of these results with other spindle detection methods evaluated on the same dataset. Further, we implemented the algorithm on a MSP430 microcontroller achieving a power consumption of 56.7 μW. The overall detection performance, combined with the low power consumption show that line length could be a useful feature for detecting sleep spindles in wearable and resource-constrained systems. PMID:25571121

  9. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  10. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote Pins(TPR)/Mud-mediated spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A; Prehoda, Kenneth E; Doe, Chris Q

    2011-10-31

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe-Pins(TPR) interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the Pins(TPR)-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the Canoe(RA) domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway.

  11. Kinesin-5 in Drosophila Embryo Mitosis: Sliding Filament or Spindle Matrix Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Scholey, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila syncytial embryo uses multiple astral mitotic spindles that are specialized for rapid mitosis. The homotetrameric kinesin-5, KLP61F contributes to various aspects of mitosis in this system, all of which are consistent with it exerting outward forces on spindle poles. In principle, kinesin-5 could accomplish this by (i) sliding microtubules (MTs), minus end leading, relative to a static spindle matrix or (ii) crosslinking and sliding apart adjacent pairs of antiparallel interpolar (ip) MTs. Here, I critically review data on the biochemistry of purified KLP61F, its localization and dynamic properties within spindles, and quantitative modeling of KLP61F function. While a matrix-based mechanism may operate in some systems, the work tends to support the latter “sliding filament” mechanism for KLP61F action in Drosophila embryo spindles. PMID:19291760

  12. Dlg1 controls planar spindle orientation in the neuroepithelium through direct interaction with LGN

    PubMed Central

    Saadaoui, Mehdi; Machicoane, Mickaël; di Pietro, Florencia; Etoc, Fred; Echard, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Oriented cell divisions are necessary for the development of epithelial structures. Mitotic spindle orientation requires the precise localization of force generators at the cell cortex via the evolutionarily conserved LGN complex. However, polarity cues acting upstream of this complex in vivo in the vertebrate epithelia remain unknown. In this paper, we show that Dlg1 is localized at the basolateral cell cortex during mitosis and is necessary for planar spindle orientation in the chick neuroepithelium. Live imaging revealed that Dlg1 is required for directed spindle movements during metaphase. Mechanistically, we show that direct interaction between Dlg1 and LGN promotes cortical localization of the LGN complex. Furthermore, in human cells dividing on adhesive micropatterns, homogenously localized Dlg1 recruited LGN to the mitotic cortex and was also necessary for proper spindle orientation. We propose that Dlg1 acts primarily to recruit LGN to the cortex and that Dlg1 localization may additionally provide instructive cues for spindle orientation. PMID:25202028

  13. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  14. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  15. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in metaphase spindles: polarized light microscopy, image registration, and correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Jan; Needleman, Daniel J.

    2010-02-01

    Metaphase spindles are highly dynamic, nonequilibrium, steady-state structures. We study the internal fluctuations of spindles by computing spatio-temporal correlation functions of movies obtained from quantitative polarized light microscopy. These correlation functions are only physically meaningful if corrections are made for the net motion of the spindle. We describe our image registration algorithm in detail and we explore its robustness. Finally, we discuss the expression used for the estimation of the correlation function in terms of the nematic order of the microtubules which make up the spindle. Ultimately, studying the form of these correlation functions will provide a quantitative test of the validity of coarse-grained models of spindle structure inspired from liquid crystal physics.

  16. A LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium controls mitotic spindle size.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Gholkar, Ankur; Senese, Silvia; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-01-01

    Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) are essential enzymes that regulate the methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC). LCMT1 and PME-1 have been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We show here an important role for an LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium in controlling mitotic spindle size. Depletion of LCMT1 or overexpression of PME-1 led to long spindles. In contrast, depletion of PME-1, pharmacological inhibition of PME-1 or overexpression of LCMT1 led to short spindles. Furthermore, perturbation of the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium led to mitotic arrest, spindle assembly checkpoint activation, defective cell divisions, induction of apoptosis and reduced cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium is critical for regulating mitotic spindle size and thereby proper cell division.

  17. A LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium controls mitotic spindle size

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Gholkar, Ankur; Senese, Silvia; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-01-01

    Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) are essential enzymes that regulate the methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC). LCMT1 and PME-1 have been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We show here an important role for an LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium in controlling mitotic spindle size. Depletion of LCMT1 or overexpression of PME-1 led to long spindles. In contrast, depletion of PME-1, pharmacological inhibition of PME-1 or overexpression of LCMT1 led to short spindles. Furthermore, perturbation of the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium led to mitotic arrest, spindle assembly checkpoint activation, defective cell divisions, induction of apoptosis and reduced cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium is critical for regulating mitotic spindle size and thereby proper cell division. PMID:25839665

  18. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Laura B.; Sockeel, Stéphane; Soon, Melissa; Bore, Arnaud; Myhr, Ayako; Stojanoski, Bobby; Cusack, Rhodri; Owen, Adrian M.; Doyon, Julien; Fogel, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    A spindle detection method was developed that: (1) extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma) relative to ongoing “background” sigma activity using complex demodulation, (2) accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and (3) employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60 s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile). Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11–16 Hz) filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles. PMID:26441604

  19. Kinetochores are transported poleward along a single astral microtubule during chromosome attachment to the spindle in newt lung cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    During mitosis in cultured newt pneumocytes, one or more chromosomes may become positioned well removed (greater than 50 microns) from the polar regions during early prometaphase. As a result, these chromosomes are delayed for up to 5 h in forming an attachment to the spindle. The spatial separation of these chromosomes from the polar microtubule- nucleating centers provides a unique opportunity to study the initial stages of kinetochore fiber formation in living cells. Time-lapse Nomarski-differential interference contrast videomicroscopic observations reveal that late-attaching chromosomes always move, upon attachment, into a single polar region (usually the one closest to the chromosome). During this attachment, the kinetochore region of the chromosome undergoes a variable number of transient poleward tugs that are followed, shortly thereafter, by rapid movement of the chromosome towards the pole. Anti-tubulin immunofluorescence and serial section EM reveal that the kinetochores and kinetochore regions of nonattached chromosomes lack associated microtubules. By contrast, these methods reveal that the attachment and subsequent poleward movement of a chromosome correlates with the association of a single long microtubule with one of the kinetochores of the chromosome. This microtubule traverses the entire distance between the spindle pole and the kinetochore and often extends well past the kinetochore. From these results, we conclude that the initial attachment of a chromosome to the newt pneumocyte spindle results from an interaction between a single polar-nucleated microtubule and one of the kinetochores on the chromosome. Once this association is established, the kinetochore is rapidly transported poleward along the surface of the microtubule by a mechanism that is not dependent on microtubule depolymerization. Our results further demonstrate that the motors for prometaphase chromosome movement must be either on the surface of the kinetochore (i.e., within the

  20. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  1. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  2. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  3. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  4. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  5. Primary pulmonary spindle cell tumour (haemangiopericytoma) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, M; Buchholz, J; Morandi, F; Laddaga, E; Brunetti, B; Rossi, F; Terragni, R; Sarli, G

    2008-10-01

    Haemangiopericytoma is a soft tissue sarcoma believed to originate from pericytes. These tumours are commonly located on the skin and subcutaneous tissue of dogs and are most commonly found on the limbs. To the authors' knowledge, primary lung haemangiopericytomas have not been previously described in dogs. This case report describes the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a primary haemangiopericytoma of the lung in a 10-year-old male, neutered, Siberian husky dog. Staging of the tumour was performed using a computed tomography scan of the thorax and a computed tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the lesion. Treatment was a right caudal lobectomy from a right lateral approach. No regional lymph node changes were noted on computed tomography or intraoperative assessments. Histopathology confirmed a spindle cell tumour that stained positive for vimentin and negative for desmin and S-100.

  6. Efavirenz modulation of sleep spindles and sleep spectral profile.

    PubMed

    Simen, Arthur A; Ma, Junshui; Svetnik, Vladimir; Mayleben, David; Maynard, James; Roth, Adam; Mixson, Lori; Mogg, Robin; Shera, David; George, Laura; Mast, T Chris; Beals, Chan; Stoch, Aubrey; Struyk, Arie; Shire, Norah; Fraser, Iain

    2015-02-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are important antiretroviral agents for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. Some non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, in particular efavirenz, have prominent effects on sleep, cognition and psychiatric variables that limit their tolerability. To avoid confounds due to drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, we assessed the effects of efavirenz in healthy volunteers on sleep, cognition and psychological endpoints during the first week of treatment. Forty healthy male subjects were randomized to receive placebo or efavirenz 600 mg nightly for 7 days after completion of a 3-day placebo run-in period. Treatment with efavirenz was associated with reduced time to sleep onset in the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test, an increase in non-rapid eye movement sleep, a large exposure-related decrease in sigma band spectral density and sleep spindle density during non-rapid eye movement sleep, and reduced performance on an attention switching task. Because efavirenz has been shown to have serotonin 2A receptor partial-agonist properties, we reasoned that antagonism of serotonin 2A receptor signalling in the thalamic reticular nucleus, which generates sleep spindles and promotes attention, may be responsible. Consistent with predictions, treatment of healthy volunteers with a single dose of a serotonin 2A receptor antagonist was found to significantly suppress sigma band spectral density in an exposure-related manner and modulated the overall spectral profile in a manner highly similar to that observed with efavirenz, consistent with the notion that efavirenz exhibits serotonin 2A receptor partial-agonist pharmacology in humans.

  7. Acidianus Tailed Spindle Virus: a New Archaeal Large Tailed Spindle Virus Discovered by Culture-Independent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hochstein, Rebecca A.; Amenabar, Maximiliano J.; Munson-McGee, Jacob H.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The field of viral metagenomics has expanded our understanding of viral diversity from all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya). Traditionally, viral metagenomic studies provide information about viral gene content but rarely provide knowledge about virion morphology and/or cellular host identity. Here we describe a new virus, Acidianus tailed spindle virus (ATSV), initially identified by bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic data sets from a high-temperature (80°C) acidic (pH 2) hot spring located in Yellowstone National Park, followed by more detailed characterization using only environmental samples without dependency on culturing. Characterization included the identification of the large tailed spindle virion morphology, determination of the complete 70.8-kb circular double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viral genome content, and identification of its cellular host. Annotation of the ATSV genome revealed a potential three-domain gene product containing an N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, followed by a likely posttranslation regulatory region consisting of high serine and threonine content, and a C-terminal ESCRT-III domain, suggesting interplay with the host ESCRT system. The host of ATSV, which is most closely related to Acidianus hospitalis, was determined by a combination of analysis of cellular clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas loci and dual viral and cellular fluorescence in situ hybridization (viral FISH) analysis of environmental samples and confirmed by culture-based infection studies. This work provides an expanded pathway for the discovery, isolation, and characterization of new viruses using culture-independent approaches and provides a platform for predicting and confirming virus hosts. IMPORTANCE Virus discovery and characterization have been traditionally accomplished by using culture-based methods. While a valuable approach, it is limited by the availability of culturable hosts. In

  8. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  9. Mdb1, a Fission Yeast Homolog of Human MDC1, Modulates DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Spindle Function

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Wang, Hai-Tao; Zhai, Yonggong; Russell, Paul; Du, Li-Lin

    2014-01-01

    During eukaryotic DNA damage response (DDR), one of the earliest events is the phosphorylation of the C-terminal SQ motif of histone H2AX (H2A in yeasts). In human cells, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) is recognized by MDC1, which serves as a binding platform for the accumulation of a myriad of DDR factors on chromatin regions surrounding DNA lesions. Despite its important role in DDR, no homolog of MDC1 outside of metazoans has been described. Here, we report the characterization of Mdb1, a protein from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which shares significant sequence homology with human MDC1 in their C-terminal tandem BRCT (tBRCT) domains. We show that in vitro, recombinant Mdb1 protein binds a phosphorylated H2A (γH2A) peptide, and the phospho-specific binding requires two conserved phospho-binding residues in the tBRCT domain of Mdb1. In vivo, Mdb1 forms nuclear foci at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the HO endonuclease and ionizing radiation (IR). IR-induced Mdb1 focus formation depends on γH2A and the phospho-binding residues of Mdb1. Deleting the mdb1 gene does not overtly affect DNA damage sensitivity in a wild type background, but alters the DNA damage sensitivity of cells lacking another γH2A binder Crb2. Overexpression of Mdb1 causes severe DNA damage sensitivity in a manner that requires the interaction between Mdb1 and γH2A. During mitosis, Mdb1 localizes to spindles and concentrates at spindle midzones at late mitosis. The spindle midzone localization of Mdb1 requires its phospho-binding residues, but is independent of γH2A. Loss of Mdb1 or mutating its phospho-binding residues makes cells more resistant to the microtubule depolymerizing drug thiabendazole. We propose that Mdb1 performs dual roles in DDR and mitotic spindle regulation. PMID:24806815

  10. Alpha spindles as neurophysiological correlates indicating attentional shift in a simulated driving task.

    PubMed

    Sonnleitner, Andreas; Simon, Michael; Kincses, Wilhelm E; Buchner, Axel; Schrauf, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to describe neurophysiological correlates of driver distraction with highly robust parameters in the EEG (i.e. alpha spindles). In a simulated driving task with two different secondary tasks (i.e. visuomotor, auditory), N=28 participants had to perform full stop brakes reacting to appearing stop signs and red traffic lights. Alpha spindle rate was significantly higher during an auditory secondary task and significantly lower during a visuomotor secondary task as compared to driving only. Alpha spindle duration was significantly shortened during a visuomotor secondary task. The results are consistent with the assumption that alpha spindles indicate active inhibition of visual information processing. Effects on the alpha spindles while performing secondary tasks on top of the driving task indicate attentional shift according to the task modality. As compared to alpha band power, both the measures of alpha spindle rate and alpha spindle duration were less vulnerable to artifacts and the effect sizes were larger, allowing for a more accurate description of the current driver state.

  11. A new method to measure circular runout of end-milling spindle based on cutting mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianlai; Liu, Shuchun

    2008-12-01

    A practical method is introduced to measure the circular runout of a end-milling spindle system at high speed rotations without the need of a reference sphere. A workpiece is held on a linear slide which moves along the axial direction of the spindle. The spindle is then programmed to run at a specific speed. A very sharp edge cutter must be used and the depth of cut will be very shallow in order to keep the cutting force very small. The workpiece is then fed into the end mill in order to make a cutting mark of teens μm in depth. The cutting marks are circular, and their diameters are related to the circular runout of the spindle system. The cutting mark that is generated at a specific speed is expected to contain information about the spindle circular runout at this speed. In practice the cutting marks are not perfectly circular. Therefore, a best-fit circle of a cutting mark is needed to determine its diameter. A high-resolution edge detector machine is used for this purpose. Quantitative precision analysis was carried out to confirm the accuracy and repeatability of this new measurement technique. It is demonstrated that this technique for the measurement of spindle circular runout is an effective tool in verifying the actual running accuracy of spindles at their actual operating speeds and can be accomplished without the need for a reference sphere.

  12. Aurora A kinase regulates proper spindle positioning in C. elegans and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kotak, Sachin; Afshar, Katayon; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Accurate spindle positioning is essential for error-free cell division. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven instrumental for dissecting mechanisms governing spindle positioning. Despite important progress, how the cortical forces that act on astral microtubules to properly position the spindle are modulated is incompletely understood. Here, we report that the PP6 phosphatase PPH-6 and its associated subunit SAPS-1, which positively regulate pulling forces acting on spindle poles, associate with the Aurora A kinase AIR-1 in C. elegans embryos. We show that acute inactivation of AIR-1 during mitosis results in excess pulling forces on astral microtubules. Furthermore, we uncover that AIR-1 acts downstream of PPH-6-SAPS-1 in modulating spindle positioning, and that PPH-6-SAPS-1 negatively regulates AIR-1 localization at the cell cortex. Moreover, we show that Aurora A and the PP6 phosphatase subunit PPP6C are also necessary for spindle positioning in human cells. There, Aurora A is needed for the cortical localization of NuMA and dynein during mitosis. Overall, our work demonstrates that Aurora A kinases and PP6 phosphatases have an ancient function in modulating spindle positioning, thus contributing to faithful cell division. PMID:27335426

  13. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions: part II--an approach to intradermal proliferations and horizontally oriented lesions.

    PubMed

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-05-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes show a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional nevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies, and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may either be a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either due to its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion due to a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified; however, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions may reliably be resolved through this standard approach, problem areas do exist for the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. With this review (part II of II), we complete our discussion of spindle cell melanocytic lesions, in order to: (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions; and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions which either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  14. ASK1 controls spindle orientation and positioning by phosphorylating EB1 and stabilizing astral microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Youguang; Ran, Jie; Xie, Songbo; Yang, Yunfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Shanshan; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Orientation and positioning of the mitotic spindle are involved in dictating cell division axis and cleavage site, and play important roles in cell fate determination and tissue morphogenesis. However, how spindle movement is controlled to achieve a defined alignment within the dividing cell is not fully understood. Here, we describe an unexpected role for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in regulating spindle behavior. We find that ASK1 is required for proper mitotic progression and daughter cell adhesion to the substratum. ASK1 interacts with end-binding protein 1 (EB1) and phosphorylates EB1 at serine 40, threonine 154 and threonine 206, enhancing its binding to the plus ends of astral microtubules. Consequently, astral microtubules are stabilized and therefore capable of mediating spindle interaction with the cell cortex, a requirement for spindle movement. These findings reveal a previously undiscovered function of ASK1 in cell division by regulating spindle orientation and positioning, and point to the importance of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of spindle behavior. PMID:27721984

  15. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  17. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  18. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation.

  19. A novel patch assembly domain in Num1 mediates dynein anchoring at the cortex during spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xianying; Germain, Bryan St.

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis in budding yeast, cortically anchored dynein generates pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the mitotic spindle across the mother–bud neck. The attachment molecule Num1 is required for dynein anchoring at the cell membrane, but how Num1 assembles into stationary cortical patches and interacts with dynein is unknown. We show that an N-terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR)–like domain in Num1 mediates the assembly of morphologically distinct patches and its interaction with dynein for spindle translocation into the bud. We name this domain patch assembly domain (PA; residues 1–303), as it was both necessary and sufficient for the formation of functional dynein-anchoring patches when it was attached to a pleckstrin homology domain or a CAAX motif. Distinct point mutations targeting the predicted BAR-like PA domain differentially disrupted patch assembly, dynein anchoring, and mitochondrial attachment functions of Num1. We also show that the PA domain is an elongated dimer and discuss the mechanism by which it drives patch assembly. PMID:22431751

  20. Bisphenol A disrupts microtubules and induces multipolar spindles in dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    The effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine chemical disruptor extensively used in the plastic and epoxy resin industry, on dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica Loudon were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after tubulin and endoplasmic reticulum immunolocalization and DNA staining. Microtubule arrays of all mitotic stages were disrupted within a few hours of treatment: preprophase bands exhibited asymmetric width; prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase spindles appeared sharply pointed, sigmoid or multipolar; phragmoplast microtubules were elongated and occasionally bended toward the daughter nuclei. Depending on the mitotic stage, the chromosomes appeared condensed at prophase, as a compact mass at metaphase and anaphase, unsegregated or bridged at telophase. Endoplasmic reticulum patterns were also affected, reflecting those of the respective microtubule arrays. Recovery of the microtubules after oryzalin treatment was more effective in a BPA solution than in water. It is concluded that the plant mitotic apparatus microtubules are very sensitive to BPA, the effect of which depends on the specific cell cycle stage. The formation of multipolar spindles is reminiscent of animal cells and is ascribed to the induction of multiple microtubule nucleation sites, deriving from the centrosomal properties of gymnosperms. PMID:26855225

  1. The Bub1–Plk1 kinase complex promotes spindle checkpoint signalling through Cdc20 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint senses unattached kinetochores and inhibits the Cdc20-bound anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), to delay anaphase, thereby preventing aneuploidy. A critical checkpoint inhibitor of APC/CCdc20 is the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). It is unclear whether MCC suffices to inhibit all cellular APC/C. Here we show that human checkpoint kinase Bub1 not only directly phosphorylates Cdc20, but also scaffolds Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of Cdc20 by Bub1–Plk1 inhibits APC/CCdc20 in vitro and is required for checkpoint signalling in human cells. Bub1–Plk1-dependent Cdc20 phosphorylation is regulated by upstream checkpoint signals and is dispensable for MCC assembly. A phospho-mimicking Cdc20 mutant restores nocodazole-induced mitotic arrest in cells depleted of Mad2 or BubR1. Thus, Bub1–Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20 constitutes an APC/C-inhibitory mechanism that is parallel, but not redundant, to MCC formation. Both mechanisms are required to sustain mitotic arrest in response to spindle defects. PMID:26912231

  2. Rediscovery of the nucleolinus, a dynamic RNA-rich organelle associated with the nucleolus, spindle, and centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alliegro, Mary Anne; Henry, Jonathan J.; Alliegro, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleolinus is an RNA-rich compartment, closely apposed to or embedded within the nucleolus. Discovered over 150 y ago, fewer than two dozen articles have been published on the nucleolinus, probably because complex histochemical stains are required for its visualization in the great majority of cells. The nucleolinus has been reported in invertebrate oocytes, mammalian and amphibian epithelial cells, neurons, and several transformed cell lines. A prominent nucleolinus, clearly visible with transmitted light microscopes at 10× magnification, is present in each oocyte of the surf clam, Spisula solidissima. We observed a consistent relationship between the nucleolinus and the developing meiotic apparatus following Spisula oocyte activation. Through sonication and sucrose gradient fractionation of purified oocyte nuclei, we isolated nucleolini, extracted their RNA, and prepared an in situ riboprobe (NLi-1), which is associated specifically with the nucleolinus, confirming its unique composition. Other in situ observations revealed a NLi-1 and nucleolinar association with the developing spindle and centrosomes. Laser microsurgery that targeted the nucleolinus resulted in failed meiotic cell division in parthenogenetically activated oocytes and failed mitosis in fertilized oocytes. Although the nucleolinus may be a forgotten organelle, its demonstrated role in spindle formation suggests it deserves renewed attention. PMID:20643950

  3. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  4. DSK1, a novel kinesin-related protein from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis that is involved in anaphase spindle elongation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have identified an 80-kD protein that is involved in mitotic spindle elongation in the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. DSK1 (Diatom Spindle Kinesin 1) was isolated using a peptide antibody raised against a conserved region in the motor domain of the kinesin superfamily. By sequence homology, DSK1 belongs to the central motor family of kinesin- related proteins. Immunoblots using an antibody raised against a non- conserved region of DSK1 show that DSK1 is greatly enriched in mitotic spindle preparations. Anti-DSK1 stains in diatom central spindle with a bias toward the midzone, and staining is retained in the spindle midzone during spindle elongation in vitro. Furthermore, preincubation with anti-DSK1 blocks function in an in vitro spindle elongation assay. This inhibition of spindle elongation can be rescued by preincubating concurrently with the fusion protein against which anti-DSK1 was raised. We conclude that DSK1 is involved in spindle elongation and is likely to be responsible for pushing hal-spindles apart in the spindle midzone. PMID:8636234

  5. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    CpG‐island methylator phenotype (CIMP)‐positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole‐exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two‐dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP‐negative and 14 CIMP‐positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non‐cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule‐associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non‐synonymous single‐nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP‐positive RCCs, whereas CIMP‐negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP‐positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the “The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10−6),” “Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10−6)” and “Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10−6)” pathways. Quantitative RT‐PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP‐positive than in CIMP‐negative RCCs. All CIMP‐positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential

  6. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  7. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  8. Tousled-like kinase in a microbial eukaryote regulates spindle assembly and S-phase progression by interacting with Aurora kinase and chromatin assembly factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin; Gourguechon, Stéphane; Wang, Ching C

    2007-11-01

    The Tousled-like kinases are an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins implicated in DNA repair, DNA replication and mitosis in metazoans and plants. Their absence from the yeasts and other eukaryotic 'microbes' suggests a specific role for them in the development of multicellular organisms. In this study, two closely related Tousled-like kinase homologs, TLK1 and TLK2, were identified in Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular protozoan parasite. Only TLK1 plays an essential role in cell growth, and a deficiency in TLK1 led to an enrichment of S-phase cells, defective spindle formation and aberrant chromosome segregation. Although both TLK proteins localize to the nucleus, only TLK1 also concentrates in the spindle poles during mitosis. Both TLK proteins are phosphorylated by the Aurora kinase (AUK1), and both can autophosphorylate and phosphorylate histone H3 and the chromatin assembly factors Asf1A and Asf1B in vitro, but only TLK1 is autophosphorylated and capable of oligomerizing and interacting with AUK1, Asf1A and Asf1B in vivo. These discrepancies between the two TLK proteins can be attributed to minor differences between their N- and C-terminal sequences. In summary, TLK1 cooperates with Aurora kinase to regulate spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, and it performs a role in DNA replication probably by regulating histone modification in trypanosomes. PMID:17940067

  9. A splicing alteration of 4.1R pre-mRNA generates 2 protein isoforms with distinct assembly to spindle poles in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Delhommeau, François; Vasseur-Godbillon, Corinne; Leclerc, Philippe; Schischmanoff, Pierre-Olivier; Croisille, Laure; Rince, Patricia; Morinière, Madeleine; Benz, Edward J; Tchernia, Gil; Tamagnini, Gabriel; Ribeiro, Leticia; Delaunay, Jean; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2002-10-01

    The C-terminal region of erythroid cytoskeletal protein 4.1R, encoded by exons 20 and 21, contains a binding site for nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a protein needed for the formation and stabilization of the mitotic spindle. We have previously described a splicing mutation of 4.1R that yields 2 isoforms: One, CO.1, lacks most of exon 20-encoded peptide and carries a missense C-terminal sequence. The other, CO.2, lacks exon 20-encoded C-terminal sequence, but retains the normal exon 21-encoded C-terminal sequence. Knowing that both shortened proteins are expressed in red cells and assemble to the membrane skeleton, we asked whether they would ensure 4.1R mitotic function in dividing cells. We show here that CO.2, but not CO.1, assembles to spindle poles, and colocalizes with NuMA in erythroid and lymphoid mutated cells, but none of these isoforms interact with NuMA in vitro. In microtubule-destabilizing conditions, again only CO.2 localizes to the centrosomes. These data suggest that the stability of 4.1R association with centrosomes requires an intact C-terminal end, either for a proper conformation of the protein, for a direct binding to an unknown centrosome-cytoskeletal network, or for both. We also found that 4.1G, a ubiquitous homolog of 4.1R, is present in mutated as well as control cells and that its C-terminal region binds efficiently to NuMA, suggesting that in fact mitotic spindles host a mixture of the two 4.1 family members. These findings led to the postulate that the coexpression at the spindle poles of 2 related proteins, 4.1R and 4.1G, might reflect a functional redundancy in mitotic cells. PMID:12239178

  10. Analysis of Coiled-Coil Interactions between Core Proteins of the Spindle Pole Body

    SciTech Connect

    Zizlsperger, N.; Malashkevich, V; Pillay, S; Keating, A

    2008-01-01

    The spindle pole body (SPB) is a multiprotein complex that organizes microtubules in yeast. Due to its large size and association with the nuclear membrane, little is known about its detailed structure. In particular, although many SPB components and some of the interactions between them have been identified, the molecular details of how most of these interactions occur are not known. The prevalence of predicted coiled-coil regions in SPB proteins suggests that some interactions may occur via coiled coils. Here this hypothesis is supported by biochemical characterization of isolated coiled-coil peptides derived from SPB proteins. Formation of four strongly self-associating coiled-coil complexes from Spc29, Spc42, and Spc72 was demonstrated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Many weaker self- and heteroassociations were also detected by CD, FRET, and/or cross-linking. The thermal stabilities of nine candidate homooligomers were assessed; six unfolded cooperatively with melting temperatures ranging from <11 to >50 C. Solution studies established that coiled-coil peptides derived from Spc42 and Spc72 form parallel dimers, and this was confirmed for Spc42 by a high-resolution crystal structure. These data contribute to a growing body of knowledge that will ultimately provide a detailed model of the SPB structure.

  11. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Konstantina; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Bryan, Glenn J; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection.

  12. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection. PMID:26937634

  13. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Konstantina; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Bryan, Glenn J; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection. PMID:26937634

  14. Neural networks with dynamical synapses: From mixed-mode oscillations and spindles to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Goltsev, A. V.; Lopes, M. A.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of short-term synaptic depression (STSD) and other forms of synaptic plasticity is a topical problem in neuroscience. Here we study the role of STSD in the formation of complex patterns of brain rhythms. We use a cortical circuit model of neural networks composed of irregular spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons having type 1 and 2 excitability and stochastic dynamics. In the model, neurons form a sparsely connected network and their spontaneous activity is driven by random spikes representing synaptic noise. Using simulations and analytical calculations, we found that if the STSD is absent, the neural network shows either asynchronous behavior or regular network oscillations depending on the noise level. In networks with STSD, changing parameters of synaptic plasticity and the noise level, we observed transitions to complex patters of collective activity: mixed-mode and spindle oscillations, bursts of collective activity, and chaotic behavior. Interestingly, these patterns are stable in a certain range of the parameters and separated by critical boundaries. Thus, the parameters of synaptic plasticity can play a role of control parameters or switchers between different network states. However, changes of the parameters caused by a disease may lead to dramatic impairment of ongoing neural activity. We analyze the chaotic neural activity by use of the 0-1 test for chaos (Gottwald, G. & Melbourne, I., 2004) and show that it has a collective nature.

  15. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  16. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays progression into anaphase until all chromosomes have aligned on the metaphase plate by inhibiting Cdc20, the mitotic co-activator of the APC/C. Mad2 and BubR1 bind and inhibit Cdc20, thereby forming the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which can bind stably to the APC/C. Whether MCC formation per se is sufficient for a functional SAC or MCC association with the APC/C is required remains unclear. Here, we analyze the role of two conserved motifs in Cdc20, IR and C-Box, in binding of the MCC to the APC/C. Mutants in both motifs assemble the MCC normally, but IR motif integrity is particularly important for stable binding to the APC/C. Cells expressing Cdc20 with a mutated IR motif have a compromised SAC, as uninhibited Cdc20 can compete with the MCC for APC/C binding and activate it. We thus show that stable MCC association with the APC/C is critical for a functional SAC. PMID:24464857

  17. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-03-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  18. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-09-30

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established.

  19. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  20. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  1. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  2. RAB-11 Permissively Regulates Spindle Alignment by Modulating Metaphase Microtubule Dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haining; Squirrell, Jayne M.

    2008-01-01

    Alignment of the mitotic spindle along a preformed axis of polarity is crucial for generating cell diversity in many organisms, yet little is known about the role of the endomembrane system in this process. RAB-11 is a small GTPase enriched in recycling endosomes. When we depleted RAB-11 by RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans, the spindle of the one-cell embryo failed to align along the axis of polarity in metaphase and underwent violent movements in anaphase. The distance between astral microtubules ends and the anterior cortex was significantly increased in rab-11(RNAi) embryos specifically during metaphase, possibly accounting for the observed spindle alignment defects. Additionally, we found that normal ER morphology requires functional RAB-11, particularly during metaphase. We hypothesize that RAB-11, in conjunction with the ER, acts to regulate cell cycle–specific changes in astral microtubule length to ensure proper spindle alignment in Caenorhabditis elegans early embryos. PMID:18385514

  3. A ligand-independent integrin β1 mechanosensory complex guides spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Petridou, Nicoletta I.; Skourides, Paris A.

    2016-01-01

    Control of spindle orientation is a fundamental process for embryonic development, morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, while defects are associated with tumorigenesis and other diseases. Force sensing is one of the mechanisms through which division orientation is determined. Here we show that integrin β1 plays a critical role in this process, becoming activated at the lateral regions of the cell cortex in a ligand-independent manner. This activation is force dependent and polar, correlating with the spindle capture sites. Inhibition of integrin β1 activation on the cortex and disruption of its asymmetric distribution leads to spindle misorientation, even when cell adhesion is β1 independent. Examining downstream targets reveals that a cortical mechanosensory complex forms on active β1, and regulates spindle orientation irrespective of cell context. We propose that ligand-independent integrin β1 activation is a conserved mechanism that allows cell responses to external stimuli. PMID:26952307

  4. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established. PMID:24077015

  5. Manipulating sleep spindles--expanding views on sleep, memory, and disease.

    PubMed

    Astori, Simone; Wimmer, Ralf D; Lüthi, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Sleep spindles are distinctive electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations emerging during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) that have been implicated in multiple brain functions, including sleep quality, sensory gating, learning, and memory. Despite considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying these neuronal rhythms, their function remains poorly understood and current views are largely based on correlational evidence. Here, we review recent studies in humans and rodents that have begun to broaden our understanding of the role of spindles in the normal and disordered brain. We show that newly identified molecular substrates of spindle oscillations, in combination with evolving technological progress, offer novel targets and tools to selectively manipulate spindles and dissect their role in sleep-dependent processes.

  6. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  7. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  8. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Kanona, Hala; Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Kumar, Gaurav; Chawda, Sanjiv; Khalil, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively. PMID:25628909

  9. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner. PMID:27475601

  10. The mitotic spindle and associated membranes in the closed mitosis of trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Karla Consort; Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene

    2002-06-01

    In the present work, we followed the several phases of Tritrichomonas foetus and Trichomonas vaginalis cell cycles using immunofluorescence, serial thin sections, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, and transmission electron microscopy. In motile trichomonad cells or in pseudocyst forms, the nuclear envelope persists throughout mitosis, and the spindle is extranuclear. We found three types of spindle microtubules: pole-to-nucleus microtubules which are attached to the nuclear envelope, pole-to-pole microtubules forming a cylindrical, cytoplasmic groove on the nuclear compartment in pseudocysts of T. foetus cells, and pole-to-cytosol microtubules which extend freely into the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that: (1) in T. foetus, the spindle is assembled from an MTOC located at the base of the costa, underneath one of the basal bodies; (2) the spindle presents an unusual arc shape during the initial phases of mitosis in motile trophozoites; (3) the spindle microtubules are glutamylated, but not acetylated; (4) several membranes similar to those of the endoplasmic reticulum follow the spindle microtubules; (5) finger-like projections extend from the nucleus towards the cell poles in pseudocysts and multinucleated cells; and (6) vesicles formed in between the two nuclear membranes are seen in the course of mitosis in both trophozoite and pseudocyst forms. PMID:12206655

  11. Density of muscle spindles in prosimian shoulder muscles reflects locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the density of muscle spindles in shoulder muscles and the locomotor mode in three species of prosimian primates: the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), Garnett's galago (Otolemur garnettii), and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The shoulder muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, teres minor, and subscapularis) were embedded in celloidin and cut into transverse serial thin sections (40 microm); then, every tenth section was stained using the Azan staining technique. The relative muscle weights and the density of the muscle spindles were determined. The slow loris muscles were heavier and had sparser muscle spindles, as compared to Garnett's galago. These features suggest that the shoulder muscles of the slow loris are more adapted to generating propulsive force and stabilizing the shoulder joint during locomotion and play a less controlling role in forelimb movements. In contrast, Garnett's galago possessed smaller shoulder muscles with denser spindles that are suitable for the control of more rapid locomotor movements. The mean relative weight and the mean spindle density in the shoulder muscles of the ring-tailed lemur were between those of the other primates, suggesting that the spindle density is not simply a consequence of taxonomic status. PMID:17361082

  12. Density of muscle spindles in prosimian shoulder muscles reflects locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the density of muscle spindles in shoulder muscles and the locomotor mode in three species of prosimian primates: the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), Garnett's galago (Otolemur garnettii), and the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The shoulder muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, teres minor, and subscapularis) were embedded in celloidin and cut into transverse serial thin sections (40 microm); then, every tenth section was stained using the Azan staining technique. The relative muscle weights and the density of the muscle spindles were determined. The slow loris muscles were heavier and had sparser muscle spindles, as compared to Garnett's galago. These features suggest that the shoulder muscles of the slow loris are more adapted to generating propulsive force and stabilizing the shoulder joint during locomotion and play a less controlling role in forelimb movements. In contrast, Garnett's galago possessed smaller shoulder muscles with denser spindles that are suitable for the control of more rapid locomotor movements. The mean relative weight and the mean spindle density in the shoulder muscles of the ring-tailed lemur were between those of the other primates, suggesting that the spindle density is not simply a consequence of taxonomic status.

  13. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M.; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  14. Fission yeast pkl1 is a kinesin-related protein involved in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, A L; LeDizet, M; Cande, W Z

    1996-01-01

    We have used anti-peptide antibodies raised against highly conserved regions of the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesin-related proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the identification of a new kinesin-related protein, which we have named pkl1. Sequence homology and domain organization place pkl1 in the Kar3/ncd subfamily of kinesin-related proteins. Bacterially expressed pkl1 fusion proteins display microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity, nucleotide-sensitive binding, and bundling of microtubules. Immunofluorescence studies with affinity-purified antibodies indicate that the pkl1 protein localizes to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle. Pkl1 null mutants are viable but have increased sensitivity to microtubule-disrupting drugs. Disruption of pkl1+ suppresses mutations in another kinesin-related protein, cut7, which is known to act in the spindle. Overexpression of pkl1 to very high levels causes a similar phenotype to that seen in cut7 mutants: V-shaped and star-shaped microtubule structures are observed, which we interpret to be spindles with unseparated spindle poles. These observations suggest that pkl1 and cut7 provide opposing forces in the spindle. We propose that pkl1 functions as a microtubule-dependent motor that is involved in microtubule organization in the mitotic spindle. Images PMID:8898367

  15. Cep55 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Guo, Lei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Cep55 is a relatively novel member of the centrosomal protein family. Here, we show that Cep55 is expressed in mouse oocytes from the germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages. Immuostaining and confocal microscopy as well as time lapse live imaging after injection of mRNA encoding fusion protein of Cep55 and GFP identified that Cep55 was localized to the meiotic spindle, especially to the spindle poles at metaphase, while it was concentrated at the midbody in telophase in meiotic oocytes. Knockdown of Cep55 by specific siRNA injection caused the dissociation of γ-tubulin from the spindle poles, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, leading to metaphase I arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Correspondingly, cyclin B accumulation and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation were observed in Cep55 knockdown oocytes. Our results suggest that Cep55 may act as an MTOC-associated protein regulating spindle organization, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:26582107

  16. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance. PMID:26057687

  17. The deubiquitinating enzyme complex BRISC is required for proper mitotic spindle assembly in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kaowen; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaojian; Hong, Ruisha; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Hua; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; He, Qihua; Zheng, Duo; Tang, Jun; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) negatively regulate protein ubiquitination and play an important role in diverse physiological processes, including mitotic division. The BRCC36 isopeptidase complex (BRISC) is a DUB that is specific for lysine 63–linked ubiquitin hydrolysis; however, its biological function remains largely undefined. Here, we identify a critical role for BRISC in the control of mitotic spindle assembly in cultured mammalian cells. BRISC is a microtubule (MT)-associated protein complex that predominantly localizes to the minus ends of K-fibers and spindle poles and directly binds to MTs; importantly, BRISC promotes the assembly of functional bipolar spindle by deubiquitinating the essential spindle assembly factor nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA). The deubiquitination of NuMA regulates its interaction with dynein and importin-β, which are required for its function in spindle assembly. Collectively, these results uncover BRISC as an important regulator of the mitotic spindle assembly and cell division, and have important implications for the development of anticancer drugs targeting BRISC. PMID:26195665

  18. The Contribution of Thalamocortical Core and Matrix Pathways to Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles arise from the interaction of thalamic and cortical neurons. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) inhibit thalamocortical neurons, which in turn excite the TRN and cortical neurons. A fundamental principle of anatomical organization of the thalamocortical projections is the presence of two pathways: the diffuse matrix pathway and the spatially selective core pathway. Cortical layers are differentially targeted by these two pathways with matrix projections synapsing in superficial layers and core projections impinging on middle layers. Based on this anatomical observation, we propose that spindles can be classified into two classes, those arising from the core pathway and those arising from the matrix pathway, although this does not exclude the fact that some spindles might combine both pathways at the same time. We find evidence for this hypothesis in EEG/MEG studies, intracranial recordings, and computational models that incorporate this difference. This distinction will prove useful in accounting for the multiple functions attributed to spindles, in that spindles of different types might act on local and widespread spatial scales. Because spindle mechanisms are often hijacked in epilepsy and schizophrenia, the classification proposed in this review might provide valuable information in defining which pathways have gone awry in these neurological disorders. PMID:27144033

  19. The far C-terminus of MCAK regulates its conformation and spindle pole focusing

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Hailing; Carnes, Stephanie K.; Moe, Christina; Walczak, Claire E.; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure proper spindle assembly, microtubule (MT) dynamics needs to be spatially regulated within the cell. The kinesin-13 MCAK is a potent MT depolymerase with a complex subcellular localization, yet how MCAK spatial regulation contributes to spindle assembly is not understood. Here we show that the far C-terminus of MCAK plays a critical role in regulating MCAK conformation, subspindle localization, and spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Alteration of MCAK conformation by the point mutation E715A/E716A in the far C-terminus increased MCAK targeting to the poles and reduced MT lifetimes, which induced spindles with unfocused poles. These effects were phenocopied by the Aurora A phosphomimetic mutation, S719E. Furthermore, addition of the kinesin-14 XCTK2 to spindle assembly reactions rescued the unfocused-pole phenotype. Collectively our work shows how the regional targeting of MCAK regulates MT dynamics, highlighting the idea that multiple phosphorylation pathways of MCAK cooperate to spatially control MT dynamics to maintain spindle architecture. PMID:26941326

  20. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-06-09

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance.

  1. Mitotic spindle asymmetry in rodents and primates: 2D vs. 3D measurement methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Delaunay, Delphine; Robini, Marc C.; Dehay, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Recent data have uncovered that spindle size asymmetry (SSA) is a key component of asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the mouse cerebral cortex (Delaunay et al., 2014). In the present study we show that SSA is independent of spindle orientation and also occurs during cortical progenitor divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the macaque cerebral cortex, pointing to a conserved mechanism in the mammalian lineage. Because SSA magnitude is smaller in cortical precursors than in invertebrate neuroblasts, the unambiguous demonstration of volume differences between the two half spindles is considered to require 3D reconstruction of the mitotic spindle (Delaunay et al., 2014). Although straightforward, the 3D analysis of SSA is time consuming, which is likely to hinder SSA identification and prevent further explorations of SSA related mechanisms in generating ACD. We therefore set out to develop an alternative method for accurately measuring spindle asymmetry. Based on the mathematically demonstrated linear relationship between 2D and 3D analysis, we show that 2D assessment of spindle size in metaphase cells is as accurate and reliable as 3D reconstruction provided a specific procedure is applied. We have examined the experimental accuracy of the two methods by applying them to different sets of in vivo and in vitro biological data, including mouse and primate cortical precursors. Linear regression analysis demonstrates that the results from 2D and 3D reconstructions are equally powerful. We therefore provide a reliable and efficient technique to measure SSA in mammalian cells. PMID:25709568

  2. Thoracolumbar fascia does not influence proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscle spindles in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G

    2009-01-01

    The thoracolumbar fascia attaches to the lumbar spinous processes and encloses the paraspinal muscles to form a muscle compartment. Because muscle spindles can respond to transverse forces applied at a muscle’s surface, we were interested in the mechanical effects this fascia may have on proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscles during vertebral movement. The discharge of paraspinal muscle spindles at rest and in response to muscle history were investigated in the presence and absence of the thoracolumbar fascia in anesthetized cats. Muscle-history was induced by positioning the L6 vertebra in conditioning directions that lengthened and shortened the paraspinal muscles. The vertebra was then returned to an intermediate position for testing the spindles. Neither resting discharge (P= 0.49) nor the effects of muscle history (P>0.30) was significantly different with the fascia intact vs. removed. Our data showed that the thoracolumbar fascia did not influence proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscles spindles during small passive vertebral movements in cats. In addition, comparison of the transverse threshold pressures needed to stimulate our sample of muscle spindles in the cat with the thoracolumbar fascia compartmental pressures measured in humans during previous studies suggests that the thoracolumbar fascia likely does not affect proprioceptive signaling from lumbar paraspinal muscle spindles in humans. PMID:19627391

  3. The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study

    PubMed Central

    Mednick, Sara C.; McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Walsh, James K.; Wamsley, Erin; Paulus, Martin; Kanady, Jennifer C.; Drummond, Sean P.A.

    2013-01-01

    An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention. Using zolpidem (ambien), a short-acting GABAA agonist hypnotic, we show increased sleep spindle density and decreased REM sleep, compared to placebo and sodium oxybate (xyrem). Naps with increased spindles produced significantly better verbal memory and significantly worse perceptual learning, but did not affect motor learning. The experimental spindles were similar to control spindles in amplitude and frequency suggesting that the experimental intervention enhanced normal sleep processes. Furthermore, using statistical methods, we demonstrate for the first time a critical role of spindles in human hippocampal memory performance. The gains in memory consolidation exceed sleep alone or control conditions, and demonstrate the potential for targeted, exceptional memory enhancement in healthy adults with pharmacologically modified sleep. PMID:23467365

  4. Katanin maintains meiotic metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle structure in vivo and has multiple effects on microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    McNally, Karen; Berg, Evan; Cortes, Daniel B; Hernandez, Veronica; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles requires both MEI-1 and MEI-2 subunits of the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. Strong loss-of-function mutants assemble apolar intersecting microtubule arrays, whereas weaker mutants assemble bipolar meiotic spindles that are longer than wild type. To determine whether katanin is also required for spindle maintenance, we monitored metaphase I spindles after a fast-acting mei-1(ts) mutant was shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Within 4 min of temperature shift, bivalents moved off the metaphase plate, and microtubule bundles within the spindle lengthened and developed a high degree of curvature. Spindles eventually lost bipolar structure. Immunofluorescence of embryos fixed at increasing temperature indicated that MEI-1 was lost from spindle microtubules before loss of ASPM-1, indicating that MEI-1 and ASPM-1 act independently at spindle poles. We quantified the microtubule-severing activity of purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes corresponding to six different point mutations and found a linear relationship between microtubule disassembly rate and meiotic spindle length. Previous work showed that katanin is required for severing at points where two microtubules intersect in vivo. We show that purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes preferentially sever at intersections between two microtubules and directly bundle microtubules in vitro. These activities could promote parallel/antiparallel microtubule organization in meiotic spindles. PMID:24501424

  5. Age-related changes in sleep spindles characteristics during daytime recovery following a 25-hour sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosinvil, T.; Lafortune, M.; Sekerovic, Z.; Bouchard, M.; Dubé, J.; Latulipe-Loiselle, A.; Martin, N.; Lina, J. M.; Carrier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11–15 Hz; >0.5 s) help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g., daytime), even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups. Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 y ± 5.0) and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1) healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artifact-free Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min), amplitude (μV), frequency (Hz), and duration (s) were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears) derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure modulates spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep. PMID

  6. Comparison of a Four-Section Spindle and Stomacher for Efficacy of Detaching Microorganisms from Fresh Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Kyun; Kim, Soo-Ji; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the effect of the spindle and stomacher for detaching microorganisms from fresh vegetables. The spindle is an apparatus for detaching microorganisms from food surfaces, which was developed in our laboratory. When processed with the spindle, food samples were barely disrupted, the original shape was maintained, and the diluent was clear, facilitating further detection analysis more easily than with stomacher treatment. The four-section spindle consists of four sample bag containers (A, B, C, and D) to economize time and effort by simultaneously processing four samples. The aerobic plate counts (APC) of 50 fresh vegetable samples were measured following spindle and stomacher treatment. Correlations between the two methods for each section of the spindle and stomacher were very high (R(2) = 0.9828 [spindle compartment A; Sp A], 0.9855 [Sp B], 0.9848 [Sp C], and 0.9851 [Sp D]). One-tenth milliliter of foodborne pathogens suspensions was inoculated onto surfaces of food samples, and ratios of spindle-to-stomacher enumerations were close to 1.00 log CFU/g between every section of the spindle and stomacher. One of the greatest features of the spindle is that it can treat large-sized samples that exceed 200 g. Uncut whole apples, green peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes were processed by the spindle and by hand massaging by 2 min. Large-sized samples were also assayed for aerobic plate count and recovery of the three foodborne pathogens, and the difference between each section of the spindle and hand massaging was not significant (P > 0.05). This study demonstrated that the spindle apparatus can be an alternative device for detaching microorganisms from all fresh vegetable samples for microbiological analysis by the food processing industry.

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Body Is a Dynamic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Tennessee J.; Pearson, Chad G.; Bloom, Kerry; Davis, Trisha N.

    2003-01-01

    During spindle pole body (SPB) duplication, the new SPB is assembled at a distinct site adjacent to the old SPB. Using quantitative fluorescence methods, we studied the assembly and dynamics of the core structural SPB component Spc110p. The SPB core exhibits both exchange and growth in a cell cycle-dependent manner. During G1/S phase, the old SPB exchanges ∼50% of old Spc110p for new Spc110p. In G2 little Spc110p is exchangeable. Thus, Spc110p is dynamic during G1/S and becomes stable during G2. The SPB incorporates additional Spc110p in late G2 and M phases; this growth is followed by reduction in the next G1. Spc110p addition to the SPBs (growth) also occurs in response to G2 and mitotic arrests but not during a G1 arrest. Our results reveal several dynamic features of the SPB core: cell cycle-dependent growth and reduction, growth in response to cell cycle arrests, and exchange of Spc110p during SPB duplication. Moreover, rather than being considered a conservative or dispersive process, the assembly of Spc110p into the SPB is more readily considered in terms of growth and exchange. PMID:12925780

  8. Robust control of mitotic spindle orientation in the developing epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor cells must balance self-amplification and production of differentiated progeny during development and homeostasis. In the epidermis, progenitors divide symmetrically to increase surface area and asymmetrically to promote stratification. In this study, we show that individual epidermal cells can undergo both types of division, and therefore, the balance is provided by the sum of individual cells’ choices. In addition, we define two control points for determining a cell’s mode of division. First is the expression of the mouse Inscuteable gene, which is sufficient to drive asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, there is robust control of division orientation as excessive ACDs are prevented by a change in the localization of NuMA, an effector of spindle orientation. Finally, we show that p63, a transcriptional regulator of stratification, does not control either of these processes. These data have uncovered two important regulatory points controlling ACD in the epidermis and allow a framework for analysis of how external cues control this important choice. PMID:21098114

  9. Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kurdziel, Laura; Duclos, Kasey; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2013-10-22

    Despite the fact that midday naps are characteristic of early childhood, very little is understood about the structure and function of these sleep bouts. Given that sleep benefits memory in young adults, it is possible that naps serve a similar function for young children. However, children transition from biphasic to monophasic sleep patterns in early childhood, eliminating the nap from their daily sleep schedule. As such, naps may contain mostly light sleep stages and serve little function for learning and memory during this transitional age. Lacking scientific understanding of the function of naps in early childhood, policy makers may eliminate preschool classroom nap opportunities due to increasing curriculum demands. Here we show evidence that classroom naps support learning in preschool children by enhancing memories acquired earlier in the day compared with equivalent intervals spent awake. This nap benefit is greatest for children who nap habitually, regardless of age. Performance losses when nap-deprived are not recovered during subsequent overnight sleep. Physiological recordings of naps support a role of sleep spindles in memory performance. These results suggest that distributed sleep is critical in early learning; when short-term memory stores are limited, memory consolidation must take place frequently. PMID:24062429

  10. Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Kurdziel, Laura; Duclos, Kasey; Spencer, Rebecca M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that midday naps are characteristic of early childhood, very little is understood about the structure and function of these sleep bouts. Given that sleep benefits memory in young adults, it is possible that naps serve a similar function for young children. However, children transition from biphasic to monophasic sleep patterns in early childhood, eliminating the nap from their daily sleep schedule. As such, naps may contain mostly light sleep stages and serve little function for learning and memory during this transitional age. Lacking scientific understanding of the function of naps in early childhood, policy makers may eliminate preschool classroom nap opportunities due to increasing curriculum demands. Here we show evidence that classroom naps support learning in preschool children by enhancing memories acquired earlier in the day compared with equivalent intervals spent awake. This nap benefit is greatest for children who nap habitually, regardless of age. Performance losses when nap-deprived are not recovered during subsequent overnight sleep. Physiological recordings of naps support a role of sleep spindles in memory performance. These results suggest that distributed sleep is critical in early learning; when short-term memory stores are limited, memory consolidation must take place frequently. PMID:24062429

  11. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Diril, M Kasim; Bisteau, Xavier; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  12. Disturbance Rejection Control of an Electromagnetic Bearing Spindle

    SciTech Connect

    PETTEYS,REBECCA; PARKER,GORDON

    2000-08-31

    The force exerted on the rotor by an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is determined by the current flow in the magnet coils. This force can be controlled very precisely, making magnetic bearings a potential benefit for grinding, where cutting forces act as external disturbances on the shaft, resulting in degraded part finish. It is possible to achieve precise shaft positioning, reduce vibration of the shaft caused by external disturbances, and even damp out resonant modes. Adaptive control is an appealing approach for these systems because the controller can tune itself to account for an unknown periodic disturbance, such as cutting or grinding forces, injected into the system. In this paper the authors show how one adaptive control algorithm can be applied to an AMB system with a periodic disturbance applied to the rotor. An adaptive algorithm was developed and implemented in both simulation and hardware, yielding significant reductions in rotor displacement in the presence of an external excitation. Ultimately, this type of algorithm could be applied to a magnetic bearing grinder to reduce unwanted motion of the spindle which leads to poor part finish and chatter.

  13. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  14. Bi-directional communication with the cumulus cells is involved in the deficiency of XY oocytes in the components essential for proper second meiotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baozeng; Noohi, Saeid; Shin, Jonghyun S; Tan, Seang Lin; Taketo, Teruko

    2014-01-15

    The oocyte becomes competent for embryonic development by involving mutual communication with cumulus cells (CCs) during folliculogenesis. How this communication takes place under physiological conditions is not fully understood. Current study examined oocyte-CCs communication in the XY sex-revered female mouse. We have previously found that the XY oocyte is defective in its cytoplasm, causing abnormal MII-spindle assembly and a failure in embryonic development. Our present study showed that transcript levels of Pfkp, Pkm2 and Ldh1 involved in glycolysis were lower in the CCs surrounding XY oocytes than in those surrounding XX oocytes. ATP contents in XY oocytes were also lower than those in XX oocytes, suggesting that lower glycolytic gene expression in CCs resulted in lower ATP contents in the enclosed oocyte. Co-culture of oocytectomized CC-oocyte complexes (COCs) with denuded oocytes showed that XY oocytes were less efficient than XX oocytes in promoting glycolytic gene expression in CCs. Furthermore, both glycolytic gene expression levels in CCs and ATP contents in oocytes of XY COCs increased to similar levels to those of XX COCs after culture for 20h in the presence of milrinone (=preincubation), which prevented spontaneous oocyte maturation. By increasing ATP levels in XY oocytes by either COC preincubation or ATP microinjection into oocytes prior to in vitro maturation, an improvement in MII-spindle assembly was observed. We conclude that the XY oocyte produces lesser amounts of paracrine factors that affect its companion CCs, which in turn make the ooplasm deficient in its components, including ATP, essential for MII-spindle assembly. PMID:24247007

  15. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Régis E.; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiotic entry, liberating chromosomes to begin homologous pairing. Surprisingly, most chromosome pairs were found to begin their spindle interactions with incorrect kMT attachments. Ipl1 released these improper connections while Mps1 triggered the formation of new force-generating microtubule attachments. This microtubule release and reattachment cycle can prevent catastrophic chromosome segregation errors in meiosis. PMID:23371552

  16. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  17. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  18. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  19. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential). PMID:261653

  20. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  1. Abortion for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N E

    1979-07-25

    I wish to thank Dr. Pauline Bennett for her reply (NZ Med J, 13 June). She has demonstrated well that in dealing with sensitive difficult issues such as abortion for fetal abnormality, the one thing the doctor is not recommended to do is to speak the truth] I am prompted to write this letter for 2 reasons. Firstly, the excellent letter written by Dr. A. M. Rutherford (NZ Med J, 13 June) on the subject of abortion stated, "The most disturbing feature about the whole controversy is the 'blunting of our conscience'." When the doctors are not encouraged to be honest with patients then indeed our conscience has been blunted. Secondly, I watched Holocaust last night, and cannot refrain from stating that I see frightening parallels between our liberal abortion policy and the activities of the Nazis. As I watched the "mental patients" being herded into the shed for gassing by the polite, tidy, white coated medical staff, and then heard the compassionate, sensitive, letter of the hospital authorities to the relatives of the deceased, the parallel became obvious. The mental patients were weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic; the unborn are weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic. The hospital authority's letter was acceptable in many ways, acceptable except that its words bore no relation to the truth. It is said that the "first casualty of war is the truth". Whether that war involves the Jews, or the insane, or the unborn, the statement would seem correct.

  2. Medroxyprogesterone acetate is associated with increased sleep spindles during non-rapid eye movement sleep in women referred for polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Plante, David T; Goldstein, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    Sleep spindles are characteristic electroencephalographic waveforms that may play functionally significant roles in sleep-dependent memory consolidation, cortical development, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Circumstantial evidence has connected endogenous progesterone and its metabolites to the production of sleep spindles; however, the effects of exogenous progestins on sleep spindles have not been described in women. We examined differences in sleep spindle frequency and morphology in a clinical sample of women (n=21) referred for polysomnography taking depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), relative to a matched comparison group. Consistent with our hypotheses, women taking MPA demonstrated significantly higher sleep spindle density and maximal amplitude relative to comparison patients. Our results suggest that progestins potentiate the generation of sleep spindles, which may have significant implications for research that examines the role of these waveforms in learning, development, and mental illness.

  3. Medroxyprogesterone acetate is associated with increased sleep spindles during non-rapid eye movement sleep in women referred for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep spindles are characteristic electroencephalographic waveforms that may play functionally significant roles in sleep-dependent memory consolidation, cortical development, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Circumstantial evidence has connected endogenous progesterone and its metabolites to the production of sleep spindles, however, the effects of exogenous progestins on sleep spindles have not been described in women. We examined differences in sleep spindle frequency and morphology in a clinical sample of women (n=21) referred for polysomnography taking depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), relative to a matched comparison group. Consistent with our hypotheses, women taking MPA demonstrated significantly higher sleep spindle density and maximal amplitude relative to comparison patients. Our results suggest that progestins potentiate the generation of sleep spindles, which may have significant implications for research that examines the role of these waveforms in learning, development, and mental illness. PMID:24054762

  4. Use of abnormal preprophase bands to decipher division plane determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C.; Cyr, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many premitotic plant cells possess a cortical preprophase band of microtubules and actin filaments that encircles the nucleus. In vacuolated cells, the preprophase band is visibly connected to the nucleus by a cytoplasmic raft of actin filaments and microtubules termed the phragmosome. Typically, the location of the preprophase band and phragmosome corresponds to, and thus is thought to influence, the location of the cell division plane. To better understand the function of the preprophase band and phragmosome in orienting division, we used a green fluorescent protein-based microtubule reporter protein to observe mitosis in living tobacco bright yellow 2 cells possessing unusual preprophase bands. Observations of mitosis in these unusual cells support the involvement of the preprophase band/phragmosome in properly positioning the preprophase nucleus, influencing spindle orientation such that the cytokinetic phragmoplast initially grows in an appropriate direction, and delineating a region in the cell cortex that attracts microtubules and directs later stages of phragmoplast growth. Thus, the preprophase band/phragmosome appears to perform several interrelated functions to orient the division plane. However, functional information associated with the preprophase band is not always used or needed and there appears to be an age or distance-dependent character to the information. Cells treated with the anti-actin drug, latrunculin B, are still able to position the preprophase nucleus suggesting that microtubules may play a dominant role in premitotic positioning. Furthermore, in treated cells, spindle location and phragmoplast insertion are frequently abnormal suggesting that actin plays a significant role in nuclear anchoring and phragmoplast guidance. Thus, the microtubule and actin components of the preprophase band/phragmosome execute complementary activities to ensure proper orientation of the division plane.

  5. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  6. Inhibition recruitment in prefrontal cortex during sleep spindles and gating of hippocampal inputs

    PubMed Central

    Peyrache, Adrien; Battaglia, Francesco P.; Destexhe, Alain

    2011-01-01

    During light slow-wave sleep, the thalamo-cortical network oscillates in waxing-and-waning patterns at about 7 to 14 Hz and lasting for 500 ms to 3 s, called spindles, with the thalamus rhythmically sending strong excitatory volleys to the cortex. Concurrently, the hippocampal activity is characterized by transient and strong excitatory events, Sharp-Waves-Ripples (SPWRs), directly affecting neocortical activity—in particular the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)—which receives monosynaptic fibers from the ventral hippocampus and subiculum. Both spindles and SPWRs have been shown to be strongly involved in memory consolidation. However, the dynamics of the cortical network during natural sleep spindles and how prefrontal circuits simultaneously process hippocampal and thalamo-cortical activity remain largely undetermined. Using multisite neuronal recordings in rat mPFC, we show that during sleep spindles, oscillatory responses of cortical cells are different for different cell types and cortical layers. Superficial neurons are more phase-locked and tonically recruited during spindle episodes. Moreover, in a given layer, interneurons were always more modulated than pyramidal cells, both in firing rate and phase, suggesting that the dynamics are dominated by inhibition. In the deep layers, where most of the hippocampal fibers make contacts, pyramidal cells respond phasically to SPWRs, but not during spindles. Similar observations were obtained when analyzing γ-oscillation modulation in the mPFC. These results demonstrate that during sleep spindles, the cortex is functionnaly “deafferented” from its hippocampal inputs, based on processes of cortical origin, and presumably mediated by the strong recruitment of inhibitory interneurons. The interplay between hippocampal and thalamic inputs may underlie a global mechanism involved in the consolidation of recently formed memory traces. PMID:21949372

  7. Accuracy analysis and design of A3 parallel spindle head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yanbing; Zhang, Biao; Sun, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    As functional components of machine tools, parallel mechanisms are widely used in high efficiency machining of aviation components, and accuracy is one of the critical technical indexes. Lots of researchers have focused on the accuracy problem of parallel mechanisms, but in terms of controlling the errors and improving the accuracy in the stage of design and manufacturing, further efforts are required. Aiming at the accuracy design of a 3-DOF parallel spindle head(A3 head), its error model, sensitivity analysis and tolerance allocation are investigated. Based on the inverse kinematic analysis, the error model of A3 head is established by using the first-order perturbation theory and vector chain method. According to the mapping property of motion and constraint Jacobian matrix, the compensatable and uncompensatable error sources which affect the accuracy in the end-effector are separated. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is performed on the uncompensatable error sources. The sensitivity probabilistic model is established and the global sensitivity index is proposed to analyze the influence of the uncompensatable error sources on the accuracy in the end-effector of the mechanism. The results show that orientation error sources have bigger effect on the accuracy in the end-effector. Based upon the sensitivity analysis results, the tolerance design is converted into the issue of nonlinearly constrained optimization with the manufacturing cost minimum being the optimization objective. By utilizing the genetic algorithm, the allocation of the tolerances on each component is finally determined. According to the tolerance allocation results, the tolerance ranges of ten kinds of geometric error sources are obtained. These research achievements can provide fundamental guidelines for component manufacturing and assembly of this kind of parallel mechanisms.

  8. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  9. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  10. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  11. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner.

  12. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  13. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA’s MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12504.001 PMID:26765568

  14. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA's MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. PMID:26765568

  15. Time-frequency characteristics and dynamics of sleep spindles in WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sitnikova, Evgenia; Hramov, Alexander E; Grubov, Vadim; Koronovsky, Alexey A

    2014-01-16

    In rat models of absence epilepsy, epileptic spike-wave discharges appeared in EEG spontaneously, and the incidence of epileptic activity increases with age. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles are known to share common thalamo-cortical mechanism, suggesting that absence seizures might affect some intrinsic properties of sleep spindles. This paper examines time-frequency EEG characteristics of anterior sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar and epileptic WAG/Rij rats at the age of 7 and 9 months. Considering non-stationary features of sleep spindles, EEG analysis was performed using Morlet-based continuous wavelet transform. It was found, first, that the average frequency of sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar rats was higher than in WAG/Rij (13.2 vs 11.2 Hz). Second, the instantaneous frequency ascended during a spindle event in Wistar rats, but it was constant in WAG/Rij. Third, in WAG/Rij rats, the number and duration of epileptic discharges increased in a period between 7 and 9 months of age, but duration and mean value of intra-spindle frequency did not change. In general, age-dependent aggravation of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats did not affect EEG properties of sleep spindles; it was suggested that pro-epileptic changes in thalamo-cortical network in WAG/Rij rats might prevent dynamic changes of sleep spindles that were detected in Wistar.

  16. Feedback-Controlled Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Reveals a Functional Role of Sleep Spindles in Motor Memory Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Mellin, Juliann M; Vaughn, Bradley V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2016-08-22

    Transient episodes of brain oscillations are a common feature of both the waking and the sleeping brain. Sleep spindles represent a prominent example of a poorly understood transient brain oscillation that is impaired in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, the causal role of these bouts of thalamo-cortical oscillations remains unknown. Demonstrating a functional role of sleep spindles in cognitive processes has, so far, been hindered by the lack of a tool to target transient brain oscillations in real time. Here, we show, for the first time, selective enhancement of sleep spindles with non-invasive brain stimulation in humans. We developed a system that detects sleep spindles in real time and applies oscillatory stimulation. Our stimulation selectively enhanced spindle activity as determined by increased sigma activity after transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) application. This targeted modulation caused significant enhancement of motor memory consolidation that correlated with the stimulation-induced change in fast spindle activity. Strikingly, we found a similar correlation between motor memory and spindle characteristics during the sham night for the same spindle frequencies and electrode locations. Therefore, our results directly demonstrate a functional relationship between oscillatory spindle activity and cognition. PMID:27476602

  17. The involvement of MCT-1 oncoprotein in inducing mitotic catastrophe and nuclear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hung-Ju; Chu, Kang-Lin; Wu, Meng-Hsun; Wu, Pei-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Wen; Chu, Jan-Show; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Takeuchi, Hideki; Ouchi, Toru; Hsu, Hsin-Ling

    2012-03-01

    Centrosome amplification and chromosome abnormality are frequently identified in neoplasia and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these defects remain unclear. We here identify that MCT-1 is a centrosomal oncoprotein involved in mitosis. Knockdown of MCT-1 protein results in intercellular bridging, chromosome mis-congregation, cytokinesis delay, and mitotic death. Introduction of MCT-1 oncogene into the p53 deficient cells (MCT-1-p53), the mitotic checkpoint kinases and proteins are deregulated synergistically. These biochemical alterations are accompanied with increased frequencies of cytokinesis failure, multi-nucleation, and centrosome amplification in subsequent cell cycle. As a result, the incidences of polyploidy and aneuploidy are progressively induced by prolonged cell cultivation or further promoted by sustained spindle damage on MCT-1-p53 background. These data show that the oncoprotein perturbs centrosome structure and mitotic progression, which provide the molecular aspect of chromsomal abnormality in vitro and the information for understanding the stepwise progression of tumors under oncogenic stress.

  18. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  19. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  20. Potentiation of electroencephalographic spindles by ibotenate microinjections into nucleus reticularis thalami of cats.

    PubMed

    Marini, G; Macchi, G; Mancia, M

    1992-12-01

    It is well known that the electroencephalogram of the cat in the early stages of slow wave sleep is mainly characterized by rhythmic wave activity at 7-14 Hz, termed spindles, which recur periodically with a slow rhythm of 0.1-0.2 Hz. From early stimulation, decortication and transection studies (see Ref. 14), spindle oscillations were thought to originate in the thalamus. The search for the anatomical substrate of thalamic spindling, however, moved from medial (intralaminar nuclei) to lateral thalamic nuclei, and recently focused on the extreme shell-shaped collection of GABA-ergic cells, the nucleus reticularis thalami. This proposition was based on its structural, hodological, and physiological aspects. There is accumulating evidence that the nucleus reticularis may act as a conditional pacemaker, synchronizing the activity of cortically projecting thalamic neurons. The introduction of glutamate analogues with excitotoxic properties such as ibotenic acid provided the opportunity of studying the immediate effects of chemical excitation of this nucleus on synchronized electroencephalographic activity. We found that, in cats, spindle density was dramatically increased following infusion of ibotenic acid into the rostral pole of the nucleus, supporting the role of this sector in spindle-related rhythmicity. PMID:1488120

  1. Review of the touch preparation cytology of spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Kijong; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2016-01-01

    We experienced a case of spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) with touch preparation cytology performed during the intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in a 22-year-old woman. The tumor was partially encapsulated by fibrous capsule. It was a highly cellular biphasic tumor characterized by fasciculated spindle cells with streaming pattern and tubulopapillary epithelial component. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, vimentin, c-kit, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). However, the tumor cells were negative for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, CD99, S-100 protein, CD34, smooth muscle actin, HBME-1, and galectin-3. The reviewed touch smears showed tight clusters with high cellularity. Most cellular clusters showed papillary configuration. However, some clusters showed spindle cells with streaming pattern. The spindle tumor cells showed elongated and cigar-shaped nuclei. Although the incidence is very rare, SETLLE should be included in the differential diagnosis when a spindle cell neoplasm is encountered in touch preparation cytology in young patients with a thyroid mass. PMID:27011438

  2. Direct kinetochore–spindle pole connections are not required for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Magidson, Valentin; Steinman, Jonathan B.; He, Jie; Le Berre, Maël; Tikhonenko, Irina; Ault, Jeffrey G.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Chen, James K.; Sui, Haixin; Piel, Matthieu; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of genetic material occurs when chromosomes move to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This movement depends on K-fibers, specialized microtubule (MT) bundles attached to the chromosomes′ kinetochores. A long-standing assumption is that continuous K-fibers connect every kinetochore to a spindle pole and the force for chromosome movement is produced at the kinetochore and coupled with MT depolymerization. However, we found that chromosomes still maintained their position at the spindle equator during metaphase and segregated properly during anaphase when one of their K-fibers was severed near the kinetochore with a laser microbeam. We also found that, in normal fully assembled spindles, K-fibers of some chromosomes did not extend to the spindle pole. These K-fibers connected to adjacent K-fibers and/or nonkinetochore MTs. Poleward movement of chromosomes with short K-fibers was uncoupled from MT depolymerization at the kinetochore. Instead, these chromosomes moved by dynein-mediated transport of the entire K-fiber/kinetochore assembly. Thus, at least two distinct parallel mechanisms drive chromosome segregation in mammalian cells. PMID:25023516

  3. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  4. Sleep spindles predict neural and behavioral changes in motor sequence consolidation.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Marc; Carrier, Julie; Debas, Karen; Lungu, Ovidiu; Fogel, Stuart; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hoge, Richard D; Bellec, Pierre; Karni, Avi; Ungerleider, Leslie G; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive function of sleep spindles in motor sequence consolidation. BOLD responses were acquired in 10 young healthy subjects who were trained on an explicitly known 5-item sequence using their left nondominant hand, scanned at 9:00 pm while performing that same task and then were retested and scanned 12 h later after a night of sleep during which polysomnographic measures were recorded. An automatic algorithm was used to detect sleep spindles and to quantify their characteristics (i.e., density, amplitude, and duration). Analyses revealed significant positive correlations between gains in performance and the amplitude of spindles. Moreover, significant increases in BOLD signal were observed in several motor-related areas, most of which were localized in the right hemisphere, particularly in the right cortico-striatal system. Such increases in BOLD signal also correlated positively with the amplitude of spindles at several derivations. Taken together, our results show that sleep spindles predict neural and behavioral changes in overnight motor sequence consolidation.

  5. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1-LGN-NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  6. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc

    PubMed Central

    Lovegrove, Holly E.; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S.; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  7. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. PMID:27075540

  8. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2013-03-20

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules.

  9. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1–LGN–NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  10. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia.

  11. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2013-03-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  12. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  13. Regulation of a Spindle Positioning Factor at Kinetochores by SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Schweiggert, Jörg; Stevermann, Lea; Panigada, Davide; Kammerer, Daniel; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-02-22

    Correct function of the mitotic spindle requires balanced interplay of kinetochore and astral microtubules that mediate chromosome segregation and spindle positioning, respectively. Errors therein can cause severe defects ranging from aneuploidy to developmental disorders. Here, we describe a protein degradation pathway that functionally links astral microtubules to kinetochores via regulation of a microtubule-associated factor. We show that the yeast spindle positioning protein Kar9 localizes not only to astral but also to kinetochore microtubules, where it becomes targeted for proteasomal degradation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) Slx5-Slx8. Intriguingly, this process does not depend on preceding sumoylation of Kar9 but rather requires SUMO-dependent recruitment of STUbLs to kinetochores. Failure to degrade Kar9 leads to defects in both chromosome segregation and spindle positioning. We propose that kinetochores serve as platforms to recruit STUbLs in a SUMO-dependent manner in order to ensure correct spindle function by regulating levels of microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:26906737

  14. Properties of cat neck muscle spindles and their excitation by succinylcholine.

    PubMed

    Price, R F; Dutia, M B

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity to sinusoidal stretching and small-amplitude vibration, and the variability of the resting discharge rate of de-efferented muscle spindles in the neck extensor muscle biventer cervicis (b.c.) of the cat have been studied. The effects of intra-arterial infusion of succinylcholine (SCh) on the response of the receptors to ramp stretches of the muscle were also determined. When activated by SCh, one group of afferents showed only a slow facilitation of their discharge rate, similar to that of spindle secondary sensory endings in hind-limb muscles. A second group of afferents developed a large dynamic response and a marked increase in their static discharge rate and were presumed to originate in "normal" b1b2 c spindles in the b.c. muscle. A third group of afferents developed only a marked increase in static discharge, without potentiation of the dynamic response, suggesting an origin in the b2c units of tandem spindles which are relatively common in the neck muscles. On the basis of their passive characteristics alone, afferents from b1b2c units could not be readily distinguished from those from b2c units. The characteristics of these receptors, and their differences from the well-studied hind-limb spindle afferents, are discussed.

  15. Sleep spindle detection: crowdsourcing and evaluating performance of experts, non-experts, and automated methods

    PubMed Central

    Warby, Simon C.; Wendt, Sabrina L.; Welinder, Peter; Munk, Emil G.S.; Carrillo, Oscar; Sorensen, Helge B.D.; Jennum, Poul; Peppard, Paul E.; Perona, Pietro; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are discrete, intermittent patterns of brain activity that arise as a result of interactions of several circuits in the brain. Increasingly, these oscillations are of biological and clinical interest because of their role in development, learning, and neurological disorders. We used an internet interface to ‘crowdsource’ spindle identification from human experts and non-experts, and compared performance with 6 automated detection algorithms in middle-to-older aged subjects from the general population. We also developed a method for forming group consensus, and refined methods of evaluating the performance of event detectors in physiological data such as polysomnography. Compared to the gold standard, the highest performance was by individual experts and the non-expert group consensus, followed by automated spindle detectors. Crowdsourcing the scoring of sleep data is an efficient method to collect large datasets, even for difficult tasks such as spindle identification. Further refinements to automated sleep spindle algorithms are needed for middle-to-older aged subjects. PMID:24562424

  16. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  17. P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is required for metaphase spindle positioning and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Bompard, G; Rabeharivelo, G; Cau, J; Abrieu, A; Delsert, C; Morin, N

    2013-02-14

    The oncogenic kinase PAK4 was recently found to be involved in the regulation of the G1 phase and the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. We have also identified that PAK4 regulates Ran GTPase activity during mitosis. Here, we show that after entering mitosis, PAK4-depleted cells maintain a prolonged metaphase-like state. In these cells, chromosome congression to the metaphase plate occurs with normal kinetics but is followed by an extended period during which membrane blebbing and spindle rotation are observed. These bipolar PAK4-depleted metaphase-like spindles have a defective astral microtubule (MT) network and are not centered in the cell but are in close contact with the cell cortex. As the metaphase-like state persists, centrosome fragmentation occurs, chromosomes scatter from the metaphase plate and move toward the spindle poles with an active spindle assembly checkpoint, a phenotype that is reminiscent of cohesion fatigue. PAK4 also regulates the acto-myosin cytoskeleton and we report that PAK4 depletion results in the induction of cortical membrane blebbing during prometaphase arrest. However, we show that membrane blebs, which are strongly enriched in phospho-cofilin, are not responsible for the poor anchoring of the spindle. As PAK4 depletion interferes with the localization of components of the dynein/dynactin complexes at the kinetochores and on the astral MTs, we propose that loss of PAK4 could induce a change in the activities of motor proteins. PMID:22450748

  18. Fine-needle aspiration of spindle cell and mesenchymal lesions of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Chhieng, D C; Cohen, J M; Cangiarella, J F

    2000-10-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy can accurately diagnose epithelial lesions of the salivary gland. Its role in the evaluation of salivary gland lesions containing a significant spindle cell component is less clear. We describe the cytologic features of 25 spindle cell lesions of the salivary gland and discuss the differential diagnosis and potential diagnostic pitfalls. Twenty-five aspiration smears (3.0%) containing a significant spindle cell or mesenchymal component were identified out of 844 salivary gland FNAs performed over a 5-year period. These aspiration smears were from 25 patients. The smears were classified into three categories: 1) reactive or inflammatory conditions, including one granulation tissue and four granulomatous sialoadenitis; 2) benign neoplasms, including one schwannoma, one fibromatosis, four lipomas, and nine pleomorphic adenomas; 3) malignant neoplasms, including one recurrent malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), two metastatic melanomas, and two metastatic osteosarcomas. There was one false-negative biopsy. The metastatic desmoplastic malignant melanoma was initially interpreted as a reactive lymph node with fibrosis. A specific diagnosis was rendered in 21 (84%) cases. The schwannoma was diagnosed cytologically as benign spindle cell lesion, not otherwise specified (NOS), fibromatosis as an atypical cellular proliferation, and MFH as poorly differentiated malignant neoplasm. Salivary gland lesions with a significant spindle cell component are rarely encountered on FNA and constitute a heterogeneous group. A specific diagnosis can be rendered in the majority of cases by correlating clinical and cytologic findings.

  19. Coordinated alpha and gamma control of muscles and spindles in movement and posture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Zhuang, Cheng; Hao, Manzhao; He, Xin; Marquez, Juan C.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Lan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that both α and γ motoneurons are active during movement and posture, but how does the central motor system coordinate the α-γ controls in these tasks remains sketchy due to lack of in vivo data. Here a computational model of α-γ control of muscles and spindles was used to investigate α-γ integration and coordination for movement and posture. The model comprised physiologically realistic spinal circuitry, muscles, proprioceptors, and skeletal biomechanics. In the model, we divided the cortical descending commands into static and dynamic sets, where static commands (αs and γs) were for posture maintenance and dynamic commands (αd and γd) were responsible for movement. We matched our model to human reaching movement data by straightforward adjustments of descending commands derived from either minimal-jerk trajectories or human EMGs. The matched movement showed smooth reach-to-hold trajectories qualitatively close to human behaviors, and the reproduced EMGs showed the classic tri-phasic patterns. In particular, the function of γd was to gate the αd command at the propriospinal neurons (PN) such that antagonistic muscles can accelerate or decelerate the limb with proper timing. Independent control of joint position and stiffness could be achieved by adjusting static commands. Deefferentation in the model indicated that accurate static commands of αs and γs are essential to achieve stable terminal posture precisely, and that the γd command is as important as the αd command in controlling antagonistic muscles for desired movements. Deafferentation in the model showed that losing proprioceptive afferents mainly affected the terminal position of movement, similar to the abnormal behaviors observed in human and animals. Our results illustrated that tuning the simple forms of α-γ commands can reproduce a range of human reach-to-hold movements, and it is necessary to coordinate the set of α-γ descending commands for accurate

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.