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Sample records for abnormal storm waves

  1. Abnormal storm waves in the East/Japan Sea in winter: Generation process and hindcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Yamashita, Takao; Shim, Jae-Seol

    2010-05-01

    The surface winds over the East/Japan Sea (EJS) vary distinctively with the seasons, blowing mild or moderate and variable in summer and very strong due to the East Asian monsoon and storms in winter. In winter atmospheric low pressure (extra-tropical cyclones) reacting with and passing through the EJS can sometimes cause abnormal storm waves on the Korean and Japanese coasts of the EJS. In February 2008, abnormal storm waves due to a developed atmospheric low pressure system propagating from the west off Hokkaido, Japan, to the south and southwest throughout the EJS caused extensive damage along the central coast of Japan on the EJS side and along the east coast of Korea. The accompanying high waves were mainly swells that developed with sufficient fetch over the EJS and lasted more than a day. The observed maximum wave heights and periods along the central coast of Japan were 6.40 m and 10.2 sec at Naoetsu, 9.92 m and 16.2 sec at Toyama, 4.22 m and 14.2 sec at Fushiki Toyama, and 7.73 m and 13.2 sec at Wajima, while the observed maximum wave height and peak wave period at Anmok on the central east coast of Korea were 5.5 m and14.17 s at 11:00:00 UTC (20:00 KST) on 24 February 2008. During February of that year, the abnormal storm waves at Toyama Bay, which are called 'Yorimawari Waves' in Japan, caused some of the most severe coastal damage ever induced by such conditions. Since the abnormal storm waves are a key factor not only in coastal damage and disaster, but also in the design of coastal structures, it is critical to estimate these waves accurately, taking into account the meteorological conditions and topographical and bathymetric effects. Therefore, in this study we describe the study results of generation mechanisms and characteristics of abnormal storm waves in the EJS in terms of meteorological conditions and numerical simulations. The generation processes of these abnormal storm waves during rough sea states were studied and the formation of abnormal

  2. Statistics of wave crests in storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfun, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    Sea waves generated in severe storms are nonlinear and display a vertically skewed profile in terms of higher more pointed crests and shallower more rounded troughs. In particular, large waves tend to have extremely large crests. A statistical description of such large crest levels has theoretical and practical importance. At present, no exact theory exists for describing the statistical distribution of crest heights of nonlinear waves. This study explores further a recently developed least-upper-bound (lub) distribution for crest heights of large waves within the context of second-order nonlinear wave theory. Preliminary comparisons of the lub distribution and associated statistics to extreme waves from hurricane Camille in the Gulf of Mexico in 1969 have been favorable. But, the measurements used in these comparisons were limited in terms of their sample sizes and infrequent sampling rates. Thus, establishing the relative validity of the lub theory warrants further comparisons with larger sample populations and accurate measurements of storm waves. This study first presents a brief overview of the underlying nonlinear lub wave-crest model, the salient properties and implications of the associated probability distributions and statistics. The theoretical results are then compared with Marex wave data collected by Shell E &P Technology at the Tern platform in the northen North Sea between the Shetland Islands and Norway. The measurements have a sampling rate of 5.12 Hz. The sample exceedance distributions and statistics such as the mean of the highest 1/n-th crest levels derived from a three-hour segment of these measurements are compared with the theoretical predictions based on the lub theory. As in the previous case of the Camille data, comparisons are very favorable and clearly confirm the validity and usefulness of the lub theory for describing the statistics of large wave crests.

  3. Levee Scour Protection for Storm Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Sustainable; Resiliency in Levee Scour Protection

    2011-12-01

    Earnest Johnson, Firat Y. Testik *, Nadarajah Ravichandran Civil Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA * Contact author ftestik@clemson.edu Levee failure due to scouring has been a prominent occurrence among intense storm surges and waves, giving rise to the implementation of various scour protection measures over the years. This study is to investigate the levee scour and to compare different scour protection measures on a model-levee system in a laboratory wave tank. The protection measures that are tested and compared for their effectiveness in this study include turf reinforcement mats, woven geotextiles, and core-locs. This is an ongoing research effort and experiments are currently being conducted with model levees constructed based upon the United States Army Corps of Engineers' levee design and construction guidelines under various simulated storm conditions. Parameters such as wave elevations, deformation time history of the floodwall, and the scour depth are measured in each test. The finding of this research will be translated to provide effective scour protection measures for robust levee designs.

  4. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Deng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Meng; Li, Haimeng

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to play a crucial role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. However, there is little consensus on which phase of the storm is more favorable for the generation of EMIC waves. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument of EMFISIS suite on board Van Allen Probe A, the occurrences of EMIC waves during geomagnetic storms are investigated in this paper. 76 storms were identified during the period under research, from 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. 50 of the 76 storms observed 124 EMIC wave events, of which 80 are found in the recovery phase, more than those observed in the main phase. Evolution of the distribution characteristics of EMIC waves respect to L and MLT in different geomagnetic phases is investigated, which is found to be consistent with that of the plasmasphere. These results are different from those derived by the observations of the CRRES satellite. The different results may result from the different orbit coverage of the two different satellite missions or from the different activity level of the magnetosphere during the different periods. Few EMIC waves in the dayside sector during the pre-onset periods are observed. It is implied that, to the generation of EMIC waves, the effect of solar wind dynamic pressure in the inner magnetosphere is not so significant as that in the outer magnetosphere.

  5. Are certain storms overestimated in the NORA10 wave hindcast?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furevik, Birgitte; Röhrs, Johannes Johannes; Carrasco, Ana; Engedahl, Harald; Reistad, Magnar

    2015-04-01

    The Norwegian Reanalysis of wind and waves (NORA10) is a downscaling to 10 km of the ERA-40 dataset and ECMWF forecasts for 1958-2014. The significant wave height (Hs) in some storms in 2006 and 2011 are modelled 13-23% higher than observed even if modelled winds seem to be in accordance with observations. The propagation track and speed of these storms and possible swell into the area is investigated compared to similar situations. The wave observations from the storms are analyzed as well as data from experiments using SWAN with different dissipation formulations and two different versions of WAM. One is WAM cycle 4 from 1998 (modified for parallel processing and rotated grid) running operationally at MET and the other is a new version made available through the MyWave project. Preliminary studies show that MyWave WAM gives higher waves than the old version of WAM in the storms mentioned while SWAN with Westhuysen dissipation gives values of Hs closest to the observed. A new operational wave model setup using MyWave WAM on 4km spatial resolution over a domain covering the Nordic Seas is implemented and considered for operational use. The performance of the new wave model setup for the Nordic Seas is validated against the offshore observations and compared to the existing forecasting system.

  6. Modeling Motu Profile Response to Varying Wave and Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. C.; Ashton, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The atolls of the Pacific Ocean are low-lying landforms (less than 5m in elevation), typically consisting of reef-building corals often mounted by subaerial islets, or motu, which encircle a central lagoon. These motu, perched atop old coral reefs, typically consist of sand and gravel, and are sometimes anchored by relict geologic features (highstand coral reefs). Despite the vital role these islets play as home to terrestrial ecosystems and human infrastructure, the morphologic processes responsible for their formation and maintenance remain poorly understood. For example, although extreme events are hypothesized as a formation mechanism, motu are found in regions where hurricanes or tropical cyclones rarely occur and across varying storm gradients and frequency tracks. Here we use hydrodynamic and event-based morphodynamic modeling to better understand the role of storm events on the formation and evolution of motu. Using XBeach, a two-dimensional model of infragravity wave propagation and sediment transport, coupled with the coastal wave model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), we simulate the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic impacts of storm events on the nearshore, beach, and backbarrier portions of atolls. We investigate the effect of different representative profile morphology, for example motu height or the distance from the reef edge to the motu, on storm response. We further test the effect of storm intensity and inundation scenarios (i.e. difference in elevated water levels of the lagoon and ocean) on storm hydrodynamics and morphologic change. Model scenarios are informed and compared to basin-wide analysis of the variation of atoll and motu characteristics, such as reef width, motu width, and motu spacing across the Pacific Ocean. Atoll morphologies and storm responses are affected by both geographic location and, locally, the shoreline orientation (compared to storm tracks). Combining these different model scenarios with measured morphometrics allows

  7. In-Situ Severe Storm Monitoring Utilizing the Wave Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, J.; Thomas, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Wave Glider (WG) is an ocean going Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) that harnesses mechanical energy from waves and electrical energy from solar cells to power a configurable panel of scientific instruments. With its ability to transmit sensor data to shore in near real-time via an Iridium satellite connection, the Wave Glider can be used as a remote, mobile data collection platform on the world's oceans for extended periods up to a year. In a series of trials and demonstrations, the vehicle was directed into the path of 2 hurricanes, a cyclone, and a tropical storm while transmitting oceanographic and meteorological data including wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, sea surface temperature and wave height. In its transit through Tropical Cyclone Freda, for example, the Wave Glider measured barometric pressure as low as 975 millibar and significant wave heights of up to 9 meters. Data from these 4 events exhibit strong correlation with independent data products such as ASCAT and NOAA's JTWC-WaveWatch III model. In all 4 events, the Wave Glider provided uninterrupted data streams in near-real time despite the extreme conditions. These data collections are solid evidence that the Wave Glider is a suitable and highly efficient platform for the observation of sea surface and lower atmospheric conditions from directly within severe storm events.

  8. Movement of boulders and megagravel by storm waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Rónadh; Jahn, Kalle L.; Watkins, Oona G.

    2016-04-01

    Coastal boulder deposits along Ireland's west coast - which include megagravel with masses in the 100s of tonnes near sea level, and boulders > 1 t at locations up to 50 m above high water (AHW) - record extreme wave events. As their scale and elevation seem inconsistent with our current understanding of storm wave hydrodynamics, and because the deposits have been largely inactive in the last decade or so (the time span over which they have been studied), there has been controversy over whether they are moved by storms or whether they are relict tsunami deposits. Recent data acquisition shows definitively that these rocks are moved during storms. Using repeat photography of sites on the Aran Islands and on the mainland (images taken before and after the severe storms of winter 2013-2014) we documented movement of >1100 clasts, 84 of which were ≥ 20 t, and 16 of which were ≥ 50 t. The highest elevation at which we recorded movement was 25 m AHW, and the largest clast moved at this elevation was ~5.5 t. Larger clasts (up to ~400 t) moved at lower elevations. Horizontal transport distances exceeded 100 m in some instances, including large dislocations of some very large clasts (e.g. a ~210 t block that moved 23 m inland). The large dataset allows us to investigate relationships between clast movements and topography. For each site, the largest clast moved represents an upper limit on the transport capacity at that site (for that set of storms). We find an inverse correlation between mass transported and height above high water, as well as a (counter-intuitive) positive correlation between boulder mass and distance inland. The strongest correlation, however, is an exponential relationship between mass and average coastal slope: the largest clasts moved over the most gently sloping terrain. We use the term "waves" quite loosely. The clasts were transported by overland flow of ocean waters activated by storm systems, but we cannot determine whether the flow was due

  9. Rapid Response Measurements of Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravois, U.

    2010-12-01

    Andrew (1992), Katrina (2005), and Ike (2008) are recent examples of extensive damage that resulted from direct hurricane landfall. Some of the worst damages from these hurricanes are caused by wind driven waves and storm surge flooding. The potential for more hurricane disasters like these continues to increase as a result of population growth and real estate development in low elevation coastal regions. Observational measurements of hurricane waves and storm surge play an important role in future mitigation efforts, yet permanent wave buoy moorings and tide stations are more sparse than desired. This research has developed a rapid response method using helicopters to install temporary wave and surge gauges ahead of hurricane landfall. These temporary installations, with target depths from 10-15 m and 1-7 km offshore depending on the local shelf slope, increase the density of measurement points where the worst conditions are expected. The method has progressed to an operational state and has successfully responded to storms Ernesto (2006), Noel (2007), Fay (2008), Gustav (2008), Hanna (2008) and Ike (2008). The temporary gauges are pressure data loggers that measure at 1 Hz continuously for 12 days and are post-processed to extract surge and wave information. For the six storms studied, 45 out of 49 sensors were recovered by boat led scuba diver search teams, with 43 providing useful data for an 88 percent success rate. As part of the 20 sensor Hurricane Gustav response, sensors were also deployed in lakes and bays inLouisiana, east of the Mississippi river delta. Gustav was the largest deployment to date. Generally efforts were scaled back for storms that were not anticipated to be highly destructive. For example, the cumulative total of sensors deployed for Ernesto, Noel, Fay and Hanna was only 20. Measurement locations for Gustav spanned over 800 km of exposed coastline from Louisiana to Florida with sensors in close proximity to landfall near Cocodrie

  10. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  11. Abnormal fb Es enhancements in equatorial Es layers during magnetic storms of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.; Batista, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed the behavior of blanketing frequency of the Es layer (fb Es) occurring at an equatorial station covering the days before, during and subsequent to 24 intense and very intense magnetic storms (Dst≤-100 nT) that occurred during the solar cycle 23. The fb Es was measured by digital ionosonde over São Luís, Brazil (2.33° S, 44.2° W, dip: -4.5°). Our analysis shows that there are significant changes in the fb Es, mainly during the recovery phase of magnetic storms, characterized by occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values. Also, these peaks are associated to other types of sporadic E layer than the Esq (a non-blanketing layer detected due the plasma irregularities in the equatorial electrojet), which in turn means competing mechanisms. The results are discussed in terms of the statistics of the abnormal enhancement taking into account the phase of the magnetic storm.

  12. Development of Operational Wave-Tide-Storm surges Coupling Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Park, S. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, K. L.

    2009-04-01

    The Korean Peninsula is surrounded by the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and East Sea. This complex oceanographic system includes large tides in the Yellow Sea and seasonally varying monsoon and typhoon events. For Korea's coastal regions, floods caused by wave and storm surges are among the most serious threats. To predict more accurate wave and storm surges, the development of coupling wave-tide-storm surges prediction system is essential. For the time being, wave and storm surges predictions are still made separately in KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) and most operational institute. However, many researchers have emphasized the effects of tides and storm surges on wind waves and recommended further investigations into the effects of wave-tide-storm surges interactions and coupling module. In Korea, especially, tidal height and current give a great effect on the wave prediction in the Yellow sea where is very high tide and related research is not enough. At present, KMA has operated the wave (RWAM : Regional Wave Model) and storm surges/tide prediction system (STORM : Storm Surges/Tide Operational Model) for ocean forecasting. The RWAM is WAVEWATCH III which is a third generation wave model developed by Tolman (1989). The STORM is based on POM (Princeton Ocean Model, Blumberg and Mellor, 1987). The RWAM and STORM cover the northwestern Pacific Ocean from 115°E to 150°E and from 20°N to 52°N. The horizontal grid intervals are 1/12° in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions. These two operational models are coupled to simulate wave heights for typhoon case. The sea level and current simulated by storm surge model are used for the input of wave model with 3 hour interval. The coupling simulation between wave and storm surge model carried out for Typhoon Nabi (0514), Shanshan(0613) and Nari (0711) which were effected on Korea directly. We simulated significant wave height simulated by wave model and coupling model and compared difference between

  13. Tidal modulation of storm waves on a macrotidal flat in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. O.

    2003-06-01

    On the open shores of the Yellow Sea along Korea's Baeksu coast, a severe erosional phase in a tidal flat has been attributed to hydrodynamic processes in winter. To investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of winter storms on the intertidal flat, in situ measurements of currents and waves were obtained with an instrumented system deployed at a low tidal zone over a neap-spring tidal period in February 1999. The measurements included two storm events under different tidal conditions, i.e. the first storm occurred during a neap tide and the second weaker storm during a spring tide. Near-bottom velocities recorded during storm conditions at an elevation of 15 cm show that currents were dominantly directed alongshore with a maximum speed of 0.55 m/s and that the wave orbital velocity and significant wave height reached up to 1 m/s and 3 m, respectively. In particular, it was observed that the magnitude of wave-related parameters was greater during the spring tide (the weaker storm) than during the neap tide, regardless of the intensity of the storms. Analysis of the relationship between wave height and water depth, and temporal variations in wave velocity spectra and skewness, show that the effect of storm conditions on waves was relevant to wave-breaking processes. The occurrence of harmonics in the broad-banded spectra of wave velocity demonstrates redistribution of wave energy due to the breaking of waves. Wave height ( Hs) was linearly related to water depth ( h) fluctuating with tides, yielding a correlation coefficient of 0.7 (= Hs/ h), which was close to the breaking limit. This tidal modulation of storm waves associated with wave-breaking processes is possibly responsible for the observed discrepancy between the intensity of storms and their hydrodynamic consequences on the intertidal flat.

  14. Development of An Unstructured Storm Surge-waves-tide Coupled Model And Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.

    2015-12-01

    An unstructured storm surge-waves-tide coupled model, which was coupled through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT), was developed based on the ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model and SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model. The developed coupled model has high resolution in the coast area and can be run efficiently. By comparing with the existing ADCIRC and SWAN coupled model, which was coupled directly not through the MCT, the newly developed one can increase the simulation efficiency by 26.4 percent, when the computational grid and coupling processes of the two coupled model were the same. The coupled model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the process of typhoon "Usagi" which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and made landfall at Shanwei in Guangdong province. Three numerical experiments were done in the simulation to study the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. Results show that the coupled model can simulate the storm surge and waves well when considering the wave induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on the waves. During the process of typhoon "Usagi" the effect of wave radiation stress can result in a maximum of 0.75m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress can cause a -0.82~0.49m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. This study is valuable to the study of hurricane storm surge disaster assessment and the development of the operational storm surge prediction technique.

  15. Review Article: Storm Britta in 2006: offshore damage and large waves in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Britta storm of 31 October-1 November 2006 was a severe autumn storm that was particularly damaging for shipping and coastal flooding from storm surge effects along the southern North Sea. The main low pressure of the storm propagated from Scotland to southern Norway on 31 October, leading to a system of strong north winds that moved southward across North Sea over an 18 h period. A progression of ship and offshore platform difficulties were registered from the northern part of the North Sea from late on 31 October and culminated near the coasts of Germany and the Netherlands early on 1 November with a series of ship emergencies linked with large waves. In two separate incidents, unusually high waves broke the bridge windows of ships and necessitated emergency rescues, and a Dutch motor lifeboat experienced a triple capsize. In the southern North Sea, several gas production and research platforms experienced wave impact damage. The FINO1 offshore research platform, near the Dutch-German border, experienced some of the worst storm conditions with some structural damage. Its meteorological and oceanographic instrumentation give a unique profile of the severe met-ocean conditions during the storm. Two Waverider buoys at FINO1 and the nearby Dutch coastal site of Schiermonnikoog recorded groups of large waves at different times during the storm. These reports give insight into a little-reported rogue wave phenomenon that sometimes accompanies the "ground sea" conditions of the worst storms of the area.

  16. Integration of coastal inundation modeling from storm tides to individual waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Roeber, Volker; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Heitmann, Troy W.; Bai, Yefei; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    2014-11-01

    Modeling of storm-induced coastal inundation has primarily focused on the surge generated by atmospheric pressure and surface winds with phase-averaged effects of the waves as setup. Through an interoperable model package, we investigate the role of phase-resolving wave processes in simulation of coastal flood hazards. A spectral ocean wave model describes generation and propagation of storm waves from deep to intermediate water, while a non-hydrostatic storm-tide model has the option to couple with a spectral coastal wave model for computation of phase-averaged processes in a near-shore region. The ocean wave and storm-tide models can alternatively provide the wave spectrum and the surface elevation as the boundary and initial conditions for a nested Boussinesq model. Additional surface-gradient terms in the Boussinesq equations maintain the quasi-steady, non-uniform storm tide for modeling of phase-resolving surf and swash-zone processes as well as combined tide, surge, and wave inundation. The two nesting schemes are demonstrated through a case study of Hurricane Iniki, which made landfall on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai in 1992. With input from a parametric hurricane model and global reanalysis and tidal datasets, the two approaches produce comparable significant wave heights and phase-averaged surface elevations in the surf zone. The nesting of the Boussinesq model provides a seamless approach to augment the inundation due to the individual waves in matching the recorded debris line along the coast.

  17. Preliminary Study on Coupling Wave-Tide-Storm Surges Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.; Park, S.; Seo, J.; Kim, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Korean Peninsula is surrounded by the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and East Sea. This complex oceanographic system includes large tides in the Yellow Sea and seasonally varying monsoon and typhoon events. For Korea's coastal regions, floods caused by wave and storm surges are among the most serious threats. To predict more accurate wave and storm surge, the development of coupling wave-tide-storm surges prediction system is essential. For the time being, wave and storm surges predictions are still made separately in KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) and most operational institute. However, many researchers have emphasized the effects of tides and storm surges on wind waves and recommended further investigations into the effects of wave-tide-storm surges interactions and coupling module on wave heights. However, tidal height and current give a great effect on the wave prediction in the Yellow sea where is very high tide and related research is not enough. At present, KMA has operated the wave (RWAM : Regional Wave Model) and storm surges/tide prediction system (RTSM : Regional Tide/Storm Surges Model) for ocean forecasting. The RWAM is WAVEWATCH III which is a third generation wave model developed by Tolman (1989). The RTSM is based on POM (Princeton Ocean Model, Blumberg and Mellor, 1987). The RWAM and RTSM cover the northwestern Pacific Ocean from 115°E to 150°E and from 20°N to 52°N. The horizontal grid intervals are 1/12° in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions. The development, testing and application of a coupling module in which wave-tide-storm surges are incorporated within the frame of KMA Ocean prediction system, has been considered as a step forward in respect of ocean forecasting. In addition, advanced wave prediction model will be applicable to the effect of ocean in the weather forecasting system. The main purpose of this study is to show how the coupling module developed and to report on a series of experiments dealing with the

  18. Extreme storm wave influence on sandy beach macrofauna with distinct human pressures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Phillipe M; Costa, Leonardo L; Suciu, Marjorie C; Tavares, Davi C; Zalmon, Ilana R

    2016-06-15

    We evaluated the influence of storm waves on the intertidal community structure of urbanized and non-urbanized areas of a sandy beach on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The macrofauna was sampled before (PREV) and after two storm wave events (POEV I; POEV II) in 2013 and 2014. Significant differences in community structure between PREV and POEV I in the urbanized sector demonstrate higher macrofauna vulnerability, and the community recovery within 41days on this scenario of less frequent events in 2013. On the other hand, significant differences in the macrofauna only in the urbanized sector between PREV and POEV II also highlight macrofauna vulnerability and community recovery failure within 42days on this scenario of more frequent storm in 2014. Urbanization and wave height were the variables that most influenced species, indicating that high storm wave events and increasing urbanization synergism are a threat to the macrofauna. PMID:27103425

  19. Planetary wave vacillations and storms in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, M.; Dalu, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    The planetary flow in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) is more zonally symmetric than the corresponding flow in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). In the upper troposphere, the wind is largest in the subtropical jet at 30°S stretching across Australia, and in the mid-latitude jet across the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean at 50°S. The sub-tropical jet weakens in the mid-troposphere, and it is absent in the lower troposphere. In the lower troposphere the annual average westerly wind is confined in a relatively narrow latitudinal band around 50°S (Lorenz and Hartmann, 2001). The zonal symmetric mode (ZW0) dominates the seasonal variance. The mode zero is modulated by two standing modes ZW1 and ZW3, which are excited by the continental topographic features and by the heat diabatic fluxes related to the SST gradients and to seasonal sea-land thermal contrast. Even if these modes are relatively weak (van Loon and Jenne, 1972, Hobbs and Raphael, 2007), they are important, since they dominate the seasonal zonal asymmetry of the planetary flow (van Loon and Jenne, 1972), with significant links with El Niño/La Niña southern oscillation (Trenberth, 1980; Renwick and Revell, 1999; Raphael, 2003). Analysis study has shown that mode ZW1 and ZW3 can exhibit chaotic like behaviour (Kidson, 1988, 1999). Vacillations of these modes with a quasi-periodicity of the order of 40 days can occur in regions of strong zonal wind because of non-linear wave-wave interaction (De Gregorio and Dalu, 1984). The onset of these vacillations can be triggered by the arrival of a higher order travelling wave in a region of strong zonal wind. In addition, the presence of these higher order modes shortens the time scale of the vacillations of mode ZW1 and ZW3. Finally an attempt is made to relate these vacillations to the diversion of the Antarctic storms towards the ANZ region.

  20. Rapid wave and storm surge warning system for tropical cyclones in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appendini, C. M.; Rosengaus, M.; Meza, R.; Camacho, V.

    2015-12-01

    The National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, is responsible for the forecast of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific basins. As such, Mexico, Central America and Caribbean countries depend on the information issued by the NHC related to the characteristics of a particular tropical cyclone and associated watch and warning areas. Despite waves and storm surge are important hazards for marine operations and coastal dwellings, their forecast is not part of the NHC responsibilities. This work presents a rapid wave and storm surge warning system based on 3100 synthetic tropical cyclones doing landfall in Mexico. Hydrodynamic and wave models were driven by the synthetic events to create a robust database composed of maximum envelops of wind speed, significant wave height and storm surge for each event. The results were incorporated into a forecast system that uses the NHC advisory to locate the synthetic events passing inside specified radiuses for the present and forecast position of the real event. Using limited computer resources, the system displays the information meeting the search criteria, and the forecaster can select specific events to generate the desired hazard map (i.e. wind, waves, and storm surge) based on the maximum envelop maps. This system was developed in a limited time frame to be operational in 2015 by the National Hurricane and Severe Storms Unit of the Mexican National Weather Service, and represents a pilot project for other countries in the region not covered by detailed storm surge and waves forecasts.

  1. Statistics and analysis of storm waves in the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrova, Ksenia; Arkhipkin, Victor; Surkova, Galina

    2013-04-01

    For the study of storm waves in the Sea of Azov spectral wave model of the third-generation SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) was used. The inputs to the model were the bottom topography in grid (pitch axis x 0,02 ° and the axis y 0,01 °) and wind field of a new high-resolution(~ 0.3°) reanalysis NCEP CFSR from 1978 to 2010 with a time step of 1 hour. This model calculates significant wave height, swell height, direction of wave propagation, its length and the period, and the wave energy transport. The time interval output was 3 hours. Results of calculation of the last 2 days of the year are used as input for the next year. Supercomputers of Lomonosov Moscow State University were used for this research. The physical processes such as quadruplet interactions, whitecapping, triads, bottom friction, depth-induced breaking and diffraction are considered. The simulation results were used to calculate the number of storms, their duration, for the period of settlement, and for each month. Total number of storms with significant wave height greater than 2 m was 165. The highest values of calculated parameters are found in the central part of the sea: significant wave height is 3.5 m, a period of waves is 5 seconds, the length is 25 m. According to model simulation, the distribution of waves with 100 years return period were calculated. As a result, it was found that the heights of "100-year" waves in the Sea of Azov do not exceed 5 m. The study presents climatic variability of storms. Found that there was downward trend of storm activity in the Sea of Azov in the simulating period from 1978 to 2010. Synoptic situations that led to increase of storm waves were analyzed for extreme cases. The work is done in Natural Risk Assessment Laboratory under contract G.34.31.0007.

  2. On the dependence of storm time ULF wave power on magnetopause location: Impacts for ULF wave radial diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Sibeck, David G.

    2015-11-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the inner magnetosphere. We examine the role of the magnetopause location in controlling the amplitude and penetration of ULF waves within the inner magnetosphere during 63 coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven and corotating interaction region (CIR)-driven geomagnetic storms. Significantly, at the time when the magnetopause is most compressed, ULF wave power increases and penetrates to the deepest L shells. Most likely this is explained by proximity to the energy source and accumulation of energy within a smaller volume through solar wind-magnetopause-magnetosphere coupling, and changes in the storm time Alfvén continuum resulting from variations in the cold plasma density. The observed ULF wave power is consistently larger than Kp-dependent statistical estimates—especially in the heart of the outer radiation belt. This has important implications for radiation belt dynamics, including main phase loss and storm time ULF wave radial diffusion.

  3. Simulation of storm surge and wave due to typhoon Isewan (5915)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Jin-Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Byung Ho

    2015-06-01

    An integrally coupled wave-tide-surge model was developed and then applied to the simulation of the wave-typhoon surge for the typhoon Isewan (typhoon Vera (5915)), which is the strongest typhoon that has struck Japan and caused incalculable damage. An integrally coupled tide-surge-wave model using identical and homogeneous meshes in an unstructured grid system was used to correctly resolve the physics of wave-circulation interaction in both models. All model components were validated independently. The storm surge and wave properties such as the surge height, the significant wave height, wave period and direction were reproduced reasonably under the meteorological forcing, which was reprocessed to be close to the observations. The resulting modeling system can be used extensively for the prediction of the storm surge and waves and the usual barotropic forecast.

  4. 76 FR 74776 - Forum-Trends in Extreme Winds, Waves, and Extratropical Storms Along the Coasts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Forum--Trends in Extreme Winds, Waves, and Extratropical... the forum Web site at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/extreme-winds-waves-extratropical-storms... this forum become available, they may be found at...

  5. Characteristics of abnormal large waves measured from coastal videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J.; Lee, D.-Y.; Ha, T.-M.; Cho, Y.-S.; Woo, S.-B.

    2010-04-01

    Recently, tsunami-like sea-level oscillations occurred in a region of the west coast of Korea (i.e. in the eastern part of the Yellow Sea), during a typical rough spring weather episode on 4 May 2008. The analysis of these tsunami-like abnormal waves focuses solely on the videos recorded by a CCTV surveillance system in the directions of the entrance and inside parts of a local coastal pocket beach. Time-series of the vertical and horizontal sea surface oscillations were extracted from the video recordings through calibrating image distortions, accumulating 1-D intensity arrays along the line transects of interest in time, and identifying the trajectories of the oscillations. Frequency and time-domain analysis of the time-series signals revealed that the maximum height of the tsunami-like waves reached 1.3 m, having a dominant period of 185 s (3.1 min). In addition, the results indicate that the celerity of the maximum height wave approximated 7.3 m/s, which lead to the losses of life of several people who could not escape immediately from the fast tsunami flooding the shore.

  6. Ionospheric remote sensing of medium-scale gravity waves and tornadic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Gravity waves associated with severe storms are investigated on the basis of ionospheric sounding using a ground-based Doppler system. Reverse-group ray tracing computations are used to determine the origin of over 20 gravity waves detected within 800 km of Huntsville, Alabama in association with a group of tornadoes, isolated tornadoes in the presence of a squall line, and isolated tornadoes in the absence of a squall line. Gravity waves associated with tornadoes are found either to be generated by thunderstorms with enhanced convection embedded in a squall line, or in an isolated cloud with enhanced convection. The computed wave sources are observed in all cases to be located near the points where the tornadoes touched down more than an hour after wave excitation. Results show that gravity waves play an important role in troposphere-ionosphere coupling during times of intense convection associated with tornadic storm activity.

  7. Ionospsheric observation of enhanced convection-initiated gravity waves during tornadic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves associated with tornadoes, with locally severe storms occuring with tornadoes, and with hurricanes were studied through the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere. Reverse group ray tracing computations of gravity waves observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array were analyzed. The results of ray tracing computations and comparisons between the computed location of the wave sources and with conventional meteorological data indicate that the computed sources of the waves were near the touchdown of the tornadoes, near the eye of the hurricanes, and directly on the squall line of the severe thunderstorms. The signals excited occurred one hour in advance of the tornadoes and three hours in advance of the hurricanes. Satellite photographs show convective overshooting turrets occurring at the same locations and times the gravity waves were being excited. It is suggested that gravity wave observations, conventional meteorological data, and satellite photographs be combined to develop a remote sensing technique for detecting severe storms.

  8. Hurricane-induced waves and storm surge modeling for the Mexican coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Padilla, Rafael; Appendini, Christian M.; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrián

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the application of a third-generation wave model and a hydrodynamic model to determine extreme waves and water levels associated to the incidence of tropical cyclones along the Mexican coast. In addition to historical records and to overcome the limitation associated to data scarcity in Mexico, we employ information from 3100 synthetic events generated from a statistical/deterministic hurricane model. This enables the generation of a more robust database for the characterization of extreme water levels along the Mexican coast. The procedure incorporates a storm track modeling approach where, for each hurricane (historic and synthetic), the entire track is numerically reproduced as it crosses the ocean and makes landfall. Extreme values for both, waves and storm surge, are determined through an extreme value analysis at each mesh element, allowing for the identification of their spatial variability. Results for the Gulf of Mexico show that highest waves are expected along both the Caribbean Sea and the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, while extreme water levels due to storm surge are identified in the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula. On the other hand, along the Pacific coast, extreme values for waves are identified at the central mainland Mexico while storm surge is minimal. The methodology is proved to be a good alternative in the reproduction of continuously varying tropical cyclone climatology along the Mexican coastline, and it provides a rational approach for assessing the hurricane-induced risk in coastal areas.

  9. Effect of wave-enhanced bottom friction on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; List, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Massachusetts Bay is a shallow (35 m average depth) semienclosed embayment, roughly 100 ?? 50 km, which opens into the Gulf of Maine at its eastern boundary. Surface waves associated with winter storm winds from the northeast cause large sediment resuspension events, and wave and circulation fields during these events have a quasi-steady response to the wind stress. Coupled wave, circulation, and boundary layer models indicate that wave-enhanced bottom friction has a significant damping effect on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay. The simulated response exhibits significant three-dimensional structure, but still can be fundamentally understood using idealized models. The depth-integrated momentum balance is dominated by along-bay stress, pressure gradient, and bottom stress. The effective bottom drag coefficient during typical storm conditions is increased by a factor of 2-5 when wave effects are included, but the mean bottom stress is relatively unaffected by wave effects due to a reduction in bottom currents by 30-50%. The vertical mixing is also relatively unaffected by the waves, and the result is that the increased drag causes a nearly depth-independent offset of the vertical current profiles. The alongshore transport in the bay is reduced 10-50%, depending on wind direction. ?? ASCE.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Storm surges/Wave using KMA Operational Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.; Park, S.; Seo, J.; Cho, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has operated numerical ocean wave prediction system since 1992. Prior June 1999, the 1st generation wave model (DSA-5) was operated twice in daily over the Northeast Asia region. With introduction of NEC SX5 supercomputer in 1999, the 3rd generation wave model (WAM) was implemented with two wave prediction systems ?V the ReWAM (Regional WAve Model) and the GoWAM (Global WAve Model). At present, KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) has operated the wave model and storm surge model based on CRAY X1E system. The study shows development and verification of operational ocean model and future plan of KMA. The operational storm surge model (STOM : Storm surge/Tide Operational Model) area covers 115°-150°E, 20°-52°N based on POM (Princeton Ocean Model) (Blumberg and Mellor, 1987) with 1/12° horizontal resolutions including the Yellow Sea, East China Sea and the East Sea, marginal seas around Korea. From July, 2006 the STOM have been applied to formal forecasting model in KMA. Sea surface wind and pressure from the Regional Data Assimilation and Prediction System (RDAPS) is used for forcing input of storm surge model. In this model, the level of storm surge calculated by the difference between tide level and sea level change caused by meteorological effects. The newly developed operational wave model is WAVEWATCH III which is a third generation wave model developed by Tolman (1989). The Regional WAVEWATCH III (RWW3) covers the northwestern Pacific Ocean from 115°E to 150°E and from 20°N to 50°N similar to STOM. The horizontal grid intervals are 1/12° in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions. The RWW3 is integrated from a state of rest and forced by the RDAPS wind stress produced by KMA. From 2007, the RWW3 will be applied to formal forecasting model in KMA. The Coastal WAVEWATCH III (CWW3) covers 6 coastal areas around Korea peninsular. The horizontal grid intervals are 1/120° for each area. Under the

  11. Study on the storm surges induced by cold waves in the Northern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Dongxue; Hou, Yijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Yahao

    2016-08-01

    Cold wave, a kind of severe weather system, can bring strong wind and induce significant sea level rise to the Northern East China Sea. Based on CFSR data, the study shows the monthly distributions of invaded days and the spatiotemporal distributions of cold-wave wind direction and wind speed. A three-dimensional numerical model (ROMS) was developed to study storm surges induced by cold waves. The role of wind direction, wind speed, wind duration, extratropical cyclone and tide-surge interaction is investigated by conducting different sensitivity experiments. The results indicate that storm surges mainly happen at the coasts perpendicular to the wind directions. Surge range and time lag are related to the geometry of the basin and the continental shelf. The response of the sea-level fluctuations to cold wave indicates that there is a positive correlation between crests and wind speed, a negative correlation between troughs and wind speed, but no obvious correlations to wind duration. Coupled weather cold waves, which yield a larger range and a multi-peak structure of surges, can be classified according to cold wave tracks and extratropical cyclones. The tide-surge interaction has an obvious and different effect on the magnitudes and phases of storm surges for different tidal stages.

  12. Wave modelling to assess the storm conditions in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Liliana; Raileanu, Alina

    2014-05-01

    The work proposed herewith presents the results of a ten-year wave hindcast performed in the Black Sea and focused on the storm conditions. A wave modelling system, SWAN based, was implemented in the basin of the Black Sea. Validations have been performed both against in situ and remotely sensed data for the entire ten-year period considered (1999-2008). The wind field provided by NCEP-CFSR (United States National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Climate Forecast System Reanalysis) with a spatial resolution of 0.312ºx0.312º and a temporal resolution of 3 hours was considered for forcing the wave model. In statistical terms, the results are in general in line with those provided by similar wave prediction systems implemented in enclosed or semi-enclosed seas, the most important factors in increasing the general system reliability being the accuracy and resolution of the wind fields considered. As regards the physical processes, the calibration tests performed show that whitecapping still represents the weak link in deep water wave modelling. The most relevant storm conditions encountered in this ten-year period considered were further analysed. This analysis was performed from the point of view of the intensity, location of occurrence, duration and propagation in the geographical space of the storms. Following the results of the work, the western side of the sea is more energetic and almost each year storms with significant wave heights of about eight meters are encountered in this part of the Black Sea, while in the case of the extreme storms significant wave heights even greater than eleven meters may occur. From this perspective, it can be concluded that the present work provides valuable information about the characteristics of the storm conditions and on their dynamics in the Black Sea. Moreover, this marine environment is currently subjected to high navigation traffic and to offshore operations and the strong storms that systematically occur may produce

  13. Storm-time electron flux precipitation in the inner radiation belt caused by wave-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Miyoshi, Y.; Katoh, Y.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2009-04-01

    It has been believed that electrons in the inner belt do not show the dynamical variation during magnetic storms except for great magnetic storms. However, Tadokoro et al. (2007) recently disclosed that low-altitude electrons in the inner belt frequently show flux variations during storms (Storm Time inner belt Electron Enhancement at the Low altitude (STEEL)). This paper investigates a possible mechanism explaining STEEL during small and moderate storms, and shows that it is caused not by radial transport processes but by pitch angle scattering through wave-particle interactions. The waves related to wave-particle interactions are attributed to be banded whistler mode waves around 30 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere by the Akebono satellite. The estimated pitch angle distribution based on a numerical calculation is roughly consistent with the observed results.

  14. Three-dimensional simulations of boulder transport by storm and tsunami waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainali, A.; Weiss, R.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunamis and storm wave with large amplitudes can transport large boulders. In earlier studies simplified approaches to boulder transport were employed to estimate storm or tsunami amplitudes for given boulder masses. These approaches commonly take the weight into account, apply a simplified equation of motion or transport condition, and assume linear wave theory. Recent studies modified these approaches by taking also roughness elements around the boulder in question into account. However so far, only simplified geometry of boulders have been considered. To consider more complex boulder geometries in the future, we employ three-dimensional numerical simulations of the flow around a boulder. We use GPUSPH, which solves the Navier-Stokes equations with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) on graphics processing units (GPU). SPH is a Langrangian method that naturally allows accurate computations of interactions between the fluid and moving objects. This means for the boulder transport problem that bidirectional momentum exchange is incorporated. In our study, we include boulder geometries most commonly employed in previous studies, such as cubes, cuboids and spheres, and apply flow conditions that are typical during tsunamis and storms. We show how important the complex and three dimensional interaction between the fluid and boulder are for boulder transport. We are convinced that with the help of three-dimensional simulations a more complete understanding of boulder transport is achieved and that new theoretical, more simplified approaches can be found that allow us to estimate storm and tsunami wave amplitudes.

  15. Wave-driven sediment mobilization on a storm-controlled continental shelf (Northwest Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberle, Ferdinand K. J.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hanebuth, Till J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Seafloor sediment mobilization on the inner Northwest Iberian continental shelf is caused largely by ocean surface waves. The temporal and spatial variability in the wave height, wave period, and wave direction has a profound effect on local sediment mobilization, leading to distinct sediment mobilization scenarios. Six grain-size specific sediment mobilization scenarios, representing seasonal average and storm conditions, were simulated with a physics-based numerical model. Model inputs included meteorological and oceanographic data in conjunction with seafloor grain-size and the shelf bathymetric data. The results show distinct seasonal variations, most importantly in wave height, leading to sediment mobilization, specifically on the inner shelf shallower than 30 m water depth where up to 49% of the shelf area is mobilized. Medium to severe storm events are modeled to mobilize up to 89% of the shelf area above 150 m water depth. The frequency of each of these seasonal and storm-related sediment mobilization scenarios is addressed using a decade of meteorological and oceanographic data. The temporal and spatial patterns of the modeled sediment mobilization scenarios are discussed in the context of existing geological and environmental processes and conditions to assist scientific, industrial and environmental efforts that are directly affected by sediment mobilization. Examples, where sediment mobilization plays a vital role, include seafloor nutrient advection, recurrent arrival of oil from oil-spill-laden seafloor sediment, and bottom trawling impacts.

  16. Wave-driven sediment mobilization on a storm-controlled continental shelf (Northwest Iberia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberle, Ferdinand; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hanebuth, Till

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor sediment mobilization on the inner Northwest Iberian continental shelf is caused largely by ocean surface waves. The temporal and spatial variability in the wave height, wave period, and wave direction has a profound effect on local sediment mobilization, leading to distinct sediment mobilization scenarios. Six grain-size specific sediment mobilization scenarios, representing seasonal average and storm conditions, were simulated with a physics-based numerical model. Model inputs included meteorological and oceanographic data in conjunction with seafloor grain-size and the shelf bathymetric data. The results show distinct seasonal variations, most importantly in wave height, leading to sediment mobilization, specifically on the inner shelf shallower than 30 m water depth where up to 49% of the shelf area is mobilized. Medium to severe storm events are modeled to mobilize up to 89% of the shelf area above 150 m water depth. The frequency of each of these seasonal and storm-related sediment mobilization scenarios is addressed using a decade of meteorological and oceanographic data. The temporal and spatial patterns of the modeled sediment mobilization scenarios are discussed in the context of existing geological and environmental processes and conditions to assist scientific, industrial and environmental efforts that are directly affected by sediment mobilization. Examples, where sediment mobilization plays a vital role, include seafloor nutrient advection, recurrent arrival of oil from oil-spill-laden seafloor sediment, and bottom trawling impacts.

  17. Particles, waves and storms in geospace: Recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2016-07-01

    The terrestrial magnetosphere features plasma populations with a wide dynamic range of energies, spanning more than 8 orders of magnitude -- from ≃V in the plasmasphere to tens of MeV in the outer Van Allen belt and hundreds of MeV in the inner Van Allen belt. A wealth of in-situ measurements of particles and waves, and ground-based measurements of waves, has shaped a comprehensive understanding of the interactions of the various plasma populations with electromagnetic waves during geospace magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. We shall discuss recent advances and persistent gaps in our comprehension of inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  18. Storm surge and wave simulations in the Gulf of Mexico using a consistent drag relation for atmospheric and storm surge models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatvani, D.; Zweers, N. C.; van Ormondt, M.; Smale, A. J.; de Vries, H.; Makin, V. K.

    2012-07-01

    To simulate winds and water levels, numerical weather prediction (NWP) and storm surge models generally use the traditional bulk relation for wind stress, which is characterized by a wind drag coefficient. A still commonly used drag coefficient in those models, some of them were developed in the past, is based on a relation, according to which the magnitude of the coefficient is either constant or increases monotonically with increasing surface wind speed (Bender, 2007; Kim et al., 2008; Kohno and Higaki, 2006). The NWP and surge models are often tuned independently from each other in order to obtain good results. Observations have indicated that the magnitude of the drag coefficient levels off at a wind speed of about 30 m s-1, and then decreases with further increase of the wind speed. Above a wind speed of approximately 30 m s-1, the stress above the air-sea interface starts to saturate. To represent the reducing and levelling off of the drag coefficient, the original Charnock drag formulation has been extended with a correction term. In line with the above, the Delft3D storm surge model is tested using both Charnock's and improved Makin's wind drag parameterization to evaluate the improvements on the storm surge model results, with and without inclusion of the wave effects. The effect of waves on storm surge is included by simultaneously simulating waves with the SWAN model on identical model grids in a coupled mode. However, the results presented here will focus on the storm surge results that include the wave effects. The runs were carried out in the Gulf of Mexico for Katrina and Ivan hurricane events. The storm surge model was initially forced with H*wind data (Powell et al., 2010) to test the effect of the Makin's wind drag parameterization on the storm surge model separately. The computed wind, water levels and waves are subsequently compared with observation data. Based on the good results obtained, we conclude that, for a good reproduction of the storm

  19. The link between abnormal calcium handling and electrical instability in acquired long QT syndrome - Does calcium precipitate arrhythmic storms?

    PubMed

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J; Salama, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Release of Ca(2+) ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into myocyte cytoplasm and their binding to troponin C is the final signal form myocardial contraction. Synchronous contraction of ventricular myocytes is necessary for efficient cardiac pumping function. This requires both shuttling of Ca(2+) between SR and cytoplasm in individual myocytes, and organ-level synchronization of this process by means of electrical coupling among ventricular myocytes. Abnormal Ca(2+) release from SR causes arrhythmias in the setting of CPVT (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia) and digoxin toxicity. Recent optical mapping data indicate that abnormal Ca(2+) handling causes arrhythmias in models of both repolarization impairment and profound bradycardia. The mechanisms involve dynamic spatial heterogeneity of myocardial Ca(2+) handling preceding arrhythmia onset, cell-synchronous systolic secondary Ca(2+) elevation (SSCE), as well as more complex abnormalities of intracellular Ca(2+) handling detected by subcellular optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts. The regional heterogeneities in Ca(2+) handling cause action potential (AP) heterogeneities through sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) activation and eventually overwhelm electrical coupling of the tissue. Divergent Ca(2+) dynamics among different myocardial regions leads to temporal instability of AP duration and - on the patient level - in T wave lability. Although T-wave alternans has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, non-alternans lability is observed in pre-clinical models of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) and CPVT, and in LQTS patients. Analysis of T wave lability may provide a real-time window on the abnormal Ca(2+) dynamics causing specific arrhythmias such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP). PMID:26631594

  20. Evaluation of wave conditions and morphological response linkage for establishment of a set of storm impact thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Ekaterina; Valchev, Nikolay; Andreeva, Nataliya; Eftimova, Petya

    2010-05-01

    Storms are one of the phenomena determining the short-term evolution of the coasts. Certain storm conditions can cause severe beach erosion, partial or complete destruction of coastal structures and human life and occupation. The majority of the unfavourable consequences could be mitigated by means of early warnings. This implies establishment of a set of thresholds triggering critical morphological response. The study explores a linkage between the wave conditions and morphological changes along the western Black sea coast. The methodology is based upon the interdependence between hydrodynamic factors (wave energy and wave induced flow), lythodynamic response (sediment transport) and morphological effects (sea bad evolution, shoreline retreat). The sea state history in representative offshore locations is reconstructed through hindcasting. The morphological changes are assessed using long-term series of coastal measurements. Furthermore, for a couple of storms there is evidence for damages on coastal infrastructures. It is found out that the thickness of the eroded layer seems to be more responsive feature with respect to the variation of the storm intensity. Moreover, in most of the cases, the more energetic the event, the larger the bottom erosion. For that reason, this feature's behavior is considered more useful for definition of the threshold for significant beach change. The sea bed erosion of the order of 0.4-0.5m is considered typical for seasonal variations to which corresponds a retreat of about 2-4m, for which the profile shape is observed to be recovering during the post storm period. However, the measured profile deformations and shoreline displacement after a particular storm (January 1977) greatly exceeded the usual seasonal course. On the whole, it is assumed that the majority of storms are not intense enough to call forth hazardous effect. Therefore, only storms with intensity similar to that of January 1977 or February 1979 are considered capable

  1. A storm surge intensity classification based on extreme water level and concomitant wave height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sheng; Gao, Junguo; Li, Xue; Wei, Yong; Wang, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Storm surge is one of the predominant natural threats to coastal communities. Qingdao is located on the southern coast of the Shandong Peninsula in China. The storm surge disaster in Qingdao depends on various influencing factors such as the intensity, duration, and route of the passing typhoon, and thus a comprehensive understanding of natural coastal hazards is essential. In order to make up the defects of merely using the warning water level, this paper presents two statistical distribution models (Poisson Bi-variable Gumbel Logistic Distribution and Poisson Bi-variable Log-normal Distribution) to classify the intensity of storm surge. We emphasize the joint return period of typhoon-induced water levels and wave heights measured in the coastal area of Qingdao since 1949. The present study establishes a new criterion to classify the intensity grade of catastrophic storms using the typhoon surge estimated by the two models. A case study demonstrates that the new criterion is well defined in terms of probability concept, is easy to implement, and fits well the calculation of storm surge intensity. The procedures with the proposed statistical models would be useful for the disaster mitigation in other coastal areas influenced by typhoons.

  2. Importance of wave age and resonance in storm surges: The case Xynthia, Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Xavier; Bruneau, Nicolas; Breilh, Jean-François; Fortunato, André B.; Karpytchev, Mikhail

    This study aims to hindcast and analyze the storm surge associated with Xynthia, a mid-latitude depression that severely hit the French central part of the Bay of Biscay on the 27-28th of February 2010. The main losses in human lives and damages were caused by the associated storm surge, which locally exceeded 1.5 m and peaked at the same time as a high spring tide, causing the flooding of low-lying coasts. A new storm surge modeling system was developed, based on the unstructured-grid circulation model SELFE and the spectral wave model WaveWatchIII. The modeling system was implemented over the North-East Atlantic Ocean and resulted in tidal and wave predictions with errors of the order of 3% and 15%, respectively. The storm surge associated with Xynthia was also well predicted along the Bay of Biscay, with only a slight underestimation of the surge peak by 3-8%. Numerical experiments were then performed to analyze the physical processes controlling the development of the storm surge and revealed firstly that the wind caused most of the water level anomaly through an Ekman setup process. The comparison between a wave-dependant and a quadratic parameterization to compute wind stress showed that the storm surge was strongly amplified by the presence of steep and young wind-waves, related to their rapid development in the restricted fetch of the Bay of Biscay. In the central part of the Bay of Biscay, both observed and predicted water level anomalies at landfall displayed ˜6 h oscillations, with amplitudes of up to 0.2 m (10-20% of the surge peak). An analytical shelf resonance model and numerical experiments demonstrated that the period of the observed oscillations corresponds to the resonant mode of the continental shelf in the central part of the Bay of Biscay. It is concluded that these oscillations originate from the interactions between the water level perturbation and the continental shelf and this phenomenon is expected to be relevant at other places along

  3. Gravity shear waves atop the cirrus layer of intense convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent visual satellite photographs of certain intense convective storms have revealed concentric wave patterns. A model for the generation and growth of these waves is proposed. The proposed initial generating mechanism is similar to the effect noticed when a pebble is dropped into a calm pond. The penetration of the tropopause by overshooting convection is analogous to the pebble's penetration of the water's surface. The model for wave growth involves instability due to the wind shear resulting from the cirrus outflow. This model is based on an equation for the waves' phase speed which is similar to the Helmholtz equation. It, however, does not assume an incompressible atmosphere, but rather assumes density is a logarithmic function of height. Finally, the model is evaluated on the two mid-latitude and three tropical cases. The data indicate that shearing instability may be a significant factor in the appearance of these waves.

  4. Parallel Computation of Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Coupled Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Yamashita, T.

    2003-12-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions are very important in the formation and development of tropical storms. These interactions are dominant in exchanging heat, momentum, and moisture fluxes. Heat flux is usually computed using a bulk equation. In this equation air-sea interface supplies heat energy to the atmosphere and to the storm. Dynamical interaction is most often one way in which it is the atmosphere that drives the ocean. The winds transfer momentum to both ocean surface waves and ocean current. The wind wave makes an important role in the exchange of the quantities of motion, heat and a substance between the atmosphere and the ocean. Storm surges can be considered as the phenomena of mean sea-level changes, which are the result of the frictional stresses of strong winds blowing toward the land and causing the set level and the low atmospheric pressure at the centre of the cyclone can additionally raise the sea level. In addition to the rise in water level itself, another wave factor must be considered. A rise of mean sea level due to white-cap wave dissipation should be considered. In bounded bodies of water, such as small seas, wind driven sea level set up is much serious than inverted barometer effects, in which the effects of wind waves on wind-driven current play an important role. It is necessary to develop the coupled system of the full spectral third-generation wind-wave model (WAM or WAVEWATCH III), the meso-scale atmosphere model (MM5) and the coastal ocean model (POM) for simulating these physical interactions. As the component of coupled system is so heavy for personal usage, the parallel computing system should be developed. In this study, first, we developed the coupling system of the atmosphere model, ocean wave model and the coastal ocean model, in the Beowulf System, for the simulation of the storm surge. It was applied to the storm surge simulation caused by Typhoon Bart (T9918) in the Yatsushiro Sea. The atmosphere model and the ocean model have

  5. Simulation of storm surge, wave, currents, and inundation in the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay during Hurricane Isabel in 2003: The importance of waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Alymov, Vadim; Paramygin, Vladimir A.

    2010-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of waves on storm surge, currents, and inundation in the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay during Hurricane Isabel in 2003 through detailed comparison between observed wind, wave, surge, and inundation data and results from an integrated storm surge modeling system, CH3D-SSMS. CH3D-SSMS, which includes coupled coastal and basin-scale storm surge and wave models, successfully simulated measured winds, waves, storm surge, currents, and inundation during Isabel. Comprehensive modeling and data analysis revealed noticeable effects of waves on storm surge, currents, and inundation. Among the processes that represent wave effects, radiation stress (outside the estuaries) and wave-induced stress (outside and inside the estuaries) are more important than wave-induced bottom stress in affecting the water level. Maximum surge was 3 m, while maximum wave height was 20 m offshore and 2.5 m inside the Chesapeake Bay, where the maximum wave-induced water level reached 1 m. Significant waves reached 3.5 m and 16 s at Duck Pier, North Carolina, and 1.6 m and 5 s at Gloucester, Virginia. At Duck, wave effects accounted for ˜36 cm or 20% of the peak surge elevation of 1.71 m. Inside the Chesapeake Bay, wave effects account for 5-10% of observed peak surge level. A two-layer flow is found at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, during the peak of storm surge owing to the combined effects of wind and wave breaking. Higher surge elevations result when the 3-D surge model, instead of the 2-D surge model, is coupled with the 2-D wave model owing to its relatively lower bottom friction. Wave heights obtained with 3- and 2-D surge models show little difference.

  6. Van Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; He, Yihua; Zhou, Qinghua; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    During 18 February to 2 March 2014, the Van Allen Probes encountered multiple geomagnetic storms and simultaneously observed intensified chorus and hiss waves. During this period, there were substantial enhancements in fluxes of energetic (53.8-108.3 keV) and relativistic (2-3.6 MeV) electrons. Chorus waves were excited at locations L = 4-6.2 after the fluxes of energetic were greatly enhanced, with a lower frequency band and wave amplitudes ˜20-100 pT. Strong hiss waves occurred primarily in the main phases or below the location L = 4 in the recovery phases. Relativistic electron fluxes decreased in the main phases due to the adiabatic (e.g., the magnetopause shadowing) or nonadiabatic (hiss-induced scattering) processes. In the recovery phases, relativistic electron fluxes either increased in the presence of enhanced chorus or remained unchanged in the absence of strong chorus or hiss. The observed relativistic electron phase space density peaked around L∗ = 4.5, characteristic of local acceleration. This multiple-storm period reveals a typical picture that chorus waves are excited by the energetic electrons at first and then produce efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons. This further demonstrates that the interplay between both competing mechanisms of chorus-driven acceleration and hiss-driven scattering often occurs in the outer radiation belts.

  7. Observation of acoustic-gravity waves in the upper atmosphere during severe storm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    A nine-element continuum wave spectrum, high-frequency, Doppler sounder array has been used to detect upper atmospheric wave-like disturbances during periods with severe weather activity, particularly severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Five events of severe weather activity, including extreme tornado outbreak of April 3, 1974, were chosen for the present study. The analysis of Doppler records shows that both infrasonic waves and gravity waves were excited when severe storms appeared in the north Alabama area. Primarily, in the case of tornado activity, S-shaped Doppler fluctuations or Doppler fold-backs are observed, while quasi-sinusoidal fluctuations are more common in the case of thunderstorm activity. A criterion for the production of Doppler fold-backs is derived and compared with possible tornado conditions.

  8. Stochastic analysis and modeling of abnormally large waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Shamin, Roman; Yudin, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    In this work stochastics of amplitude characteristics of waves during the freak waves formation was estimated. Also amplitude characteristics of freak wave was modeling with the help of the developed Markov model on the basis of in-situ and numerical experiments. Simulation using the Markov model showed a great similarity of results of in-situ wave measurements[1], results of directly calculating the Euler equations[2] and stochastic modeling data. This work is supported by grant of Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) n°16-35-00526. 1. K. I. Kuznetsov, A. A. Kurkin, E. N. Pelinovsky and P. D. Kovalev Features of Wind Waves at the Southeastern Coast of Sakhalin according to Bottom Pressure Measurements //Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2014, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp. 213-220. DOI: 10.1134/S0001433814020066. 2. R.V. Shamin, V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y 3.E. N. Pelinovsky, K. I. Kuznetsov, J. Touboul, A. A. Kurkin Bottom pressure caused by passage of a solitary wave within the strongly nonlinear Green-Naghdi model //Doklady Physics, April 2015, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 171-174. DOI: 10.1134/S1028335815040035

  9. Characteristics of storms driving wave-induced seafloor mobility on the U.S. East Coast continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between spatial and temporal patterns of wave-driven sediment mobility events on the U.S. East Coast continental shelf and the characteristics of the storms responsible for them. Mobility events, defined as seafloor wave stress exceedance of the critical stress of 0.35 mm diameter sand (0.2160 Pa) for 12 or more hours, were identified from surface wave observations at National Data Buoy Center buoys in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and South Atlantic Bight (SAB) over the period of 1997-2007. In water depths ranging from 36-48 m, there were 4-9 mobility events/year of 1-2 days duration. Integrated wave stress during events (IWAVES) was used as a combined metric of wave-driven mobility intensity and duration. In the MAB, over 67% of IWAVES was caused by extratropical storms, while in the SAB, greater than 66% of IWAVES was caused by tropical storms. On average, mobility events were caused by waves generated by storms located 800+ km away. Far-field hurricanes generated swell 2-4 days before the waves caused mobility on the shelf. Throughout most of the SAB, mobility events were driven by storms to the south, east, and west. In the MAB and near Cape Hatteras, winds from more northerly storms and low-pressure extratropical systems in the mid-western U.S. also drove mobility events. Waves generated by storms off the SAB generated mobility events along the entire U.S. East Coast shelf north to Cape Cod, while Cape Hatteras shielded the SAB area from swell originating to the north offshore of the MAB.

  10. Satellite infrared imagery, rawinsonde data, and gravity wave remote sensing of severe convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    GOES digital infrared data during the time period between two hours before the touchdown of tornado and the tornado touchdown time were used in this study. Comparison between tornado-associated clouds and non-tornado-associated clouds indicates that the difference between overshooting cloud top temperature and the tropopause temperature, or how much the cloud has penetrated above the tropopause, rather than either the absolute temperature of penetrative cloud top or the height of the top of overshooting turret is significant for the possible formation of severe storms. The penetrative overshooting cloud top collapses about 15 to 30 minutes before the touchdown of tornado. Gravity waves were detected from the severe convective storms.

  11. Sele coastal plain flood risk due to wave storm and river flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido; Aucelli, Pietro; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Della Morte, Renata; Cozzolino, Luca; Rizzo, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Wind waves, elevated water levels and river discharge can cause flooding in low-lying coastal areas, where the water level is the interaction between wave storm elevated water levels and river flow interaction. The factors driving the potential flood risk include weather conditions, river water stage and storm surge. These data are required to obtain inputs to run the hydrological model used to evaluate the water surface level during ordinary and extreme events regarding both the fluvial overflow and storm surge at the river mouth. In this paper we studied the interaction between the sea level variation and the river hydraulics in order to assess the location of the river floods in the Sele coastal plain. The wave data were acquired from the wave buoy of Ponza, while the water level data needed to assess the sea level variation were recorded by the tide gauge of Salerno. The water stages, river discharges and rating curves for Sele river were provided by Italian Hydrographic Service (Servizio Idrografico e Mareografico Nazionale, SIMN).We used the dataset of Albanella station (40°29'34.30"N, 15°00'44.30"E), located around 7 km from the river mouth. The extreme river discharges were evaluated through the Weibull equation, which were associated with their return period (TR). The steady state river water levels were evaluated through HEC-RAS 4.0 model, developed by Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) of the United States Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center (USACE,2006). It is a well-known 1D model that computes water surface elevation (WSE) and velocity at discrete cross-sections by solving continuity, energy and flow resistance (e.g., Manning) equation. Data requirements for HEC-RAS include topographic information in the form of a series of cross-sections, friction parameter in the form of Manning's n values across each cross-section, and flow data including flow rates, flow change locations, and boundary conditions. For a steady state sub

  12. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  13. A Proton-cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Viñas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O'Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    We use audification of 0.092 s cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes \\gt 0.1 nT near the ion gyrofrequency (˜0.1 Hz) with duration longer than 1 hr during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  14. A multivariate extreme wave and storm surge climate emulator based on weather patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, A.; Camus, P.; Tomás, A.; Vitousek, S.; Méndez, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    Coastal floods often coincide with large waves, storm surge and tides. Thus, joint probability methods are needed to properly characterize extreme sea levels. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework for multivariate extremes that relates the non-stationary behavior of coastal flooding events to the occurrence probability of daily weather patterns. The proposed method is based on recently-developed weather-type methods to predict extreme events (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, surge level) from large-scale sea-level pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions and a Gaussian copula for modelling the interdependence between variables. The statistical dependence between consecutive days is addressed by defining a climate-based extremal index for each weather type. This work allows attribution of extreme events to specific weather conditions, enhancing the knowledge of climate-driven coastal flooding.

  15. Pioneer 9 plasma wave and solar plasma measurements for the August 1972 storm period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar disturbances of August 1972 produced large-scale solar wind perturbations that were detected by the Pioneer 9 plasma probe, electric field detector, and magnetometer for an extended time period commencing early on August 3. During this ten-day interval the interplanetary plasma parameters at r approximately equal 0.8 AU varied over unusually wide ranges, so that the conditions for generation of high and low VLF wave levels could be identified fairly readily. It is demonstrated that no measurable signals were detected in the broadband electric field channel (sensitive to waves with f greater than or equal to 100 Hz in the spacecraft frame of reference) unless the proton density was high enough to yield a proton plasma frequency with f greater than or about equal to 100 Hz. The analysis suggests that waves related to ion acoustic oscillations were detected throughout the extended storm period.

  16. Electrocardiographic T Wave Abnormalities and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Finnish Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Jani T; Kenttä, Tuomas; Porthan, Kimmo; Huikuri, Heikki V; Junttila, M Juhani

    2015-11-01

    The identification of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists. Noninvasive identification of high-risk patients has been of great interest, and several ventricular depolarization and repolarization abnormalities in the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) have been associated with increased vulnerability to lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Several benign and pathological conditions can induce changes in repolarization detected as alteration of the ST segment or T wave. Changes in the ST segment and T waves can be early markers of an underlying cardiovascular disease, and even minor ST-T abnormalities have predicted reduced survival and increased risk of SCD in the adult population. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge of the SCD risk with standard 12-lead ECG T wave abnormalities in the general population, and possible T wave changes in various cardiac conditions predisposing to SCD. PMID:26391699

  17. The influence of forward speed on ship motions in abnormal waves: Experimental measurements and numerical predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. S.; Hudson, D. A.; Temarel, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ship encounters with abnormal waves are increasingly well documented and it is therefore important to be able to model such encounters in order to assess the risks involved and whether there is a requirement for more stringent design rules.This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the influence of abnormal waves on a vessel travelling with forward speed in irregular seas. The vessel studied in this case is a naval frigate travelling at a range of speeds. To put the motions measured in abnormal waves into context comparisons are made to those in random seas with a variety of significant wave heights, both non-severe and severe. A further objective is to compare experimental measurements with motion predictions from both a two-dimensional linear strip theory and a three-dimensional partly nonlinear seakeeping model.Results demonstrate that abnormal waves may not necessarily be the worst conditions that a ship can encounter. However, accelerations derived from the rigid body motions appear to be in excess of rules values. This has implications for design due to the unexpected nature of abnormal wave occurrence and the consequent likelihood of encountering such a wave at a higher speed (hence in a more severe operating condition) than a random sea of an equivalent height.The three-dimensional partly nonlinear model demonstrates improved agreement with experimental measurements of rigid body motions, compared to the two-dimensional strip theory. It is therefore considered to have greater potential as a design tool for abnormal wave encounters. Further validation with a wide range of sea states and vessel types is required.

  18. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The 2-7 May 1998 Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    A complete description of a self-consistent model of magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and back on waves are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under nonsteady state conditions. The developed model is employed to simulate the entire 2-7 May 1998 storm period. First, the trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with comparison with the data measured by the three- dimensional hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Incorporating in the model the wave-particle interaction leads to much better agreement between the experimental data and the model results. Second, examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced by the model during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emission about 2 days after the main phase of the storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Finally, the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates of the wave power spectral densities are studied. It is found that about 2 days after the storm s main phase on 4 May, mainly non-Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  19. Body wave microseisms from a distant storm revealed by Hi-net data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of microseisms were firmly established in 1940's. Their excitation sources are ocean swell activities. Microseisms from 0.1 to 0.5 Hz, which double the frequency, indicating the generation of the former through nonlinear wave-wave interaction of the latter. Because the swell activities are their sources, surface wave excitation is dominant.Recently body wave microseisms from a distant storm, however, have been focussed [e.g. Gerstoft et al. 2006]. They show clear teleseismic P waves excited by distant storms. A back-projection method could constrain the source distribution, which gives clues to their excitation mechanisms. Most studies focused, however, only vertical components.In this study, in order to constrain excitation mechanisms of microseisms, we conducted a 3-component array analysis using Hi-net operated by NIED, when a strong weather bomb hit the Atlantic ocean on Dec. 9th, 2014. We analyzed 3-component velocity-meters with a natural frequency of 1 Hz at 775 stations. The instrumental response was deconvolved by using the inverse filtering technique after reduction of common logger noise Their frequency-wavenumber spectra were calculated at 0.15 Hz. The spectra of a vertical component and a radial component show that clear teleseismic P-wave. The slowness of about 0.05 [s/km] and the back azimuth of -5 degrees are consistent with that of the P wave traveled from the weather bomb in the Atlantic ocean. The radial component shows SV wave with about 20% of P wave amplitudes. These observations could be explained by a single force source at the sea surface in the 1-D medium in the first order approximation. The transverse component also shows SH waves with about 10% of the P wave amplitude. The excitation source of P, SV and SH wave were located in the same small area by a backprojection analysis. These observations suggest that the steep topography and the thick sediment beneath the source area also affected the excitations.Observations of

  20. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans. PMID:26699461

  1. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans. PMID:26699461

  2. Past, present and future of wave climate, storms and morphological impacts on sandy coasts: Spain and Wales coasts examples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Buitrago, N. G.; Anfuso, G.; Phillips, M.; Thomas, T.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal response to climate events is very important for both socio-economic and environmental reasons. In order to carry out a correct coastal management program, it is important to provide realistic analysis of the natural variability and trend associated with climatic events (i.e. hurricanes, storms). In a scenario of rising sea level and increasing wave heights, the coastline will suffer huge impacts in terms of erosion and flooding especially with respect to low-lying regions that may partly or entirely disappear. This work deals with the analysis of a 22 year long wave buoy dataset recorded at Cadiz (SW Spain) and Tenby (S Wales, UK) with the objective of find the existing relationships between wave climate and coastal response. The analysis consisted in the characterization of winter wave climate, extreme waves and storms characteristics and distribution and their relationships with regional cycles (Teleconnection Patterns) such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) Index, the East Atlantic (EA) pattern and the Arctic Oscillation (AO), among others. Wave climate showed clear cyclic variations in average monthly significant wave height (Hs). Winter waves rapidly increased in height, reaching peak values (Hs = 1.2 m, Cadiz, Hs = 2.1 m, Tenby) between December and January. Energy patterns calculated using the equation of wave energy flux, showed average values of 37 kW/m and 155 kW/m respectively, during winter. In the same way, storm characterization in each study area was carried out using the Storm Power Index (Dolan and Davis, 1992) and five classes were obtained, from class I (weak) to V (extreme). Storm occurrence probability was 95% for class I (i.e. almost one event per year) to 5 % for class V. The return period for class V was 25 years and ranged from 5 to 8 years for classes III and IV storms, e.g. significant and severe events. Classes I and II showed a period of recurrence ranging from 1 to 3 years. For both areas high energy wave values were

  3. Modeling fresh water lens damage and recovery on atolls after storm-wave washover.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Terry, James P

    2012-01-01

    The principal natural source of fresh water on scattered coral atolls throughout the tropical Pacific Ocean is thin unconfined groundwater lenses within islet substrates. Although there are many threats to the viability of atoll fresh water lenses, salinization caused by large storm waves washing over individual atoll islets is poorly understood. In this study, a mathematical modeling approach is used to examine the immediate responses, longer-term behavior, and subsequent (partial) recovery of a Pacific atoll fresh water lens after saline damage caused by cyclone-generated wave washover under different scenarios. Important findings include: (1) the saline plume formed by a washover event mostly migrates downward first through the top coral sand and gravel substrate, but then exits the aquifer to the ocean laterally through the more permeable basement limestone; (2) a lower water table position before the washover event, rather than a longer duration of storm washover, causes more severe damage to the fresh water lens; (3) relatively fresher water can possibly be found as a preserved horizon in the deeper part of an aquifer after disturbance, especially if the fresh water lens extends into the limestone under normal conditions; (4) post-cyclone accumulation of sea water in the central depression (swamp) of an atoll islet prolongs the later stage of fresh water lens recovery. PMID:21883195

  4. Hindcast and validation of Hurricane Ike (2008) waves, forerunner, and storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, M. E.; Westerink, J. J.; Kennedy, A. B.; Kerr, P. C.; Dietrich, J. C.; Dawson, C.; Bender, C. J.; Smith, J. M.; Jensen, R. E.; Zijlema, M.; Holthuijsen, L. H.; Luettich, R. A.; Powell, M. D.; Cardone, V. J.; Cox, A. T.; Pourtaheri, H.; Roberts, H. J.; Atkinson, J. H.; Tanaka, S.; Westerink, H. J.; Westerink, L. G.

    2013-09-01

    Hurricane Ike (2008) made landfall near Galveston, Texas, as a moderate intensity storm. Its large wind field in conjunction with the Louisiana-Texas coastline's broad shelf and large scale concave geometry generated waves and surge that impacted over 1000 km of coastline. Ike's complex and varied wave and surge response physics included: the capture of surge by the protruding Mississippi River Delta; the strong influence of wave radiation stress gradients on the Delta adjacent to the shelf break; the development of strong wind driven shore-parallel currents and the associated geostrophic setup; the forced early rise of water in coastal bays and lakes facilitating inland surge penetration; the propagation of a free wave along the southern Texas shelf; shore-normal peak wind-driven surge; and resonant and reflected long waves across a wide continental shelf. Preexisting and rapidly deployed instrumentation provided the most comprehensive hurricane response data of any previous hurricane. More than 94 wave parameter time histories, 523 water level time histories, and 206 high water marks were collected throughout the Gulf in deep water, along the nearshore, and up to 65 km inland. Ike's highly varied physics were simulated using SWAN + ADCIRC, a tightly coupled wave and circulation model, on SL18TX33, a new unstructured mesh of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and western Atlantic Ocean with high resolution of the Gulf's coastal floodplain from Alabama to the Texas-Mexico border. A comprehensive validation was made of the model's ability to capture the varied physics in the system.

  5. Vulnerability of a subarctic barrier spit to global warming induced changes in storm surge and wave runup: Shaktoolik, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, K. A.; Erikson, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    The native Inupiaq community of Shaktoolik, in northwestern Alaska, is located on a low-lying barrier spit located on Norton Sound. The inhabited portion of the spit is 7.07 m above MLLW at its highest and only ~200 m across. The community is vulnerable to marine flooding on both the open ocean and lagoon sides of the spit during storms. Storm events in this region typically occur during the fall and winter months, often when the coastline is protected from flooding and erosion by shorefast ice. High latitudes are experiencing the greatest increases in temperature due to global warming and the reduced duration and extent of sea ice is affecting Alaskan coastal communities. Continued reduction of sea ice protecting the coastline from exposure during large storm events may result in the need to relocate many Native Alaskan coastal communities. The goal of this study was to quantify changes in storm surge and wave runup during ice-free months for the mid to late 21st century. An analytical approach was developed to quantify storm surge in Alaskan coastal communities with historical meteorological data from the North American Regional Reanalysis. This analytical model was used to calculate projected storm surge inundation levels in Shaktoolik for the mid and late 21st century for both a moderate and high greenhouse gas emissions scenario (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 respectively), with meteorological output from the MIROC5 global climate model. Additionally, projected wave runup heights during storm events were calculated numerically using WAVEWATCH III to calculate wave height and period from the projected MIROC5 meteorological data and SBEACH to model the maximum runup heights along the Shaktoolik shoreline. Total storm water levels (storm surge plus wave runup height) were calculated for 236 projected storm events in the Bering Sea and used to find the return periods of inundation for each emissions scenario. When compared to historical total storm water levels, the results

  6. An European historical reconstruction of sea surface dynamics (waves and storm surge) for coastal impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, Melisa; Perez, Jorge; Cid, Alba; Castanedo, Sonia; Losada, Inigo; Medina, Raul; Mendez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Despite their outstanding relevance in coastal processes, a study of the sea surface dynamics due to atmospheric wind and pressure variations are rather limited in comparison with the mean sea level rise. Data of waves and surges along the European region are scarce and in-homogeneous, not only in terms of spatial coverage but also in terms of temporal coverage. This study presents two databases focused on a historical reconstruction of: (i) the wind-generated waves (GOW) and (ii) the meteorological sea level component (GOS). The GOW and GOS datasets cover the whole European coast (North Atlantic, North Sea, Baltic Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea) at high-spatial resolution from 1979 to present. The meteorological sea level component (storm surge) has been generated by the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). To take into account non-linear interactions between tides and surges, both dynamics were simulated jointly. Final results of meteorological component of sea level were obtained by subtracting the astronomical tide from the simulated sea surface. The model was set-up for Europe using an orthogonal grid, with a horizontal resolution ranging between 3.5 to 11 km. A spatial domain of approximately 5 km was used for the Black Sea. Local coastal waves can be the integrated result of the ocean surface over a large region of influence. GOW-Europe is designed from a multigrid approach based on the overlapping of two-way nested domains. The coarser spatial resolution along the European coast of GOW is 15 km. The generation and propagation of the sea surface waves of GOW-Europe are simulated with the model WAVEWATCH III v4.18. Effects of non-linear wave-wave interactions, whitecapping and depth-induced refraction are considered in the propagation model. In order to validate GOW and GOS over Europe with available observations, an exhaustive comparison with in-situ and remote measurements was developed. In-situ buoys and tide-gauges are used to compare hourly time

  7. Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Green, J. C.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2014-06-01

    Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our simulation results show remarkable agreement in magnitude, timing, energy dependence, and pitch angle distribution with the observed electron PSD near its peak location. However, radial diffusion and other loss processes may be required to explain the differences between the observation and simulation at other locations away from the PSD peak. Our simulation results, together with previous studies, suggest that local acceleration by chorus waves is a robust and ubiquitous process and plays a critical role in accelerating injected seed electrons with convective energies (~100 keV) to highly relativistic energies (several MeV).

  8. Modelling the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan storm surge: Effect of waves, offshore winds, tide phase, and translation speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgera, P. H. T.

    2015-12-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan, with wind speeds exceeding 300 km h-1 (160 knots) generated a storm surge in San Pedro Bay reaching heights of more than 6m in Tacloban City. Delft Dashboard (DDB), an open-source standalone Matlab based graphical user interface linked to the FLOW and WAVE modeling software of Deltares, was used to develop a coupled flow and wave storm surge model to understand the Typhoon Haiyan storm surge development and propagation. Various experiments were designed to determine the effect of waves, the occurrence of offshore winds prior to the surge, tidal phase, and typhoon translation speed on the surge height. Wave coupling decreased the surge height by about 0.5m probably due to energy dissipation from white capping, bottom friction, and depth-induced breaking. Offshore-directed winds before the arrival of the storm eye resulted to receding of the water level in San Pedro and Cancabato Bay, corroborated by eyewitness and tide gauge data. The experiment wherein the offshore winds were removed resulted to no water receding and a surge with a smaller and gentler surge front, pointing to the importance of the initial water level drawdown in contributing to the destructive power of the wave front. With regard to tides, the effect in Tacloban was actually neither linear nor additive to the surge, with higher surge coincident to low tides and lower surge coincident to high tides. Lastly, the model run with typhoon having a slower translation speed than Haiyan was found to generate higher surges.

  9. Modeling the storm time behavior of the magnetosonic waves using solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Chen, Lunjin

    2016-01-01

    We build empirical models of magnetosonic waves (also called as equatorial noise) both outside and inside the plasmapause, based on the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms fast-survey data during the period from 1 May 2010 to 30 November 2014, which utilize solar wind measurements as model inputs, i.e., interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz, solar wind speed (VSW), and dynamic pressure (PSW). For model development, the time delay of magnetosonic wave amplitude relative to the solar wind parameters is first identified based on correlation analysis. We find that PSW is better correlated with the variation of wave amplitude outside the plasmapause than VSW, while the opposite is true inside the plasmapause. Among the solar wind parameters, the preceding southward IMF Bz with the time delay of 3-4 h and 4-5 h, corresponding to outside and inside the plasmapause, respectively, yields the best correlation with the variation of wave amplitude. In this study, we use the solar wind parameter-based model to investigate magnetosonic wave activity during corotating interaction region-driven storm. The results show that with increasing southward IMF Bz, wave activity is amplified mostly on the dayside both outside and inside the plasmapause and high amplitude is more shifted toward the prenoon sector, while increasing PSW, it is amplified only in the postnoon sector outside the plasmapause. Our statistical model can explain the observed amplitudes by 38% on average outside the plasmapause and 26% inside, and their model performance is generally higher than that of a model using AE index only as an input.

  10. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The May 2-7, 1998, Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Complete description of a self-consistent model for magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and back on waves, are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under non steady-state conditions. In the paper by Khazanov et al. [2002] this self-consistent model has only been shortly outlined, and discussions of many the model related details have been omitted. For example, in present study for the first time a new algorithm for numerical finding of the resonant numbers for quasilinear wave-particle interaction is described, or it is demonstrated that in order to describe quasilinear interaction in a multi-ion thermal plasma correctly, both e and He(+) modes of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves should be employed. The developed model is used to simulate the entire May 2-7, 1998 storm period. Trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with their comparison with the data measured by the 3D hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emissions in about two days after main phase of storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Also the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates for power spectral densities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are studied. It is found that in about 2 days after the storm main phase on May 4, mainly non Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  11. ULF waves observed by the low altitude satellite DEMETER during the geomagnetic super storm in November 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisa, David; Parrot, Michel; Santolik, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    This study reports observations of ULF waves by the low altitude satellite DEMETER (~700 km) during the magnetic super storm in November 2004. This storm was the largest geomagnetic storm during the entire DEMETER mission (maximum Dst = - 373 nT and Kp = 9 on 8 November), and it was the opportunity to record many new phenomena in the equatorial region. The reported ULF emissions are observed both by electric and magnetic antennas and can be attributed to Schumann resonances and/or EMIC (Electro-Magnetic Ion Cyclotron) waves. It is not the first time that these emissions are observed in the low-altitude ionosphere. EMIC waves are very common whereas waves at Schumann resonances have been only recorded by a few satellites. But it is the first time that they are observed during an extended period of time. They extend continuously between the trough region in one hemisphere up to the other trough region in the other hemisphere. We explain our observation by a penetration of waves through these trough regions to the position at the satellite altitude. EMIC waves are generated in the equatorial region, but at much higher altitudes than the satellite orbit whereas waves linked to Schumann resonances must be coming from the Earth-ionosphere waveguide.

  12. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  13. Observations of ULF waves on the ground and ionospheric Doppler shifts during storm sudden commencement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinyan; Liu, Wenlong; Xiao, Zuo; Hao, Yongqiang

    2016-04-01

    Using data from ground-based magnetometers and HF Doppler sounder, we study ultralow frequency (ULF) waves excited during the storm sudden commencement (SSC) on 8 March 2012 and find possible evidence on the link between ULF waves and ionospheric Doppler shifts. Pc1-Pc2 ULF waves are observed from 11:04 to 11:27 UT after the SSC by ground stations of L shell ranging from 1.06 to 2.31, mapping to the topside ionosphere. There are weak responses in this frequency range in the power spectra of ionospheric Doppler shift. From 11:19 to 11:23 UT, oscillations of magnetic field in a lower frequency range of Pc3-Pc4 are observed and are well correlated with the trace of Doppler shift. It is thus suggested that ionospheric Doppler shift can response to ULF oscillations in magnetic field in various frequency ranges, especially in the frequency range of Pc3-Pc4 and below. This paper demonstrates a new mechanism of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  14. A New Look to Interactions of Saharan Dust with Waves in the Tropical Atlantic Storm Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses mechanisms of the interactions between light-absorbing aerosols and transient atmospheric waves, including their feedback onto the mean-circulation in one of the most meteorologically sensitive areas of the world: the tropical western African/eastern Atlantic Ocean. Evidence of these interactions are presented based on analyses of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of The Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. We analyzed the components of the rate of change of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) to explore the possible role of dust aerosol radiative forcing on reinforcing energetic terms associated with the African easterly waves (AEWs) during boreal summer seasons when the activity of AEWs peaks. This study shows that the anomalous perturbations in concentration of dust in the oceanic Saharan Air Layer (OSAL) precede amplified growth and decay of the subsequent waves compared to waves occurring prior to dust outbreaks. The amplified EKE associated with dust outbreaks are followed by seeding of new wave packets through enhanced divergence and convergence of ageostrophic geopotential height fluxes in the tropical Atlantic storm track. Meanwhile, the enhanced forcing of the mean-circulation associated with the increased momentum fluxes of the high frequency eddies at the northern track of AEWs occurs with a time-lag after the peak of dust concentration in the OSAL. We suggest that dust radiative heating in the OSAL may act as an additional energy source to amplify the thermal/mechanical activity of eddies in the northern track of the AEWs.

  15. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  16. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  17. Storm-time fingerprints of Pc 4-5 waves on energetic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Zesta, Eftyhia; Balasis, George; Mann, Ian R.; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2014-05-01

    Geospace magnetic storms, associated with either coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or high speed solar streams, involve global variations of the geomagnetic field as well as acceleration of charged particles in the magnetosphere. Ultra low frequency (ULF) waves with frequencies in the range of a few mHz (Pc 4-5 waves) can be generated externally by compressive variations in the solar wind or shear flow along the magnetopause unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect. Furthermore, low frequency instabilities of ring current ions are also considered as a possible internal driver of ULF wave growth. We examine power enhancements of ULF waves during four successive magnetic storms, which occurred in July 2004 and were characterized by a decreasing minimum of the Dst index, from -76 nT down to -197 nT. During the course of the magnetic storms, ULF wave power variations have been observed nearly simultaneously at different magnetic latitudes and longitudes by the ground-based CARISMA, IMAGE, 210 MM and SAMBA magnetometer networks. Nonetheless, stronger magnetic storms were accompanied by greater ULF wave power enhancements tending to be more pronounced at magnetic stations located at lower L shells. Furthermore, the generation and penetration of ULF wave power deep into the inner magnetosphere seems to be contributing to the energization and transport of relativistic electrons. Except for the magnetic storm on 25 July 2000, the three magnetic storms on 17, 23 and 27 July 2004 were characterized by a significant increase in the flux of electrons with energies higher than 1 MeV, as measured by GOES-10 and -12 during the recovery phase of each storm. On the other hand, when looking at the magnetic storm on 17 August 2001, the initial decrease was followed by an increase six days after the commencement of the storm. The electron flux decrease was more than two orders of magnitude and remained low after the recovery of the Dst index. These observations provided us the basis for

  18. The simulation of a storm surge and wave due to Typhoon Sarah using an integrally coupled tide-surge-wave model of the Yellow and East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Jin-Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Byung Ho

    2015-12-01

    The Yellow and East China Seas are characterized by shallow shelf seas, seasonal monsoons and typhoons, especially the Korean Peninsula's western coastal area, which features large tides, a complex coastline and many islands. This study implemented an integrally coupled tide-surge-wave model based on an unstructured grid to evaluate the impact of Typhoon Sarah, which occurred in September of 1959, on the Yellow and East China Seas and, specifically, the southern coast of Korea in terms of waves and storm surges. The model results projected a significant wave height of 2-7 m, a mean wave period of 4-14 sec, and positive surge heights that were 0.3-1 m along the southern coast of Korea. Additional model runs included two independent model runs for waves and tides, and one tide-surge model run was conducted to investigate the interactions in the wave, tide and storm surge processes. The coupled tide-surgewave model reasonably reproduced wave properties and storm surges, but uncoupled models, i.e. independent models, slightly overestimated waves and surges. The wave forces associated with the gradient radiation stress resulted in water being elevated into coastal regions, thereby the water elevation increased onshore and the reverse happened offshore. A possible water level change due to a storm equivalent to Typhoon Sarah in the year 2100 was estimated by considering a mean sea level rise of 70 cm and was generally in the range of 70-100 cm in the Yellow and East China Seas and approximately 68 cm along the southern coast of Korea.

  19. Estimating the Power per Mode Number and Power vs L-shell of Broadband, Storm-time ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Liu, W.; Argyriadis, E.

    2013-12-01

    In studies of particles' radial diffusion processes in the magnetosphere it is well known that Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves of frequency m*ωd can resonantly interact with particles of drift frequency ωd, where m is the azimuthal mode number of the waves; however due to difficulties in estimating m an over-simplifying assumption is often made in radial diffusion simulations, namely that all ULF wave power is located at m=1 or, in some cases, m=2. In another assumption that is commonly made, power measured from geosynchronous satellites is assumed to be uniform across L-shells. In the present work, a technique is presented for extracting information on the distribution of ULF wave power in a range of azimuthal mode numbers, through calculations of the cross-power and phase differences between a number of azimuthally aligned pairs of magnetometers, either in space or on the ground. We find that the temporal evolution of power at each mode number gives unique insight into the temporal evolution of ULF waves during a storm as well as a more accurate characterization of broadband ULF waves. Furthermore, using multi-spacecraft measurements during a particular storm, we calculate the L-dependence of ULF wave power. These measurements and calculations can be used in more accurate ULF wave representation in radial diffusion simulations.

  20. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  1. ULF waves and radiation belts: earthward penetration of Pc 4-5 waves and energetic electron flux enhancements during geospace magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis; Zesta, Eftyhia; Balasis, George; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2013-04-01

    Energetic particle fluxes in the outer radiation belt can vary over orders of magnitude on time scales ranging from minutes, to days and years. Geospace magnetic storms when sufficiently strong to exceed key thresholds of the Dst index may either increase or decrease the fluxes of energetic electrons. We examine the responses of energetic electrons to nine moderate, intense and weak magnetic storms, which occurred at different phases of the solar cycle, and compare these with concurrent variations of ULF wave power. Pc 4-5 waves with frequencies in the range of a few mHz may be generated internally in the magnetosphere by low frequency instabilities of ring current ions and externally by shear instabilities at the magnetopause flanks, or compressive variations in the solar wind. Here, we present multipoint observations from ground-based magnetometer arrays collocated with electron drift orbits, which are complemented and measurements by conjugate multi-point satellites, such as CHAMP, Cluster, GOES and THEMIS. We discuss the excitation, growth and decay characteristics of Pc 4-5 waves during the different phases of the magnetic storms with particular emphasis on the distribution of Pc 4-5 wave power over a variety of L shells. We investigate whether Pc 4-5 wave power penetrates to lower L shell values during periods of relatively intense geomagnetic activity as compared to weak magnetic storms. Structural changes of the magnetosphere during intense geomagnetic storms can play an important role in the generation and penetration of Pc 4-5 waves deep into the inner magnetosphere, which in turn is of significance for the wave-particle interactions contributing to the acceleration, transport and loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. We present preliminary statistics of Pc 4-5 waves observed during magnetic storms of varying intensity, which occurred over the course of the previous solar cycle. This work is supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework

  2. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Ludlam, M.; Turin, P.; Harvey, P. R.; Hochmann, R.; Harps, K.; Dalton, G.; McCauley, J.; Rachelson, W.; Gordon, D.; Donakowski, B.; Shultz, C.; Smith, C.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Fischer, J.; Heavner, S.; Berg, P.; Malsapina, D. M.; Bolton, M. K.; Hudson, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Albert, J.; Foster, J. C.; Chaston, C. C.; Mann, I.; Donovan, E.; Cully, C. M.; Cattell, C. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Kersten, K.; Brenneman, A.; Tao, J. B.

    2013-11-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ˜15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrument provides a continuous stream of measurements over the entire orbit of the low frequency electric field vector at 32 samples/s in a survey mode. This survey mode also includes measurements of spacecraft potential to provide information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure. Survey mode spectral information allows the continuous evaluation of the peak value and spectral power in electric, magnetic and density fluctuations from several Hz to 6.5 kHz. On-board cross-spectral data allows the calculation of field-aligned wave Poynting flux along the magnetic field. For higher frequency waveform information, two different programmable burst memories are used with nominal sampling rates of 512 samples/s and 16 k samples/s. The EFW burst modes provide targeted measurements over brief time intervals of 3-d electric fields, 3-d wave magnetic fields (from the EMFISIS magnetic search coil sensors), and spacecraft potential. In the burst modes all six sensor-spacecraft potential measurements are telemetered enabling interferometric timing of small-scale plasma structures. In the first burst mode, the instrument stores all or a substantial fraction of the high frequency

  3. ON THE BRIGHTNESS AND WAITING-TIME DISTRIBUTIONS OF A TYPE III RADIO STORM OBSERVED BY STEREO/WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, J. P.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Bale, S. D.; Wheatland, M. S.; Maksimovic, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Goetz, K.

    2010-01-10

    Type III solar radio storms, observed at frequencies below {approx}16 MHz by space-borne radio experiments, correspond to the quasi-continuous, bursty emission of electron beams onto open field lines above active regions. The mechanisms by which a storm can persist in some cases for more than a solar rotation whilst exhibiting considerable radio activity are poorly understood. To address this issue, the statistical properties of a type III storm observed by the STEREO/WAVES radio experiment are presented, examining both the brightness distribution and (for the first time) the waiting-time distribution (WTD). Single power-law behavior is observed in the number distribution as a function of brightness; the power-law index is {approx}2.1 and is largely independent of frequency. The WTD is found to be consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson process. This indicates that during the storm individual type III bursts occur independently and suggests that the storm dynamics are consistent with avalanche-type behavior in the underlying active region.

  4. Numerical experiments of storm winds, surges, and waves on the southern coast of Korea during Typhoon Sanba: the role of revising wind force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J. J.; Shim, J. S.; Park, K. S.; Lee, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The southern coastal area of Korea has often been damaged by storm surges and waves due to the repeated approach of strong typhoons every year. The integrated model system is applied to simulate typhoon-induced winds, storm surges, and surface waves in this region during Typhoon Sanba in 2012. The TC96 planetary boundary layer wind model is used for atmospheric forcing and is modified to incorporate the effect of the land's roughness on the typhoon wind. Numerical experiments are carried out to investigate the effects of land-dissipated wind on storm surges and waves using the three-dimensional, unstructured grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), which includes integrated storm surge and wave models with highly refined grid resolutions along the coastal region of complex geometry and topography. Compared to the measured data, the numerical models have successfully simulated storm winds, surges, and waves. Better agreement between the simulated and measured storm winds has been found when considering the effect of wind dissipation by land roughness. In addition, this modified wind force leads to clearly improved results in storm surge simulations, whereas the wave results have shown only slight improvement. The study results indicate that the effect of land dissipation on wind force plays a significant role in the improvement of water level modeling inside coastal areas.

  5. Numerical experiments of storm winds, surges, and waves on the southern coast of Korea during Typhoon Sanba: the role of revising wind force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J. J.; Shim, J. S.; Park, K. S.; Lee, J. C.

    2014-08-01

    The southern coastal area of Korea has often been damaged by storm surges and waves, due to the repeated approach of strong typhoons every year. The integrated model system is applied to simulate typhoon-induced winds, storm surges, and surface waves in this region during Typhoon Sanba in 2012. The TC96 (planetary boundary layer model) wind model is used for atmospheric forcing and is modified to incorporate the effect of the land's roughness on the typhoon wind. Numerical experiments are carried out to investigate the effects of land-dissipated wind on storm surges and waves using a three dimensional, unstructured grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), which includes integrated storm surge and wave models with highly refined grid resolutions along the coastal region of complex geometry and topography. Compared to the measured data, the numerical models have successfully simulated storm winds, surges, and waves. Better agreement between the simulated and measured storm winds has been found when considering the effect of wind dissipation by land roughness. In addition, this modified wind force leads to clearly improved results in storm surge simulations, whereas the wave results have shown only slight improvement. The study results indicate that the effect of land dissipation on wind force plays a significant role in the improvement of water level modeling inside coastal areas.

  6. A modeling study of the impact of major storms on waves, surface and near-bed currents on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Michael Z.; Wu, Yongsheng; Prescott, Robert H.; Tang, Charles C. L.; Han, Guoqi

    2015-08-01

    Waves and current processes, both surface and near-bed were simulated for major storms on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland using integrated wave, 3-D tidal and ocean current models. Most storms track southwest to northeast and pass to the north or northwest of the Grand Banks. Significant wave heights can reach up to ˜14 m and are predominantly to the northeast at the peak of storms. Extreme surface currents reach approximately 1 m s-1 and are largely to the southeast. The strongest bottom currents, up to 0.8 m s-1, occur on St. Pierre Bank and are dominantly to the south and southeast. While wave height and wind-driven current generally increase with wind speed, factors such as storm paths, the relative location of the storm center at the storm peak, and storm translation speed also affect waves and currents. Surface and near-bed wind-driven currents both rotate clockwise and decrease in strength as the storm traverses the Grand Banks. While the spatial variability of the storm impact on surface currents is relatively small, bottom currents show significant spatial variation of magnitude and direction as well as timing of peak current conditions. These spatial variations are controlled by the changes of bathymetry and mixed layer depth over the model domain. The storm-generated currents can be 7 to 10 times stronger than the background mean currents. These strong currents interact with wave oscillatory flows to produce shear velocities up to 15 cm s-1 and cause wide occurrences of strong sediment transport over nearly the entire Grand Banks.

  7. Peculiarities of long-wave radio bursts from solar flares preceding strong geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokudina, V. S.; Kuril'Chik, V. N.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Kudela, K.; Slivka, M.

    2009-02-01

    Radio bursts in the frequency range of 100-1500 kHz, recorded in 1997-2000 on the INTERBALL-1 satellite during the solar flares preceding the strong geomagnetic storms with D st < -100 nT, are analyzed in this paper. The observed long-wave III-type radio bursts of solar origin at frequencies of 1460 and 780 kHz were characterized by large values of the flux S f = 10-15 -10-17 W/m2 Hz and duration longer than 10 min. The rapid frequency drift of a modulated radio burst continued up to a frequency of 250 kHz, which testified that the exciting agent (a beam of energetic electrons) propagated from the Sun to the Earth. All such flares were characterized by the appearance of halo coronal mass ejections, observed by the LASCO/ SOHO, and by the presence of a southward Bz-component of the IMF, measured on the ACE and WIND spacecraft. In addition, shortly after radio bursts, the INTERBALL-1 satellite has recorded the fluxes of energetic electrons with E > 40 keV.

  8. Association of radiation belt electron enhancements with earthward penetration of Pc5 ULF waves: a case study of intense 2001 magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Zesta, E.; Balasis, G.; Mann, I. R.; Katsavrias, C.; Tsinganos, K.

    2015-11-01

    Geospace magnetic storms, driven by the solar wind, are associated with increases or decreases in the fluxes of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt. We examine the response of relativistic electrons to four intense magnetic storms, during which the minimum of the Dst index ranged from -105 to -387 nT, and compare these with concurrent observations of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves from the trans-Scandinavian IMAGE magnetometer network and stations from multiple magnetometer arrays available through the worldwide SuperMAG collaboration. The latitudinal and global distribution of Pc5 wave power is examined to determine how deep into the magnetosphere these waves penetrate. We then investigate the role of Pc5 wave activity deep in the magnetosphere in enhancements of radiation belt electrons population observed in the recovery phase of the magnetic storms. We show that, during magnetic storms characterized by increased post-storm electron fluxes as compared to their pre-storm values, the earthward shift of peak and inner boundary of the outer electron radiation belt follows the Pc5 wave activity, reaching L shells as low as 3-4. In contrast, the one magnetic storm characterized by irreversible loss of electrons was related to limited Pc5 wave activity that was not intensified at low L shells. These observations demonstrate that enhanced Pc5 ULF wave activity penetrating deep into the magnetosphere during the main and recovery phase of magnetic storms can, for the cases examined, distinguish storms that resulted in increases in relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belts from those that did not.

  9. MESSENGER survey of in situ low frequency wave storms between 0.3 and 0.7 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Jian, L. K.; Raines, J. L.; Gershman, D. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Korth, H.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetometer data was surveyed between 0.3 and 0.7 AU from 6 June 2007 to 23 March 2011 for low-frequency wave (LFW) storms, when the magnetometer was sampling at a rate of at least 2 s-1. A total of 12,197 LFW events were identified, of which 5506 lasted 10 min or longer. The events have a high degree of polarization, are circularly polarized, with wave vectors nearly aligned or antialigned with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at frequencies in the vicinity of the proton cyclotron frequency. These events are observed about 6% of the time, preferentially associated with radially directed inward or outward IMF. Their occurrence rate and median duration do not change much with R, where R is the heliocentric radial distance. For a narrow-frequency window in the solar wind frame, left-handed storms in the spacecraft frame have a power drop off that is roughly proportional to R-3 which is consistent with a source close the Sun, while right-handed storms have a power drop off roughly proportional R-1 which is not consistent with a source close to the Sun. The power in the left-handed LFW storms is on average greater than the right-handed ones by a factor of 3. In the solar wind frame, the wave frequency decreases from 0.13 to 0.04 Hz moving from 0.3 to 0.7 AU, but the frequency normalized by the local proton cyclotron frequency does not change much with the running median varying from 0.35 to 0.5. The normalized frequency band widths of the wave power spectra increase slightly with R, possibly associated with energy dissipation.

  10. Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon seep communities. V. Biofacies and shell orientation of autochthonous shell beds below storm wave base

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, W.R.; Staff, G.M.; Powell, E.N.; MacDonald, I.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Clam and mussel assemblages associated with petroleum seepage on the Louisiana continental slope form the only substantial shell accumulations below storm wave base on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope. Four distinct biofacies are present at the seeps, dominated respectively by mussels, lucinid clams, vesicomyid clams and tubeworms. Each primary seep site is typically composed of a series of not necessarily contiguous, autochthonous beds dominated by one biofacies. Mussels and tubeworms often co-occur, but neither normally co-occur with lucinid or vesicomyid clams. Lucinid and vesicomyid clam beds have the best chance of preservation. Despite essentially undisturbed accumulation in quiet water below storm wave base, concavity ratios rarely differ from 1:1 and frequency of articulation may be low. Dominantly concave-up valves previously reported in quiet water may result from man's fishing activities. Significant variability in shell orientation, frequency of articulation and concavity ratio between adjacent samples indicates that many individual stratigraphically-equivalent samples should be used in any taphofacies analysis of assemblages formed in low-energy environments. Lucinid beds which form below the sediment surface and vesicomyid beds which form on the sediment surface differed significantly in shell orientation and articulation frequency. Assemblages forming below storm wave base in low-energy environments may comprise a wide variety of taphofacies depending upon whether formation occurs primarily beneath the sediment surface or on the sediment surface, despite contemporaneous formation under similar environmental conditions.

  11. Data and numerical analysis of astronomic tides, wind-waves, and hurricane storm surge along the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Cox, A. T.; Salisbury, M.; Coggin, D.

    2016-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) is a unique geophysical setting for complex tropical storm-induced hydrodynamic processes that occur across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Each hurricane includes its own distinctive characteristics and can cause unique and devastating storm surge when it strikes within the intricate geometric setting of the NGOM. While a number of studies have explored hurricane storm surge in the NGOM, few have attempted to describe storm surge and coastal inundation using observed data in conjunction with a single large-domain high-resolution numerical model. To better understand the oceanic and nearshore response to these tropical cyclones, we provide a detailed assessment, based on field measurements and numerical simulation, of the evolution of wind waves, water levels, and currents for Hurricanes Ivan (2004), Dennis (2005), Katrina (2005), and Isaac (2012), with focus on Mississippi, Alabama, and the Florida Panhandle coasts. The developed NGOM3 computational model describes the hydraulic connectivity among the various inlet and bay systems, Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, coastal rivers and adjacent marsh, and built infrastructure along the coastal floodplain. The outcome is a better understanding of the storm surge generating mechanisms and interactions among hurricane characteristics and the NGOM's geophysical configuration. The numerical analysis and observed data explain the ˜2 m/s hurricane-induced geostrophic currents across the continental shelf, a 6 m/s outflow current during Ivan, the hurricane-induced coastal Kelvin wave along the shelf, and for the first time a wealth of measured data and a detailed numerical simulation was performed and was presented for Isaac.

  12. Study of Ardmore, Oklahoma storm clouds. I - Convective storm cloud initiation and development based on the remote sensing gravity-wave-induced convection. II - Satellite infrared remote sensing and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.

    1991-01-01

    The role of gravity waves is discussed with respect to the vertical velocity of convection. Specific attention is given to wave-induced convection which contributes to the fractions of formation and the development of severe convective storms. Large-amplitude gravity waves and convective instability were investigated in storm clouds above Ardmore, Oklahoma. Rapid-scan satellite imagery and radar summaries provide evidence of water-vapor condensation related to convection which is introduced by gravity waves. Gravity wave periods of 35 minutes are found to initiate weak convection, which can be intensified by gravity waves with periods of 20 minutes. The convective motion reaches a maximum about one hour before funnel clouds develop. Other mechanisms which contribute to convective motion are considered, but gravity waves are the major contributor to the initiation, formation, and development of mesoscale storm clouds. Cloud modeling based on satellite imagery and sounding data showed that by overshooting cloud tops that penetrated the tropopause, storm clouds mature; that these clouds collapse about 9 minutes before the touchdown of tornadoes; and that cloud tops collapse at a high rate about 6 minutes before tornadoes lift off.

  13. Storms or cold fronts? What is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    On Friday, 7 March 2009, a 200 m-long section of the tourist pier in Puerto Colombia collapsed under the impact of the waves generated by a cold front in the area. The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms on extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean to determine the degree of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed and the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the wave's height; therefore, it is necessary to definitively know the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. Using Gumbel's extreme value methodology, the significant height values for the study area were calculated. The methodology was evaluated using data from the re-analysis of the spectral NOAA Wavewatch III (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombia Caribbean coast (continental and insular) of the last 15 years. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area formed by Baja Guajira, Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena, the strong influence of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. On the other hand, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast, from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá, even though extreme waves are lower than in the previous regions, extreme waves are dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from that in the continental area due to its geographic location. The wave heights in the extreme regime are

  14. Past analogs of recent climate anomalies and impacts in Portugal. Droughts, storms and heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoforado, M. J.; Nunes, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    An indexed reconstruction of precipitation variability, based on documentary and instrumental data, has been done for southern Portugal starting in 1675. The descriptions of the extreme events in the documentary sources have also supplied information about their impacts. We will compare past and recent extreme weather events in Portugal, their causes and their impacts on society. We have selected periods of winter droughts, of storms that triggered great floods and of heat waves. There are a number of documentary sources dating from 1693-94 indicating that that there was no rainfall from December 1693 to at least November 1694 with the exception of light showers in June. Several pro-pluvia rogations ceremonies took place all over the country, even in the Northwest that is generally rainy. There are numerous descriptions of the impact of droughts on agriculture, of shortage of cereals, of escalating prices and the subsequent generalised famine. An analogy will be made for the 20th century using the 1980-81 winter drought that lasted roughly the same time and which also had severe social and economic impacts. The decrease in production of hydroelectric energy (50% below average) between January and July 1981 is also pointed out. In both cases, the lack of rainfall was partly due to a ridge that stayed over the Eastern Atlantic and kept Iberia in aerologic shelter. Apart from urban flash floods there are two types of floods in Portugal: (i) floods from the big river basins (Tagus, Mondego and Douro) that are due to the frequent passage of westerly frontal depressions during days or weeks; and (ii) floods of the small river basins due to convective depressions that affect small areas. The December 1739 flood, caused by the overflow of the great rivers, will be compared with the ones that occurred in February 1978. Both were caused by intensive precipitation all over the country at a time when the soil was already saturated with water from previous rainfall. The damages

  15. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy, time dependency, and prognostic impact of abnormal Q waves, combined electrocardiographic criteria, and ST segment abnormalities in right ventricular infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Zehender, M; Kasper, W; Kauder, E; Schönthaler, M; Olschewski, M; Just, H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the diagnostic and prognostic impact of abnormal Q waves in comparison to or in combination with ST segment abnormalities in the right precordial and inferior leads as indicators of right ventricular infarction during the acute phase of inferior myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Prospective study of a consecutive series of 200 patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction with and without right ventricular infarction. SETTING--Department of internal medicine, university clinic. RESULTS--Right ventricular infarction was diagnosed in 106 (57%) out of 187 patients from the results of coronary angiography, technetium pyrophosphate scanning, and measurement of haemodynamic variables or at necropsy, or both. In the acute phase of inferior infarction ST segment elevation > or = 0.1 mV in any of the right precordial leads V4-6R was the most reliable criterion for right ventricular infarction (sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 83%). Abnormal Q waves in the right precordial leads, the most specific criterion (91%) for right ventricular infarction, were superior to ST segment elevation in patients admitted > 12 hours after the onset of symptoms. Both ST segment elevation in leads V4-6R (increase in in hospital mortality, 6.2-times; P < 0.001; major complications, 2.3-times; P < 0.01) and abnormal Q waves (2.3-times, P < 0.05; 1.8-times, P < 0.05) on admission were highly predictive of a worse outcome during the in hospital period. In the presence of inferior myocardial infarction previously proposed combined electrocardiographic criteria were not better diagnostically or prognostically than ST segment abnormalities and abnormal Q waves alone. CONCLUSIONS--During the first 24 hours of inferior myocardial infarction ST segment elevation and abnormal Q waves derived from the right precordial leads are complementary rather than competitive criteria for reliably diagnosing right ventricular infarction, both indicating a worse in hospital course for the

  16. Global ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 and their influence on HF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Daria; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Zakharov, Veniamin

    2013-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the global ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 using GSM TIP (Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere) simulation results. In the GSM TIP storm time model runs, several input parameters such as cross-polar cap potential difference and R2 FAC (Region 2 Field-Aligned Currents) varied as a function of the geomagnetic activity AE-index. Current simulation also uses the empirical model of high-energy particle precipitation by Zhang and Paxton. In this model, the energy and energy flux of precipitating electrons depend on a 3 hour Kp-index. We also have included the 30 min time delay of R2 FAC variations with respect to the variations of cross-polar cap potential difference. In addition, we use the ground-based ionosonde data for comparison our model results with observations. We present an analysis of the physical mechanisms responsible for the ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storms. The obtained simulation results are used by us as a medium for HF radio wave propagation at different latitudes in quiet conditions, and during main and recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. To solve the problem of the radio wave propagation we used Zakharov's (I. Kant BFU) model based on geometric optics. In this model the solution of the eikonal equation for each of the two normal modes is reduced using the method of characteristics to the integration of the six ray equation system for the coordinates and momentum. All model equations of this system are solved in spherical geomagnetic coordinate system by the Runge-Kutta method. This model was tested for a plane wave in a parabolic layer. In this study, the complex refractive indices of the ordinary and extraordinary waves at ionospheric heights was calculated for the first time using the global first-principal model of the thermosphere-ionosphere system that describes the parameters of an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium during a

  17. The Effects of Variations in Jet Width on the Growth of Baroclinic Waves: Implications for Midwinter Pacific Storm Track Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnik, Nili; Chang, Edmund K. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of variations in jet width on the downstream growth of baroclinic waves are studied, using a simple quasigeostrophic model with a vertically varying basic state and variable channel width, as well as a simplified primitive equation model with a basic state that varies in latitude and height. This study is motivated by observations that in midwinter in the Pacific the storm track is weaker and the jet is narrower during years when the jet is strong.The linear models are able to reproduce the observed decrease of spatial growth rate with shear, if the narrowing of the jet is accounted for by assuming it decreases the meridional wavelength of the perturbations, which hampers their growth. A common suggestion has been that perturbations are weaker when the jet is strong because they move faster out of the unstable storm track region. The authors find that one needs to take into account that the jet narrows when it strengthens; otherwise, the increase of growth rate is strong enough to counteract the effect of increased advection speed.It is also found that, when the model basic state is Eady-like (small or zero meridional potential vorticity gradients in the troposphere), the short-wave cutoff for instability moves to large-scale waves as shear is increased, due to the accompanying increase in meridional wavenumber. This results in a transition from a regime where upper-level perturbations spin up a surface circulation very rapidly, and normal-mode growth ensues, to a regime where the initial perturbations take a very long time to excite growth. Since waves slow down when a surface perturbation develops, this can explain the observations that the storm track perturbations are more “upper level” during strong jet years and their group velocities increase faster than linearly with shear.

  18. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... thyroid storm can be caused by treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine therapy.

  19. Coarse, Intermediate and High Resolution Numerical Simulations of the Transition of a Tropical Wave Critical Layer to a Tropical Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Wang, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from within the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the Kurihara and Tuleya problem examining the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km), intermediate (9 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of rotationally dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation near the center of the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together.

  20. RAM-SCB Simulations of Electron Transport and Plasma Wave Scattering During the October 2012 double-dip Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms for particle injection in the near-Earth space environment and their subsequent trapping or loss have been studied for many years, however, their theoretical evaluation and implementation in numerical models remain challenging. We address these outstanding questions using our RAM-SCB model that couples the kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model with an Euler potential-based three-dimensional plasma equilibrium code. We simulate wave-particle interactions on a global scale using L and MLT-dependent event-specific wave models and investigate the fast dropout of the radiation belts during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm event. The calculated cold plasma densities with a coupled time-dependent 2-D plasmasphere model show good agreement with in situ EMFISIS observations along the Van Allen Probes' orbits. The simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating electron fluxes are compared with measurements of electron precipitation by multiple NOAA satellites during the investigated storm event. The combined effects from radial transport and scattering by plasma waves on ring current and radiation belt dynamics are evaluated.

  1. Mean flow-storm track relationship and Rossby wave breaking in two types of El-Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengji; Ren, Xuejuan; Yang, Xiuqun

    2014-01-01

    The features of large-scale circulation, storm tracks and the dynamical relationship between them were examined by investigating Rossby wave breaking (RWB) processes associated with Eastern Pacific (EP) and Central Pacific (CP) El-Niño. During EP El-Niño, the geopotential height anomaly at 500 hPa (Z500) exhibits a Pacific-North America (PNA) pattern. During CP El-Niño, the Z500 anomaly shows a north positive-south negative pattern over the North Pacific. The anomalous distributions of baroclinicity and storm track are consistent with those of upper-level zonal wind for both EP and CP El-Niño, suggesting impacts of mean flow on storm track variability. Anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) occurs less frequently in EP El-Niño years, while cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) occurs more frequently in CP El-Niño years over the North Pacific sector. Outside the North Pacific, more CWB events occur over North America during EP El-Niño. When AWB events occur less frequently over the North Pacific during EP El-Niño, Z500 decreases locally and the zonal wind is strengthened (weakened) to the south (north). This is because AWB events reflect a monopole high anomaly at the centroid of breaking events. When CWB events occur more frequently over the North Pacific under CP El-Niño conditions, and over North America under EP El-Niño condition, Z500 increases (decreases) to the northeast (southwest), since CWB events are related to a northeast-southwest dipole Z500 anomaly. The anomalous RWB events act to invigorate and reinforce the circulation anomalies over the North Pacific-North America region linked with the two types of El-Niño.

  2. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  3. Influence of precipitating energetic ions caused by EMIC waves on the subauroral ionospheric E region during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhigang; Xiong, Ying; Li, Haimeng; Huang, Shiyong; Qiao, Zheng; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Meng; Wang, Dedong; Deng, Xiaohua; Raita, Tero; Wang, Jingfang

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we have presented the influence of precipitating energetic ions caused by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the subauroral ionospheric E region during a geomagnetic storm on 8 March 2008 with observations of the Meteorological Operational (METOP-02) of the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), a GPS receiver in Vaasa of Finland and Finnish network of search coil magnetometers. Conjugate observations of the POES METOP-02 satellite and Finnish network of search coil magnetometers have demonstrated that enhancements of the precipitating energetic ion flux within the proton anisotropic zone are attributed to the interaction between ring current (RC) ions and EMIC waves. With enhancements of the intensity of Pc1 waves observed by search coil magnetometers, the total electron content observed by the GPS receiver accordingly increased, meaning that the enhancement of the ionospheric electron density is attributed to the precipitation of RC ions caused by EMIC waves. The electron density profiles derived by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2007) model and with precipitating energetic protons observed by the POES METOP-02 satellite show that the energetic proton precipitation can cause the E layer peak electron density to increase from 1.62 × 109 m-3 to 5.05 × 1011 m-3 by 2.49 orders of magnitude. In comparison with the height-integrated conductivities derived by the IRI-2007 model, the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities derived with precipitating energetic protons increase by 2.4 and 2.34 orders of magnitude, respectively. Our result suggests that precipitating energetic ions caused by EMIC waves can lead to an obvious enhancement of the electron density and conductivities in the subauroral ionospheric E region during geomagnetic storms.

  4. Moderate geomagnetic storms of January 22-25, 2012 and their influences on the wave components in ionosphere and upper stratosphere-mesosphere regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu Tsidu, Gizaw; Abraha, Gebregiorgis

    2014-11-01

    Moderate geomagnetic storms occurred during January 22-25, 2012 period. The geomagnetic storms are characterized by different indices and parameters. The SYM-H value on January 22 increased abruptly to 67 nT at sudden storm commencement (SSC), followed by a sharp decrease to -87 nT. A second SSC on January 24 followed by a shock on January 25 was also observed. These SSCs before the main storms and the short recovery periods imply the geomagnetic storms are CME-driven. The sudden jump of solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF Bz are also consistent with occurrence of CMEs. This is also reflected in the change in total electron content (TEC) during the storm relative to quiet days globally. The response of the ionospheric to geomagnetic storms can also be detected from wave components that account for the majority of TEC variance during the period. The dominant coherent modes of TEC variability are diurnal and semidiurnal signals which account upto 83% and 30% of the total TEC variance over fairly exclusive ionospheric regions respectively. Comparison of TEC anomalies attributed to diurnal (DW1) and semidiurnal (SW2) tides, as well as stationary planetary waves (SPW1) at 12 UTC shows enhancement in the positive anomalies following the storm. Moreover, the impact of the geomagnetic storms are distinctly marked in the daily time series of amplitudes of DW1, SW2 and SPW1. The abrupt changes in amplitudes of DW1 (5 TECU) and SW2 (2 TECU) are observed within 20°S-20°N latitude band and along 20°N respectively while that of SPW1 is about 3 TECU. Coherent oscillation with a period of 2.4 days between interplanetary magnetic field and TEC was detected during the storm. This oscillation is also detected in the amplitudes of DW1 over EIA regions in both hemispheres. Eventhough upward coupling of quasi two day wave (QTDWs) of the same periodicity, known to have caused such oscillation, are detected in both ionosphere and upper stratosphere, this one can likely be attributed to

  5. Global modeling of Pc5 ULF Wave Activity and Relativistic Electron Dynamics following a Large Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Khazanov, G. V.; Rae, I. J.

    2008-12-01

    Ground-based observations during an interval of narrow-band ULF activity following a geomagnetic storm on November 25, 2001 are used to constrain the temporal and spatial characteristics of waves produced by a global model for ULF waves in the magnetosphere. This event is characterized by a long interval of high solar wind speed, and a strong field line resonance (FLR) localized to the local dusk sector. Both Polar and Cluster satellite observations during the interval of interest indicate that MHD fast waves produced by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability along the dusk magnetopause flank are the likely source of wave power for the FLR. Based on this interpretation, an anti-sunward propagating ULF wave source is prescribed along the magnetopause boundary of the ULF wave model. The model is constrained by adjusting parameters that specify the source power distribution and bandwidth to improve local comparisons between the model output and observed time-series for field lines mapping to ground-based magnetometer stations. In order to assess the effects of these ULF waves on the relativistic electron population within the magnetosphere, the output from the ULF wave model is used to provide a time dependent magnetic field input for the bounce-averaged electron dynamics model developed by M-C Fok. This model computes the non-diffusive transport of electron phase space density (PSD) due to electrostatic and electromagnetic perturbations, assuming initial and outer boundary conditions for PSD that are dependent on solar wind parameters. The first results of this study will be presented.

  6. Abnormal T-wave axis is associated with coronary artery calcification in older adults

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, MATTHEW L.; ASPELUND, THOR; SIGURDSSON, SIGURDUR; DETRANO, ROBERT; GARCIA, MELISSA; MITCHELL, GARY F.; LAUNER, LENORE J.; THORGEIRSSON, GUDMUNDUR; GUDNASON, VILMUNDUR; HARRIS, TAMARA B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether T-wave axis on the resting electrocardiogram (ECG) is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) score, a measurement of coronary atherosclerosis, in older adults. Methods The sample consisted of 2004 adults aged 66 and over participating in the prospective, population-based Age-Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. The cohort was divided into gender-stratified quartiles based upon Agatston CAC score derived from computerized tomography. Frontal T-axis deviation from 45° was assessed using surface ECG. Statistical analysis was performed with Tobit regression models adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Results In the entire study population, T-axis deviation from 45° was significantly associated with increasing CAC score in men (p<0.001) and women (p = 0.03). In men without clinically recognized coronary heart disease (CHD), the association with CAC score remained statistically significant (p = 0.02). This association was significant among women without CHD once male CAC cut points were used (p = 0.05). Conclusion An abnormal T-wave axis is associated with an increasing CAC score in this population of Icelandic older adults. This association remains in the subgroup of subjects without clinical CHD. PMID:18937149

  7. Comparison of wave propagation through ice covers in calm and storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingkai; Kohout, Alison L.; Shen, Hayley H.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by a dramatic reduction in Arctic sea ice cover, interest in the field of wave-ice interaction has accelerated over the past few years. Recent observations have identified that large waves (>3 m) have a linear attenuation rate, rather than the previously assumed exponential rate that is found for small waves. This suggests that waves penetrate further into the ice cover than previously expected. To explore this further we tested two exponentially decaying wave models. Contributions from nonlinear and wind generation source terms enabled both models to reproduce the observed regime shift. Essentially, the accumulation of nonlinear and wind energy contributions to long (and thus higher amplitude) waves can offset the ice damping, thus reducing the apparent attenuation. This study highlights the relevance of considering frequency dependence when analyzing wave attenuation in sea ice field data.

  8. Intermediate and high resolution numerical simulations of the transition of a tropical wave critical layer to a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis that typifies the trade wind belt. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the problem of the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of a vorticity dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation within the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together. Implications of these findings are

  9. Coarse, intermediate and high resolution numerical simulations of the transition of a tropical wave critical layer to a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from within the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the Kurihara and Tuleya problem examining the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km), intermediate (9 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of a rotationally dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation near the center of the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together

  10. Ionospheric disturbances during November 30-December 1, 1988. XI - Abnormal propagations of HF and VHF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Masaru; Kamata, Mitsuhiro

    1992-07-01

    Unusual propagations of HF and VHF radio waves associated with a geomagnetic storm during the period from November 30 to December 1, 1988 are investigated using ionospheric data collected from Japan, China, and Taiwan. The increased field strength of the Japanese frequency standard signals (JJY 2.5 MHz and 5 MHz) which were received at Akita Radio Wave Observatory on the night of November 30 seem to have been caused by increased MUFs and/or scattering due to the disturbed ionosphere. The VHF-TV radio waves propagated from China were received at Kokubunji in Tokyo. One of the most probable mechanisms explaining this unusual propagation of VHF is a one-hop-F2 mode of propagation created by an ionosphere with an anomalously high f0F2. It was found out that these unusual HF and VHF propagations were attributed to unusual ionospheric conditions associated with these geomagnetic disturbances.

  11. Using IRI and GSM TIP model results as environment for HF radio wave propagation model during the geomagnetic storm occurred on September 26-29, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, D. S.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Zakharov, V. E.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Nosikov, I. A.; Zhao, B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyses the geomagnetic storm on September 26-29, 2011. We compare the calculation results obtained using the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) and IRI-2012 (Bilitza et al., 2014) model with ground-based ionosonde data of stations at different latitudes and longitudes. We examined physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of ionospheric effects during the main phase of geomagnetic storm that occurred at the rising phase of the 24th solar cycle. We used numerical results obtained from IRI-2012 and GSM TIP models as propagation environment for HF signals from an equatorial transmitter during quiet and disturbed conditions. We used the model of HF radio wave propagation developed in I. Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) that is based on the geometrical optics approximation. We compared the obtained radio paths in quiet conditions and during the main and recovery storm phases and evaluated radio wave attenuation in different media models.

  12. Can myocardial ischemia be recognized by the exercise electrocardiogram in coronary disease patients with abnormal resting Q waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnve, S.; Savvides, M.; Abouantoun, S.; Atwood, J.E.; Froelicher, V.

    1986-05-01

    This study was performed in order to determine whether exercise-induced myocardial ischemia demonstrated by thallium-201 imaging could be detected by ST segment shifts in patients with abnormal Q waves at rest. Fifty-four patients with coronary artery disease and exercise-induced thallium-201 defects were compared to 22 patients with similar Q wave patterns but without thallium-201 exercise defects and to 14 normal subjects. Exercise data were analyzed visually in the 12-lead ECG and for spatial ST vector shifts. Both ST segment depression observed on the 12-lead ECG and spatial criteria were reasonably sensitive and specific for ischemia when the resting ECG showed no Q waves or inferior Q waves (range 69% to 93%). However, when anterior Q waves were present, ST segment shifts could not distinguish patients with ischemia from those with normal perfusion as determined by thallium imaging.

  13. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism ... Thyroid storm occurs in people with untreated hyperthyroidism. It is usually brought on by a major stress such as trauma, heart attack, or infection. Thyroid storm is very rare.

  14. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  15. Coarse-clast ridge complexes of the Caribbean: A preliminary basis for distinguishing tsunami and storm-wave origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal gravel-ridge complexes deposited on islands in the Caribbean Sea are recorders of past extreme-wave events that could be associated with either tsunamis or hurricanes. The ridge complexes of Bonaire, Jamaica, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona), and Guadeloupe consist of polymodal clasts ranging in size from sand to coarse boulders that are derived from the adjacent coral reefs or subjacent rock platforms. Ridge-complex morphologies and crest elevations are largely controlled by availability of sediments, clast sizes, and heights of wave runup. The ridge complexes are internally organized, display textural sorting and a broad range of ages including historical events. Some display seaward-dipping beds and ridge-and-swale topography, and some terminate in fans or steep avalanche slopes. Together, the morphologic, sedimentologic, lithostratigraphic, and chronostratigraphic evidence indicates that shore-parallet ridge complexes composed of gravel and sand that are tens of meters wide and several meters thick are primarily storm-constructed features that have accumulated for a few centuries or millennia as a result of multiple high-frequency intense-wave events. They are not entirely the result of one or a few tsunamis as recently reported. Tsunami deposition may account for some of the lateral ridge-complex accretion or boulder fields and isolated blocks that are associated with the ridge complexes. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  16. Determination of Effects of Coastal Deformation Caused by Waves and Storms at Black Sea Coast of Turkey utilizing InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, D. Z.; Direk, S.; Musaoglu, N.; Gazioglu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many pressures are exerted on the coastal zones. Winds and waves effect the landscapes mainly on coastal areas. More dramatic deformation occurs with coastal storms like hurricanes which bring strong winds and waves to change the topography of coast. The coastal areas at Black Sea are under pressure of strong wind, waves and storms. Sometimes waves reaches to 10 m height, thus the landscapes of the coastal areas change very dramatically. Advances in Space geodesy have made it possible to determine variations on the Earth with high precision especially by using InSAR technique. InSAR technique is able to cover large areas and can be used in all weather conditions at high spatial resolution. With InSAR technique sub-cm level surface deformation can be determined. Recently, InSAR is the most often used technique to monitor crustal deformation, subsidence and landslides. The aim of this study is to make temporal and spatial analysis and determine the effects of strong wind and wave storms on the coast of Karasu in Black Sea Region of Turkey. By temporal analysis will be able to see the deformation on coast of Karasu in time domain where spatial analysis will show us the changes in landscapes.

  17. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/14 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-10-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/14 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. Coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. This paper provides these levels for the winter storms, and discusses their application to the given data sets for two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England, and Suffolk, east England. Tide gauge records and wave buoy data were used to compare the 2013/14 storms with return periods from a national data set, and also joint probabilities of sea level and wave heights were generated, incorporating the recent events. The 2013/14 high waters and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a high return period at both case study sites. The national-scale impact of this event was due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment could in the future be recorded alongside defence performance and upgrade. Ideally other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) would also be included, and with appropriate offsetting for local trends (e.g. mean sea-level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. This could allow long-term comparison of storm severity, and an assessment of how sea-level rise influences return levels over time, which is important for consideration of coastal resilience in strategic management plans.

  18. Weak kinetic Alfvén waves turbulence during the 14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, Pablo. S.; Pinto, Víctor A.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Sibeck, David G.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Wygant, John R.

    2015-07-01

    In the dawn sector, L ˜ 5.5 and MLT ˜ 4-7, from 01:30 to 06:00 UT during the 14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm, both Van Allen Probes observed an alternating sequence of locally quiet and disturbed intervals with two strikingly different power fluctuation levels and magnetic field orientations: either small (˜10-2 nT2) total power with strong GSM Bx and weak By or large (˜10 nT2) total power with weak Bx and strong By and Bz components. During both kinds of intervals the fluctuations occur in the vicinity of the local ion gyrofrequencies (0.01-10 Hz) in the spacecraft frame, propagate oblique to the magnetic field, (θ ˜ 60∘), and have magnetic compressibility C=|δB∥|/|δB⊥|˜1, where δB∥ (δB⊥) are the average amplitudes of the fluctuations parallel (perpendicular) to the mean field. Electric field fluctuations are present whenever the magnetic field is disturbed, and large electric field fluctuations follow the same pattern for quiet and disturbed intervals. Magnetic frequency power spectra at both spacecraft correspond to steep power laws ˜f-α with 4 < α < 5 for f ≲ 2 Hz, and 1.1 < α < 1.7 for f≳ 2 Hz, spectral profiles that are consistent with weak kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) turbulence. Electric power is larger than magnetic power for all frequencies above 0.1 Hz, and the ratio increases with increasing frequency. Vlasov linear analysis is consistent with the presence of compressive KAW with k⊥ρi≲1, right-handed polarization and positive magnetic helicity, in the plasma frame, considering a multiion plasma. All these results suggest the presence of weak KAW turbulence which dissipates the energy associated with the intermittent sudden changes in the magnetic field during the main phase of the storm.

  19. Parameter sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a storm surge and wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, L. A.; Knighton, J.; Kline, S. W.

    2015-10-01

    Development and simulation of synthetic hurricane tracks is a common methodology used to estimate hurricane hazards in the absence of empirical coastal surge and wave observations. Such methods typically rely on numerical models to translate stochastically generated hurricane wind and pressure forcing into coastal surge and wave estimates. The model output uncertainty associated with selection of appropriate model parameters must therefore be addressed. The computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates is exacerbated by the high dimensionality of numerical surge and wave models. We present a model parameter sensitivity analysis of the Delft3D model for the simulation of hazards posed by Hurricane Bob (1991) utilizing three theoretical wind distributions (NWS23, modified Rankine, and Holland). The sensitive model parameters (of eleven total considered) include wind drag, the depth-induced breaking γB, and the bottom roughness. Several parameters show no sensitivity (threshold depth, eddy viscosity, wave triad parameters and depth-induced breaking αB) and can therefore be excluded to reduce the computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates. The sensitive model parameters also demonstrate a large amount of interactions between parameters and a non-linear model response. While model outputs showed sensitivity to several parameters, the ability of these parameters to act as tuning parameters for calibration is somewhat limited as proper model calibration is strongly reliant on accurate wind and pressure forcing data. A comparison of the model performance with forcings from the different wind models is also presented.

  20. Simulation of ULF wave-modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B.; Paral, J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; Usanova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the millihertz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Losses balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible. Three-dimensional simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code, during a coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock event on 17 March 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation. The arrival of a strong CME-shock, such as the one simulated, disrupts the electric and magnetic fields in the magnetosphere and causes significant changes in both components of momentum, pitch angle, and L shell of radiation belt electrons, which may cause them to precipitate into the loss cone.

  1. Impact of Current-Wave Interaction on Storm Surge Simulation: A Case Study for Hurricane Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Chen, C.; Beardsley, R. C.; Xu, Q.; Qi, J.; Lin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricane Bob moved up the US east coast and crossed over southern New England and the Gulf of Maine (with peak marine winds up to 100 mph) on 19-20 August 1991, causing significant damage along the coast and shelf. A three-dimensional fully wave-current coupled Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) system was developed and applied to simulate and examine the coastal ocean responses to Hurricane Bob, Results from process study-oriented experiments show that wave-current interaction caused a significant change of the current direction and mixing, but had relatively little contribution to the maximum sea level along the coast. Diagnostic analyses suggest that the contribution of hurricane-derived wave-current interaction to the net water flux varies in space and time. While sea level change along the coast was mainly driven by the barotropic water flux and the vertically integrated water transports were essentially the same for cases with and without water stratification, the hurricane-induced wave-current interaction could generate strong vertical current shear in the stratified areas, leading to strong offshore transport near the bottom and enhanced water mixing over the continental shelf. Stratification also could result in a significant difference of water currents around islands where the water is not vertically well mixed.

  2. Storm fronts over galaxy discs: models of how waves generate extraplanar gas and its anomalous kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Curtis; Smith, Daniel C.

    2009-09-01

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy discs was an unexpected discovery about 20 years ago. Subsequent observations showed that this extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas (EDIG) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20 per cent lower than those in the central plane, and has been hard to account for. Here, we present results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. We find that in models with star formation generated stochastically across the disc, an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong. However, this gas rotates at nearly the same speed as the midplane gas. We then studied a range of models with imposed spiral or bar waves in the disc. EDIG layers were also generated in these models, but primarily over the wave regions, not over the entire disc. Because of this partial coverage, the EDIG clouds move radially, as well as vertically, with the result that observed kinematic anomalies are reproduced. The implication is that the kinematic anomalies are the result of three-dimensional motions when the cylindrical symmetry of the disc is broken. Thus, the kinematic anomalies are the result of bars or strong waves, and more face-on galaxies with such waves should have an asymmetric EDIG component. The models also indicate that the EDIG can contain a significant fraction of cool gas, and that some star formation can be triggered at considerable heights above the disc mid-plane. We expect all of these effects to be more prominent in young, forming discs, to play a role in rapidly smoothing disc asymmetries and in working to self-regulate disc structure.

  3. Acoustic and gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere, generated by severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandran, N. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and their propagation in the ionosphere and the study of infrasonic signals from thunder were investigated. Doppler shifts of the order of 0.1 Hz are determined and they provide high-resolution measurements of the movements in the ionosphere. By using an array of transmitters with different frequencies and at different locations, the horizontal and vertical propagation vectors of disturbances propagating through the ionosphere are determined.

  4. Impact of current-wave interaction on storm surge simulation: A case study for Hurricane Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunfang; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert C.; Xu, Qichun; Qi, Jianhua; Lin, Huichan

    2013-05-01

    Hurricane Bob moved up the U.S. east coast and crossed over southern New England and the Gulf of Maine [with peak marine winds up to 54 m/s (100 mph)] on 19-20 August 1991, causing significant damage along the coast and shelf. A 3-D fully wave-current-coupled finite-volume community ocean model system was developed and applied to simulate and examine the coastal ocean responses to Hurricane Bob. Results from process study-oriented experiments showed that the impact of wave-current interaction on surge elevation varied in space and time, more significant over the shelf than inside the inner bays. While sea level change along the coast was mainly driven by the water flux controlled by barotropic dynamics and the vertically integrated highest water transports were essentially the same for cases with and without water stratification, the hurricane-induced wave-current interaction could generate strong vertical current shear in the stratified areas, leading to a strong offshore transport near the bottom and vertical turbulent mixing over the continental shelf. Stratification could also result in a significant difference of water currents around islands where the water is not vertically well mixed.

  5. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/2014 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-04-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/2014 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. In such circumstances, coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. We therefore provide these levels for the winter storms, as well as discussing their application to the given data sets and case studies (two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England; and Suffolk, east England). We use tide gauge records and wave buoy data to compare the 2013/2014 storms with return periods from a national dataset, and also generate joint probabilities of sea level and waves, incorporating the recent events. The UK was hit at a national scale by the 2013/2014 storms, although the return periods differ with location. We also note that the 2013/2014 high water and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a very high return period at both case study sites. Our return period analysis shows that the national scale impact of this event is due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations as the tide and storm propagated across the continental shelf. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment should be recorded alongside details of defence performance and upgrade, with other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) included and appropriate offsetting for linear trends (e.g. mean sea level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. Local offsetting of the mean trends in sea level allows long-term comparison of

  6. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region: The Magnetic Storm May 1-7 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E.; Gamayunov, K.; Avanov, L.

    2003-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on our newly developed self-consistent model that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  7. Subtropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The circling clouds of an intense low-pressure system sat off the southeast coast of the United States on May 8, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. By the following morning, the storm developed enough to be classified as a subtropical storm, a storm that forms outside of the tropics, but has many of the characteristics--hurricane-force winds, driving rains, low pressure, and sometimes an eye--of a tropical storm. Although it arrived several weeks shy of the official start of the hurricane season (June 1), Subtropical Storm Andrea became the first named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. The storm has the circular shape of a tropical cyclone in this image, but lacks the tight organization seen in more powerful storms. By May 9, the storm's winds reached 75 kilometers per hour (45 miles per hour), and the storm was not predicted to get any stronger, said the National Hurricane Center. Though Subtropical Storm Andrea was expected to remain offshore, its strong winds and high waves pummeled coastal states, prompting a tropical storm watch. The winds fueled wild fires (marked with red boxes) in Georgia and Florida. The wind-driven flames generated thick plumes of smoke that concentrated in a gray-brown mass over Tampa Bay, Florida. Unfortunately for Georgia and Florida, which are experiencing moderate to severe drought, Subtropical Storm Andrea was not predicted to bring significant rain to the region right away, according to reports on the Washington Post Website.

  8. Green roof and storm water management policies: monitoring experiments on the ENPC Blue Green Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Gires, Auguste; Fitton, George; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Currently widespread in new urban projects, green roofs have shown a positive impact on urban runoff at the building/parcel scale. Nevertheless, there is no specific policy promoting their implementation neither in Europe nor in France. Moreover they are not taken into account (and usually considered as an impervious area) in the sizing of a retention basin for instance. An interesting example is located in the heart of the Paris-East Cluster for Science and Technology (Champs-sur-Marne, France). Since 2013 a large (1 ha) wavy-form vegetated roof (called bleu green wave) is implemented. Green roof area and impervious areas are connected to a large retention basin, which has been oversized. The blue green wave represents a pioneering site where an initially amenity (decorative) design project has been transformed into a research oriented one. Several measurement campaigns have been conducted to investigate and better understand the hydrological behaviour of such a structure. Rainfall, humidity, wind velocity, water content and temperature have been particularly studied. The data collected are used for several purposes: (i) characterize the spatio-temporal variability of the green roof response, (ii) calibrate and validate a specific model simulating its hydrological behavior. Based on monitoring and modeling results, green roof performances will be quantified. It will be possible to estimate how they can reduce stormwater runoff and how these performances can vary in space and in time depending on green roof configuration, rainfall event characteristics and antecedent conditions. These quantified impacts will be related to regulation rules established by stormwater managers in order to connect the parcel to the sewer network. In the particular case of the building of a retention basin, the integration of green roof in the sizing of the basin will be studied. This work is funded by the European Blue Green Dream project (http://bgd.org.uk/, funded by Climate

  9. Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Ni, B.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Morley, S. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Usanova, M.; Mann, I. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H.; Kurth, W.; Kletzing, C.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2014-03-01

    Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc1-2 wave activity, we show that this sudden loss was consistent with pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the dusk magnetic local time sector at 3 < L* < 4. At 4 < L* < 5, local acceleration was also active during the main and early recovery phases, when growing peaks in electron PSD were observed by both Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. This acceleration corresponded to the period when IMF Bz was southward, the AE index was >300 nT, and energetic electron injections and whistler-mode chorus waves were observed throughout the inner magnetosphere for >12 h. After this period, Bz turned northward, and injections, chorus activity, and enhancements in PSD ceased. Overall, the outer belt was depleted by this storm. From the unprecedented level of observations available, we show direct evidence of the competitive nature of different wave-particle interactions controlling relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt.

  10. Defining Coastal Storm and Quantifying Storms Applying Coastal Storm Impulse Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudpour, Nader

    2014-05-01

    What defines a storm condition and what would initiate a "storm" has not been uniquely defined among scientists and engineers. Parameters that have been used to define a storm condition can be mentioned as wind speed, beach erosion and storm hydrodynamics parameters such as wave height and water levels. Some of the parameters are storm consequential such as beach erosion and some are not directly related to the storm hydrodynamics such as wind speed. For the purpose of the presentation, the different storm conditions based on wave height, water levels, wind speed and beach erosion will be discussed and assessed. However, it sounds more scientifically to have the storm definition based on the hydrodynamic parameters such as wave height, water level and storm duration. Once the storm condition is defined and storm has initiated, the severity of the storm would be a question to forecast and evaluate the hazard and analyze the risk in order to determine the appropriate responses. The correlation of storm damages to the meteorological and hydrodynamics parameters can be defined as a storm scale, storm index or storm parameter and it is needed to simplify the complexity of variation involved developing the scale for risk analysis and response management. A newly introduced Coastal Storm Impulse (COSI) parameter quantifies storms into one number for a specific location and storm event. The COSI parameter is based on the conservation of linear, horizontal momentum to combine storm surge, wave dynamics, and currents over the storm duration. The COSI parameter applies the principle of conservation of momentum to physically combine the hydrodynamic variables per unit width of shoreline. This total momentum is then integrated over the duration of the storm to determine the storm's impulse to the coast. The COSI parameter employs the mean, time-averaged nonlinear (Fourier) wave momentum flux, over the wave period added to the horizontal storm surge momentum above the Mean High

  11. Field observation of morpho-dynamic processes during storms at a Pacific beach, Japan: Role of long-period waves in storm-induced berm erosion

    PubMed Central

    MIZUGUCHI, Masaru; SEKI, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Many ultrasonic wave gages were placed with a small spacing across the swash zone to monitor either sand level or water level. Continuous monitoring conducted for a few years enabled the collection of data on the change in wave properties as well as swash-zone profiles. Data sets including two cases of large-scale berm erosion were analyzed. The results showed that 1) shoreline erosion started when high waves with significant power in long-period (1 to 2 min.) waves reached the top of a well-developed berm with the help of rising tide; 2) the beach in the swash zone was eroded with higher elevation being more depressed, while the bottom elevation just outside the swash zone remained almost unchanged; and 3) erosion stopped in a few hours after the berm was completely eroded or the swash-zone slope became uniformly mild. These findings strongly suggest that long waves play a dominant role in the swash-zone dynamics associated with these erosional events. PMID:25748583

  12. Abnormal pressure-wave reflection in pregnant women with chronic hypertension: association with maternal and fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tomimatsu, Takuji; Fujime, Mika; Kanayama, Tomoko; Mimura, Kazuya; Koyama, Shinsuke; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Endo, Masayuki; Shimoya, Koichiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that abnormal pressure-wave reflection may have an important role in identifying pregnant women with chronic hypertension who might develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and/or fetal growth restriction. Pulse-wave analyses were performed to assess maternal arterial stiffness during 26-32 weeks of gestation in 41 women with chronic hypertension. We measured the central systolic pressure (CSP) and augmentation index (AIx) noninvasively using pulse waveforms of the radial artery with an automated applanation tonometric system. In a multiple regression analysis that included AIx-75 (AIx at a heart rate of 75 beats per minute), brachial systolic pressure, maternal height, smoking status, gestational age at testing and the presence of antihypertensive treatment at testing as independent determinants, AIx-75 was the only significant determinant of birth weight, whereas the brachial systolic pressure was not. In pregnant women with chronic hypertension who subsequently developed both superimposed PE and fetal growth restriction, CSP, AIx, AIx-75, and the brachial systolic and pulse pressures were all significantly higher than those who did not develop superimposed PE nor small for gestational age. In contrast, AIx-75 was the only significantly elevated hemodynamic parameter in patients who developed fetal growth restriction but not superimposed PE. In addition, CSP was the only significantly elevated hemodynamic parameter in patients who developed superimposed PE but not fetal growth restriction. Abnormal pressure-wave reflection during 26-32 weeks of gestation showed a stronger correlation with birth weight than conventional brachial blood pressure. Our findings might provide new insight into the pathophysiology of fetal growth restriction as well as superimposed PE in pregnancies complicated with chronic hypertension. PMID:24965168

  13. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  14. Equatorial sporadic E-layer abnormal density enhancement during the recovery phase of the December 2006 magnetic storm: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Sporadic layers appear in the equatorial region ( E sq) between 90 and 130 km mainly due to irregularities in the electrojet equatorial (EEJ) current. In the present work, we have analyzed the behavior of the frequency parameters associated with these sporadic layers, covering the days before, during, and subsequent to, the intense magnetic storm that occurred on December 14, 2006. The parameters used in our analyses are the top frequency ( f t E s) and blanketing frequency ( f b E s) of the E s layer as measured over São Luís, Brazil (2.33°S, 44.2°W, dip: -4.5°) by digital ionosonde. A tentative association between these parameters and X-ray data measured by sensors on board the GOES satellite was carried out. Also, we investigated the effects on the dynamics of the equatorial electrojet using magnetometer data related to the presence of these E s layers. Our analyses show that there are notable changes in the f b E s, which are characterized by the occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values.

  15. Simulation study of diffuse photon density waves traveling through normal and abnormal breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoyuan; Xing, Da

    1999-09-01

    Diffuse Photon Density Waves (DPDW) is new concept and principle, which takes advantage of the difference of absorption and scattering coefficients of different tissues to study the law of photon density fluctuation during a modulated light traveling through the tissues, thus to explore the structure and function of tissues. With the combination of image reconstruction technology, we can directly `visualize' the tissues. As a non- invasive exam, it has highly extensive applied prospect in medical field and brain cognition study. In this paper, the behavior of DPDW traveling through simulated breast tissue is tentatively examined. Under various conditions, we observed the characteristics of DPDW. We observed the reasonability of the distribution of sources and detectors, the factors that influence the distortion of DPDW. Simulation results could be used as a good theoretical guideline for experiments.

  16. A case of ataxic diplegia, mental retardation, congenital nystagmus and abnormal auditory brain stem responses showing only waves I and II.

    PubMed

    Aiba, K; Yokochi, K; Ishikawa, T

    1986-01-01

    A three-year-old boy who had ataxic diplegia, mental retardation, horizontal pendular nystagmus with head nodding and abnormal auditory brain stem responses showing only waves I and II was presented. His clinical features coincided with recent reports in the Japanese literature of cases of a new syndrome that is congenital in origin and seen only in boys. PMID:3826555

  17. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Kamide, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the first conference devoted entirely to magnetic storms. Topics cover the relevant phenomena at the Sun/corona, propogation of these structures through interplanetary space, the response of the magnetosphere to interaction with these interplanetary structures, the formation of the storm time ring current (in particular the oxygen content of the ring-current), and storm ionospheric effects and ground based effects.

  18. Distribution of stable isotopes in arid storms . II. A double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, Alexander; Dody, Avraham; Adar, Eilon M.; Borisov, Viacheslav; Geyh, Mebus

    A new mathematical method based on a double-component model of kinematic wave flow and approach assesses the dynamic isotopic distribution in arid rain storms and runoff. This model describes the transport and δ18O evolution of rainfall to overland flow and runoff in an arid rocky watershed with uniformly distributed shallow depression storage. The problem was solved numerically. The model was calibrated using a set of temporal discharge and δ18O distribution data for rainfall and runoff collected on a small rocky watershed at the Sede Boker Experimental Site, Israel. Simulation of a reliable result with respect to observation was obtained after parameter adjustment by trial and error. Sensitivity analysis and model application were performed. The model is sensitive to changes in parameters characterizing the depression storage zones. The model reflects the effect of the isotopic memory in the water within the depression storage between sequential rain spells. The use of the double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport provides an appropriate qualitative and quantitative fitting between computed and observed δ18O distribution in runoff. RésuméUne nouvelle méthode mathématique basée sur un modèle à double composante d'écoulement et de transport par une onde cinématique a été développée pour évaluer la distribution dynamique en isotopes dans les précipitations et dans l'écoulement en région aride. Ce modèle décrit le transport et les variations des δ18O de la pluie vers le ruissellement et l'écoulement de surface dans un bassin aride rocheux où le stockage se fait dans des dépressions peu profondes uniformément réparties. Le problème a été résolu numériquement. Le modèle a été calibré au moyen d'une chronique de débits et d'une distribution des δ18O dans la pluie et dans l'écoulement de surface sur un petit bassin versant rocheux du site expérimental de Sede Boker (Israël). La simulation d'un résultat cr

  19. Storm impact for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  20. Multi-decadal shoreline changes on Takú Atoll, Papua New Guinea: Observational evidence of early reef island recovery after the impact of storm waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Thomas; Westphal, Hildegard

    2016-03-01

    Hurricanes, tropical cyclones and other high-magnitude events are important steering mechanisms in the geomorphic development of coral reef islands. Sandy reef islands located outside the storm belts are strongly sensitive to the impact of occasional high-magnitude events and show abrupt, commonly erosive geomorphic change in response to such events. Based on the interpretation of remote sensing data, it is well known that the process of landform recovery might take several decades or even longer. However, despite the increasing amount of scientific attention towards short- and long-term island dynamics, the lack of data and models often prevent a robust analysis of the timing and nature of recovery initiation. Here we show how natural island recovery starts immediately after the impact of a high-magnitude event. We analyze multi-temporal shoreline changes on Takú Atoll, Papua New Guinea and combine our findings with a unique set of published field observations (Smithers and Hoeke, 2014). Trends of shoreline change since 1943 and changes in planform island area indicate a long-term accretionary mode for most islands. Apparent shoreline instability is detected for the last decade of analysis, however this can be explained by the impact of storm waves in December 2008 that (temporarily?) masked the long-term trend. The transition from negative to positive rates of change in the aftermath of this storm event is indicative of inherent negative feedback processes that counteract short-term changes in energy input and represent the initiation of island recovery. Collectively, our results support the concept of dynamic rather than static reef islands and clearly demonstrate how short-term processes can influence interpretations of medium-term change.

  1. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  2. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, H.; Palmer, M. D.; Howard, T.; Bricheno, L.; Calvert, D.; Krijnen, J.; Wood, R.; Tinker, J.; Bunney, C.; Harle, J.; Saulter, A.; O'Neill, C.; Bellingham, C.; Lowe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea-level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the IPCC AR5. Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ~ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled (~ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980-2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the RCP 4.5 (8.5) scenarios respectively. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2 year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically very small under the more severe RCP8.5 scenario. We conclude that changes to long-term mean sea level constitute the

  3. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, Heather; Palmer, Matthew D.; Howard, Tom; Bricheno, Lucy; Calvert, Daley; Krijnen, Justin; Wood, Richard; Tinker, Jonathan; Bunney, Chris; Harle, James; Saulter, Andrew; O'Neill, Clare; Bellingham, Clare; Lowe, Jason

    2016-05-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time-mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5). Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ˜ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled ( ˜ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980 to 2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea-surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data, respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)4.5 (8.5) scenarios. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2-year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically

  4. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W; Chang, Douglas G; Harrington, Deborah L; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M; Christopher Edgar, J; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1-4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1-4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  5. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A.; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W.; Chang, Douglas G.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M.; Christopher Edgar, J.; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  6. Geomorphological impacts of high-latitude storm waves on low-latitude reef islands - Observations of the December 2008 event on Nukutoa, Takuu, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithers, S. G.; Hoeke, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    Low-latitude reefs and reef islands usually experience relatively benign climatic and hydrodynamic conditions due to their location near to the equator, outside of the major storm belts, and they typically exhibit geomorphological traits that reflect the prevailing low-energy conditions. For example, algal ridges are poorly developed, reef flat boulder zones are modest or lacking, rubble banks are rare, and reef islands tend to be low and dominated by sand. Nukutoa is a low-lying triangular-shaped reef island of ~ 6 ha located on the eastern rim of Takuu atoll (4°45‧S, 157°2‧E), Papua New Guinea, approximately 300 km northeast of Bougainville. The approximately 450 residents of Takuu all live on Nukutoa. In December 2008 Takuu was struck by several days of very high water levels and waves, which washed completely over approximately 50% of Nukutoa. GPS shoreline mapping and topographic surveys of the island were undertaken in the days immediately prior to the event, and were repeated immediately after. Homes and village infrastructure were damaged during this event, which eroded around 60% of the shoreline, and deposited a sand sheet averaging around 50 mm thick over approximately 13% of the island. This event was generated by two distant storms - one located > 6000 km away near 50°N, and affected a wide area of the Western Pacific. Oral histories record at least five similar events since the 1940s. In this paper we document the geomorphic impacts of the December 2008 event and discuss the possible significance of similar events in the past, and in the future.

  7. Extreme wave deposits on the Pacific coast of Mexico: Tsunamis or storms? — A multi-proxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Herrera, María-Teresa; Lagos, Marcelo; Hutchinson, Ian; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Machain, Maria Luisa; Caballero, Margarita; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Aguilar, Bertha; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana-Carolina; Ortiz, Modesto; Nava, Hector; Bautista, Francisco; Lopez, Gloria I.; Quintana, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Historical and instrumental data show that the Pacific coast of Mexico has been exposed to destructive tsunamis over at least the past 500 years. This coast is also affected by hurricanes generated in the eastern Pacific. The great 1985 Mexico earthquake and its aftershock generated tsunamis that affected the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo and Michoacán coast. The purpose of our study was two-fold — a) to determine whether storm and tsunami deposits could be distinguished, and b) whether tsunami deposits from historical events are preserved in the tropical environments of the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo coast. Two anomalous sand units in the Ixtapa estuary are interpreted to be the result of high-energy marine inundation events that occurred in the last century. Several lines of evidence using a multi-proxy approach (historical studies, interviews with local witnesses, geomorphological and geological surveys, coring and trenching, laboratory analyses including grain size, micropaleontology, geochemistry, magnetic susceptibility and radiometric dating, and numerical modeling) indicate the occurrence of two tsunamis that we link to local events: the 21st September 1985 Mexico and possibly the 14th March 1979 Petatlan earthquakes. We thereby provide the first onshore geological evidence of historical tsunamis on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  8. Extreme Wave Deposits On The Pacific Coast Of Mexico: Tsunamis Or Storms? - A Multi-Proxy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Herrera, M.; Lagos, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Chague-Goff, C.; Kostoglodov, V.; Goff, J. R.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A.; Machain, M.; Caballero, M.; Goguitchaichrili, A.; Aguilar, B.; Urquijo, P.; Laboratorio Universitario de Geofísica Ambiental (Luga)

    2011-12-01

    Historical and instrumental data show that the Pacific coast of Mexico has been exposed to destructive tsunamis over at least the past 500 years. This coast is also affected by hurricanes generated in the eastern Pacific. The great 1985 Mexico earthquake and its aftershock generated tsunamis that affected the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo and Michoacán coast. The purpose of our study was two-fold, a) to determine whether we could distinguish storm from tsunami deposits, and b) whether tsunami deposits from historical events are preserved in the tropical environments of the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo coast. Two anomalous sand units in the Ixtapa estuary are interpreted as the result of high-energy marine inundation events that occurred in the last century. Several lines of evidence using a multi-proxy approach (historical studies, interviews with local witnesses, geomorphological and geological surveys, coring and trenching, and laboratory analyses including grain size, micropaleontology, geochemistry, magnetic susceptibility and radiometric dating) indicate the occurrence of two tsunamis that we link to local events: the 1985 Mexico and possibly the 1979 Petatlan earthquakes. We thereby provide the first onshore geological evidence of historical tsunamis on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  9. The perfect storm: Unusual synchronisation of the components of wave energy spectra dominates episodic soft-cliff erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, Christopher; Darby, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Between December 2013 and February 2014 the United Kingdom experienced the stormiest winter on record. The persistent low pressure systems arriving from the North Atlantic during this period resulted in some of the most energetic maritime conditions ever recorded along the English Channel. The unprotected soft cliffs which comprise the south west Isle of Wight coastline were highly exposed to these conditions, facing the full force of extreme sea-levels and significant wave heights. Although long term rates of soft-cliff erosion have previously been defined for this coastline, the role of such extreme forcings on rates of soft-cliff erosion has not previously been document, and is therefore relatively poorly understood. We employed pre-event LIDAR and post-event RTK-GPS shoreline surveys in tandem with hourly sea-levels and significant wave height records from the English Channel to build an unprecedented data set that we use here to determine the response of this soft-cliff coastline to the extreme forcings of the 2013/2014 winter. It was found that the between October 2013 and March 2014, the south west Isle of Wight eroded, on average 4.25 m (σ = 3.6m). Such a high degree of erosion is approximately a factor of nine times greater than the long term average retreat rate of ~0.5 m/yr for this coastline and is the largest recorded erosion event since the start of reliable records began. The extreme erosion observed is shown to be a result of the synchronisation between sea-levels and wave heights. Indeed, we show that a 7-hour lag of the wave height record relative to background sea-level would have resulted in only half (2.1 m) of the observed erosion. An analysis of the historical record implies that previous extreme erosion events were a function of similar synchronisation between sea-levels and wave heights, thus it is likely that future changes in the timing of peak sea-levels and wave heights have the potential to outweigh changes in magnitude in terms of

  10. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). These data products from ... as yellowish ripples that obscure a large part of southern Iraq. The dust is easy to discern over the dark waters of the teardrop-shaped ...

  11. Polar views of Saturn's deep atmosphere from Cassini/VIMS: New insights into waves, storms, and global circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, K.; Momary, T.; Temma, T.; Roos-Serote, M.; Showman, A.; Morales-Juberias, R.; Dowling, T.; Atreya, S.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2007-08-01

    We present recently-acquired imagery of cloud and wave systems spanning the depths of Saturn down to the 3-bar level in the polar regions of Saturn, obtained by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini/Huygens orbiter. Images taken in both reflected sunlight and in Saturn's thermal glow at 5 microns wavelengths, will be presented. The 5-micron images reveal thick clouds at depth, seen silhouetted against the upwelling radiation. In the south polar region, a significant fraction of these deep discrete clouds appear surprisingly dark in reflected sunlight, indicating a nearly wavelength-independent dark absorber spanning the 0.5-3 micron region exists in or above these clouds. These compositionally-different cloud regions then may indicate that unusually strong vertical upwelling occurs at discrete locations near the south pole. In the north polar region, Saturn's Polar Hexagon, discovered in Voyager imagery by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988), is a prominent feature at 5 microns, indicating that the feature is comprised of relatively large particles (> 1 micron) and extends at least several bars of pressure down into the atmosphere. The re-acquisition of this feature near 77.5 degrees planetocentric latitude indicates that the hexagon is a multi-decade, long-lived feature which survives the Saturn seasons. A second hexagon, significantly darker at 5 micron than the brighter historical feature, is located near 74.2 degrees planetocentric latitude. The clouds in the 5-micron-bright hexagon are relatively deep: 3.5 bars compared to the 2.5-3.0-bar level of clouds in the dark hexagon. Observed three times over a 12-day period between October 29 and November 10, 2006, both hexagonal features stay fixed in a rotational system defined by the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch and Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253- 256, 1981) to within an accuracy of 11 seconds per rotational period. This agrees with the stationary nature of the wave in

  12. Local Mars dust storm generation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    On an areocentric solar longitude of 340 deg, first Mars year of Viking on the surface, a local dust storm was observed at the Viking Lander No. 1 site by Viking Orbiter A. The storm lasted less than one Martian day (sol) with the dust raised affecting the site for about three sols. It is concluded that this storm was caused by baroclinic waves and that the threshold wind speed for saltation was 25-30 m/sec.

  13. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  14. The storm time evolution in the night side high altitude field aligned wave Poynting flux and its relation to low altitude downward electron kinetic energy flux at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Scott A.

    In this thesis we investigate the evolution of the wave and large scale Poynting flux on earth's night side at altitudes from the auroral acceleration regions to the near earth tail over the course of major geomagnetic storms. Specifically, we are examining the field aligned components of the Poynting flux which carries energy from the tail into the auroral acceleration regions and to the ionosphere, and the down going field aligned electron kinetic energy flux. During major storm Poynting flux, over the range of observed time scales (from 6-180 seconds, and 600 -7200 seconds) intensify significantly (between one and three orders of magnitude), even down to low latitudes (≤ 65o invariant latitude). Concurrently, over the same range of latitudes, but at low altitudes, the downward electron kinetic energy flux enhances by at least an order of magnitude. The wave Poynting flux is thus shown to be a significant energy transport mechanism at low latitudes during storms, which provides strong evidence that Alfven waves can be an important mechanism for auroral electron acceleration at low latitudes. This result is important, in part because low latitudes are on field lines mapping to the inner magnetosphere, and the nature of the energy transport processes associated with the near tail and inner magnetosphere are not yet fully understood. Most previous research on the Alfven wave powered aurora focused on the higher latitude regions of the auroral zone and plasma sheet boundary layer. Prior studies were also conducted with either localized spacecraft conjunctions or with long term statistical compilations. The study presented herein is the first to examine the wave Poynting flux evolution over the course of major storms, from pre-storm, main phase, and recovery phase, from a high altitude standpoint on an orbit by orbit basis and to compare this to the low altitude electron kinetic energy flux. We find that the latitudinal evolution of the intensities of the high

  15. Plasmaspheric hiss intensity variations during magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Frandsen, A. M. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Thorne, R. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The storm time intensity variations of ELF electromagnetic emissions have been studied by using the Ogo 6 search coil magnetometer. Low-latitude signals exhibit a sharp low-frequency cutoff and are identified as plasmaspheric hiss. Such waves show pronounced intensification during the recovery phase of magnetic storms but remain close to background levels during the storm main phase. This behavior is consistent with cyclotron resonant generation within the plasmasphere as the latter expands into the intensified belt of outer zone electrons during the storm recovery.

  16. Storm impact scale for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  17. A simplified wave enhancement criterion for moving extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Golubkin, Pavel; Chapron, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    An analytical model is derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution along the main transects of a moving extreme weather event. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves defined as gr/ur2≈cT>(ur/V>)1/q, with r, u, and V, radial distance, average sustained wind speed, and translation velocity, respectively. Constants q and cT follow the fetch-law definitions. If forced during a sufficient time scale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely related to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Compared to altimeter satellite measurements, the proposed analytical solutions for the wave energy distribution demonstrate convincing agreement. As analytically developed, the wave enhancement criterion can provide a rapid evaluation to document the general characteristics of each storm, especially the expected wavefield asymmetry.

  18. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  19. Beaufort Sea storm and resuspension modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintern, D. Gwyn; Macdonald, Robie W.; Solomon, Steven M.; Jakes, Hunter

    2013-11-01

    Along the shallow Beaufort Sea coast of the Arctic Ocean, storm events during the summer are responsible for significant sediment resuspension and transport. Given the paucity of data in this difficult field area, a model has been developed to be used as a tool towards investigation of these processes. Two contrasting set of conditions are modeled; one simulation for a relatively quiescent period and a second simulation for a period that included a moderate and typical northwesterly storm. Results for these two periods are compared with shallow-water current and wave data collected by instrumented moorings. For the calm period, the model did not predict specific events very well, whereas for the period with a strong storm, the model performed very well in predicting wave height and wave period, and less well in predicting currents. However, under both calm and stormy conditions, mean current speeds and mean current directions were predicted with sufficient accuracy to proceed to calculations of sediment transport. Sensitivity analysis showed that currents contribute very little to the wave dominated resuspension, but mean currents could be used for computing sediment transport quantities and directions. Measurements of storm surge were represented well by the model output, aligning perfecting with the building and waning storm, but with a slight overprediction at the peak of the storm. The reasonable reproduction of wave heights and periods, and of storm surge indicate that the model is responding well to the input parameters. The modeling suggests that the most significant sediment erosion occurs at the northern tips of the Mackenzie Delta and the Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula, and around the area of Herschal Island. The model also indicates that waves are not fully developed during a storm for the present day ice limited fetch, and that extending the fetch a further 100 km to simulate ice retreat led to wave heights at the coast being increased by 20 cm.

  20. Relationships between SC- and SI-associated ULF waves and ionospheric HF Doppler oscillations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yumoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsunomura, S.; Nagai, T.

    1989-01-01

    The SC- and SI-associated ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations and geomagnetic pulsations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986 are interpreted. This is done by considering the 'dynamo-motor' mechanism of ionospheric E-field and the global compressional oscillations of the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, respectively.

  1. Relationships between SC- and SI-associated ULF waves and ionospheric HF Doppler oscillations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsunomura, S.; Nagai, T.

    The SC- and SI-associated ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations and geomagnetic pulsations during the great geomagnetic storm of February 1986 are interpreted. This is done by considering the 'dynamo-motor' mechanism of ionospheric E-field and the global compressional oscillations of the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, respectively.

  2. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A Giant Storm in Saturn's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Fischer, G.; Gurnett, D. A.; Zarka, P. M.; Dyudina, U. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Ewald, S. P.; Porco, C.; Wesley, A.; Go, C.; Delcroix, M.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on December 5, 2010, an extraordinary thunderstorm developed as observed via the radio signatures of lightning using the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the appearance of a convective cloud in Cassini's Imaging Science System (ISS) images. These instruments as well as amateur astronomers across the globe have continued to track this storm to the present. The storm is extraordinary in that it is the first observed by Cassini in the northern hemisphere near 35 degrees planetocentric north latitude and is, by far, the largest storm observed by Cassini during its mission at Saturn and is comparable to the Great White Spot (GWS) storms observed approximately once per Saturn year. The development from the barely visible indications on December 5 to a storm of GWS status occurred over about 3 weeks. Expansion of the storm in latitude within a latitudinal gradient in the wind system of the planet resulted in an elongated eastward tail which entirely circled the planet by February 2011. The primary active cell lies in a relatively localized area around the main plume of high altitude clouds that overshoot the ammonia cloud layer due to strong vertical convection, although other, weaker cells occasionally develop within the tail. The lightning flash rate of this storm peaked at an order of magnitude higher than previously recorded storms with strokes occurring at the rate of 10 per second and the total power estimated for the storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power, making it a significant element of the planet's energy budget. That this storm occurred a year or so after northern vernal equinox suggests a seasonal change in the location of Saturn's thunderstorms. We will summarize observations of this extraordinary storm and update its progress as it is ongoing at the time of this writing.

  4. Further Constraints on Electron Acceleration in Solar Noise Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Becker, Peter A.

    2006-08-01

    We reexamine the energetics of nonthermal-electron acceleration in solar noise storms. A new result is obtained for the minimum nonthermal-electron number density required to produce a Langmuir-wave population of sufficient intensity to power the noise-storm emission. We combine this constraint with the stochastic electron acceleration formalism developed by Subramanian and Becker (2005) to derive a rigorous estimate for the efficiency of the overall noise-storm emission process, beginning with nonthermal-electron acceleration and culminating in the observed radiation. We also calculate separate efficiencies for the electron acceleration Langmuir wave generation stage and the Langmuir wave noise-storm production stage. In addition, we obtain a new theoretical estimate for the energy density of the Langmuir waves in noise-storm continuum sources.

  5. Sporadic Geomagnetic Pulsations at Frequencies of up to 15 HZ in the Magnetic Storm of November 7-14, 2004: Features of the Amplitude and Polarization Spectra and their Connection with Ion-Cyclotron Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E. N.; Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Demekhov, A. G.; Kotik, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the geomagnetic-pulsation spectra at unusually high frequencies (including the frequencies exceeding the Schumann resonance frequency 8 Hz), which were detected for the first time at the Novaya Zhizn' midlatitude station (the McIlwain parameter L = 2.6) at the time of a strong magnetic storm on November 07-14, 2004. To interpret the observed pulsation frequencies, we used the data from the NOAA low-orbit satellites which recorded localized precipitations of energetic protons (with energies of 30 to 80 keV) and calculations of the singlepass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Amplitude and polarization characteristics of the radiation spectra at frequencies of up to 15 Hz at the Novaya Zhizn' and Lovozero stations (L = 5.2) are compared. It is shown that the magnetic field oscillations in the frequency range 7-15 Hz correlate with proton precipitations and proton auroras at geomagnetic latitudes 50°-57° (L = 2.42-3.37). It is also shown that for a high anisotropy of the pitch-angle distribution of the ring-current protons at such low geomagnetic latitudes, the frequency spectrum of observed high-frequency radiation agrees well with the calculated location of the maximum of the single-pass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Analysis of the data and calculation results has led to the conclusion that inherently the recorded signals are a high-frequency counterpart of the Pc1 pulsations and are due to the generation of ion-cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere at unusually low latitudes, which are probably stipulated by the shift of the plasma pause to these latitudes during a strong magnetic storm.

  6. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  7. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  8. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  9. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  10. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  11. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  12. Ionospheric and satellite remote sensing of tornadic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Phan, T.; Smith, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Gravity waves associated with tornadoes were studied by using a ground-based ionospheric sounding system and satellite visible and infrared photographs of clouds associated with storms. Examples were chosen from gravity waves associated with a group of tornadoes and with isolated tornadic storms. Ray tracing computation was carried out to identify the location of the wave source. It is found that the wave sources of gravity waves associated with tornadoes were located on the squall line and/or isolated clouds where the tornado touched down one hour after the gravity waves were excited.

  13. Modeling Coastline Response to Changing Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Murray, A. B.; Moore, L. J.; Brenner, O.

    2009-12-01

    Gradients in wave-driven alongshore sediment transport cause long-term change in the shape of sandy coastlines. Recent modeling work (Ashton, et. al. 2001; Ashton and Murray 2006) suggests coastlines can attain shapes that are in quasi-equilibrium with a regional wave climate—the distribution of wave influences as a function of deep-water wave-approach angles. Changes in storm frequency and/or magnitude will alter the wave climates affecting coastlines. Such a shift in wave forcing will tend to alter large-scale shapes of sedimentary coastlines (Slott et al., 2007). Even moderate changes in wave climate may cause coastlines to change shape rapidly, compared to a steady-wave-climate scenario. Such large-scale shape changes involve greatly accentuated rates of local erosion, and highly variable erosion/accretion rates. A recent analysis of wave records from the Southeastern US (Komar and Allen, 2007) indicates that wave climates have already been changing; for the past three decades, the heights of waves attributable to tropical storms have been increasing, changing the angular distribution of wave influences. These observations motivate ongoing, more refined modeling of how coastlines in this region should already be changing shape. Simulating patterns of shoreline change on actual coastlines involves examining the role of varying dynamical approximations in sub models of different environments (including wave propagation over the continental shelf) and uncertainties in model forcing (including the relationship between offshore buoy records and the wave climates affecting the coastline, when storm tracks often extend onshore of the buoy). Results suggest that modifications to the wave climate as recently seen along the Southeastern US give rise to rapid changes in shoreline shape and associated changes in patterns of erosion and accretion. Comparisons with results from related work, in which we examine historical and recent patterns of shoreline change for the

  14. Storms in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Introduction; The cast of characters; Vignettes of the storm; 1. Two kinds of weather; 2. The saga of the storm; 3. Weather stations in space; 4. Lights in the night: the signature of the storm; 5. A walking tour of the magnetosphere; 6. The sun: where it all begins; 7. Nowcasting and forecasting storms in space; 8. Technology and the risks from storms in space; 9. A conversation with Joe Allen; 10. Manned exploration and space weather hazards; 11. The present and future of space weather forecasting; Mathematical appendix. A closer look; Glossary; Figure captions.

  15. Utilities weather the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lihach, N.

    1984-11-01

    Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

  16. The contribution of ion-cyclotron waves to electron heating and SAR-arc excitation near the storm-time plasmapause. [Stable Auroral Red arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The potential role of ion-cyclotron waves in the electron heating process has been studied, using the HOTRAY code. It is demonstrated that ion-cyclotron waves can play an important role in both the energy transfer to plasmaspheric electrons and the subsequent downward heat conduction to SAR arc altitudes. In particular, such waves can experience enhanced path integrated amplification along the steep plasmapause density gradient. The latter tends to keep the wave normal angle small on several successive bounces across the equator, thus allowing cyclotron-resonant amplification leading to a total gain of up to 20 e-foldings. When the wave propagation vector becomes highly oblique, absorption occurs during Landau resonance with thermal plasmaspheric electrons, increasing the electron temperature in the direction parallel to the ambient field and leading directly to heat conduction into ionosphere.

  17. The North Sea Andrea storm and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2014-06-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase-resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm at the nearest grid point to the Ekofisk field are here applied as input to calculate the evolution of random realizations of the sea surface and its statistical properties. Numerical simulations are carried out using the Euler equations with a higher-order spectral method (HOSM). Results are compared with some characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at Ekofisk.

  18. Predicting severe winter coastal storm damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondula, David M.; Dolan, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 40 years residents of, and visitors to, the North Carolina coastal barrier islands have experienced the destructive forces of several 'named' extratropical storms. These storms have caused large-scale redistributions of sand and loss of coastal structures and infrastructure. While most of the population living on the islands are familiar with the wintertime storms, the damage and scars of the 'super northeasters'—such as the Ash Wednesday storm of 7 March 1962, and the Halloween storm of 1989—are slipping away from the public's memory. In this research we compared the damage zones of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm, as depicted on aerial photographs taken after the storm, with photos taken of the same areas in 2003. With these high-resolution aerial photos we were able to estimate the extent of new development which has taken place along the Outer Banks of North Carolina since 1962. Three damage zones were defined that extend across the islands from the ocean landward on the 1962 aerial photos: (1) the zone of almost total destruction on the seaward edge of the islands where the storm waves break; (2) the zone immediately inland where moderate structural damage occurs during severe storms; and (3) the zone of flood damage at the landward margin of the storm surge and overwash. We considered the rate of coastal erosion, the rate of development, and increases in property values as factors which may contribute to changing the financial risk for coastal communities. In comparing the values of these four factors with the 1962 damage data, we produced a predicted dollar value for storm damage should another storm of the magnitude of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm occur in the present decade. This model also provides an opportunity to estimate the rate of increase in the potential losses through time as shoreline erosion continues to progressively reduce the buffer between the development and the edge of the sea. Our data suggest that the losses along the

  19. Low Latitude Pulsations Associated with Different Phases of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, J.; Vankayala, R. C.; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, G.; Thomas, N.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm lot of free energy is available in the magnetosphere and this energy can act as feeder to electromagnetic waves in different frequency bands. A classical geomagnetic storm consists mainly of four phases i.e. SSC (Sudden Storm commencement), initial Phase, main phase and recovery phase. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of electromagnetic waves in ULF (ultra low frequency) band associated with different phases of geomagnetic storms. Electromagnetic waves in ULF band (Period~ 10-100s) in the Earth's magnetosphere are generally termed as geomagnetic pulsations. A detailed statistical analysis has been performed over ten years of geomagnetic data from low latitude ground stations in Indian and Japanese sectors. The study reveals that storms in general, are accompanied with continuous pulsations of different frequency bands during different phases. In particular, the main phase of 91 % of intense storms was accompanied with pulsations in Pc5 band (frequency~ 2-7 mHz). However, the occurrence of these pulsations was less frequent during main phase of weak to moderate storms. Further, the amplitude of these pulsations increased with the intensity of storm.

  20. Investigating the impact of surface wave breaking on modeling the trajectories of drifters in the northern Adriatic Sea during a wind-storm event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carniel, S.; Warner, J.C.; Chiggiato, J.; Sclavo, M.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate numerical prediction of the oceanic upper layer velocity is a demanding requirement for many applications at sea and is a function of several near-surface processes that need to be incorporated in a numerical model. Among them, we assess the effects of vertical resolution, different vertical mixing parameterization (the so-called Generic Length Scale -GLS- set of k-??, k-??, gen, and the Mellor-Yamada), and surface roughness values on turbulent kinetic energy (k) injection from breaking waves. First, we modified the GLS turbulence closure formulation in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to incorporate the surface flux of turbulent kinetic energy due to wave breaking. Then, we applied the model to idealized test cases, exploring the sensitivity to the above mentioned factors. Last, the model was applied to a realistic situation in the Adriatic Sea driven by numerical meteorological forcings and river discharges. In this case, numerical drifters were released during an intense episode of Bora winds that occurred in mid-February 2003, and their trajectories compared to the displacement of satellite-tracked drifters deployed during the ADRIA02-03 sea-truth campaign. Results indicted that the inclusion of the wave breaking process helps improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations, subject to an increase in the typical value of the surface roughness z0. Specifically, the best performance was obtained using ??CH = 56,000 in the Charnok formula, the wave breaking parameterization activated, k-?? as the turbulence closure model. With these options, the relative error with respect to the average distance of the drifter was about 25% (5.5 km/day). The most sensitive factors in the model were found to be the value of ??CH enhanced with respect to a standard value, followed by the adoption of wave breaking parameterization and the particular turbulence closure model selected. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  2. Two major dust storms, one Mars year apart - Comparison from Viking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The Viking Mars Landers have been on the Mars surface for over two Mars years. During the first year two major, probably global, dust storms occurred. The first was unusually early compared to most previous earth-based observations. A major storm occurred during the second year, almost precisely one year after the first storm of the first year. Meteorological data show roughly similar atmospheric behavior for the two early storms. Of particular note is the increase in amplitude of pressure oscillations (probably of baroclinic origin) and concurrent increases in wind speed during the build-up phase of all three storms. The generation of these waves appears to be a natural consequence of seasonal effects not associated with the dust storms. It is suggested that baroclinic waves, should they exist in the Southern Hemisphere during the time of dust storm generation, could be an important factor in the growth and development of the dust storms.

  3. Observing storm surges from space: Hurricane Igor off Newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Dake; Deyoung, Brad; Chen, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Coastal communities are becoming increasingly more vulnerable to storm surges under a changing climate. Tide gauges can be used to monitor alongshore variations of a storm surge, but not cross-shelf features. In this study we combine Jason-2 satellite measurements with tide-gauge data to study the storm surge caused by Hurricane Igor off Newfoundland. Satellite observations reveal a storm surge of 1 m in the early morning of September 22, 2010 (UTC) after the passage of the storm, consistent with the tide-gauge measurements. The post-storm sea level variations at St. John's and Argentia are associated with free equatorward-propagating continental shelf waves (with a phase speed of ~10 m/s and a cross-shelf decaying scale of ~100 km). The study clearly shows the utility of satellite altimetry in observing and understanding storm surges, complementing tide-gauge observations for the analysis of storm surge characteristics and for the validation and improvement of storm surge models. PMID:23259048

  4. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  5. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  6. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  7. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  8. Atmospheric circulation and storm events in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkova, G. V.; Arkhipkin, Victor S.; Kislov, Alexander V.

    2015-09-01

    The storm events in the Baltic Sea are examined in connection with the main weather patterns grouped into the circulation types (CTs), and their changes in present climate. A calendar of storms was derived from results of wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) experiments for 1948-2011. Based on this calendar, a catalogue of atmospheric sea level pressure (SLP) fields was prepared for CTs from the NCEP/NCAR dataset. SLP fields were then analyzed using a pattern recognition algorithm which employed empirical orthogonal decomposition and cluster analysis. For every CT we conducted an analysis of their seasonal and interannual changes, along with their role in storm event formation. An increase of the storm CTs' frequency in the second part of the 20th century was shown to be in a close agreement with teleconnection circulation patterns such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation and the Scandinavian blocking.

  9. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  10. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  11. Boulders moved by tsunamis and storms: Insights from a new equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R.; Diplas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Boulders can move during storms and tsunamis. However, it is a non-trivial problem to find a clear method to distinguish boulders moved by tsunami waves from those moved in storms in the field, but also in theory. This contribution is motivated the ongoing discussion about methods on how to find out if a boulder was moved by a tsunami or storm. We solve Newton's Second Law of Motion in polar coordinates and apply general conclusions of the Impulse Theory for Incipient Motion. We find that the boulder incipient motion and dislodgement is not only a function of the causative wave, but also of the roughness in the vicinity of the boulder and the slope angle. We employ the difference in the time of dislodgement in a tsunami and storm as a measure of how similar the storm and tsunami amplitudes are. If the roughness around the boulder is small, we conclude that it is impossible to find any method to discriminate between storm and tsunami waves. However, if the roughness is larger, amplitudes of storm waves and tsunami waves can be inverted, for example, with Nott's Equations. If the difference between the times to dislodgement is small or large depends also on the slope. For practical purposes, it is necessary to know the pre-transport setting of the boulder in terms of roughness and slope angle with confidence in order to be able to invert meaningful amplitudes of causative tsunami or storm waves, for example, with equations derived by Nott (2003).

  12. Ionospheric Doppler sounder as remote sensing for detection and prediction of severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Phan, T.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe storms are detected by a ground-based ionospheric sounding array, and the location of the severe storms responsible for the wave generation is determined by group ray path computation. Computations based on six events during the extreme tornado outbreak of April 3, 1974, and five single tornado events show that the wave sources are located near the location where tornadoes touchdown more than one hour later. In the hurricane case, the results indicate that waves were generated along the storm track more than 3 hours ahead of the actual location of the storm. The possibility of the development of the present system as a remote sensor for the detection and prediction of severe storms is discussed.

  13. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  14. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  15. Mechanisms for beach erosion during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Paul E.

    1993-11-01

    Simultaneous time-series measurements of waves, currents, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) were obtained from the surf zone of a high energy, macrotidal, dissipative beach (Llangennith, Gower, South Wales, U.K.) during "storm" and "calm" conditions. A collocated pressure transducer (PT), electromagnetic current meter (EMCM) and optical backscatter sensor (OBS) were used to measure waves, bi-directional currents and SSCs respectively. Incident wave heights were found to be saturated in the inner surf zone. As the incident waves decayed shorewards, low frequency (infragravity) oscillations in water level and current velocity grew. During the storm, the inner surf zone was dominated by strong (± 1m s -1), low frequency (≈0.01Hz), cross-shore fluid motions which accounted for up to 80% of the total spectral energy. Suspension events associated with the infragravity motions reached peak concentrations of over 70 g l -1, 0.04 m above the bed, and persisted for periods of 30-40 s. Co-spectra between the SSC and cross-shore velocity time-series were computed and used to examine the frequency dependence of the near-bed cross-shore (suspended) sediment transport rate, which was seen to be composed of mainly onshore transport due to asymmetric flows at incident wave frequencies, and predominantly offshore transport coupled with infragravity oscillations in the cross-shore current velocity. A mean (steady) transport component was also measured in association with the undertow (directed offshore). The combined effect of the infragravity band and mean offshore transport components was responsible for the erosion of the beach during the storm

  16. Observing Storm Surges from Space: A New Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Dake; de Young, Brad; Chen, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    Coastal tide gauges can be used to monitor variations of a storm surge along the coast, but not in the cross-shelf direction. As a result, the cross-shelf structure of a storm surge has rarely been observed. In this study we focus on Hurricane Igor-induced storm surge off Newfoundland, Canada. Altimetric observations at about 2:30, September 22, 2010 UTC (hours after the passage of Hurricane Igor) reveal prominent cross-shelf variation of sea surface height during the storm passage, including a large nearshore slope and a mid-shelf depression. A significant coastal surge of 1 m derived from satellite altimetry is found to be consistent with tide-gauge measurements at nearby St. John's station. The post-storm sea level variations at St. John's and Argentia are argued to be associated with free equatorward-propagating continental shelf waves (with phase speeds of 11-13 m/s), generated along the northeast Newfoundland coast hours after the storm moved away from St. John's. The cross-shelf e-folding scale of the shelf wave was estimated to be ~100 km. We further show approximate agreement of altimetric and tide-gauge observations in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Isaac (2012). The study for the first time in the literature shows the robustness of satellite altimetry to observe storm surges, complementing tide-gauge observations for the analysis of storm surge characteristics and for the validation and improvement of storm surge models.

  17. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  18. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are ... nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper ...

  19. Desert Storm environmental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, E. W.

    It is noted that after more than six months of operation of the Patriot launch station in the Saudi Arabian desert no problems that were attributed to high temperature occurred. The environmental anomalies that did occur were cosmetic in nature and related to dust and salt fog. It was concluded that the Desert Storm environmental effects were typical of worldwide hot, dry climates.

  20. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  1. Stories from the Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoczynski, Carol

    2007-01-01

    For four months, St. Paul's Episcopal School in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana remained closed after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the entire city in August 2005. The storm left St. Paul's campus under nine feet of water for two weeks, destroying many buildings and the entire first floor of the campus. As the only remaining art…

  2. Abnormal Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bo; Wang, Xinglong; Zheng, Ling; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases. A deeper understanding of the remarkably dynamic nature of mitochondria, characterized by a delicate balance of fission and fusion, has helped to fertilize a recent wave of new studies demonstrating abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease and discusses how these abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. We propose that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics represents a key common pathway that mediates or amplifies mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal dysfunction during the course of neurodegeneration. PMID:19799998

  3. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  4. Deposit characteristics of suspended sediments in storms and tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Weiss, R.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended load is the dominant sediment transport regime for the common near and onshore sand grain sizes in most common storms and tsunamis, which can be shown by simple Rouse number analysis. However, deposits laid down by storms and tsunamis can have very different characteristics although many similarities exist. Despite the vast amount of research on suspended sediment transport, few models focus on their sedimentary features. We aim to answer the question which wave processes are the driving mechanisms that govern the differences and similarities of storm and tsunami deposits. We employ the Discrete Element Method to model sediment settling and deposition that produces detailed deposit structure. Sediment transport is modeled as a single phase that does not feedback to hydrodynamics. Interaction between different grain sizes and their concentration -- a process known as hindered settling -- is incorporated. It should be noted that we assume only silty to sandy grain sizes, and exclude mud due to its cohesive nature and thus the difficulty in modelling. For the water motion, we assume linear long waves, and this limits our model to the offshore region where linear wave theory is most applicable. In our simulations, we assume that sediments initially distribute uniformly or follow a Rouse concentration profile. Our results indicate that storm deposits show periodic features in terms of vertical grading, because of the relatively short period of storm waves. In contrast, tsunami deposit structures are largely dependent on the relative position between sediments and tsunami wave crest. Both tsunami and storm deposit structures are the complex interplay between wave amplitude, water depth and grain-size distribution. For a certain grain-size distribution, greater water depth and amplitude result in greater settling distance, and hence better grading of deposits. Moreover, there exists a threshold water depth, beyond which deposit grading does not vary.

  5. Facilitating Adaptation to Changing Storm Surge Patterns in Western Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. A.; Holman, A.; Reynolds, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal regions of North America are already experiencing the effects of climate change and the consequences of new storm patterns and sea level rise. These climate change effects are even more pronounced in western Alaska where the loss of sea ice in early winter and spring are exposing the coast to powerful winter storms that are visibly altering the landscape, putting coastal communities at risk, and are likely impacting important coastal wildlife habitat in ways we don't yet understand. The Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative has funded a suite of projects to improve the information available to assist managers and communities to adapt changes in coastal storms and their impacts. Projects range from modeling tide, wave and storm surge patters, to ShoreZone and NHD mapping, to bathymetry mapping, community vulnerability assessments and risks to important wildlife habitat. This group of diverse projects has helped stimulate momentum among partners which will lead to better tools for communities to respond to dangerous storms. For example, the State of Alaska and NOAA are working together to compile a series of community-scale maps that utilize best-available datasets to streamline communication about forecasted storm surges, local elevations and potentially impacted infrastructure during storm events that may lead to coastal flooding.

  6. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmiller, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.

  7. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  8. Impacts of storm chronology on the morphological changes of the Formby beach and dune system, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, P.; Brown, J.; Karunarathna, H.

    2015-04-01

    Impacts of storm chronology within a storm cluster on beach/dune erosion are investigated by applying the state-of-the-art numerical model XBeach to the Sefton coast, northwest England. Six temporal storm clusters of different storm chronologies were formulated using three storms observed during the 2013/14 winter. The storm power values of these three events nearly halve from the first to second event and from the second to third event. Cross-shore profile evolution was simulated in response to the tide, surge and wave forcing during these storms. The model was first calibrated against the available post-storm survey profiles. Cumulative impacts of beach/dune erosion during each storm cluster were simulated by using the post-storm profile of an event as the pre-storm profile for each subsequent event. For the largest event the water levels caused noticeable retreat of the dune toe due to the high water elevation. For the other events the greatest evolution occurs over the bar formations (erosion) and within the corresponding troughs (deposition) of the upper beach profile. The sequence of events impacting the size of this ridge-runnel feature is important as it consequently changes the resilience of the system to the most extreme event that causes dune retreat. The highest erosion during each single storm event was always observed when that storm initialised the storm cluster. The most severe storm always resulted in the most erosion during each cluster, no matter when it occurred within the chronology, although the erosion volume due to this storm was reduced when it was not the primary event. The greatest cumulative cluster erosion occurred with increasing storm severity; however, the variability in cumulative cluster impact over a beach/dune cross-section due to storm chronology is minimal. Initial storm impact can act to enhance or reduce the system resilience to subsequent impact, but overall the cumulative impact is controlled by the magnitude and number of

  9. Impacts of storm chronology on the morphological changes of the Formby beach and dune system, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, P.; Brown, J.; Karunarathna, H.

    2015-07-01

    Impacts of storm chronology within a storm cluster on beach/dune erosion are investigated by applying the state-of-the-art numerical model XBeach to the Sefton coast, northwest England. Six temporal storm clusters of different storm chronologies were formulated using three storms observed during the 2013/2014 winter. The storm power values of these three events nearly halve from the first to second event and from the second to third event. Cross-shore profile evolution was simulated in response to the tide, surge and wave forcing during these storms. The model was first calibrated against the available post-storm survey profiles. Cumulative impacts of beach/dune erosion during each storm cluster were simulated by using the post-storm profile of an event as the pre-storm profile for each subsequent event. For the largest event the water levels caused noticeable retreat of the dune toe due to the high water elevation. For the other events the greatest evolution occurs over the bar formations (erosion) and within the corresponding troughs (deposition) of the upper-beach profile. The sequence of events impacting the size of this ridge-runnel feature is important as it consequently changes the resilience of the system to the most extreme event that causes dune retreat. The highest erosion during each single storm event was always observed when that storm initialised the storm cluster. The most severe storm always resulted in the most erosion during each cluster, no matter when it occurred within the chronology, although the erosion volume due to this storm was reduced when it was not the primary event. The greatest cumulative cluster erosion occurred with increasing storm severity; however, the variability in cumulative cluster impact over a beach/dune cross section due to storm chronology is minimal. Initial storm impact can act to enhance or reduce the system resilience to subsequent impact, but overall the cumulative impact is controlled by the magnitude and number

  10. Thyroid Storm Complicated by Bicytopenia and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Tokushima, Yoshinori; Sakanishi, Yuta; Nagae, Kou; Tokushima, Midori; Tago, Masaki; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Sugioka, Takashi; Yamashita, Shu-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Delirium • diarrhea • fever • hypertension • hyperventilation • tachycardia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The clinical presentation of thyroid storm includes fever, tachycardia, hypertension, and neurological abnormalities. It is a serious condition with a high mortality rate. Furthermore, some other complications affect the clinical course of thyroid storm. Although it is reported that prognosis is poor when thyroid storm is complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome (DIC) and leukopenia, reports of such cases are rare. Case Report: A 23-year-old man presented with delirium, high pyrexia, diarrhea, and weight loss of 18 kg over 2 months. According to the criteria of Burch and Wartofsky, he was diagnosed with thyroid storm on the basis of his symptom-complex and laboratory data that confirmed the presence of hyperthyroidism. Investigations also found leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are very rare complications of thyroid storm. We successfully treated him with combined therapy including anti-thyroid medication, despite leukopenia. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and treatment are essential in ensuring a good outcome for patients with this rare combination of medical problems. PMID:25072662

  11. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  12. Distant Storms as Drivers of Environmental Change at Pacific Atolls

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jonathan P. A.; Garton, David W.; Collen, John D.; Zwartz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The central Pacific Ocean with its many low lying islands and atolls is under threat from sea level rise and increased storm activity. Here, we illustrate how increasing frequency and severity of large scale storm events associated with global climate change may be particularly profound at the local scale for human populations that rely on lagoon systems for provision of a variety of goods and services. In August 2011 a storm originating in the Southern Ocean caused a large amplitude ocean swell to move northward through the Pacific Ocean. Its arrival at Palmyra Atoll coincided with transient elevated sea surface height and triggered turnover of the lagoon water column. This storm-induced change to the lagoon reflects long distance connectivity with propagated wave energy from the Southern Ocean and illustrates the increasing threats generated by climate change that are faced by human populations on most low-lying Pacific islands and atolls. PMID:24498232

  13. Distant storms as drivers of environmental change at Pacific atolls.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Garton, David W; Collen, John D; Zwartz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The central Pacific Ocean with its many low lying islands and atolls is under threat from sea level rise and increased storm activity. Here, we illustrate how increasing frequency and severity of large scale storm events associated with global climate change may be particularly profound at the local scale for human populations that rely on lagoon systems for provision of a variety of goods and services. In August 2011 a storm originating in the Southern Ocean caused a large amplitude ocean swell to move northward through the Pacific Ocean. Its arrival at Palmyra Atoll coincided with transient elevated sea surface height and triggered turnover of the lagoon water column. This storm-induced change to the lagoon reflects long distance connectivity with propagated wave energy from the Southern Ocean and illustrates the increasing threats generated by climate change that are faced by human populations on most low-lying Pacific islands and atolls. PMID:24498232

  14. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  15. Morphology of Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestine, E. H.

    1961-01-01

    This publication is a product of the continuing study of the properties of charged particles and fields in space being conducted by The RAND Corporation under contract No. NAS5-276 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Magnetic storms, revealed by world-wide changes in the intensity of the earth's magnetic field, and emphasized by disturbances in electromagnetic communication channels, form detectable patterns on the surface of the earth and above it. The author draws together data from various times, places, and altitudes and, coupling these with what is known or inferred about the aurora, the ionosphere, and the relationship between them and the earth's radiation belts, creates a picture of what is believed to occur during a magnetic storm.

  16. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  17. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  18. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. A Novel Electrocardiographic T-Wave Measurement (Tp-Te Interval) as a Predictor of Heart Abnormalities in Hypertension: A New Opportunity for First-Line Electrocardiographic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Andrea; Canichella, Flaminia; Battistoni, Allegra; Palano, Francesca; Francia, Pietro; Ciavarella, Giuseppino Massimo; Volpe, Massimo; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of conventional and new markers of early cardiac organ damage (OD) on 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) in 25 outpatients with newly diagnosed untreated essential hypertension compared with 15 normotensive, otherwise healthy individuals. Each participant underwent ECG, echocardiographic, and blood pressure (BP) measurements. Conventional and new ECG indexes for cardiac OD (Tp-Te interval, ventricular activation time, and P-wave analysis) were also measured. Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BP levels as well as left ventricular mass indexes were significantly higher in hypertensive than in normotensive patients. No significant differences were found between the two groups for ECG and echocardiographic markers of OD. Only Tp-Te interval was higher in hypertensive than in normotensive individuals (3.06 mm vs 2.24 mm; P<.0001), even after adjustment for anthropometric and clinical parameters. Preliminary results of this study demonstrated prolonged Tp-Te interval in newly diagnosed, untreated hypertensive outpatients compared with normotensive individuals. PMID:25772633

  20. Storm Surge Simulation and Ensemble Forecast for Hurricane Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricane Irene, raking the U.S. East Coast during the period of 26-30 August 2011, caused widespread damage estimated at $15.8 billion and was responsible for 49 direct deaths (Avila and Cangialosi, 2011). Although the most severe impact in the northeastern U.S. was catastrophic inland flooding, with its unusually large size, Irene also generated high waves and storm surges and caused moderate to major coastal flooding. The most severe surge damage occurred between Oregon Inlet and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina (NC). Significant storm surge damage also occurred along southern Chesapeake Bay, and moderate and high surges were observed along the coast from New Jersey (NJ) northward. A storm surge of 0.9-1.8 m caused hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage in New York City (NYC) and Long Island, despite the fact that the storm made landfall to the west of NYC with peak winds of no more than tropical storm strength. Making three U.S. landfalls (in NC, NJ, and NY), Hurricane Irene provides a unique case for studying storm surge along the eastern U.S. coastline. We apply the hydrodynamic model ADCIRC (Luettich et al. 1992) to conduct surge simulations for Pamlico Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and NYC, using best track data and parametric wind and pressure models. The results agree well with tidal-gauge observations. Then we explore a new methodology for storm surge ensemble forecasting and apply it to Irene. This method applies a statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to generate large numbers of storm ensembles under the storm environment described by the 51 ECMWF ensemble members. The associated surge ensembles are then generated with the ADCIRC model. The numerical simulation is computationally efficient, making the method applicable to real-time storm surge ensemble forecasting. We report the results for NYC in this presentation. The ADCIRC simulation using the best track data generates a storm surge of 1.3 m and a storm tide of 2.1 m

  1. Shallow Water Simulations of the Three Last Saturn's Giant Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2015-11-01

    Shallow Water (SW) simulations are used to present a unified study of the polar (1960), equatorial (1990), and mid-latitude (2010) major storms in Saturn nicknamed as Great White Spots (GWS). The 2010 GWS appeared at +40, moved at -30 m s-1 where the Coriolis force is predominant producing an open anticyclone with a high speed peripheral circulation and a cloud front around the convective source; a long-lived anticyclone; and strong zonal advection on the south part of the storm forming a turbulent region. The 1990 GWS onset took place near the equator, between +12 and +5, on the broad prograde equatorial jet (450 m s-1) where equatorial dynamics dominated producing a storm nucleus, with rapid expansion to the west of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the north side of the perturbation due to advection, and trapped equatorial waves which also expanded the storm to the east around the equator. The 1960 GWS appeared at high latitudes (+56) where Coriolis force is predominant in a region where zonal wind velocity is 0 m s-1. SW simulations predict a strong injection of relative vorticity which may produce large anticyclones on the anticyclonic side of the zonal profile, and a quick turbulent expansion on the background cyclonic regions at mid and high latitudes. In general, simulations indicate that negative relative vorticity injected by the storms also defines the natural interaction with the zonal winds at latitudes where the Coriolis force is dominant dictating its large scale dynamical behavior. Numerical experiments on the 1990 storm indicate that the onset of the storm can only be reproduced if the Voyager era background zonal flow is used, which suggests that it dominated the circulation dynamics at the storm’s outbreak region at that time. They also reproduce its most important morphological features, and show the production of planetary waves and turbulence. We discuss possible mechanism for the observed equatorial jet alterations during the storm

  2. Midlatitude Storms in a Moister World: Lessons from Idealized Baroclinic Life Cycle Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, J.; Wang, S.; Polvani, L.

    2012-04-01

    In global warming projections, the response of midlatitude storms has varied, depending on model resolution and storm metric analyzed. One point of contention regarding the varied response relates to the impact of moisture, because Global Climate Models parameterize some portion of the moist physics of midlatitude storms. Therefore, this study examines the sensitivity of midlatitude storms to moisture using a baroclinic wave in a weather forecasting model. Additionally, this study focuses on multiple storm metrics: eddy kinetic energy (EKE), storm central pressure, and the extremes in precipitation and surface winds. We take two approaches to vary the model's moisture: (1) we vary the relative humidity in the initial conditions, and (2) we fix the initial relative humidity and alter the definition of the saturation vapor pressure. The second approach allows us to increase moisture content above the current levels, which is something that is expected in a warmer climate. In both of our experiments, the storm central pressure minimum and the extremes in surface winds and precipitation strengthen monotonically as moisture increases. However, the response is quite small for moisture levels equal to those projected for the 21st century in GCMs. The behavior of the storm EKE is more complicated: for moisture content values near and above current levels, EKE responds non-monotonically. This behavior is caused by a change in the storm's circulation: increasing moisture content increases the vertical slope of the storm warm conveyor belt, which decreases the meridional extent of the storm. This decrease in meridional scale weakens the EKE.

  3. Factors controlling storm impacts on coastal barriers and beaches - A preliminary basis for near real-time forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of ground conditions and meteorological and oceanographic parameters for some of the most severe Atlantic and Gulf Coast storms in the U.S. reveals the primary factors affecting morphological storm responses of beaches and barrier islands. The principal controlling factors are storm characteristics, geographic position relative to storm path, timing of storm events, duration of wave exposure, wind stress, degree of flow confinement, antecedent topography and geologic framework, sediment textures, vegetative cover, and type and density of coastal development. A classification of commonly observed storm responses demonstrates the sequential interrelations among (1) land elevations, (2) water elevations in the ocean and adjacent lagoon (if present), and (3) stages of rising water during the storm. The predictable coastal responses, in relative order from high frequency beach erosion to low frequency barrier inundation, include: beach erosion, berm migration, dune erosion, washover terrace construction, perched fan deposition, sheetwash, washover channel incision, washout formation, and forced and unforced ebb flow. Near real-time forecasting of expected storm impacts is possible if the following information is available for the coast: a detailed morphological and topographic characterization, accurate storm-surge and wave-runup models, the real-time reporting of storm parameters, accurate forecasts of the storm position relative to a particular coastal segment, and a conceptual model of geological processes that encompasses observed morphological changes caused by extreme storms.

  4. Lightning location relative to storm structure in a supercell storm and a multicell storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Peter S.; Macgorman, Donald R.; Rust, W. David; Taylor, William L.; Rasmussen, Lisa Walters

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between lightning location and storm structure are examined for one radar volume scan in each of two mature, severe storms. One of these storms had characteristics of a supercell storm, and the other was a multicell storm. Data were analyzed from dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning-mapping systems. The distributions of VHF impulse sources were compared with radar reflectivity, vertical air velocity, and their respective gradients. In the supercell storm, lightning tended to occur along streamlines above and down-shear of the updraft and reflectivity cores; VHF impulse sources were most concentrated in reflectivities between 30 and 40 dBZ and were distributed uniformly with respect to updraft speed. In the multicell storm, on the other hand, lightning tended to coincide with the vertical reflectivity and updraft core and with the diverging streamlines near the top of the storm. The results suggest that the location of lightning in these severe storms were most directly associated with the wind field structure relative to updraft and reflectivity cores. Since the magnitude and vertical shear of the environmental wind are fundamental in determining the reflectivity and wind field structure of a storm, it is suggested that these environmental parameters are also fundamental in determining lightning location.

  5. Storm surges formation in the White and Barents Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobrolyubov, Sergey; Korablina, Anastasia; Myslenkov, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of storm surges in the Arctic seas are of high priority in Russia due to the active development of offshore oil and gas, construction of facilities in the coastal zone, as well as for the safety of navigation. It is important to study the variability of surges, to predict this phenomena and subsequent economic losses, thus including such information into the Russian Arctic Development Program 2020. Surges in the White and Barents Seas are caused mainly by deep cyclones of two types: "diving" from the north (88% of all cyclones) and western. The average height of the storm surges in the White Sea is 0.6-0.9 m. An average duration of storm surges is about 80 hours. Mathematical modeling is used to analyze the characteristics of storm surges formation in the Dvina Bay of the White Sea, and in the Varandey village on the Barents Sea coast. Calculating storm surge heights in the White and Barents seas is performed using the ADCIRC model on an unstructured grid with a step from 20 km in the Barents Sea to 100 m in the White Sea. Unstructured grids allowed keeping small features of the coastline of the White and Barents seas, small islands and shallow banks, and assessing their impact on the development and transformation of wind-generated waves. The ADCIRC model used data of wind field reanalysis CFSv2. The storm surges were simulated for the time period from 1979 to 2010 and included scenarios with / without direct atmospheric pressure forcing, waves and tides. Numerical experiments have revealed distribution of storm surges in channels of the Northern Dvina River delta. The storm surges spreads in the model from the north-north-west of the Dvina Bay. As storm surge moves from the wellhead to the seaside estuary of the Northern Dvina (district Solombala), its height increases from 0.5 to 2 m. We also found a non-linear interaction of the surge and tide during the phase of surge destruction. This phenomenon is the highest in the period of low water, and the

  6. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  7. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  8. On the Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Projections for Infrastructure Risk Analysis and Adaptation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storm surge can cause coastal hydrology changes, flooding, water quality changes, and even inundation of low-lying terrain. Strong wave actions and disruptive winds can damage water infrastructure and other environmental assets (hazardous and solid waste management facilities, w...

  9. Morphological response and coastal dynamics associated with major storm events along the Gulf of Lions Coastline, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, M.; Balouin, Y.; Belon, R.

    2012-03-01

    Along the coast, anticipating the different morphological responses induced by storm events is crucial for managers to evaluate coastal risks and to develop the best measures to mitigate them. In this paper, a methodology is developed to determine the best storm intensity parameter to derive storm thresholds for different morphological responses. The methodology is applied to the northern part of the Gulf of Lions coastline where storm events can induce important morphological changes. These include shoreline retreat, beach and dune erosion, significant migration of nearshore bars, overwashes and even breaches of coastal barriers, as well as damage to coastal defences and coastal infrastructure. In order to evaluate historical storm characteristics and impact, an extensive review was undertaken to obtain quantitative datasets (beach profiles, wave records), aerial photographs and more qualitative information on morphological evolution and coastal damage. Re-analysis of hydrodynamic and morphology data was undertaken, and hindcast wave modelling results were used to characterised storm intensities. The methodology developed to evaluate storm thresholds consists of obtaining morphological evolution indicators (evidence of breaching, overwash processes, volume variations and migration of morphological patterns) that can be directly linked to a storm event and its characteristics. Results demonstrate that in such a quasi-non-tidal wave-dominated environment, with intermediate double-barred beach shoreface morphology, major coastal changes occur following the maximum significant wave height reached during the storm, or else according to maximum wave run-up elevation regarding upper beach impact, a wave height dependant parameter. Inversely storm surge (and water level) alone, as well as total storm energy, do not explain any storm impact scale. Storm-specific datasets indicate that important morphological evolution is observed during moderate storm events (significant

  10. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  11. Dawn-dusk asymmetry and adiabatic dynamic of the radiation belt electrons during magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid L.

    2016-09-01

    The changes of the latitudinal profiles of outer belt energetic electrons during magnetic storms are mostly explained by the precipitation into the loss cone caused by VLF and EMIC waves or by the scattering into the magnetopause. In present work, energetic electron dynamics during magnetic storm of August 29-30, 2004 we attributed at most to the adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories and Dst effect. This conclusion was based on the analysis of dawn-dusk asymmetry of the electron latitudinal profiles measured by low altitude polar orbiter SERVIS-1 and on the coincidence of pre-storm and after-storm profiles of radiation belt electrons and protons.

  12. Empirical STORM-E Model. [I. Theoretical and Observational Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Xu, Xiaojing; Bilitza, Dieter; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2013-01-01

    Auroral nighttime infrared emission observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite is used to develop an empirical model of geomagnetic storm enhancements to E-region peak electron densities. The empirical model is called STORM-E and will be incorporated into the 2012 release of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). The proxy for characterizing the E-region response to geomagnetic forcing is NO+(v) volume emission rates (VER) derived from the TIMED/SABER 4.3 lm channel limb radiance measurements. The storm-time response of the NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER is sensitive to auroral particle precipitation. A statistical database of storm-time to climatological quiet-time ratios of SABER-observed NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER are fit to widely available geomagnetic indices using the theoretical framework of linear impulse-response theory. The STORM-E model provides a dynamic storm-time correction factor to adjust a known quiescent E-region electron density peak concentration for geomagnetic enhancements due to auroral particle precipitation. Part II of this series describes the explicit development of the empirical storm-time correction factor for E-region peak electron densities, and shows comparisons of E-region electron densities between STORM-E predictions and incoherent scatter radar measurements. In this paper, Part I of the series, the efficacy of using SABER-derived NO+(v) VER as a proxy for the E-region response to solar-geomagnetic disturbances is presented. Furthermore, a detailed description of the algorithms and methodologies used to derive NO+(v) VER from SABER 4.3 lm limb emission measurements is given. Finally, an assessment of key uncertainties in retrieving NO+(v) VER is presented

  13. Communicating Storm Surge Forecast Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, J. A.; Rhome, J.

    2015-12-01

    When it comes to tropical cyclones, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property along the coastal United States. The coastal population density has dramatically increased over the past 20 years, putting more people at risk. Informing emergency managers, decision-makers and the public about the potential for wind driven storm surge, however, has been extremely difficult. Recently, the Storm Surge Unit at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida has developed a prototype experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to help communicate this threat more effectively by identifying areas most at risk for life-threatening storm surge. This prototype is the initial step in the transition toward a NWS storm surge watch/warning system and highlights the inundation levels that have a 10% chance of being exceeded. The guidance for this product is the Probabilistic Hurricane Storm Surge (P-Surge) model, which predicts the probability of various storm surge heights by statistically evaluating numerous SLOSH model simulations. Questions remain, however, if exceedance values in addition to the 10% may be of equal importance to forecasters. P-Surge data from 2014 Hurricane Arthur is used to ascertain the practicality of incorporating other exceedance data into storm surge forecasts. Extracting forecast uncertainty information through analyzing P-surge exceedances overlaid with track and wind intensity forecasts proves to be beneficial for forecasters and decision support.

  14. Hubble Tracks Jupiter Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is following dramatic and rapid changes in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere that will be critical for targeting observations made by the Galileo space probe when it arrives at the giant planet later this year.

    This Hubble image provides a detailed look at a unique cluster of three white oval-shaped storms that lie southwest (below and to the left) of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The appearance of the clouds, as imaged on February 13, 1995 is considerably different from their appearance only seven months earlier. Hubble shows these features moving closer together as the Great Red Spot is carried westward by the prevailing winds while the white ovals are swept eastward. (This change in appearance is not an effect of last July's comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 collisions with Jupiter.)

    The outer two of the white storms formed in the late 1930s. In the centers of these cloud systems the air is rising, carrying fresh ammonia gas upward. New, white ice crystals form when the upwelling gas freezes as it reaches the chilly cloud top level where temperatures are -200 degrees Fahrenheit (- 130 degrees Centigrade).

    The intervening white storm center, the ropy structure to the left of the ovals, and the small brown spot have formed in low pressure cells. The white clouds sit above locations where gas is descending to lower, warmer regions. The extent of melting of the white ice exposes varied amounts of Jupiter's ubiquitous brown haze. The stronger the down flow, the less ice, and the browner the region.

    A scheduled series of Hubble observations will help target regions of interest for detailed scrutiny by the Galileo spacecraft, which will arrive at Jupiter in early December 1995. Hubble will provide a global view of Jupiter while Galileo will obtain close-up images of structure of the clouds that make up the large storm systems such as the Great Red Spot and white ovals that are seen in this picture.

    This color picture is assembled from a

  15. Ionospheric and satellite observations for studying the dynamic behavior of typhoons and the detection of severe storms and tsunamis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, typhoons (hurricanes) and tsunamis can be studied through the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere. Reverse ray tracing computations of acoustic-gravity waves observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array show that wave sources are in the nearby storm systems and that the waves are excited prior to the storms. Results show that ionospheric observations, together with satellite observations, can contribute to the understanding of the dynamical behavior of typhoons, severe storms and tsunamis.

  16. Risk Assessment of Hurricane Storm Surge for Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States and many other coastal areas around the world. Risk assessment of current and future hurricane storm surge provides the basis for risk mitigation and related decision making. This study investigates the hurricane surge risk for Tampa Bay, located on the central west coast of Florida. Although fewer storms have made landfall in the central west Florida than in regions farther west in the Gulf of Mexico and the east coast of U.S., Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge due to its geophysical features. It is surrounded by low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. Also, edge waves trapped on the west Florida shelf can propagate along the coastline and affect the sea level outside the area of a forced storm surge; Tampa Bay may be affected by storms traversing some distance outside the Bay. Moreover, when the propagation speed of the edge wave is close to that of a storm moving parallel to the coast, resonance may occur and the water elevation in the Bay may be greatly enhanced. Therefore, Tampa Bay is vulnerable to storms with a broad spectrum of characteristics. We apply a model-based risk assessment method to carry out the investigation. To estimate the current surge risk, we apply a statistical/deterministic hurricane model to generate a set of 1500 storms for the Tampa area, under the observed current climate (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) estimated from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis. To study the effect of climate change, we use four climate models, CNRM-CM3, ECHAM, GFDL-CM2.0, and MIROC3.2, respectively, to drive the hurricane model to generate four sets of 1500 Tampa storms under current climate conditions (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) and another four under future climate conditions of the IPCC-AR4 A1B emission scenario (represented by 2081-2100 statistics). Then, we apply two hydrodynamic models, the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model and the Sea

  17. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  18. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  19. Analysis of a Storm-induced Surge Anomaly Under Climate Change with Focus on Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.; Bilskie, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of sea level rise (SLR) on hurricane storm surge and wind-waves is a non-linear process (Bilskie et al., 2014). Using a high-resolution physics-based numerical model, we examine shelf wave dynamics in general and a shelf anomaly in particular under global climate change scenarios, which include SLR and potential hurricane intensification. To begin it is noted that Hurricane Dennis (2005) produced local storm surge in Apalachee Bay of six to ten feet, but the National Hurricane Center advisory for the region forecast only four to six feet of storm surge. This forecast was based on the relatively weak wind forcing along the west Florida shelf, but the additional storm-induced surge was caused by a remotely forced shelf wave that propagated along the Florida shelf as a topographic Rossby wave (Morey et al.,2006).These mesoscale processed are studied under climate change scenarios using a state-of-the-art wind-waved hurricane storm surge model (SWAN+ADCIRC) of the northern Gulf of Mexico that encompasses the off-shore regions including the western North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. The finitie element model penetrates the shoreline along Florida's "Big Bend" region, the Florida panhandle, Alabama, and the Mississippi coast with high resolution that is sufficient to describe the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, for example. The large domain and fine mesh resolution included in the model permits the description, and non-linear interaction, of the physics associated with wind-generated waves and hurricane storm surge that produce storm-induced anomalies such as the Rossby wave generated during Hurricane Dennis. Examination of various wave statistics such as significant wave height, mean wave period and direction, and wave radiation stress gradients provide insight into future behavior of storm-induced shelf wave dynamics under global climate change scenarios. This study may impact future statistics and probability distributions for analysis of

  20. Modeling CME-shock-driven storms in 2012-2013: MHD test particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M.; Baker, D. N.; Foster, J. C.; Turner, D. L.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock-driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and prenoon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock-driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch. Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 with electric field diagnostics that were not available for storms immediately following launch have improved our understanding of the complex role that ULF waves play in radial transport during such events.

  1. The reduction of storm surge by vegetation canopies: Three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Lapetina, Andrew; Ma, Gangfeng

    2012-10-01

    Significant buffering of storm surges by vegetation canopies has been suggested by limited observations and simple numerical studies, particularly following recent Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. Here we simulate storm surge and inundation over idealized topographies using a three-dimensional vegetation-resolving storm surge model coupled to a shallow water wave model and show that a sufficiently wide and tall vegetation canopy reduces inundation on land by 5 to 40 percent, depending upon various storm and canopy parameters. Effectiveness of the vegetation in dissipating storm surge and inundation depends on the intensity and forward speed of the hurricane, as well as the density, height, and width of the vegetation canopy. Reducing the threat to coastal vegetation from development, sea level rise, and other anthropogenic factors would help to protect many coastal regions against storm surges.

  2. Storms on Venus: Lightning-induced chemistry and predicted products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, K. H.

    2015-08-01

    Observations by many spacecraft that have visited Venus over the last 40 years appear to confirm the presence of lightning storms in the Venus atmosphere. Recent observations by Venus Express indicate that lightning frequency and power is similar to that on Earth. While storms are occurring, energy deposition by lightning into Venus atmospheric constituents will immediately dissociate molecules into atoms, ions and plasma from the high temperatures in the lightning column (>30,000 K) and the associated shock waves and heating, after which these atom and ion fragments of C,O,S,N,H-containing molecules will recombine during cooldown to form new sets of molecules. Spark and discharge experiments in the literature suggest that lightning effects on the main atmospheric molecules CO2, N2, SO2, H2SO4 and H2O will yield carbon oxides and suboxides (COm, CnOm), sulfur oxides (SnO, SnOm), oxygen (O2), elemental sulfur (Sn), nitrogen oxides (NO, N2O, NO2), sulfuric acid clusters (HnSmOx-.aHnSmOx e.g. HSO4-.mH2SO4), polysulfur oxides, carbon soot and other exotic species. While the amounts generated in lightning storms would be much less than that derived from photochemistry, during storms these species can build up in a small area and so their local concentrations may increase significantly. For a storm of 100×100 km, the increase could be ~5 orders of magnitude if they remain in the storm region for a period before becoming well-mixed. Some of these molecular species may be detectable by instruments onboard Venus Express while they are concentrated in the storm regions. We explore the diversity of new products likely created in lightning storms on Venus.

  3. Interannual Behavior of Large Regional Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Smith, M. D.

    2014-07-01

    We examine large regional dust storms in MCS and TES retrieved temperature profiles. There is significant repeatability with three regional storms (A, B and C) each Mars year. Each type of storm is distinct seasonally and in its behavior.

  4. At the eye of the storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The great storm now going on in the atmosphere of Saturn is discussed. Observational results are summarized, and possible explanations for the storm's origin are addressed. The potential for ongoing observations to clarify the storm's causes is considered.

  5. The Study of Insurance Premium Rate GIS Mapping Considering the Storm and Flood Hazard Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, I. S.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the number of natural disaster occurrence is increasing because of abnormal changes of weather in Korea. In Korea the storm and flood insurance system is in effect to prevent these natural disasters. The national storm and flood insurance Premium rate is very low and the risk of adverse selection resides because of choosing by who lives in high risk area. To solve these problems, the storm and flood insurance rate map are required. In this study, the prototype of storm and flood insurance premium rate map of the Ulsan, Korea was made and the method of GIS analysis for the insurance premium rate calculating and the procedure of the Ulsan storm and flood insurance rate map were researched.

  6. Response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Codrescu, M. V.; Moffett, R. J.; Quegan, S.

    1994-01-01

    Four numerical simulations have been performed, at equinox, using a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model, to illustrate the response of the upper atmosphere to geomagnetic storms. The storms are characterized by an increase in magnetospheric energy input at high latitude for a 12-hour period; each storm commences at a different universal time (UT). The initial response at high latitude is that Joule heating raises the temperature of the upper thermosphere and ion drag drives high-velocity neutral winds. The heat source drives a global wind surge, from both polar regions, which propagates to low latitudes and into the opposite hemisphere. The surge has the character of a large-scale gravity wave with a phase speed of about 600 m/s. Behind the surge a global circulation of magnitude 100 m/s is established at middle latitudes, indicating that the wave and the onset of global circulation are manifestations of the same phenomena. A dominant feature of the response is the penetration of the surge into the opposite hemisphere where it drives poleward winds for a few hours. The global wind surge has a preference for the night sector and for the longitude of the magnetic pole and therefore depends on the UT start time of the storm. A second phase of the meridional circulation develops after the wave interaction but is also restricted, in this case by the buildup of zonal winds via the Coriolis interaction. Conservation of angular momentum may limit the buildup of zonal wind in extreme cases. The divergent wind field drives upwelling and composition change on both height and pressure surfaces. The composition bulge responds to both the background and the storm-induced horizontal winds; it does not simply rotate with Earth. During the storm the disturbance wind modulates the location of the bulge; during the recovery the background winds induce a diurnal variation in its position. Equatorward winds in sunlight produce positive ionospheric changes during the main driving

  7. Clouds and Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with

  8. Satellite Vulnerability To Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Freemen, M. P.; Riley, D.; Daws, M.; Rutten, K.

    There are several examples where satellites on orbit have failed or partially failed during geomagnetic storms resulting in large insurance claims. Whether the storm is directly responsible for the failures is very controversial, commercially sensitive, and difficult to prove conclusively since there are so few examples. However, there are many non-fatal errors, or anomalies, that occur during the lifetime of spacecraft that enable a statistical analysis. Here we present an analysis of over 5000 satellite anomalies that shows for the first time a statistically significant link between satellite anomalies and geomagnetic storms. We find that the period of highest risk lasts for six days after the start of a magnetic storm. Approximately 40% of anomalies could be due to a random occurrence, but in addition there are between 0 and 35% of satellite anomalies that we attribute as being directly related to geomagnetic storms. We show that the risk depends on satellite prime contractor, orbit type, and age of satellite.

  9. Laboratory measurements of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation a...

  10. Peace at Storm King

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, T.

    1981-02-01

    A 20 year struggle between energy and environmental interests concerning a proposed pumped storage plant near Storm King Mountain, N.Y., has ended in a compromise that will hopefully protect the Hudson River's fish and scenic beauty. Consolidated Edison has agreed to halt construction of the pumped storage power plant and, along with other utilities operating power generating units on the Hudson River, has agreed to undertake appropriate measures to reduce destruction of fish and other aquatic life. These utilities will also set up a $12 million endowment to fund independent research on ways to lessen power plant impacts on aquatic ecosystems. In exchange for these commitments, the utilities will not be required to build cooling towers at operating power plant sites, and all lawsuits and administrative proceedings against them will be dropped.

  11. Dust storm in Chad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Chad (lower left) and the surrounding wetlands are under increasing pressure from desertification. The encroachment of the Sahara occurs with creeping sand dunes and major dust storms, such as the one pictured in this MODIS image from October 28, 2001. The amount of open water (lighter green patch within the darker one) has declined markedly over the last decades and the invasion of dunes is creating a rippled effect through the wetlands that is all too clear in the high-resolution images. Growing population and increasing demands on the lake give it an uncertain future. The loss of such an important natural resource will have profound effects on the people who depend on the rapidly diminishing source of fresh water. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. ARkStorm: A West Coast Storm Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. A.; Jones, L. M.; Ralph, F. M.; Dettinger, M. D.; Porter, K.; Perry, S. C.; Barnard, P. L.; Hoover, D.; Wills, C. J.; Stock, J. D.; Croyle, W.; Ferris, J. C.; Plumlee, G. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Miller, M.; Wein, A.; Rose, A.; Done, J.; Topping, K.

    2009-12-01

    The United Stated Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) is preparing a new emergency-preparedness scenario, called ARkStorm, to address massive U.S. West Coast storms analogous to those that devastated California in 1861-62. Storms of this magnitude are projected to become more frequent and intense as a result of climate change. The MHDP has assembled experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USGS, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, the State of California, California Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other organizations to design the large, but scientifically plausible, hypothetical scenario storm that would provide emergency responders, resource managers, and the public a realistic assessment of what is historically possible. The ARkStorm patterns the 1861 - 1862 historical events but uses modern modeling methods and data from large storms in 1969 and 1986. The ARkStorm draws heat and moisture from the tropical Pacific, forming Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) that grow in size, gain speed, and with a ferocity equal to hurricanes, slam into the U.S. West Coast for several weeks. Using sophisticated weather models and expert analysis, precipitation, snowlines, wind, and pressure data the modelers will characterize the resulting floods, landslides, and coastal erosion and inundation. These hazards will then be translated into the infrastructural, environmental, agricultural, social, and economic impacts. Consideration will be given to catastrophic disruptions to water supplies resulting from impacts on groundwater pumping, seawater intrusion, water supply degradation, and land subsidence. Possible climate-change forces that could exacerbate the problems will also be evaluated. In contrast to the recent U.S. East and Gulf Coast hurricanes, only recently have scientific and technological advances documented the ferocity and strength of possible future

  13. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  14. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  15. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  16. Untangling boulder dislodgement in storms and tsunamis: Is it possible with simple theories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R.; Diplas, P.

    2015-03-01

    Boulders can move during storms and tsunamis. It is difficult to find a simple method to distinguish boulders moved by tsunami waves from those moved during storms in the field. In this contribution, we explore boulder dislodgement by storm and tsunami waves by solving an adapted version of Newton's Second Law of Motion in polar coordinates and defining a critical position for boulder dislodgement. We find that the boulder dislodgement is not only a function of the causative wave, but also of the roughness in the vicinity of the boulder and the slope angle. We employ the amplitude of storm and tsunami waves to dislodge boulders of given masses to evaluate if boulder dislodgement in storms can be untangled from boulder transport in tsunamis. As the main result of our numerical experiments, we find a significant difference between storm and tsunami waves to dislodge the same boulder for large masses and large roughness values. This allows us to conclude that simple theories are applicable to answer the questions asked in the title, but we argue only if they contain a critical dislodgement condition like the one presented here.

  17. Thermal Tides During the 2001 Martian Global-Scale Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Wilson, R. John; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Bandfield, Donald J.; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 (Mars Year 25) global dust storm radically altered the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. Using observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and Mars WRF general circulation model simulations, we examine the changes to thermal tides and planetary waves caused by the storm. We find that the extratropical diurnal migrating tide is dramatically enhanced during the storm, particularly in the southern hemisphere, reaching amplitudes of more than 20 K. The tropical diurnal migrating tide is weakened to almost undetectable levels. The diurnal Kelvin waves are also significantly weakened, particularly during the period of global expansion at Ls=200deg-210deg. In contrast, the westward propagating diurnal wavenumber 2 tide strengthens to 4-8 K at altitudes above 30km. The wavenumber 1 stationary wave reaches amplitudes of 10-12 K at 50deg-70degN, far larger than is typically seen during this time of year. The phase of this stationary wave and the enhancement of the diurnal wavenumber 2 tide appear to be responses to the high-altitude westward propagating equatorial wavenumber 1 structure in dust mixing ratio observed during the storm in previous works. This work provides a global picture of dust storm wave dynamics that reveals the coupling between the tropics and high-latitude wave responses. We conclude that the zonal distribution of thermotidal forcing from atmospheric aerosol concentration is as important to understanding the atmospheric wave response as the total global mean aerosol optical depth.

  18. IRI STORM validation over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambous, Haris; Vryonides, Photos; Demetrescu, Crişan; Dobrică, Venera; Maris, Georgeta; Ionescu, Diana

    2014-05-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model includes an empirical Storm-Time Ionospheric Correction Model (STORM) extension to account for storm-time changes of the F layer peak electron density (NmF2) during increased geomagnetic activity. This model extension is driven by past history values of the geomagnetic index ap (The magnetic index applied is the integral of ap over the previous 33 hours with a weighting function deduced from physically based modeling) and it adjusts the quiet-time F layer peak electron density (NmF2) to account for storm-time changes in the ionosphere. In this investigation manually scaled hourly values of NmF2 measured during the main and recovery phases of selected storms for the maximum solar activity period of the current solar cycle are compared with the predicted IRI-2012 NmF2 over European ionospheric stations using the STORM model option. Based on the comparison a subsequent performance evaluation of the STORM option during this period is quantified.

  19. Association of Isolated Minor Non-specific ST-Segment and T-Wave Abnormalities with Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged, Biracial Population: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Liu, Kiang; Ning, Hongyan; Daviglus, Martha L.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Isolated minor non-specific ST segment and T wave abnormalities (NSSTTA) are common and known to be independent electrocardiographic risk markers for future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The association of NSSTTA with subclinical atherosclerosis is not well defined, but has been postulated as a potential mechanism of association with future clinical events. Methods and Results We studied participants from the Year 20 examination of the middle-aged, biracial CARDIA cohort. This examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG), coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). ECGs were coded using both Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC) criteria. Isolated minor STTA was defined by MC as presence of MC 4-3, 4-4, 5-3, or 5-4, and by NC as presence of NC 5.8. ECGs with secondary causes of STTA (i.e. LVH) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the cross-sectional association of isolated minor NSSTTA with CAC and CC-IMT. The study sample consisted of 2175 participants with an average age of 45 years (57% women and 43% black). No association was observed between NSSTTA and CAC. After multivariable-adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors, the presence of isolated minor NSSTTA remained significantly associated with the extent of CCIMT (OR 1.25 (1.06 – 1.48), p < 0.01). This association remained significant after further adjustment for CAC. Conclusions Isolated minor NSSTTA were associated with the extent of CCIMT, but not with CAC, in this middle-aged biracial cohort. Further study is needed to elucidate potential mechanisms for these findings. PMID:22952292

  20. Total Storm Currents in Relation to Storm Type and Lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deierling, W.; Kalb, C. P.; Mach, D. M.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Electrified lightning and non-lightning producing clouds of various types are thought to play a major role in supplying current to the global electric circuit (GEC). However, the contribution of storm conduction currents of different cloud types to the GEC is still not entirely known. Estimates of storm total conduction currents for different electrified clouds for the general categories of oceanic and continental electrified clouds were recently estimated from data collected over two decades during multiple field campaigns involving the NASA ER-2 and Altus-II aircraft. Building on this previous work, in this study we differentiate cloud categories into more specific cloud types (e.g. convective and stratiform partitions, severe versus ordinary single cell storms) and investigate on a case by case basis their underlying microphysical and dynamical structure. We also investigate the temporal evolution of storm total conduction currents during the lifecycle of electrified clouds.

  1. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  2. Winter Storm Zones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Barnes, J. R.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Preferred regions of weather activity in Mars' winter middle latitudes-so called 'storm zones' are found in a general circulation model of Mars' atmospheric circulation. During northern winter, these storm zones occur in middle latitudes in the major planitia (low-relief regions) of the western and eastern hemisphere. In contrast, the highlands of the eastern hemisphere are mostly quiescent. Compared to Earth's storm zones where diabatic heating associated with land-sea thermal contrasts is crucial, orography on Mars is fundamental to the regionalization of weather activity. Future spacecraft missions aimed at assessing Mars' climate and its variability need to include such regions in observation strategies.

  3. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  4. Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Pu, Zuyin; Fu, Suiyan; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Li, Jinxing; Guo, Ruilong; Parks, G. K.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such "energy-dependent" responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux dropouts during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux buildup during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provides a viable candidate for the energy-dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  5. Energy Dependent Responses of Relativistic Electron Fluxes in the Outer Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase 4 or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons fluxes show increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such 'energy dependent' behavior of electrons preferably occurs during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and these 'energy dependent' events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux drop-outs during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux build-up during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provide a viable candidate for the energy dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  6. Storm Occurrence and Coastal Response on the Western Irish Coast: a Meso-scale Perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.

    2001-05-01

    The western Irish coast comprises a highly compartmentalised series of headland-embayment cells in which sand and gravel beaches are typically backed by large vegetated dune systems. Exposure to modally high energy swell renders most beach systems dissipative in character although many are backed by a reflective coarse-grained section. A mesotidal range (c.3.5 m) exists along much of the coast. Analysis of instrumental wind records from three locations permitted the identification of a variety of storm types and the construction of a storm catalogue for the region. Few individual storms were recorded at all three stations indicating a lack of regional consistency in storm record although all stations recorded an increase in the frequency of strong winds. Analysis of historical shoreline changes recorded in maps and air photographs at a variety of sites on the west Irish coast reveals an apparently non-uniform record of mesoscale coastal behaviour with periods of stability apparently interrupted by phases of erosion that are tentatively linked to individual storms. Long-period wave energy attenuation across dissipative shorefaces and beaches minimises coastal response to distant storms whereas short-period, locally generated wind waves are more likely to cause dune and beach erosion. The lack of regional consistency in storm-related coastal response is interpreted as a function of: (i) the spatially non-uniform distribution of the storm record; (ii) the differing orientation of coastal cells with respect to storm-related winds; (iii) the need for a storm to coincide with high water to provide a measurable record of coastal response. This highly variable response of beach and dune systems to storm forcing at a decadal to century scale over a coastline length of 200km suggests that caution must be exercised when making generalisations regarding regional-scale coastal responses to climatic change.

  7. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Energy dependence of relativistic electron flux variations in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Fu, Suiyan; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt, depending on the delicate competition between electron energization and loss processes. Despite the well-known "energy independent" prototype in which electron fluxes enhance after geomagnetic storms at all energies, we present observations of "energy dependent" events, i.e., post-storm electron fluxes at lower energies (0.3-2.5 MeV, measured by MEPED/POES) recover or even exceed the pre-storm level, while electron fluxes at higher energies (2.5-14 MeV, measured by PET/SAMPEX) do not restore. The statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies: ~ 82% (3%) storm events produce increased (decreased) flux for 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons, while ~ 37% (45%) storms lead to enhancements (reductions) of 2.5-14 MeV electron flux. Superposed epoch analysis suggests that "energy dependent" events preferentially occur during periods of high solar wind density along with high dynamic pressure. Previous statistical studies have shown that this kind of solar wind conditions account for significant enhancements of EMIC waves, which cause efficient precipitation of > 2 MeV electrons into atmosphere via pitch angle scattering. Two cases of "energy dependent" events are investigated in detail with evident observations of EMIC waves that can resonate effectively with >2 MeV electrons. Besides, we do not capture much differences in the chorus wave activity between those "energy dependent" and "energy independent" events. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that EMIC waves play a crucial role in the occurrences of those "energy dependent" events in the outer zone during geomagnetic storms.

  9. Forecasting of Storm Surge Floods Using ADCIRC and Optimized DEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of storm surge flood forecasts is essential for improving preparedness for hurricanes and other severe storms and, in particular, for optimizing evacuation scenarios. An interactive database, developed by WorldWinds, Inc., contains atlases of storm surge flood levels for the Louisiana/Mississippi gulf coast region. These atlases were developed to improve forecasting of flooding along the coastline and estuaries and in adjacent inland areas. Storm surge heights depend on a complex interaction of several factors, including: storm size, central minimum pressure, forward speed of motion, bottom topography near the point of landfall, astronomical tides, and most importantly, maximum wind speed. The information in the atlases was generated in over 100 computational simulations, partly by use of a parallel-processing version of the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model. ADCIRC is a nonlinear computational model of hydrodynamics, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the US Navy, as a family of two- and three-dimensional finite element based codes. It affords a capability for simulating tidal circulation and storm surge propagation over very large computational domains, while simultaneously providing high-resolution output in areas of complex shoreline and bathymetry. The ADCIRC finite-element grid for this project covered the Gulf of Mexico and contiguous basins, extending into the deep Atlantic Ocean with progressively higher resolution approaching the study area. The advantage of using ADCIRC over other storm surge models, such as SLOSH, is that input conditions can include all or part of wind stress, tides, wave stress, and river discharge, which serve to make the model output more accurate.

  10. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  11. Cloudsat Dissects Tropical Storm Ileana

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Tropical Storm Ileana on Aug. 27 at 20:40 UTC. The colors indicate intensity of reflected radar energy. The blue ar...

  12. Tropical Storm Faxai's Rainfall Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows Tropical Storm Faxai's rainfall rates on March 2 from a TRMM TMI/PR rainfall analysis being faded in over infrared cloud data from the TRMM VIRS instrument. Credit: SSAI/NASA, ...

  13. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  14. The responses of artificial embayed beaches to storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.

    2009-09-01

    The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy beaches largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy beaches and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain beach. With increasing wave energy, the beach will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and Beach, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative beach state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed beaches, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the beach from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) beaches due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged beach profile of two of the artificial embayed beaches of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed beaches under study are single-barred beaches subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The

  15. Riding the storm out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, Josh

    2009-04-01

    I am standing on a bridge near the North Carolina coast. There is a light breeze, and I am enjoying some hazy sunshine. But this calm is an illusion: in a few minutes winds of up to 45ms-1 (100 mph) will sweep in again. The approaches to my section of the bridge are already drowned under 2.5 m of water, and my companions on this island are an eclectic mix of traumatized animals, including snakes, rats, wounded pelicans and frogs. Earlier, one of the snakes flew through the air past my truck. The animals and I have been drawn to this bridge by Hurricane Isabel, which has just slammed into the coastal islands of North Carolina, and at the moment we are in the calm, sunny eye of the storm. The animals are just trying to survive on the area's only dry ground. But I have come to the bridge with a radar system on a truck and have spent a night and a day on it because I want to know what is happening inside this hurricane.

  16. Storm-driven sediment transport in Massachusetts Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John C.; Butman, Bradford; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2008-02-01

    Massachusetts Bay is a semi-enclosed embayment in the western Gulf of Maine about 50 km wide and 100 km long. Bottom sediment resuspension is controlled predominately by storm-induced surface waves and transport by the tidal- and wind-driven circulation. Because the Bay is open to the northeast, winds from the northeast ('Northeasters') generate the largest surface waves and are thus the most effective in resuspending sediments. The three-dimensional oceanographic circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is used to explore the resuspension, transport, and deposition of sediment caused by Northeasters. The model transports multiple sediment classes and tracks the evolution of a multilevel sediment bed. The surficial sediment characteristics of the bed are coupled to one of several bottom-boundary layer modules that calculate enhanced bottom roughness due to wave-current interaction. The wave field is calculated from the model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Two idealized simulations were carried out to explore the effects of Northeasters on the transport and fate of sediments. In one simulation, an initially spatially uniform bed of mixed sediments exposed to a series of Northeasters evolved to a pattern similar to the existing surficial sediment distribution. A second set of simulations explored sediment-transport pathways caused by storms with winds from the northeast quadrant by simulating release of sediment at selected locations. Storms with winds from the north cause transport southward along the western shore of Massachusetts Bay, while storms with winds from the east and southeast drive northerly nearshore flow. The simulations show that Northeasters can effectively transport sediments from Boston Harbor and the area offshore of the harbor to the southeast into Cape Cod Bay and offshore into Stellwagen Basin. This transport pattern is consistent with Boston Harbor as the source of silver found in the surficial sediments of Cape Cod Bay and

  17. A Real-time, Two-way, Coupled, Refined, Forecasting System to Predict Coastal Storm Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, B. N.; Warner, J. C.; Signell, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Storms are one of the primary environmental forces causing coastal change. These discrete events often produce large waves, storm surges, and flooding, resulting in coastal erosion. In addition, strong storm-generated currents may pose threats to life, property, and navigation. The ability to predict these events, their location, duration, and magnitude allows resource managers to better prepare for the storm impacts as well as guide post-storm survey assessments and recovery efforts. As a step towards increasing our event prediction capability we have developed an automated system to run a daily forecast of the Coupled Ocean - Atmosphere - Wave - Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System, which includes the ocean model ROMS and the wave model SWAN. Management of the system is controlled on a high-performance computing cluster. Data required to drive the modeling system include wave, wind, atmospheric surface inputs, and climatology fields obtained from other modeling products. The Unidata Internet Data Distribution/Local Data Manager, nctoolbox and other NetCDF tools are used to access large data sets from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the Nomads http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov site. The data are used to create forcings and boundary conditions for the ROMS and SWAN models that run on both a 5 km US east coast and a 1 km nested region in the Gulf of Maine. Improvements in the modeling system, data acquisition, and visualization methods required for the forecasting system are described. Results of the newly coupled and refined system show improvement for the prediction of the free surface due to the increased resolution from the grid refinement in the Bay of Fundy. The surface currents of the refined system are more consistent with climatology. The surface waves are permitted to interact with the surface currents and show tidal oscillations at certain locations. Additionally, wave heights during storm events are modified by wave

  18. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  19. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  20. Role of wetlands in attenuation of storm surges using coastal circulation model (ADCIRC), Chesapeake Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Mithun; Ferreira, Celso; Lawler, Seth

    2014-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia is subject to storm surge from extreme weather events nearly year-round; from tropical storms and hurricanes during the summer and fall, (e.g., hurricanes Isabel [2003] and Sandy [2012]), and from nor'easters during the winter (e.g., winter storms Nemo and Saturn [2013]). Coastal wetlands can deliver acute fortification against incoming hurricane storm surges. Coastal wetlands and vegetation shape the hydrodynamics of storm surge events by retaining water and slowing the propagation of storm surge, acting as a natural barrier to flooding. Consequently, a precise scheme to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels was also prerequisite. Two wetland sites were chosen in the Chesapeake Bay region for detailed cataloging of vegetation characteristics, including: height, stem diameter, and density. A framework was developed combining these wetlands characterizations with numerical simulations. Storms surges were calculated using Coastal circulation model (ADCIRC) coupled to a wave model (SWAN) forced by an asymmetric hurricane vortex model using an unstructured mesh (comprised of 1.8 million nodes) under a High Performance Computing environment. The Hurricane Boundary Layer (HBL) model was used to compute wind and pressure fields for historical tropical storms and for all of the synthetic storms. Wetlands were characterized in the coupled numerical models by bathymetric and frictional resistance. Multiple model simulations were performed using historical hurricane data and hypothetical storms to compare the predicted storm surge inundation resulting from various levels of wetlands expansion or reduction. The results of these simulations demonstrate the efficacy of wetlands in storm surge attenuation and also the outcome will scientifically support planning of wetlands restoration projects with multi-objective benefits for society.

  1. On Adler space-time extremes during ocean storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romolo, Alessandra; Arena, Felice

    2015-04-01

    The paper concerns the statistical properties of extreme ocean waves in the space-time domain. In this regard, a solution for the exceedance probability of the maximum crest height during a sea state over a certain area is obtained. The approach is based on the Adler's solution for the extremal probability for Gaussian random processes in a multidimensional domain. The method is able to include the effects of spatial variability of three-dimensional sea waves on short-term prediction, both over an assigned area XY and in a given direction. Next, the storm-term predictions in the space-time are investigated. For this purpose, the exceedance probability of ηmaxfunc during an ocean storm over an assigned area A is derived. This solution gives a generalization to the space-time of the Borgman's time-based model for nonstationary processes. The validity of the model is assessed from wave data of two buoys of the NOOA-NDBC network located along the Pacific and the Atlantic U.S. coasts. The results show that the size of the spatial domain A remarkably influences the expected maximum crest height during a sea storm. Indeed, the exceedance probabilities of the maximum crest height during an ocean storm over a certain area significantly deviate from the classical Borgman's model in time for increasing area. Then, to account for the nonlinear contributions on crest height, the proposed model is exploited jointly with the Forristall's distribution for nonlinear crest amplitudes in a given sea state. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of a sea storm are performed showing a very good agreement with theoretical results.

  2. Oval Storms Merging on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These four images of clouds in a portion of Jupiter's southern hemisphere show steps in the consolidation of three 'white oval' storms into one over a three-year span of time. They were obtained on four dates, from Sept. 18, 1997, to Sept. 2, 2000, by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The widths of the white ovals range from about 8,000 kilometers to 12,000 kilometers (about 5,000 miles to 7,500 miles). North is up and east is to the right.

    The top image shows three white oval storms, which had coexisted for about 60 years. They were nicknamed FA, DE and BC, in order from west to east. By mid-1998, as shown in the second image, the two easternmost storms had merged into one, called BE. By October 1999, as shown in the third image, the merged oval and the last of the original three were approaching each other, but they were separated by a dark storm, called o 1, between them. The two white oval storms later merged into a single storm, as shown in the final image from September 2000.

    The Hubble Space Telescope is a facility of NASA and the European Space Agency. It is operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., which is managed for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy in Honolulu.

  3. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  4. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  5. Storm after-effects observed at Ushuaia and Kerguelen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, M.

    1981-12-01

    D-region disturbances have been detected at mid-latitudes after intense magnetic storms by means of a wide range of radiowave signals. Two different mechanisms have been suggested to account for these storm 'after-effects': one implies precipitation of energetic electrons from the radiation belt; the other, transport of neutral constituents from the auroral zones. This paper presents observations of abnormal enhancements of ionospheric absorption arising after two major magnetic storms occurring in March and April 1976. The measurements were made at Ushuaia (54.8 deg S, L equals 1.7) and at Kerguelen (49.4 deg S, L equals 3.7). The former were obtained by means of the pulse reflection method (A1) at MF and the latter by the riometer technique. It is shown that electron precipitation can explain the effects observed at Kerguelen but not those at Ushuaia which also depart significantly from the 'winter anomaly' trend observed at that site. The abnormal ionization at Ushuaia is attributed to transport from the southern auroral zone.

  6. A case study of ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during the October 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian; Sun, Lingfeng; Hu, Lianhuan; Wang, Yungang; Wang, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during 2 October 2013 geomagnetic storm. The TEC map over China sector (1° × 1°) and eight ionosondes data along the longitude of 110°E are used to show significant positive ionospheric phases (enhancements in TEC and ionospheric peak electron density NmF2) in the high-middle latitude region and the negative effects at the low latitude and equatorial region during the storm. A wave structure with periods about 1-2 h and horizontal speed about 680 m/s, propagating from the high latitudes to the low latitudes is observed in electron densities within the height region from 200 to 400 km, which is caused by the combined effects of neutral wind and the large-scale traveling disturbances (LSTIDs). In the low latitude regions, compared with those in the quiet day, the ionospheric peak heights of the F2 layer (hmF2) in the storm day obviously increase accompanying a notably decrease in TEC and NmF2, which might be as a result of the eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) evidenced by the two magnetometers and the subsequent westward disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF). The storm-time TEC enhancement mainly occurs in the topside ionosphere, as revealed from the topside TEC, bottomside TEC and GPS TEC.

  7. Freak Waves Registration in 2009 in the Aniva, Bay, Okhotsk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, A.; Kostenko, I.; Pelinovsky, E.; Yalciner, A.

    2012-04-01

    Harbors, oil and gas platforms, and some other coastal structures are one of the most valuable facilities in coastal zones onshore and offshore requiring special operative and statistical information in high-precision on different wave regimes. Okhotsk Sea is a very important coastal area for navigation and mining operations in Far East. Within last free years, continuous measurements of sea level changes in the Aniva Bay are carried out by Special Research Bureau of Automation of Marine Researches of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The results of these measurements can be used for the interpretation of sea dynamics and wave regimes. Freak waves are one of the special research themes. Okhotsk Sea has not been analyzed yet in case of the risk of freak waves which threat the safety of navigation and mining operations along the sea shelf. In this work we present an analysis of gauge records of a sea level from June to September of 2009 near Aniva cape (southern coast of Sakhalin island). Background excitement in this area rather weak (average heights of waves about 10 cm, however the height of waves increases in storm conditions to 50 cm). For this period was registered 394 abnormal big waves (freak waves) -the wave height in two and more times exceeds considerable height of a wave, from them 6 cases when excess reaches 2.5 are resulted. These records help us to understand the mechanism of freak waves in this region such as the dispersion enhancement of transient wave groups, geometrical focusing in basins of variable depth, and wave-current interaction. A numerical model study will be performed to understand the physical mechanisms of the freak wave phenomenon and to select areas in Okhotsk Sea having the highest or lowest values of the probability of freak waves depending on hydrological and meterological conditions in the study zone. This study is partly supported by RFBR Projects No. 11-05-00216 and 11-05-92002

  8. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  9. Forecasting the impact of storm waves and sea-level rise on Midway Atoll and Laysan Island within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—a comparison of passive versus dynamic inundation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Berkowitz, Paul; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    Two inundation events in 2011 underscored the potential for elevated water levels to damage infrastructure and affect terrestrial ecosystems on the low-lying Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The goal of this study was to compare passive "bathtub" inundation models based on geographic information systems (GIS) to those that include dynamic water levels caused by wave-induced set-up and run-up for two end-member island morphologies: Midway, a classic atoll with islands on the shallow (2-8 m) atoll rim and a deep, central lagoon; and Laysan, which is characterized by a deep (20-30 m) atoll rim and an island at the center of the atoll. Vulnerability to elevated water levels was assessed using hindcast wind and wave data to drive coupled physics-based numerical wave, current, and water-level models for the atolls. The resulting model data were then used to compute run-up elevations using a parametric run-up equation under both present conditions and future sea-level-rise scenarios. In both geomorphologies, wave heights and wavelengths adjacent to the island shorelines increased more than three times and four times, respectively, with increasing values of sea-level rise, as more deep-water wave energy could propagate over the atoll rim and larger wind-driven waves could develop on the atoll. Although these increases in water depth resulted in decreased set-up along the islands’ shorelines, the larger wave heights and longer wavelengths due to sea-level rise increased the resulting wave-induced run-up. Run-up values were spatially heterogeneous and dependent on the direction of incident wave direction, bathymetry, and island configuration. Island inundation was modeled to increase substantially when wave-driven effects were included, suggesting that inundation and impacts to infrastructure and terrestrial habitats will occur at lower values of predicted sea-level rise, and thus sooner in the 21st century, than suggested

  10. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  13. Storm tracks in regional climate simulations:verification and changes with doubled CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzfey, J. J.

    1999-10-01

    The ability of the CSIRO Atmospheric Research's regional climate model (RCM) to simulate the mean July storm track over Australia is investigated in this study. The observed storm track is characterized by the time-averaged eddy kinetic energy in the ECMWF analyses for years 1985 1992. RCM runs nested within these analyses are used to verify the ability of the model to simulate the storm track with ''perfect'' boundary conditions. Comparison is also made with 20years of the CSIRO9 Mk2 global climate model (GCM) and the RCM nested within this GCM, for equilibrium simulations with both current and doubled CO2 levels. Correlations of the meridional wind with a point within the storm track over Australia are used to characterize the structure of the mean baroclinic wave within the storm track. The location of the storm tracks in both the RCM and the GCM are simulated very well. The main deficiency is the lack of intensity of the upper-level storm track, but the RCM is more realistic than the GCM, indicating that the intensity of the storm track is partly related to horizontal resolution. The mean wave structure in the GCM and the RCM simulations is very similar to observed. Under doubled CO2 conditions, both the upper-level jetstream and storm track intensify, and move equatorward, in response to the increasing upper-troposphere north south temperature gradient. In the lower troposphere, the mean and eddy kinetic energy decrease to the south-east of Australia in response to the decrease in the north south temperature gradient there. As a response to the generally decreasing mid-tropospheric north south temperature gradient, the mean baroclinic wave appears to become slightly more barotropic, as indicated by less tilt in the zonal direction.

  14. Comparisons of hurricane-induced storm surge models and their operational use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Gay, P.; Rigney, J. P.; Doody, M.

    2010-12-01

    The most devastating hazard to human life, habitat and property associated with hurricanes is due to storm surge. The US Navy is often called upon to render humanitarian assistance and aid in disaster recovery in the wake of storm surge events. It is imperative, therefore, that the US Navy, as well as other agencies responsible for national security and safeguarding life and property, evaluate the options available for improvements to operational modeling capabilities. Improvement of storm surge forecast skill has advanced significantly during the past couple of decades as a result of finer resolution, more robust physics, and the inclusion of wave setup and wave-current interaction. Current storm surge models used by United States government agencies, the SLOSH model used by the National Hurricane Center, PCTides by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO), and ADCIRC by the US Army Corps of Engineers, have several drawbacks such as neglect of tides, wave effects, and insufficient spatial resolution. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare available hurricane-induced storm surge models in order to inform the selection of the optimal storm surge model for operational use at NAVOCEANO. This will involve investigation of operational capability and forecast skill of SLOSH, PCTides and ADCIRC, as well as several other storm surge models including CH3D-SSMS, Delft3D and FVCOM. The initial phase, presented in this poster, will entail a literature review to determine and summarize the recent and current state of storm-surge model comparisons in the scientific, industry, and government communities. Consideration will be given to the relative importance of improved inputs to the models (wind-fields and storm track/intensity and associated hurricane prediction models) as compared with model selection.

  15. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  16. Mechanisms for Mars dust storms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Pollack, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Characteristics of the Mars global dust storm are reviewed. At the Mariner 9 encounter, the dust consisted of highly absorbing particles distributed rather uniformly up to great height (about 50 km). These observations together with temperature distributions inferred from the Mariner 9 IRIS by Hanel et al. (1972) are used to estimate global wind systems during the dust storm. The global distribution and direction of light surface streaks indicate that the axisymmetric circulation was a dominant part of flow during the dust storm. The axisymmetric winds may become strong enough to raise dust over wide areas of Mars' tropics under unusual conditions: the incoming solar radiation must be near its seasonal maximum, the static stability must be low, and the atmosphere must be able to absorb and re-emit a sizeable fraction of the incoming radiation. Strong winds around the periphery of the retreating south polar cap would be driven by the temperature gradient at the cap edge and by the mass outflow due to subliming CO2. These polar winds could generate local dust storms, raising the general level of dustiness, and providing the conditions necessary for onset of a global dust storm.

  17. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  18. Hindcast storm events in the Bering Sea for the St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet Regions, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; McCall, Robert T.; van Rooijen, Arnold; Norris, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study provides viable estimates of historical storm-induced water levels in the coastal communities of Gambell and Savoonga situated on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, as well as Unalakleet located at the head of Norton Sound on the western coast of Alaska. Gambell, Savoonga, and Unalakleet are small Native Villages that are regularly impacted by coastal storms but where little quantitative information about these storms exists. The closest continuous water-level gauge is at Nome, located more than 200 kilometers from both St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet. In this study, storms are identified and quantified using historical atmospheric and sea-ice data and then used as boundary conditions for a suite of numerical models. The work includes storm-surge (temporary rise in water levels due to persistent strong winds and low atmospheric pressures) modeling in the Bering Strait region, as well as modeling of wave runup along specified sections of the coast in Gambell and Unalakleet. Modeled historical water levels are used to develop return periods of storm surge and storm surge plus wave runup at key locations in each community. It is anticipated that the results will fill some of the data void regarding coastal flood data in western Alaska and be used for production of coastal vulnerability maps and community planning efforts.

  19. A local dust storm in the Chryse region of Mars - Viking Orbiter observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.; Evans, N.

    1981-01-01

    A local dust storm was observed near the Viking Lander 1 site by Viking Orbiter 1 in September, 1977, when the areocentric longitude of the sun (L sub s) was 340 deg (shortly before vernal equinox). The orbiter observations, which consisted of a time sequence of pictures, show that the storm moved at about 50 m/sec to the ENE from the Lunae-Planum region into the Chryse basin. Both baroclinic waves and topography may have been associated with the generation of the storm.

  20. Mars' great storm of 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capen, C. F.; Martin, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the development of this planet-wide storm and its subsequent decline through mid-January 1972. The initial core of the disturbance extended northeast to southwest. Preliminary examination of photographic data indicates that the storm, yellow in color, spread completely around the planet in about 16 days. During the storm, red- and green-light photographs recorded Mars as brighter than normal, while in blue it was only slightly brighter, and in the ultraviolet there was no significant change. The history of yellow clouds is discussed. They seem to germinate in specific areas in the southern hemisphere, such as the Hellas-Noachis region. Another yellow cloud is predicted for July or August of 1973.

  1. Intense geomagnetic storms: A study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbergleit, Virginia

    In the pipes and the lines of the transmission of the electrical energy, the route of the currents through them, causes a diminution of the life utility of the same one. The intense storms are studied, because these are induced quickly to the ionospheric systems that they change, obtaining great induced telluric currents (or GICs). Also the Akasofús parameter based on the time for periods of strong and moderate magnetic storms during the last 10 years is calculated. The method also standardizes the parameters of the storm: electron flow between 30-300 KeV, z component of the magnetic field (Bz), the solar Wind velocity (v), indices AE and AL. Also, the decay time of the ring current (which is different during the main and the recovery phase from of the geomagnetic disturbances) are calculated.

  2. Experimental investigation of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation are not fully understood. K...

  3. Jupiter's Violent Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This Voyager 2 image shows the region of Jupiter extending from the equator to the southern polar latitudes in the neighborhood of the Great Red Spot. A white oval, different from the one observed in a similar position at the time of the Voyager 1 encounter, is situated south of the Great Red Spot. The region of white clouds now extends from east of the red spot and around its northern boundary, preventing small cloud vortices from circling the feature. The disturbed region west of the red spot has also changed since the equivalent Voyager 1 image. It shows more small scale structure and cloud vortices being formed out of the wave structures. The picture was taken on July 3 from 6 million kilometers (3.72 million miles).

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  4. Overview of midlatitude ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Paul; Coster, Anthea; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections erupting from the roiling Sun can smash into the Earth's magnetosphere causing geomagnetic storms that penetrate deep into the atmosphere, which can short out satellites, upset radio communications, disrupt navigation, and even damage terrestrial electrical power grids. Though effects on other regions of the atmosphere have been analyzed, the mechanism by which geomagnetic storms influence the ionosphere's middle latitudes remains poorly understood.This brief report provides an overview of current knowledge in midlatitude ionospheric dynamics and disturbances, from the historic record to recent discoveries presented at a January AGU Chapman Conference.

  5. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  6. GPM Sees Powerful Storms in Tropical Storm Hermine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a 3-D animated flyby of Tropical Storm Hermine created using radar data from the GPM core satellite. On Aug. 31 at 4 p.m. EDT GPM found rainfall occurring at a rate of over 9.9 inches (251 ...

  7. Hindcast of extreme sea states in North Atlantic extratropical storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, Sonia; Guedes Soares, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the variability of freak wave parameters around the eye of northern hemisphere extratropical cyclones. The data was obtained from a hindcast performed with the WAve Model (WAM) model forced by the wind fields of the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). The hindcast results were validated against the wave buoys and satellite altimetry data showing a good correlation. The variability of different wave parameters was assessed by applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) technique on the hindcast data. From the EOF analysis, it can be concluded that the first empirical orthogonal function (V1) accounts for greater share of variability of significant wave height (Hs), peak period (Tp), directional spreading (SPR) and Benjamin-Feir index (BFI). The share of variance in V1 varies for cyclone and variable: for the 2nd storm and Hs V1 contains 96 % of variance while for the 3rd storm and BFI V1 accounts only for 26 % of variance. The spatial patterns of V1 show that the variables are distributed around the cyclones centres mainly in a lobular fashion.

  8. Templates of Change: Storms and Shoreline Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Robert; Hayden, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Presents results of research designed to assess and predict the storm-related hazards of living on the coast. Findings suggest that certain sections of coastline are more vulnerable than others to storm damage. (WB)

  9. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  10. Intensification of Pacific storm track linked to Asian pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Fan, Jiwen; Wu, Dong L; Molina, Mario J

    2007-03-27

    Indirect radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols by modification of cloud processes poses the largest uncertainty in climate prediction. We show here a trend of increasing deep convective clouds over the Pacific Ocean in winter from long-term satellite cloud measurements (1984-2005). Simulations with a cloud-resolving weather research and forecast model reveal that the increased deep convective clouds are reproduced when accounting for the aerosol effect from the Asian pollution outflow, which leads to large-scale enhanced convection and precipitation and hence an intensified storm track over the Pacific. We suggest that the wintertime Pacific is highly vulnerable to the aerosol-cloud interaction because of favorable cloud dynamical and microphysical conditions from the coupling between the Pacific storm track and Asian pollution outflow. The intensified Pacific storm track is climatically significant and represents possibly the first detected climate signal of the aerosol-cloud interaction associated with anthropogenic pollution. In addition to radiative forcing on climate, intensification of the Pacific storm track likely impacts the global general circulation due to its fundamental role in meridional heat transport and forcing of stationary waves. PMID:17374719

  11. Intensification of Pacific storm track linked to Asian pollution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Fan, Jiwen; Wu, Dong L.; Molina, Mario J.

    2007-01-01

    Indirect radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols by modification of cloud processes poses the largest uncertainty in climate prediction. We show here a trend of increasing deep convective clouds over the Pacific Ocean in winter from long-term satellite cloud measurements (1984–2005). Simulations with a cloud-resolving weather research and forecast model reveal that the increased deep convective clouds are reproduced when accounting for the aerosol effect from the Asian pollution outflow, which leads to large-scale enhanced convection and precipitation and hence an intensifed storm track over the Pacific. We suggest that the wintertime Pacific is highly vulnerable to the aerosol–cloud interaction because of favorable cloud dynamical and microphysical conditions from the coupling between the Pacific storm track and Asian pollution outflow. The intensified Pacific storm track is climatically significant and represents possibly the first detected climate signal of the aerosol–cloud interaction associated with anthropogenic pollution. In addition to radiative forcing on climate, intensification of the Pacific storm track likely impacts the global general circulation due to its fundamental role in meridional heat transport and forcing of stationary waves. PMID:17374719

  12. Simulating the effects of vegetation on storm surge and coastal inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapetina, A. J.; Sheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation such as tidal marshes and mangroves can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics, including water levels, wave processes, turbulent mixing, storm surge, and coastal inundation. This study makes use of a one dimensional turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) model developed by Sheng, et al. [2012] and validated with data from several flume experiments, including those of Shimizu and Tsujimoto [1994], Nepf and Vivoni [2000], and Neumeier [2007]. This one dimensional vertical model is unique because it evaluates profile drag and skin friction drag introduced by vegetation separately. The model is incorporated into a three-dimensional coupled circulation-wave model, CH3D-SWAN, to simulate the influence of coastal wetlands on storm surge and inundation at the regional scale. In many two-dimensional storm surge models, the effects of vegetation are included through an enhanced Manning coefficient, but the modeling system presented here is a significant improvement, because it realistically models vertical velocity profiles in flow through vegetation. Two experiments utilizing this three-dimensional vegetation-resolving storm surge model are presented, one investigating the influence of vegetation canopies of varying sizes on the same storm, and another examining how the dissipation of storm surge by given vegetation is affected by a storm's forward speed and intensity. Three variables describing vegetation canopies are considered (canopy density, canopy height, canopy width) and two variables describing storm conditions are considered (forward speed and storm intensity). Clear trends on the influence of various parameters emerge, and will prove valuable to coastal scientists, engineers, land-use planners, and ecologists.

  13. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  14. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  15. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  16. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  17. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  18. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  19. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  20. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  1. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  2. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  3. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  4. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  5. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  6. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  7. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  8. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  9. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  10. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  11. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  12. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  13. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  14. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  15. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  16. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  17. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  18. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  19. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  20. A Global Database of Tropical Storm Surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, Hal F.; Keim, Barry D.; Sathiaraj, David; Shafer, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Tropical cyclone-generated storm surges are among the world's most deadly and costly natural disasters. The destructive nature of this hazard was clearly seen last fall, as Hurricane Sandy generated a devastating storm surge along the mid-Atlantic coast. The storm killed 147 people and caused approximately $50 billion in economic losses [Blake et al., 2012].

  1. The geological effects of hurricanes on coral reefs and the interpretation of storm deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoffin, T. P.

    1993-11-01

    Hurricanes occur in belts 7° to 25° north and south of the equator. Reefs growing in these belts suffer periodic damage from hurricane-generated waves and storm surge. Corals down to 20m depth may be broken and removed, branching colonies being much more susceptible to breakage than upright massive forms. Sand cays may be washed away and former storm ridges may migrate to leeward across reef flats to link with islands. Reef crest and reef front coral debris accumulate as talus at the foot of the fore-reef slope, on submarine terraces and grooves, on the intertidal reef flat as storm ridges of shingle or boulders and isolated blocks of reef framework, as accreting beach ridges of leeward migrating shingle, as lobes and wedges of debris in back-reef lagoons, as drapes of carbonate sand and mud in deep off-reef locations in the fore-reef and lagoonal areas. In addition to the coarse debris deposited, other features may aid the recognition of former hurricane events, including the assemblage of reef biota, its species composition and the structure of the skeletons; graded internal sediments in framework cavities; characteristic sequences of encrusting organisms; characteristic shapes of reef flat microatoll corals; and submarine cement crusts over truncated reef surfaces. The abundance of reef flat storm deposits whose ages cluster around 3000 4000 y BP in certain parts of the world most likely relate to a slight fall in relative sea level rather than an increase in storminess during that period. A higher frequency of storms need not result in more reef flat storm deposits. The violence of the storm relative to normal fair-weather conditions influences the extent of damage; the length of time since the previous major storm influences the amount of coral debris created; the length of time after the hurricane, and before a subsequent storm influences the degree of stabilization of reef-top storm deposits and hence their chances of preservation.

  2. Numerical simulations to account for boulder movements on Lanyu Island, Taiwan: tsunami or storm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mamoru; Arashiro, Yasuhisa; Shiga, Shota

    2014-12-01

    Boulders that originated from the Holocene coral terrace and coral reef are distributed on the coral terrace or talus on the shore of Lanyu Island, Taiwan. We employed numerical simulation of storm waves and estimated whether the boulders could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years, by larger storm waves with return periods of hundreds of years, or by tsunamis. The coral boulders are distributed between 36 and 128 m from the shoreline at elevations of 2.7 to 9.3 m. The sizes of the boulders are in the range 0.3 to 6.4 m. The boulder volume and a-axis length versus distance from the shore show weak and moderate correlation ( r = 0.21 and 0.48), respectively. We reproduced the runup of waves using the equation of continuity for a two-dimensional non-compressive fluid and the Navier-Stokes formula. In order to handle the free surface of the fluid, the volume of fluid method was applied. For the flow velocity to move the boulder, we employed the theoretical formula for the transport of boulders. We used the wave height for a return period of 50 years and set the height of the input wave to 13.1 m. The results show that all the large boulders on Lanyu Island could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years. Moreover, the computations show that most of the boulders could not have been transported by tsunamis generated by the Mw8.7 earthquakes. The ages of two boulders indicate that they were transported after 340 and 6,330 years ago. If these boulders were moved by tsunamis several hundred years ago, they would have been relocated subsequently by storm waves.

  3. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  4. Impacts of storms on coastal circulation in Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Warner, J. C.; Voulgaris, G.; Work, P.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the effects of coastal storms on the regional circulation in Long Bay, South Carolina, using a coupled ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System)- SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) model. Meteorological observations during the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (October 2003 April 2004) reveal three dominant types of storms in the region warm fronts, cold fronts, and tropical storms. Each storm has a characteristic progression of wind patterns: (1) Warm fronts start with southwestward winds and change to northeastward after the front passes; (2) Cold fronts begin with northeastward winds and shift to southeastward when the front moves out; and (3) Tropical storms change wind directions from the southwest to the southeast during the storm. It is observed the coastal circulation distinctly responds to such atmospheric disturbances in either a upwelling-favorable condition to the northeastward winds or a downwelling-favorable condition to the southwestward winds. The study domain encompasses 300-km of gently arcing shoreline between Cape Romain to Cape Fear, and approximately 100-km offshore to the shelf edge. The model domain is resolved by a 300×130 mesh at 1-km intervals in the horizontal and twenty terrain-following layers in the vertical. The ROMS model is driven by tides and wind stress, and it includes wave-current interactions via dynamic coupling to the surface wave model SWAN. Salinity and temperature along the open boundaries are included by nudging to climatological values. A time period of six months is simulated from October 2003 to April 2004, concurrent with the observation study. Model results are compared to an extensive set of measurements collected at eight sites in the inner part of Long Bay, and are used to identify varying circulation response to each storm type. In addition, we investigate the significance of the Capes on the development of the alongshore pressure gradients, and examine the importance of wave-current interactions

  5. Enhancement of wind stress evaluation method under storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjian; Yu, Xiping

    2016-02-01

    Wind stress is an important driving force for many meteorological and oceanographical processes. However, most of the existing methods for evaluation of the wind stress, including various bulk formulas in terms of the wind speed at a given height and formulas relating the roughness height of the sea surface with wind conditions, predict an ever-increasing tendency of the wind stress coefficient as the wind speed increases, which is inconsistent with the field observations under storm conditions. The wave boundary layer model, which is based on the momentum and energy conservation, has the advantage to take into account the physical details of the air-sea interaction process, but is still invalid under storm conditions without a modification. By including the energy dissipation due to the presence of sea spray, which is speculated to be an important aspect of the air-sea interaction under storm conditions, the wave boundary layer model is improved in this study. The improved model is employed to estimate the wind stress caused by an idealized tropical cyclone motion. The computational results show that the wind stress coefficient reaches its maximal value at a wind speed of about 40 m/s and decreases as the wind speed further increases. This is in fairly good agreement with the field data.

  6. Observations on thermospheric and mesospheric density disturbances caused by typhoons and convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Lee, C. C.; Johnson, D. L.; Chen, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Atmospheric parameter observations have been conducted during the passage of typhoons and tropical storms, from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere, and thence to the thermosphere, using the VHF radar and HF Doppler sounder at an observation site in Taiwan. The density perturbations caused by the propagation of gravity waves due to the typhoons and tropical storms were calculated on the basis of these observations. The short-term middle atmospheric and thermospheric density changes are significant factors in spacecraft launches. The successful remote measurement of three-dimensional winds, gravity waves, and density perturbations is demonstrated for this subtropical site.

  7. Dust storms - Great Plains, Africa, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woiceshyn, P. M.; Krauss, R.; Minzner, R.; Shenk, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dust storms in the Great Plains of North America and in the Sahara Desert are analyzed on the basis of imagery from the geostationary Synchronous Meteorological Satellite. The onset time, location and areal extent of the dust storms are studied. Over land surfaces, contrast enhancement techniques are needed to obtain an adequate picture of dust storm development. In addition, infrared imagery may provide a means of monitoring the strong horizontal temperature gradients characteristic of dust cloud boundaries. Analogies between terrestrial dust storms and the airborne rivers of dust created by major Martian dust storms are also drawn.

  8. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  9. Source of microbaroms from tropical cyclone waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Cheung, Kwok Fai; GarcéS, Milton A.; Fee, David

    2011-03-01

    Microbaroms are continuous infrasonic signals with a dominant frequency around 0.2 Hz produced by ocean surface waves. Monitoring stations around the globe routinely detect strong microbaroms in the lee of tropical cyclones. We utilize a parametric wind model and a spectral wave model to construct the tropical cyclone wave field and a theoretical acoustic source model to describe the intensity, spatial distribution, and dynamics of microbarom sources. This approach excludes ambient wave conditions and facilitates a parametric analysis to elucidate the source mechanism within the storm. A stationary tropical cyclone produces the strongest microbarom signals at the center, where the waves generated by the cyclonic winds converge. As the tropical cyclone moves forward, the converging wave field becomes less coherent and lags and expands behind the storm center. The models predict a direct relation between the storm forward speed and the location of maximum microbarom source intensity consistent with the infrasonic observations from Hurricane Felicia 2009 in the North Central Pacific.

  10. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  11. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  12. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome. PMID:25838951

  13. Thermospheric storms and related ionospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study of thermospheric storms for equinox and winter conditions is presented based on neutral-composition measurements from the Aeros-A neutral-atmosphere temperature experiment. The main features of the two storms as inferred from changes in N2, Ar, He, and O are described, and their implications for current theories of thermospheric storms are discussed. On the basis of the study of the F-region critical frequency measured from a chain of ground-based ionospheric stations during the two storm periods, the general characteristics of the ionospheric storms and the traveling ionospheric disturbances are described. It is suggested that the positive and negative phases of ionospheric storms are different manifestations of thermospheric storms.

  14. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Duodenal Ulcer Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome. PMID:25838951

  15. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  16. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  17. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  18. Assessing storm events for energy meteorology: using media and scientific reports to track a North Sea autumn storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Important issues for energy meteorology are to assess meteorological conditions for normal operating conditions and extreme events for the ultimate limit state of engineering structures. For the offshore environment in northwest Europe, energy meteorology encompasses weather conditions relevant for petroleum production infrastructure and also the new field of offshore wind energy production. Autumn and winter storms are an important issue for offshore operations in the North Sea. The weather in this region is considered as challenging for extreme meteorological events as the Gulf of Mexico with its attendant hurricane risk. The rise of the Internet and proliferation of digital recording devices has placed a much greater amount of information in the public domain than was available to national meteorological agencies even 20 years ago. This contribution looks at reports of meteorology and infrastructure damage from a storm in the autumn of 2006 to trace the spatial and temporal record of meteorological events. Media reports give key information to assess the events of the storm. The storm passed over northern Europe between Oct.31-Nov. 2, 2006, and press reports from the time indicate that its most important feature was a high surge that inundated coastal areas. Sections of the Dutch and German North Sea coast were affected, and there was record flooding in Denmark and East Germany in the southern Baltic Sea. Extreme wind gusts were also reported that were strong enough to damage roofs and trees, and there was even tornado recorded near the Dutch-German border. Offshore, there were a series of damage reports from ship and platforms that were linked with sea state, and reports of rogue waves were explicitly mentioned. Many regional government authorities published summaries of geophysical information related to the storm, and these form part of a regular series of online winter storm reports that started as a public service about 15 years ago. Depending on the

  19. Dust storm off Western Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of Saharan dust storms reach far beyond Africa. Wind-swept deserts spill airborne dust particles out over the Atlantic Ocean where they can enter trade winds bound for Central and North America and the Caribbean. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows a dust storm casting an opaque cloud of cloud across the Canary Islands and the Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on June 30, 2002. In general it takes between 5 and 7 days for such an event to cross the Atlantic. The dust has been shown to introduce foreign bacteria and fungi that have damaged reef ecosystems and have even been hypothesized as a cause of increasing occurrences of respiratory complaints in places like Florida, where the amount of Saharan dust reaching the state has been increasing over the past 25 years.

  20. Spectral features of background ULF noise during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotik, Dmitry; Ermakova, Elena; Ryabov, Alexander; Shchecoldin, Aexander

    The monitoring of tangential components of ULF noise below first Schumann resonance was permanently provided since 2003 up to now at mid-latitude station New Life (56N, 44,7E). The regular structure in ULF spectrograms named SRS -spectral resonance structure could be observed practically every night excepting years of solar activity maximum. The SRS appears in the ULF noise due existing the resonator for Alfven waves in the ionosphere at heights from the bottom up to 600 -1000 km [1]. It was noticed that during magnetically disturbed time the strong anti-correlation between the intensity of SRS events and K index from station on neighbor magnetic meridian [2]. For more detail investigation it was choused several magnetic storms. First one is storm witch has began at November 20, 2003 with maximum Kp=9 (strong), second -at March 19, 2006 with Kp=6+ (moderate) and the third -at November 25, 2008 with Kp=5 (weak). The spectra of magnetic component amplitude and polarization parameter were analyzed. The comparison with ionosond and magnetic field data as well as world TEC maps for mentioned storm periods were made. The dynamics of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms were explored. The general regularities of these changes were displayed. One of the prominent feathers appeared at the end of the strong and moderate storms looked like fish shoals. Perhaps this kind of ULF bursts is the same nature as well known pearls pulsation but displayed in broad frequency range 1-6 Hz. May be it could be classified as special spectral structure. The analysis of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms together with geo-physical data has shown that the main regularities in changes the SRS caused by changing of the ionospheric parameters above the observation point. But some of ULF spectral features are results of interaction waves and particles in the magnetosphere. 1. Belyaev P.P., Polyakov S.V., Ermakova E.N., Isaev S.V. Solar cycle variations in

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Severe storms observing satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Stern, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Payload distribution and the attitude control system for the multi-mission modular spacecraft/StormSat configuration are discussed. The design of the advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer (AASIR) gimbal drive and its servomechanism is described. Onboard data handling, data downlink communications, and ground data handling systems are developed. Additional topics covered include: magnetic unloading at synchronous altitude, north-south stationkeeping, and the feasibility and impact of flying the microwave atmospheric sounding radiometer (MASR) as an additional payload.

  3. Dust Storm in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Along historic Route 66, just southeast of the little town of Amboy, California, lies a dried-up lake. Dry lakebeds are good sources of two things: salt and dust. In this image, the now-parched Bristol Lake offers up both. On April 12, 2007, dust storms menaced the area around Amboy. To the northwest, near Newberry Springs, California, dust hampered visibility and led to a multi-car collision on Interstate 40, killing two people and injuring several others. The same day, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a dust storm in the dry remains of Bristol Lake. Many small dust clouds boil up from the ground surface, casting their shadows to the northwest. A bright white cloud floating over the dust also throws its shadow onto the ground below. East of the dust storm are salt works that stand out from the surrounding landscape thanks to their straight lines and sharp angles. Dark ground surfaces alternate with mined white salt in a network of stripes. When lakes evaporate, chemicals that had been dissolved in the water stay behind, making dry lake beds an ideal place to find heavy concentrations of minerals, including salt. Besides the salt works, something else appears in stark contrast to this arid place. Lush green fields of irrigated crops appear in the east. Besides their color, their orderly arrangement reveals their human-made origin.

  4. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  5. Impacts of Hurricane Rita on the beaches of western Louisiana: Chapter 5D in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Fauver, Laura A.; Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Rita made landfall as a category 3 storm in western Louisiana in late September 2005, 1 month following Hurricane Katrina's devastating landfall in the eastern part of the State. Large waves and storm surge inundated the lowelevation coastline, destroying many communities and causing extensive coastal change including beach, dune, and marsh erosion.

  6. Impacts of land cover changes on hurricane storm surge in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M.; Lawler, S.; Ferreira, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States with more than 150 rivers draining into the bay's tidal wetlands. Coastal wetlands and vegetation play an important role in shaping the hydrodynamics of storm surge events by retaining water and slowing the propagation of storm surge. In this way coastal wetlands act as a natural barrier to inland flooding, particularly against less intense storms. Threats to wetlands come from both land development (residential or commercial/industrial) and sea level rise. The lower region of the Chesapeake Bay near its outlet is especially vulnerable to flooding from Atlantic storm surge brought in by hurricanes, tropical storms and nor'easters (e.g., hurricanes Isabel [2003] and Sandy [2012]). This region is also intensely developed with nearly 1.7 million residents within the greater Hampton Roads metropolitan area. Anthropogenic changes to land cover in the lower bay can directly impact basin drainage and storm surge propagation with impacts reaching beyond the immediate coastal zone to affect flooding in inland areas. While construction of seawall barriers around population centers may provide storm surge protection to a specifically defined area, these barriers deflect storm surge rather than attenuate it, underscoring the importance of wetlands. To analyze these impacts a framework was developed combining numerical simulations with a detailed hydrodynamic characterization of flow through coastal wetland areas. Storm surges were calculated using a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) coupled to a wave model (SWAN) forced by an asymmetric hurricane vortex model using the FEMA region 3 unstructured mesh (2.3 million nodes) under a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. Multiple model simulations were performed using historical hurricanes data and hypothetical storms to compare the predicted storm surge inundation with various levels of wetland reduction and/or beach hardening. These data were combined and overlaid

  7. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  9. Storms, shoreface morphodynamics, sand supply, and the accretion and erosion of coastal dune barriers in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Edward J.

    2013-10-01

    The coast of the southern North Sea is bound by dune barriers that have developed adjacent to a shallow storm- and tide-dominated shoreface comprising numerous shore-parallel to sub-shore-parallel tidal sand banks. The banks evolve under the joint control of tide-, wave- and wind-induced shore-parallel currents, which tend to ‘stretch' them, eventually leading to bank division, and to shoaling and breaking storm waves, which tend to drive them ashore. The banks, thus, modulate the delivery of storm wave energy to the coast, redirect currents alongshore and are the sand sources for the accretion of coastal dunes. Foredune accretion occurs where major sand banks have migrated shoreward over the last centuries to be finally driven ashore and weld under the impact of storm waves. Morphological changes in the bank field can impact on shoreline stability through dissipation or enhanced shoreward transmission of storm wave energy and effects on radiation stress, particularly when waves are breaking over the banks. Where banks are close to the shore, mitigation of offshore sediment transport, especially during storms, can occur because of gradients in radiation stress generated by the complex 3D bank structure. These macro-scale mechanisms involve embedded meso-scale interactions that revolve around the mobility of sand waves, mobility of beach bars and troughs and foredune mobility, and micro-scale processes of bedform mobility in the subaqueous and intertidal domains, and of swash and aeolian beach-dune sand transport. These embedded interactions and the morphodynamic feedback loops illustrate the importance of synchroneity of sand transport from shoreface to dune on this coast. Large stretches of the foredunes show either signs of stability, or mild but chronic erosion. Furthermore, a demonstrated lack of a clear relationship occurs between storminess and coastal response over the second half of the 20th century. The present situation may be indicative of conditions

  10. Clearing the Martian air - The troubled history of dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. J.

    1984-03-01

    This note is an attempt to resolve some misconceptions regarding the historical record of the Martian atmospheric phenomena referred to as 'dust storms,' but often called yellow storms, yellow clouds, planetwide dust storms, global dust storms, great dust storms, etc. The known frequency of planet-encircling storms will be specifically addressed. Better knowledge of the sizes, frequencies, and locations of Martian dust storms is needed for atmospheric modeling and for future mission planning.

  11. The Sources of Bz Fluctuations within CIRs: Magnetic Storms During the Descending Phase of the Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, R. K.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Smith, E. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation examines the magnetic field fluctuations within Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) detected by Ulysses at mid- and low-latitudes. CIRs are formed by the interaction of high-speed streams flowing from the polar coronal hole with slow-speed streams. Several wave modes are identified, and the effectiveness of these waves causing magnetic storms at Earth will be discussed.

  12. Understanding Storm Time Poynting Flux Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, H. M.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that energy deposited by dayside Earth-directed Poynting flux (S||) is greater during geomagnetic storms; however, S|| spatial and temporal variability are less well understood. Eight years (2000-2008) of data from the WDC for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, were collected to identify thirteen large and five super storms according to specific criteria: "classic" storm structure in which the time interval between sudden storm commencement (SSC) and minimum Dst (Dstmin) was ≤ 24 hours; the main and recovery phases did not experience secondary or tertiary disturbances; large storms where Dst ≤ -93 nT; and, super storms where Dst ≤ -184 nT. Solar wind and magnetospheric data for the 18 storms were collected from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F-15) and NASA OMNI. For all storms, the data were averaged and plotted to identify S|| variability for the mantle, cusp, polar rain, and central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions during geomagnetic storm time. As known for all storms, while Dst decreased, average S|| peaked, as did Kp. The energy deposited per square-meter by precipitating energetic particles (electrons) did not increase, though average hemispheric power increased by nearly a factor of two for the large and super storms between SSC and Dstmin. For the large storms, average S|| from the central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions (on closed field lines) was enhanced by nearly a factor of two between SSC and Dstmin; for the super storms, enhancement was over a factor of three. Average large storm S|| enhancement from the mantle, cusp, and polar rain regions (on open field lines) was significantly more enhanced by a factor of three between SSC and Dstmin. It was enhanced by a factor of over five for the super storms. For the open field line regions, a large, prolonged secondary peak in S|| was observed for large and super storms during the recovery phase. As suggested by this and prior studies, research is needed to better

  13. Boulder Dislodgement by Tsunamis and Storms: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R.; Diplas, P.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Sheremet, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, boulder dislodgement by tsunami and storm waves has been approached with a simple threshold approach in which a boulder was moved if the sum of the acting forces on the boulder is larger than zero. The impulse theory taught us, however, that this criterion is not enough to explain particle dislodgement. We employ an adapted version of the Newton's Second Law of Motion (NSLM) in order to consider the essence of the impulse theory which is that the sum of the forces has to exceed a certain threshold for a certain period of time. Furthermore, a classical assumption is to consider linear waves. However, when waves travel toward the shore, they alter due to non-linear processes. We employ the TRIADS model to quantify that change and how it impacts boulder dislodgement. We present our results of the coupled model (adapted NSLM and TRIADS model). The results project a more complex picture of boulder transport by storms and tsunami. The following question arises: What information do we actually invert, and what does it tell us about the causative event?

  14. Boulder Dislodgement by Tsunamis and Storms: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In the past, boulder dislodgement by tsunami and storm waves has been approached with a simple threshold approach in which a boulder was moved if the sum of the acting forces on the boulder is larger than zero. The impulse theory taught us, however, that this criterion is not enough to explain particle dislodgement. We employ an adapted version of the Newton's Second Law of Motion (NSLM) in order to consider the essence of the impulse theory which is that the sum of the forces has to exceed a certain threshold for a certain period of time. Furthermore, a classical assumption is to consider linear waves. However, when waves travel toward the shore, they alter due to non-linear processes. We employ the TRIADS model to quantify that change and how it impacts boulder dislodgement. We present our results of the coupled model (adapted NSLM and TRIADS model). The results project a more complex picture of boulder transport by storms and tsunami. The following question arises: What information do we actually invert, and what does it tell us about the causative event?

  15. Coastal morphodynamic impacts induced by main storm phenomena on the Central East Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, Marco; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Bonamano, Simone; Scanu, Sergio; Martellucci, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The coastal area is a major dynamic systems of the Earth and in particular the sandy beaches are very sensitive to waves energy variation which mainly force morphological changes. Waves drive beaches morphological changes particularly when they exceed a determined threshold. In a short term (from hours to days) of storm conditions, intense erosion phenomena occur. They generate overwash, dunal erosion, loss of lands, damage to engineering structures and coastal ownerships. Several hazardous weather events take place every year in the Mediterranean region and cause relevant economic losses. The western Mediterranean Sea is an area subjected to cyclonic activity. In winter and during the negative phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), cyclonic activity generates extreme events as intense precipitation, the highest waves, landslides and surges. The study area is the Latium coast, eastern side of Central Tyrrhenian Sea.Wave data were measured by three wave buoys. In order to obtain a better spatial coverage useful to take into account the waves variability over the study area, wave data also has been calculated by WAM model. On the basis of storms events selected by a threshold criteria of events greater than 2 m for a period more than 6 hour, the Mean Sea Level Pressure (MSLP) field was analysed through Empirical Orthogonal Function and cluster analysis obtaining 3 classes of barometric events. The storms are always induced by the lows of Gulf of Genoa to be formed in the Mediterranean region triggered from the middle latitude storms which center is located in the northern atlantic and scandinavian region. The different classes, with a probability of 28%, 23% and 49%, generate different circulation driving waves from different directions. The classes of storms show spatial differences in terms of main directions but show similar behavior in terms of distribution of wave direction. In this study the wave and wind field induced by the different barometric condition

  16. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  17. Understanding impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes on submerged bank reefs and coral communities in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Fernández, A.; Gravois, M.

    2010-06-01

    A 100-year climatology of tropical storms and hurricanes within a 200-km buffer was developed to study their impacts on coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks (FGB) and neighboring banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The FGB are most commonly affected by tropical storms from May through November, peaking in August-September. Storms approach from all directions; however, the majority of them approach from the southeast and southwest, which suggests a correlation with storm origin in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. A storm activity cycle lasting 30-40 years was identified similar to that known in the Atlantic basin, and is similar to the recovery time for impacted reefs. On average there is 52% chance of a storm approaching within 200 km of the FGB every year, but only 17% chance of a direct hit every year. Storm-generated waves 5-25 m in height and periods of 11-15 s induce particle speeds of 1-4 m s -1 near these reefs. The wave-current flow is capable of transporting large (˜3 cm) sediment particles, uplifting the near-bottom nepheloid layer to the banks tops, but not enough to break coral skeletons. The resulting storm-driven turbulence induces cooling by heat extraction, mixing, and upwelling, which reduces coral bleaching potential and deepens the mixed layer by about 20 m. Tropical storms also aid larvae dispersal from and onto the FGB. Low storm activity in 1994-2004 contributed to an 18% coral cover increase, but Hurricane Rita in 2005 reduced it by 11% and brought coral cover to nearly pre-1994 levels. These results suggest that the FGB reefs and neighboring reef banks act as coral refugia because of their offshore location and deep position in the water column, which shields them from deleterious effects of all but the strongest hurricanes.

  18. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed, and the large field depression at the flight time must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  19. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed and the large field depression, at the flight time, must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  20. Convective storms in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The atmospheres of the planets in the Solar System have different physical properties that in some cases can be considered as extreme when compared with our own planet's more familiar atmosphere. From the tenuous and cold atmosphere of Mars to the dense and warm atmosphere of Venus in the case of the terrestrial planets, to the gigantic atmospheres of the outer planets, or the nitrogen and methane atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, we can find a large variety of physical environments. The comparative study of these atmospheres provides a better understanding of the physics of a geophysical fluid. In many of these worlds convective storms of different intensity appear. They are analogous to terrestrial atmospheres fed by the release of latent heat when one of the gases in the atmosphere condenses and they are therefore called moist convective storms. In many of these planets they can produce severe meteorological phenomena and by studying them in a comparative way we can aspire to get a further insight in the dynamics of these atmospheres even beyond the scope of moist convection. A classical example is the structure of the complex systems of winds in the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. These winds are zonal and alternate in latitude but their deep structure is not accessible to direct observation. However the behaviour of large--scale convective storms vertically extending over the "weather layer" allows to study the buried roots of these winds. Another interesting atmosphere with a rather different structure of convection is Titan, a world where methane is close to its triple point in the atmosphere and can condense in bright clouds with large precipitation fluxes that may model part of the orography of the surface making Titan a world with a methane cycle similar to the hydrological cycle of Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  2. A Personal Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Although lightning detection systems operated by government agencies, utilities and other businesses provide storm warnings, this information often does not reach the public until some time after the observations have been made. A low-cost personal lightning detector offers a significant safety advantage to private flyers, boaters, golfers and others. Developed by Airborne Research Associates, the detectors originated in Space Shuttle tests of an optical lightning detection technique. The commercial device is pointed toward a cloud to detect invisible intracloud lightning by sensing subtle changes in light presence. The majority of the sales have been to golf courses. Additional products and more advanced applications are in progress.

  3. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  4. The differences between storms driven by helmet streamer CIRs and storms driven by pseudostreamer CIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Denton, Michael H.

    2013-09-01

    A corotating interaction region (CIR) is formed when fast coronal hole origin solar wind overtakes slow solar wind and forms a region of compressed plasma and magnetic field. The slow wind upstream of the coronal hole fast wind can be either of helmet streamer origin or pseudostreamer origin. For a collection of 125 CIR-driven geomagnetic storms, the slow wind ahead of each CIR is examined; for those storm not containing ejecta, each CIR is categorized as a helmet streamer CIR (74 of the 125 storms) or a pseudostreamer CIR (11 of the 125 storms). Separate superposed epoch studies are performed on the two groups to discern the differences between storms driven by pseudostreamer CIRs and those driven by helmet streamer CIRs. A major difference is that pseudostreamer CIR storms tend not to have a calm before the storm, so the outer plasmasphere does not refill before storm onset, and the outer electron radiation belt does not exhibit a pre-storm decay. The superdense plasma sheet is weaker for pseudostreamer CIR storms, and the dropout of the electron radiation belt is weaker. Pseudostreamer CIR storms and helmet streamer CIR storms tend to be of the same strength as measured by the magnitude of Kp, MBI (midnight boundary index), or Dst.

  5. In the Eye of the Storm: A Participatory Course on Coastal Storms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Storm disasters are amplified in the coastal environment due to population pressures and the power of the sea. The upper-division/graduate university course "Coastal Storms" was designed to equip future practitioners with the skills necessary to understand, respond to, and mitigate for these natural disasters. To accomplish this, "Coastal Storms"…

  6. The Framework of a Coastal Hazards Model - A Tool for Predicting the Impact of Severe Storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; O'Reilly, Bill; van Ormondt, Maarten; Elias, Edwin; Ruggiero, Peter; Erikson, Li H.; Hapke, Cheryl; Collins, Brian D.; Guza, Robert T.; Adams, Peter N.; Thomas, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California (Jones and others, 2007) is a five-year project (FY2007-FY2011) integrating multiple USGS research activities with the needs of external partners, such as emergency managers and land-use planners, to produce products and information that can be used to create more disaster-resilient communities. The hazards being evaluated include earthquakes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, wildfires, and coastal hazards. For the Coastal Hazards Task of the Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California, the USGS is leading the development of a modeling system for forecasting the impact of winter storms threatening the entire Southern California shoreline from Pt. Conception to the Mexican border. The modeling system, run in real-time or with prescribed scenarios, will incorporate atmospheric information (that is, wind and pressure fields) with a suite of state-of-the-art physical process models (that is, tide, surge, and wave) to enable detailed prediction of currents, wave height, wave runup, and total water levels. Additional research-grade predictions of coastal flooding, inundation, erosion, and cliff failure will also be performed. Initial model testing, performance evaluation, and product development will be focused on a severe winter-storm scenario developed in collaboration with the Winter Storm Working Group of the USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California. Additional offline model runs and products will include coastal-hazard hindcasts of selected historical winter storms, as well as additional severe winter-storm simulations based on statistical analyses of historical wave and water-level data. The coastal-hazards model design will also be appropriate for simulating the impact of storms under various sea level rise and climate-change scenarios. The operational capabilities of this modeling system are designed to provide emergency planners with

  7. Optimal index related to the shoreline dynamics during a storm: the case of Jesolo beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archetti, Renata; Paci, Agnese; Carniel, Sandro; Bonaldo, Davide

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents an application of shoreline monitoring aimed at understanding the response of a beach to single storms and at identifying its typical behaviour, in order to be able to predict shoreline changes and to properly plan the defence of the shore zone. On the study area, in Jesolo beach (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy), a video monitoring station and an acoustic wave and current profiler were installed in spring 2013, recording, respectively, images and hydrodynamic data. The site lacks previous detailed hydrodynamic and morphodynamic data. Variations in the shoreline were quantified in combination with available near-shore wave conditions, making it possible to analyse the relationship between the shoreline displacement and the wave features. Results denote characteristic patterns of beach response to storm events, and highlight the importance of improving beach protection in this zone, notwithstanding the many interventions experimented in the last decades. A total of 31 independent storm events were selected during the period October 2013-October 2014, and for each of them synthetic indexes based on storm duration, energy and maximum wave height were developed and estimated. It was found that the net shoreline displacements during a storm are well correlated with the total wave energy associated to the considered storm by an empirical power law equation. A sub-selection of storms in the presence of an artificial dune protecting the beach (in the winter season) was examined in detail, allowing to conclude that the adoption of this coastal defence strategy in the study area can reduce shoreline retreat during a storm. This type of intervention can sometimes contribute to prolonging overall stability not only in the replenished zone but also in downdrift areas. The implemented methodology, which confirms to be economically attractive if compared to more traditional monitoring systems, proves to be a valuable system to monitor beach erosive

  8. Best index related to the shoreline dynamics during a storm: the case of Jesolo beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archetti, R.; Paci, A.; Carniel, S.; Bonaldo, D.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents an application of shoreline monitoring aimed to understand the response of a beach to single storms and to identify its typical behaviour, in order to be able to predict shoreline changes and to properly plan the defence of the shore zone. On the study area, in Jesolo beach (Nothern Adriatic sea, Italy), a video monitoring station and an acoustic wave and current profiler were installed in spring 2013, recording respectively images and hydrodynamic data. The site lacks of previous detailed hydrodynamic and morphodynamics data. Variations in the shoreline were quantified in combination with available nearshore wave conditions, making it possible to analyse a relationship between the shoreline displacement and the wave features. Results denote characteristic patterns of beach response to storm events, and highlight the importance of improving beach protection in this zone, notwithstanding the many interventions experimented in the last decades. A total of 31 independent storm events were selected during the period October 2013-October 2014, and for each of them synthetic indexes based on storm duration, energy and maximum wave height were developed and estimated. It was found that the mean shoreline displacements during a storm are well correlated with the total wave energy during the considered storm by an empirical power law equation. A sub-selection of storms on beach protected by artificial dunes (in winter season) was examined in detail; we can conclude that the extensive adoption of artificial dunes in the study area was useful in the past also to reduce shoreline retreat during the storm. This type of interventions can sometimes contribute to prolonged overall stability not only in the replenished zone but also in down drift areas. The implemented methodology, which confirms to be economically attractive if compared to more traditional monitoring systems, proves to be a valuable system to monitor beach erosive processes and provide detailed

  9. Storm-induced hazards and vulnerability along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The recently signed Protocol on ICZM in the Mediterranean by the EU and the Mediterranean countries includes a chapter on Natural Hazards where the Parties are advised to undertake vulnerability and hazard assessments of coastal zones. Within this context, the main aim of this work is to present a comprehensive framework developed within the Spain-funded VuCoMA research project to analyze coastal storm-induced hazards and vulnerability. The framework consists of three steps: definition of local storm characteristics, estimation of hazard intensities and vulnerability assessment. Storms recorded in different locations along the 500 km long Catalan coast have been analyzed to characterize the regional climate. First, a 5-class intensity scale was developed for the NW Mediterranean conditions using the wave power as classification variable. Each storm class was defined in terms of class-averaged values of Hs, Tp and duration. In addition to this, the storm climate was probabilistically defined by obtaining the wave height extreme probability function for different locations along the coast. The linkage of Hs to the other storm parameters (Tp and duration) was done through empirical relationships between each variable with Hs obtained for each location along the coast. To analyze storm-induced hazards, three main processes have been considered: sediment transport potential, beach erosion and inundation. Each process was formulated in terms of a simple indicator and they were quantified in two ways: (i) by just retaining the contribution of storm properties (wave and surge) to the considered hazard and, (ii) by including the local modulation due to coastal geomorphology (sediment and slope). This step follows the above presented two approaches. To define the hazard intensity of each storm class, we calculate the magnitude of induced processes for each individual storm within a class and, final representative figures are given in terms of class-averaged values plus the

  10. Typhoon Haiyan-Induced Storm Surge Simulation in Metro Manila Using High-Resolution LiDAR Topographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Storm surge is the abnormal rise in sea water over and above astronomical tides due to a forthcoming storm. Developing an early warning system for storm surges is vital due to the high level of hazard they might cause. On 08 November 2013, Typhoon Haiyan generated storm surges that killed over 6,000 people in the central part of the Philippines. The Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards under the Department of Science and Technology was tasked to create storm surge hazard maps for the country's coastal areas. The research project aims to generate storm surge hazard maps that can be used for disaster mitigation and planning. As part of the research, the team explored a scenario wherein a tropical cyclone hits the Metro Manila with strength as strong as Typhoon Haiyan. The area was chosen primarily for its political, economic and cultural significance as the country's capital. Using Japan Meteorological Agency Storm Surge model, FLO2D flooding software, LiDAR topographic data, and GIS technology, the effects of a Haiyan-induced tropical cyclone passing through Metro Manila was examined. The population affected, number of affected critical facilities, and potential evacuation sites were identified. The outputs of this study can be used by the authorities as basis for policies that involve disaster risk reduction and management.

  11. High Resolution Hurricane Storm Surge and Inundation Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettich, R.; Westerink, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal counties are home to nearly 60% of the U.S. population and industry that accounts for over 16 million jobs and 10% of the U.S. annual gross domestic product. However, these areas are susceptible to some of the most destructive forces in nature, including tsunamis, floods, and severe storm-related hazards. Since 1900, tropical cyclones making landfall on the US Gulf of Mexico Coast have caused more than 9,000 deaths; nearly 2,000 deaths have occurred during the past half century. Tropical cyclone-related adjusted, annualized losses in the US have risen from 1.3 billion from 1949-1989, to 10.1 billion from 1990-1995, and $35.8 billion per year for the period 2001-2005. The risk associated with living and doing business in the coastal areas that are most susceptible to tropical cyclones is exacerbated by rising sea level and changes in the characteristics of severe storms associated with global climate change. In the five years since hurricane Katrina devastated the northern Gulf of Mexico Coast, considerable progress has been made in the development and utilization of high resolution coupled storm surge and wave models. Recent progress will be presented with the ADCIRC + SWAN storm surge and wave models. These tightly coupled models use a common unstructured grid in the horizontal that is capable of covering large areas while also providing high resolution (i.e., base resolution down to 20m plus smaller subgrid scale features such as sea walls and levees) in areas that are subject to surge and inundation. Hydrodynamic friction and overland winds are adjusted to account for local land cover. The models scale extremely well on modern high performance computers allowing rapid turnaround on large numbers of compute cores. The models have been adopted for FEMA National Flood Insurance Program studies, hurricane protection system design and risk analysis, and quasi-operational forecast systems for several regions of the country. They are also being evaluated as

  12. Impacts on the Deep-Sea Ecosystem by a Severe Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M.; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B.; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26th of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem. PMID:22295084

  13. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  14. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  15. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  16. Alfvénic field-aligned currents, ion upflow and electron precipitation during large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Spencer; LaBelle, James; Chaston, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present four years of FAST observations of Alfvénic field-aligned currents (FACs) in the Northern Hemisphere coincident with 40 moderate (Dst < -50 nT) to very large geomagnetic storms. Superposed epoch analysis of Alfvénic activity of storm periods demonstrate a sharp increase in the probability of AlfvÉn wave occurrence just after storm commencement, and analysis based on storm phase shows that the probability of Alfvén wave occurrence increases by more than a factor of 5 on both dayside and nightside. Additionally, recently reported Van Allen Probes measurements in the magnetosphere imply a region (˜60-68 degrees invariant latitude) in the nightside ionosphere where Alfvén waves are statistically likely to be observed during storm main phase; we report statistical observations during main phase showing that this region instead corresponds to both intense electron precipitation (>10 mW m-2) and strong upflowing ion number flux (> 108 cm^{-2 s-1), while observed Alfvénic FAC occurrence rates are diminished relative to Van Allen Probes measurements. FAST observations also indicate that the most intense electron precipitation associated with Alfvénic FACs occurs pre-midnight during storm recovery phase.

  17. Characteristics of ionospheric storms in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guojun; Shi, Jiankui

       The ionosphere experiences intense response during the geomagnetic storm and it varies with latitude and longitude. The DPS-4 digisonde measurements and GPS-TEC data of ionospheric stations located at different latitudes in the longitudinal sector of 90-130E during 2002 to 2012 were analyzed to investigate the ionospheric effects in the different latitude of East Asia during geomagnetic storm. About 70 geomagnetic storms are selected according to the Dst index and observed data and they are in different seasons and different solar activity levels. A few quiet days’ averages of data before geomagnetic storm were used as the undisturbed level. Results show that for the middle and high latitude, the short-lived positive disturbance associated with the initial phase of the every storm was observed in each season and then the disturbances were negative till the termination of storm. At the low latitude, storm-time disturbances of foF2 have obvious diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics. Generally, geomagnetic activity will cause foF2 to increase at daytime and decrease at nighttime except for the summer in low solar activity period. The intensity of response of foF2 is stronger at nighttime than that at daytime. The negative ionospheric storm effect is the strongest in summer and the positive ionospheric storm effect is the strongest in winter. In high solar activity period, the diurnal variation of the response of foF2 is very pronounced in each season, and the strong ionospheric response can last several days. In low solar activity period, ionospheric response has very pronounced diurnal variation in winter only. It’s notable that geomagnetic activities occurred at local time nighttime can cause stronger and longer responses of foF2 at the low latitude. All in all, the obvious negative phase ionospheric storms often occurred at the low latitude. Moreover a notable phenomenon was observed for the low latitude, there are the intensive

  18. Understanding Variability in Beach Slope to Improve Forecasts of Storm-induced Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, K. S.; Stockdon, H. F.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards combines measurements of beach morphology with storm hydrodynamics to produce forecasts of coastal change during storms for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Wave-induced water levels are estimated using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon et al. (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. Seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of a meter in wave runup elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. Spatial variation in beach slope is accounted for through alongshore averaging, but temporal variability in beach slope is not included in the final computation of the likelihood of coastal change. Additionally, input morphology may be years old and potentially very different than the conditions present during forecast storm. In order to improve our forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards, the temporal variability of beach slope must be included in the final uncertainty of modeled wave-induced water levels. Frequently collected field measurements of lidar-based beach morphology are examined for study sites in Duck, North Carolina, Treasure Island, Florida, Assateague Island, Virginia, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, with some records extending over a period of 15 years. Understanding the variability of slopes at these sites will help provide estimates of associated water level uncertainty which can then be applied to other areas where lidar observations are infrequent, and improve the overall skill of future forecasts of storm-induced coastal change. Stockdon, H. F., Holman, R. A., Howd, P. A., and Sallenger Jr, A. H. (2006). Empirical parameterization of setup

  19. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  20. Global Pc5 pulsations during strong magnetic storms: excitation mechanisms and equatorward expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, J. A.; Pilipenko, V.; Vega, P.; Zesta, E.; Stepanova, M. V.; Uozumi, T.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial structure of Pc5 waves during the recovery phases of strong magnetic storms is important not only for the identification of possible physical mechanisms of its excitation, but as an important parameter of the ULF driver of relativistic electrons. The dynamics of global Pc5 waves during the magnetic storms on October 29-31, 2003 and May 15, 2005 is studied, using the data from the trans-American network of magnetometers comprising SAMBA, MAGDAS, CARISMA, and MACCS arrays. We study the behavior of Pc5 wave properties and spectral characteristics with respect to latitude. One of the accepted sources of Pc5 wave activity is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the flanks of the magnetosphere. In our study we examine whether the KH instability is sufficient as an excitation mechanism for the observed waves? More specifically, we attempt to determine, what is the Pc5 wave generation type: self-excitation, resonant response, trigger? While the KH instability generation takes place at the outer flanks of the magnetosphere, Pc5 waves are observed at all latitudes. We determine how deep into the magnetosphere these Pc5 waves activity can extend and what is the wave energy transmission mechanism: surface mode, cavity mode, Alfven field-line resonance, magnetospheric MHD waveguide?

  1. Influence of resonance on tide and storm surge in the Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkratoke, Saifhon; Sirisup, Sirod; Udomchoke, Veerasak; Kanasut, Jirawat

    2015-10-01

    A numerical simulation is used to determine the effective resonance period, quality factor Q and linear friction coefficient and mechanism of tide and storm surge in the Gulf of Thailand. The results indicated that the resonance response is triggered by the forced wave with the period of 20.25 hours. The Q factor and linear friction coefficient are approximately 3.15 and 2.76×10-5 ms-1, respectively. The gulf is regarded as a moderately dissipative system, which may yield small amplification for the oscillating forced wave. The resonance structure of the basin can play an important role in spatial distribution and amplification of tidal waves in the Gulf of Thailand and nearby area. Distance from the effective resonance period and the corresponding Q factor can be employed in characterizing of tidal amplification in the gulf. The study found that phase difference in the incoming tidal waves can induce the distortion of a nodal band to the normal mode analysis results. The resonance in the north-south direction is the principal mechanism to control tidal waves, specifically for the upper part of the gulf (the Gulf of Thailand). However, significant effect of resonance in the west-east direction on the amplification of tidal waves near the southern part of the gulf (Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore coast) may be pronounced. From the reproduced historic storm surge and hypothetical results, the spatial distribution of storm surge elevation and the response ratio are in good agreement with the resonance mode and Q factor of the basin. Individually, the contribution of resonance factor to induce severe storm surge (positive surge) tends to be insignificant. Conversely, the interaction process between the disturbance system and the propagating surge wave in the gulf can induce large positive surge near the landfall location significantly.

  2. Simulating complex storm surge dynamics: Three-dimensionality, vegetation effect, and onshore sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapetina, Andrew; Sheng, Y. Peter

    2015-11-01

    The 3-D hydrodynamics of storm surge events, including the effects of vegetation and impact on onshore transport of marine sediment, have important consequences for coastal communities. Here, complex storm surge dynamics during Hurricane Ike are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D), vegetation-resolving storm surge-wave model (CH3D-SWAN) which includes such effects of vegetation as profile drag, skin friction, and production, dissipation, and transport of turbulence. This vegetation-resolving 3-D model features a turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) closure model, which uses momentum equations with vegetation-induced profile and skin friction drags, a dynamic q2 equation including turbulence production and dissipation by vegetation, as well as vegetation-dependent algebraic length-scale equations, and a Smagorinsky-type horizontal turbulence model. This vegetation model has been verified using extensive laboratory tests, but this study is a comparison of 2-D and 3-D simulations of complex storm surge dynamics during Hurricane Ike. We examine the value of 3-D storm surge models relative to 2-D models for simulating coastal currents, effects of vegetation on surge, and sediment transport during storm events. Comparisons are made between results obtained using simple 2-D formulations for bottom friction, the Manning coefficient (MC) approach, and physics-based 3-D vegetation-modeling (VM) approach. Last, the role that the 3-D hydrodynamics on onshore transport and deposition of marine sediments during the storm is investigated. While both the 3-D and 2-D results simulated the water level dynamics, results of the physics-based 3-D VM approach, as compared to the 2-D MC approach, more accurately captures the complex storm surge dynamics.

  3. Normothermic thyroid storm: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Anas Ahmad; Sada, Kabiru; Yusuf, Bashir O.; Aliyu, Idris

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare life-threatening emergency due to thyrotoxicosis. A 30-year-old female presented with restlessness, tachycardia and vomiting but with normothermia which is an unusual presentation. There is the need for clinicians to be aware of atypical clinical features that can make the diagnosis of thyroid storm difficult. PMID:27540465

  4. Normothermic thyroid storm: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Anas Ahmad; Sada, Kabiru; Yusuf, Bashir O; Aliyu, Idris

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare life-threatening emergency due to thyrotoxicosis. A 30-year-old female presented with restlessness, tachycardia and vomiting but with normothermia which is an unusual presentation. There is the need for clinicians to be aware of atypical clinical features that can make the diagnosis of thyroid storm difficult. PMID:27540465

  5. Geomagnetic storm forecasts several hours ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, Tatiana; Petrukovich, Anatoli

    In this study we present a service implemented at Space Research Institute, Russia, providing an advance warning about the future geomagnetic storm magnitude (the negative peak Dst) using first geomagnetic storm indications. We demonstrate a clear relation between the solar wind parameters in the beginning of the storm development with the ultimate storm strength. For suddenly developing major storms that have essential influence on susceptible technological systems such as satellites, pipelines, power systems, and radio communications we predict lower and upper limits of the negative peak Dst. The high predictive potential of the proposed technique was confirmed by testing it on geomagnetic storms during the period 1995-2013. The advance warning time about the future geomagnetic storm strength on average achieves 5-6 hours and varies from 1 to 22 hours. The error of the peak Dst prediction does not exceed 25% with probability of 0.96. The false prediction probability does not exceed 0.03. Real-time predictions of the geomagnetic storm magnitude are updated every hour and published at http://spaceweather.ru

  6. Global differences between moderate and large storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valek, P. W.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.; Goldstein, J.; Keesee, A. M.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The current solar maximum has been relatively quiet compared to previous solar cycles. Whereas numerous moderate storms (Dst < -50 nT) have occurred, there have been only a small number of large (Dst < - 100 nT) and extreme (Dst < -200 nT) storms. Throughout this sequence of storms, the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission has since 2008 observed the inner magnetosphere. TWINS consists of two ENA cameras flown aboard two separate spacecraft in Molniya orbits. TWINS images the ENA emissions from the inner magnetosphere across a broad range of energies (1 to 100 keV for H, 16 to 256 keV for O). This allows TWINS to observe the evolution in space and time of the trapped and precipitating particles most relevant for storm time dynamics on very high time scales (i.e., minutes). Here we will present the differences seen between moderate storms and the two large storms of 17 March 2015 (Dst < -223, St. Patrick's day storm) and 22 June 2015 (Dst < -195 nT). We will present composition-separated ENA observations of the inner magnetosphere covering the both the medium (1 to 30 keV) and high (30 to > 100 keV) energy ranges, and describe how the inner magnetosphere evolves during storm time.

  7. Severe storms and local weather research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Developments in the use of space related techniques to understand storms and local weather are summarized. The observation of lightning, storm development, cloud development, mesoscale phenomena, and ageostrophic circulation are discussed. Data acquisition, analysis, and the development of improved sensor and computer systems capability are described. Signal processing and analysis and application of Doppler lidar data are discussed. Progress in numerous experiments is summarized.

  8. Storm surge modeling of Superstorm Sandy in the New York City Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimoff, A. I.; Blanton, B. O.; Dzedzits, E.; Fritz, W. J.; Kress, M.; Muzio, P.; Sela, L.

    2013-12-01

    Even though the New York/New Jersey area does not lie within the typical 'hurricane belt', recent events and the historical record indicate that large infrequent tropical storms have had direct hits on the region, with impacts being amplified due to the nearly right angle bend in the coastline. The recent plan unveiled by New York City's Mayor Bloomberg lays out mitigation strategies to protect the region's communities, infrastructure, and assets from future storms, and numerical simulation of storm surge and wave hazards driven by potential hurricanes plays a central role in developing and evaluating these strategies. To assist in local planning, recovery, and decision-making, we have used the tide, storm surge, and wind wave model ADCIRC+SWAN to simulate storm surge in one of the most populated areas of the United States: the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. We have generated a new high-resolution triangular finite-element model grid for the region from recent USGS data as well as recent city topographic maps at 2-foot (0.6m) contour intervals, nautical charts, and details of shipping channels. Our hindcast simulations are compared against Superstorm Sandy. We used the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center's Cray XE6tm at the College of Staten Island for these simulations. Hindcasting and analysis of the Superstorm Sandy storm surge and waves indicates that our simulations produce a reasonable representation of actual events. The grid will be used in an ADCIRC-based forecasting system implementation for the region.

  9. Long-term increase in New York Harbor storm tides, 1844-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, S. A.; Orton, P. M.; Jay, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Eight of the largest twenty recorded water levels in the New York Harbor region recorded since 1821 occurred after 1990, and three of the 10 largest have occurred since 2010 (March 2010, August 2011, and October 2012). Archival research and numerical modeling indicates, however, that the storm surge during an 1821 hurricane exceeded that from hurricane Sandy (~3.5m vs. 2.8m). To investigate flood risk we recover archival tide gauge data back to 1844 and evaluate whether the recent cluster of extreme water levels is random, driven solely by sea-level rise, or is caused by changes to storm tides (the sum of storm surge and tidal effects). Results indicate both long term trends and decadal variability in the annual maximum storm tide (AMST). Approximately half of long-term AMST variability is explained by a long term increase in storm tides, while the remainder is explained by the North Atlantic Oscillation. The magnitude of the 10 year return period storm tide has increased by 0.28m. Combined with a 0.44m increase in local sea level since 1856, the 10 year flood level has increased by approximately 0.72 ± 0.25m, and magnified the annual probability of overtopping the nominal Manhattan seawall from less than 1% to about 20-25%. Further, including the 1821 event in extreme value analysis suggests that the return period of hurricane Sandy storm tides is much smaller than other estimates. Though the cause of the long-term AMST trend is unclear, analysis of tidal properties indicates that long-wave propagation in New York harbor has shifted since the 1850s. Because storm surge is also a long-wave with a component in the tidal band, at least a portion of changed storm-tide hazard is likely driven by local anthropogenic alterations of the region's waterways. Along with sea-level rise, local development and climate-induced shifts to the North Atlantic Oscillation may continue to affect the New York harbor storm tide hazard in the future.

  10. Phase I Report for SERRI Project No. 80037: Investigation of surge and wave reduction by vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and other severe storms can cause devastating damage of property and loss of life in coastal areas. Vegetation in wetlands, coastal fringes and stream floodplains can reduce storm surge and waves while providing ecological benefits and complementing traditiona...

  11. Interactions Between Convective Storms and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Hoxit, L. R.; Chappell, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which intense convective storms interact with their environment are considered for a number of specific severe storm situations. A physical model of subcloud wind fields and vertical wind profiles was developed to explain the often observed intensification of convective storms that move along or across thermal boundaries. A number of special, unusually dense, data sets were used to substantiate features of the model. GOES imagery was used in conjunction with objectively analyzed surface wind data to develop a nowcast technique that might be used to identify specific storm cells likely to become tornadic. It was shown that circulations associated with organized meso-alpha and meso-beta scale storm complexes may, on occasion, strongly modify tropospheric thermodynamic patterns and flow fields.

  12. ESTIMATION OF URBAN STORM-RUNOFF LOADS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driver, Nancy E.; Lystrom, David J.

    1986-01-01

    The United States was divided into three regions, on the basis of mean annual rainfall, to decrease the variability in storm-runoff constituent loads and to improve regression relations with basin and climatic characteristics. Multiple-regression analyses, in progress, are being refined to determine the best regression models for each of the storm-runoff constituent loads in each of the three regions. These techniques, when finalized, can be used to estimate storm-runoff constituent loads for gaged and ungaged urban watersheds. The preliminary standard errors of estimate for five constituents examined to date ranged from 54 to 223 percent, and the coefficients of determination (r**2) ranged from 0. 39 to 0. 94. Total storm rainfall and total contributing drainage area appear to be the most significant independent variables in the regression models. This paper is a progress report on preliminary results of estimating storm-runoff constituent loads for ungaged watersheds.

  13. Storm-time behavior of the generalized polar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A.; Schunk, R.

    2003-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of the high-latitude plasma during a representative geomagnetic storm was investigated using a macroscopic particle-in-cell (mac-PIC) model. Special attention was given to the ion outflow dependence on the season and solar activity. The model simulates the behavior of a plasma-filled flux tube as it drifts across the different high-latitude regions (cusp, polar cap, auroral, and subauroral regions). In addition to the variations in the season and solar activity, the simulation properly accounts for gravity, electrostatic field, magnetic mirror force, ion-ion collisions, wave-particle interactions (WPI), low-altitude ion energization (LAE), magnetospheric electrons, and centrifugal acceleration. However, the focus here is on roles that season, solar activity, and LAE play in deciding the plasma characteristics. Several simulation runs under storm conditions were performed for different seasons (summer/winter), for different solar activity levels, and for the LAE turned on and off. The results from these runs were compared with each other, and with the results corresponding to quiet conditions form a previous study. The following conclusions can be drawn: (1)The oxygen ion escape flux is enhanced during the storm by more than an order of magnitude over its value at quiet times. (2) In the absence of LAE, the dominant source of escaping oxygen ions occurs in the polar cap due to magnetospheric electrons. (3)Both upward and downward oxygen ion fluxes occur at low altitudes, while only upward oxygen ion fluxes occur at high altitudes. (4)As the plasma drifts from the polar cap into the auroral region, it is (first) depleted due to the rapid energization associated with wave-particle interactions (WPI) and then it is slowly replenished due to the effect of the LAE. (5) A deep trough in the oxygen ion escape flux occurs at the pole-ward edge of the night-side auroral oval due to the initial plasma depletion mentioned in the previous point.

  14. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  15. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  16. Particle Energization During Magnetic Storms with Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, J.; Kepko, L.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, W.; McPherron, R. L.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electrons pose a space weather hazard to satellites in the radiation belts. Although about half of all geomagnetic storms result in relativistic electron flux enhancements, other storms decrease relativistic electron flux, even under similar solar wind drivers. Radiation belt fluxes depend on a complex balance between transport, loss, and acceleration. A critically important aspect of radiation belt enhancements is the role of the 'seed' population--plasma sheet particles heated and transported Earthward by magnetotail processes--which can become accelerated by wave-particle interactions with chorus waves. While the effect of substorms on seed electron injections has received considerable focus, in this study we explore how quasi-steady convection during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events affects the transport and energization of electrons. SMC events are long-duration intervals of enhanced convection without any substorm expansions, and are an important mechanism in coupling magnetotail plasma populations to the inner magnetosphere. We detail the behavior of the seed electron population for stormtime SMC events using the Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt and THEMIS in the plasma sheet and inner magnetosphere. Together, the two missions provide the ability to track particle transport and energization from the plasma sheet into the radiation belts. We present SMC events with Van Allen Probes/THEMIS conjunctions and compare plasma sheet fast flows/enhanced transport to radiation belt seed electron enhancements. Finally we utilize statistical analyses to quantify the relative importance of SMC events on radiation belt electron acceleration in comparison to isolated substorms.

  17. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-12-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia.

  18. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-01-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia. PMID:26657163

  19. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-01-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia. PMID:26657163

  20. Dust Storm Hits Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A thick pall of sand and dust blew out from the Sahara Desert over the Atlantic Ocean yesterday (January 6, 2002), engulfing the Canary Islands in what has become one of the worst sand storms ever recorded there. In this scene, notice how the dust appears particularly thick in the downwind wake of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. Perhaps the turbulence generated by the air currents flowing past the island's volcanic peaks is churning the dust back up into the atmosphere, rather than allowing it to settle toward the surface. This true-color image was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on January 7, 2002. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Magnetic Storms in October 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Solar Extreme Events in 2003 Collaboration SEE-2003; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Lazutin, L. L.; Avdyushin, S. I.; Alexeev, I. I.; Ammosov, P. P.; Antonova, A. E.; Baishev, D. G.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Beletsky, A. B.; Belov, A. V.; Benghin, V. V.; Bobrovnikov, S. Yu.; Bondarenko, V. A.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Veselovsky, I. S.; Vyushkova, T. Yu.; Gavrilieva, G. A.; Gaidash, S. P.; Ginzburg, E. A.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Ivanov-Kholodny, G. S.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Kanonidi, Kh. D.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Kolomiitsev, O. P.; Krasheninnikov, I. A.; Krivolutsky, A. A.; Kropotkin, A. P.; Kuminov, A. A.; Leshchenko, L. N.; Mar'in, B. V.; Mitrikas, V. G.; Mikhalev, A. V.; Mullayarov, V. A.; Muravieva, E. A.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. M.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Podorolsky, A. N.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Samsonov, S. N.; Sakharov, Ya. A.; Svidsky, P. M.; Sokolov, V. D.; Soloviev, S. I.; Sosnovets, E. N.; Starkov, G. V.; Starostin, L. I.; Tverskaya, L. V.; Teltsov, M. V.; Troshichev, O. A.; Tsetlin, V. V.; Yushkov, B. Yu.

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of satellite and ground-based measurements during extremely strong magnetic storms at the end of October 2003 are presented, including some numerical modeling. The geosynchronous satellites Ekspress-A2 and Ekspress-A3, and the low-altitude polar satellites Coronas-F and Meteor-3M carried out measurements of charged particles (electrons, protons, and ions) of solar and magnetospheric origin in a wide energy range. Disturbances of the geomagnetic field caused by extremely high activity on the Sun were studied at more than twenty magnetic stations from Lovozero (Murmansk region) to Tixie (Sakha-Yakutia). Unique data on the dynamics of the ionosphere, riometric absorption, geomagnetic pulsations, and aurora observations at mid-latitudes are obtained.

  2. Determining the Return Period of Storm Surge Events in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth; Lapidez, John Phillip; Mendoza, Jerico; Caro, Carl Vincent; Tablazon, Judd; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The devastating damages generated by the Tropical Cyclone Haiyan storm surges in Eastern Samar, Philippines prompted the Department of Science and Technology-Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) to calculate the return period and storm surge exceedance probability of these events. The recurrence interval or the period of return of a storm surge event is the estimated likelihood that that event would occur again. Return periods are measured through historical data denoting the interval of recurrence in average over a period of time. The exceedance probability however, is a graphical representation that describes the probability that some various levels of loss will be exceeded over a future time period or will be surpassed over a given time. DOST-Project NOAH simulates storm surge height time series using JMA storm surge model which is a numerical model based on shallow water equations. To determine the period of recurrence of storm surges with this type of intensity, the agency intends to compute the estimation of storm surge heights generated by tropical cyclones for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, 50-year and 100-year return periods for the Philippine coast. The storm surge time series generated from JMA combined with WXTide simulation, a software containing archives/catalogues of world-wide astronomical tides, and 5-meter resolution DEM were used as input parameters for the inundation model, which shows probable extent of flooding at a specific storm surge return period. Flo-2D two-dimensional flood routing model, a GIS integrated software tool that facilitates the creation of the flood model grid system, was used for flood hazard model. It is a simple volume conservation model composed of processor program that facilitate graphical editing and mapping of flooding details which uses continuity equation and the dynamic wave momentum equations. The measurements of storm surge return period and probable extent of coastal flooding in the

  3. Testable Predictions for Large-Scale Coastline-Shape Change in Response to Changing Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. B.; Moore, L. J.; McNamara, D.; Brenner, O.; Slott, J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent modeling (Ashton et al. 2001; Ashton and Murray, 2006a) and observations (Ashton and Murray 2006b) suggest that sandy coastlines self-organize into large-scale, plan-view shapes that depend sensitively on the regional wave climate-the distribution of influences on alongshore sediment transport from different deep-water wave-approach angles. Subsequent modeling (Slott et al., 2007) shows that even moderate changes in wave climate, as are likely to arise as storm behaviors shift in the coming century, will cause coastlines to change shape rapidly, compared to a steady-wave-climate scenario. Such large-scale shape changes involve greatly accentuated rates of local erosion, and highly variable erosion/accretion rates. A recent analysis of wave records from the Southeastern US (Komar and Allen, 2007) indicates that wave climates have already been changing over the past three decades; the heights of waves attributable to tropical storms have been increasing, changing the angular distribution of wave influences. Modeling based on these observations leads to predictions of how coastlines in this region should already be changing shape (McNamara et al., in prep.). As a case study, we are examining historical shorelines for the Carolina coastline, to test whether the predicted alongshore patterns of shoreline change can already be detected.

  4. Storm Surge Modelling of Super Typhoon Haiyan Event in Tacloban City, Leyte using MIKE 21 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelligera, Flor Angel; Caro, Carl Vincent; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Lapidez, John Phillip; Malano, Vicente; Agaton, Rojelee; Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines on 08 November 2013 causing massive destruction to the central part of the country. Arguably the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history, Haiyan caused 6,201 deaths and damages amounting to PhP 36,690,882,497.27 (USD 824,390,091.77). The typhoon also brought about destructive storm surges reaching up to 7 meters in height. A better understanding of storm surge is essential to the development of mechanisms to mitigate the effects of similar events. Thus, a computer simulation of Haiyan with the resulting wave heights and storm surge levels was made using MIKE 21 model -- a software used for many different coastal and marine engineering projects worldwide. Simulations were made using the Hydrodynamic Flexible Mesh (HD FM) model coupled with the Spectral Wave (SW) model of the software. This coupled approach allows accurate calculations of both surge water levels and wave crest heights for overtopping of coastal structures. The maximum mesh flexibility of MIKE 21 allows mesh refinement for the coastal areas of Tacloban City within coarser mesh elements resulting to higher grid accuracy. Input parameters for the simulations of the coastline of Tacloban City, a densely populated coastal community heaviest hit by the storm surges of Haiyan, were obtained from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Atmospheric conditions such as wind and pressure values were input to a set of regional and local hydrodynamic and spectral wave models. Simulation results were compared with available tidal gauge records and the comparison showed good correlation. Coastal regional inundation maps were then created from the results of the storm surge simulations. These maps or its equivalent should be used to develop and further improve disaster risk management plans for future surge events. These plans include, but are not limited to

  5. Vertical structure of Saturn lightning storms and storm-related dark ovals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Fry, Patrick M.

    2014-11-01

    In Cassini ISS images of Saturn during 2004-2006 Dyudina et al. (2007, Icarus 190, 545-555) identified four cases in which bright cloud features near 35o S were correlated with thunderstorm activity, inferred from SED events detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument. The bright features left behind remnant dark ovals that reached full contrast within about a week. Baines et al. (2009, Plan. & Space Sci. 57, 1650-1658) investigated similar radio-correlated storms, using 2008 VIMS spectra. Noting that the dark ovals were about 20% less reflective than surrounding clouds over a wide spectral range, they suggested that the cloud particles might contain a broadband absorber that was produced by lightning-induced chemistry at the 10-20 bar water cloud level and convected up to the visible cloud level. Another possibility is that lower optical depths cause the ovals to be less reflective than the surrounding clouds. We carried out quantitative radiative transfer calculations to evaluate these alternatives, and also derived cloud models for the active region that is the presumed source of lightning. The main result for the dark ovals is that we can obtain good fits with typical condensates in vertically thin cloud layers, but can also obtain good fits with deep clouds of composite particles containing a sooty core within a shell of n=1.4+0i material. However, unlike Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus), neither the bright clouds nor the dark ovals show the significant 3-micron absorption that would be expected if NH3, NH4SH, or H20 were lofted to upper cloud level. This missing absorption tends to favor models in which the upper cloud layer (near 250 mbar) is comprised of conservative (non-absorbing) particles and physically thin, in which case the dark oval spectra can be explained by a reduced upper cloud opacity (by ~50%) relative to surrounding clouds, and raises the possibility that the upper cloud features might be

  6. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  7. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  8. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  9. The Wave Carpet: An Omnidirectional and Broadband Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.-Reza

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by the strong attenuation of ocean surface waves by muddy seafloors, we have designed, theoretically investigated the performance, and experimentally tested the ``Wave Carpet:'' a mud-resembling synthetic seabed-mounted mat composed of vertically-acting linear springs and generators that can be used as an efficient wave energy absorption device. The Wave Carpet is completely under the water surface hence imposes minimal danger to boats and the sea life (i.e. no mammal entanglement). It is survivable against the high momentum of storm surges and in fact can perform even better under very energetic (e.g. stormy) sea conditions when most existing wave energy devices are needed to shelter themselves by going into an idle mode. In this talk I will present an overview of analytical results for the linear problem, direct simulation of highly nonlinear wave fields, and results of the experimental wave tank investigation.

  10. In Brief: Cassini images Saturn storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-11-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has spotted an 8000-kilometer-wide, hurricane-like storm around Saturn's South Pole, NASA announced on 9 November. The storm has a dark `eye' at the South Pole along with eye-wall clouds and spiral arms, but it is not known if moist convection-the driver of hurricanes on Earth-drives the Saturn storm. A movie taken by Cassini's camera indicates that the winds are blowing clockwise at about 560 kilometers per hour. Although large storms have been observed on other planets in the past-most notably, Jupiter's Great Red Spot-this is the first storm found to have eye-wall clouds and a relatively calm center. Andrew Ingersoll, a member of Cassini's imaging team at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, said the storm looks like a hurricane but is not behaving like one. ``Whatever it is, we are going to focus on the eye of this storm and find out why it is there.''

  11. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  12. Stability of subsea pipelines during large storms

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Scott; An, Hongwei; Cheng, Liang; White, David J.; Griffiths, Terry

    2015-01-01

    On-bottom stability design of subsea pipelines transporting hydrocarbons is important to ensure safety and reliability but is challenging to achieve in the onerous metocean (meteorological and oceanographic) conditions typical of large storms (such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes or typhoons). This challenge is increased by the fact that industry design guidelines presently give no guidance on how to incorporate the potential benefits of seabed mobility, which can lead to lowering and self-burial of the pipeline on a sandy seabed. In this paper, we demonstrate recent advances in experimental modelling of pipeline scour and present results investigating how pipeline stability can change in a large storm. An emphasis is placed on the initial development of the storm, where scour is inevitable on an erodible bed as the storm velocities build up to peak conditions. During this initial development, we compare the rate at which peak near-bed velocities increase in a large storm (typically less than 10−3 m s−2) to the rate at which a pipeline scours and subsequently lowers (which is dependent not only on the storm velocities, but also on the mechanism of lowering and the pipeline properties). We show that the relative magnitude of these rates influences pipeline embedment during a storm and the stability of the pipeline. PMID:25512592

  13. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  14. VHF radar observations of mesospheric density distrubance caused by Typhoon Susan and tropical storms in the western Pacific area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Johnson, D. L.; Chen, A. J.; Lin, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric parameters from the toposphere to the middle atmosphere during Typhoon Susan and tropical storms in May and June 1988 were observed by VHF radar in Taiwan. Time-dependent wind velocities with three-dimensional profiles are plotted by processing the backscattered echo power data and the Doppler spectral width of the signal returns from the VHF radar. The propagation characteristics of the gravity waves excited by the enhanced convection motions of the storms and the density perturbations caused by this gravity wave progagation are determined.

  15. Extreme Waves at Filyos, Southern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyay, Engin; Oztunali Ozbahceci, Berguzar; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet

    2010-05-01

    The Ministry of Transport, General Directorate of Railways, Ports and Airports Construction which is responsible for the design and construction of ports and harbors in Turkey, carried out a wave measurement project for a new planned port in Filyos, Western Black Sea region of Turkey. The wave measurement project at Filyos lasted for a period of two years. A self-recording pressure type instrument was used to conduct the wave measurements. Directional information of both waves and current was determined according to an electromagnetic system. The instrument was installed at a depth of 12.5m. Wave data were sampled every two hours with a sample length of 20 minutes and a sampling interval of 0.5 sec (i.e. a sampling frequency of 2 Hz). Before any further wave data analysis, the recorded subsurface pressure data was converted into the corresponding surface profile data. Then individual waves were obtained by zero-up crossing method. The characteristic waves like maximum, Hmax, significant, Hs, one-tenth, H1-10, mean wave height Hmean and the corresponding wave periods were calculated by using individual waves of each record. The analysis results show that the maximum significant wave height during the measurement period is 5.0 m. The maximum wave height is 7.5m in this record which makes the ratio of Hmax/Hs =1.5. The relation between the Hmax and Hs was investigated through a linear regression and the ratios for chosen 14 storms among the whole record were found to change between 1.38 and 1.88. It is stated that the ratio of Hmax / Hs is between 1.6 and 2 in the deep water but it decreases to 1.3 through to shallower zones (Goda, 2000). Since the measurement depth in Filyos is 12.5 m which is an intermediate depth, the result can be expected. However; it was noticed during the analysis that there are records in which Hmax /Hs ratio is higher than 2.0. These higher waves in a record are called as extreme waves using the abnormality index (AI) of Kharif et al. (2009

  16. The great dust storm of 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.; James, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    It is reported that on the global scale, no major dust storm activity was seen during telescopic observations of Mars during the several months or so preceeding this conference. However, the corresponding season on Mars was early fall, which is at the beginning of the dust storm season. It was too early to tell, therefore, if a great dust storm was going to occur that year. Current observations and what they show about present atmospheric conditions and the recession of the South Polar Cap is discussed.

  17. Geomagnetic storm fields near a synchronous satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    An apparent early recovery of the main phase of geomagnetic storms at the distance of the synchronous satellite is examined in terms of changing electric current distributions in the magnetosphere during magnetic storms. It is suggested that a rapid recession of the edge of the plasma sheet (after the advance toward the earth during an early epoch of the main phase) is partly responsible for the early recovery. Relevant plasma sheet variations during geomagnetic storms are found to be in agreement with the inferred variations.

  18. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  19. Inverse modeling of storm intensity based on grain-size analysis of hurricane-induced event beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagno, K. A.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    As the coastal population continues to grow in size and wealth, increased hurricane frequency and intensity present a growing threat of property damage and loss of life. Recent reconstructions of past intense-hurricane landfalls from sediment cores in southeastern New England identify a series of active intervals over the past 2,000 years, with the last few centuries among the most quiescent intervals. The frequency of intense-hurricane landfalls in southeastern New England is well constrained, but the intensity of these storms, particularly prehistoric events, is not. This study analyzes the grain sizes of major storm event beds along a transect of sediment cores in Salt Pond, Falmouth, MA. Several prehistoric events contain more coarse material than any of the deposits from the historical interval, suggesting that landfalling hurricanes in the northeastern United States may have been more intense than the historically encountered category 2 and 3 storms. The intensity of major storm events is estimated using grain-size analysis with a digital image processing, size, and shape analyzer. Since event deposits in Salt Pond result from a combination of coastal inundation and wave action, a large population of both historical and synthetic storms is used to assess the storm characteristics that could result in the wave heights inversely modeled from grain size trends. Intense-hurricane activity may be closely tied to warming in sea surface temperature. As such, the prehistoric intervals of increased frequency and intensity provide potential analogs for current and future hurricane risk in the northeastern United States.

  20. Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (≳0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where its magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the depletions: fully adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering by plasma waves (e.g., EMIC and whistler waves), and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the magnetopause losses to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of March 17, 2013 storm. The intensities of > 1 MeV electrons were depleted by more that an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 hours after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test-particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with the inductive electric field. The comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the MagEIS experiment shows that the magnetopause losses in the model accounts for most of the observed depletion. The individual electron motion the process is non-adiabatic; the third invariant is violated by global variations of the inner magnetospheric fields caused by the magnetopause compressions and the buildup of ring current, while the second invariant is violated at drift orbit bifurcations. The analysis shows that the observed deep depletion of radiation belt intensities is enabled by the change in the global configuration of magnetic

  1. Relativistic electron acceleration during HILDCAA events: are precursor CIR magnetic storms important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Brum, Christiano Garnett Marques; Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; Santolik, Ondrej

    2015-07-01

    We present a comparative study of high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events, both isolated and those occurring in the "recovery phase" of geomagnetic storms induced by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The aim of this study is to determine the difference, if any, in relativistic electron acceleration and magnetospheric energy deposition. All HILDCAA events in solar cycle 23 (from 1995 through 2008) are used in this study. Isolated HILDCAA events are characterized by enhanced fluxes of relativistic electrons compared to the pre-event flux levels. CIR magnetic storms followed by HILDCAA events show almost the same relativistic electron signatures. Cluster 1 spacecraft showed the presence of intense whistler-mode chorus waves in the outer magnetosphere during all HILDCAA intervals (when Cluster data were available). The storm-related HILDCAA events are characterized by slightly lower solar wind input energy and larger magnetospheric/ionospheric dissipation energy compared with the isolated events. A quantitative assessment shows that the mean ring current dissipation is ~34 % higher for the storm-related events relative to the isolated events, whereas Joule heating and auroral precipitation display no (statistically) distinguishable differences. On the average, the isolated events are found to be comparatively weaker and shorter than the storm-related events, although the geomagnetic characteristics of both classes of events bear no statistically significant difference. It is concluded that the CIR storms preceding the HILDCAAs have little to do with the acceleration of relativistic electrons. Our hypothesis is that ~10-100-keV electrons are sporadically injected into the magnetosphere during HILDCAA events, the anisotropic electrons continuously generate electromagnetic chorus plasma waves, and the chorus then continuously accelerates the high-energy portion of this electron spectrum to MeV energies.

  2. Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent.

    PubMed

    Kohout, A L; Williams, M J M; Dean, S M; Meylan, M H

    2014-05-29

    The propagation of large, storm-generated waves through sea ice has so far not been measured, limiting our understanding of how ocean waves break sea ice. Without improved knowledge of ice breakup, we are unable to understand recent changes, or predict future changes, in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that storm-generated ocean waves propagating through Antarctic sea ice are able to transport enough energy to break sea ice hundreds of kilometres from the ice edge. Our results, which are based on concurrent observations at multiple locations, establish that large waves break sea ice much farther from the ice edge than would be predicted by the commonly assumed exponential decay. We observed the wave height decay to be almost linear for large waves--those with a significant wave height greater than three metres--and to be exponential only for small waves. This implies a more prominent role for large ocean waves in sea-ice breakup and retreat than previously thought. We examine the wider relevance of this by comparing observed Antarctic sea-ice edge positions with changes in modelled significant wave heights for the Southern Ocean between 1997 and 2009, and find that the retreat and expansion of the sea-ice edge correlate with mean significant wave height increases and decreases, respectively. This includes capturing the spatial variability in sea-ice trends found in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. Climate models fail to capture recent changes in sea ice in both polar regions. Our results suggest that the incorporation of explicit or parameterized interactions between ocean waves and sea ice may resolve this problem. PMID:24870546

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  4. Tropical cyclone waves detected with infrasound sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    The strong winds of a tropical cyclone whip up the sea surface, driving ocean waves a dozen meters high. When one such ocean wave runs into another wave that has an equal period but is traveling in the opposite direction, the interaction produces low-frequency sound waves that can be detected thousands of kilometers away. The infrasound signals produced by interacting ocean surface waves—known as microbarom—have typical frequencies around 0.2 hertz. Researchers previously determined that as a hurricane travels along its track, early waves generated by the storm will interact with those generated later on, producing a strong microbarom signal in the storm's wake. Researchers also found, however, that microbarom signals are produced by regular surface ocean behavior, including swell, surface waves, and nontropical cyclone storms.

  5. Wave age and wave forecasting in the NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, A.; Bolaños, R.; Gómez Aguar, J.; Sairoun, A.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction The North-western Mediterranean is characterized by a high industrial and touristic activity and is vulnerable to environmental phenomena such as snow, rain and wave storms. This paper will focus on the improvement of wave predictions by using the wave-age parameter with a view to reduce coastal vulnerability. This will be done with the WAM model (WAMDI group, 1988). The runs have used a grid covering the Mediterranean with a resolution of 0.166º (approximately 18km). The wind fields used as input for the wave model were generated by the MASS model (Codina et al, 1997) with the same spatial resolution as the wave model. The wind input selected to force the wave model was updated every 6 hours. Wave forecasting The WAM model is relatively slow to respond to rapidly variable wind events, particularly for limited fetches. This is the situation normally found in the North-western Mediterranean where atmospheric storms may last less than 12 hours and feature heavy land originated winds. The characterization and parameterization of conditions for such waves is far from straight forward and even the classical distintion between sea and swell needs a different threshold. In this context the wave-age parameter (wave celerity to wind spin ratio) can help to understand and parameterize the momentum transfer of wind to surface waves (Donelan, 1988). This can allow increasing the drag coefficient for younger seas, such as the ones presented in (Bortkovskii and Novak, 1993) or (Volkov, 2001). By selecting as test storms the ones recorded by buoys in November 2001 and March/April 2002, the paper will show an analysis of wave-age and wave prediction quality for these two periods. Discussion The obtained simulations show that the more complex sea states are well correlated with higher error bounds. This suggests using the wave-age parameter for parameterizing the momentum transfer and even various other related parameters involved in wave predictions. This also

  6. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  7. Ionospheric effects at low latitudes during the March 22, 1979, geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G. ); Crowley, G.; Roble, R.G. )

    1989-05-01

    This paper investigates the response of the equatorial ionosphere to the neutral atmosphere perturbations produced by the magnetic storm of March 22, 1979. A numerical model of the equatorial ionosphere is used to calculate the maximum electron densities and F layer heights associated with a storm-perturbed neutral atmosphere and circulation model. Possible electric field perturbations due to the storm are ignored. The neutral atmosphere and dynamics are simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model (TGCM) for the storm day of March 22, 1979, and the preceding quiet day. The most striking feature of the TGCM storm day simulations is the presence of waves in the neutral composition, wind, and temperature fields which propagate from high latitudes to the equator. The TGCM-calculated fields for the two days are input into a low-latitude ionosphere model which calculates n{sub max} and h{sub max} between {plus minus}20{degree}dip latitude. The calculated nighttime 6300-{angstrom} airglow emission and the altitude profiles of electron concentration are also highly perturbed by the storm. Examination of ionosonde data for March 22, 1979, shows remarkable agreement between the measured and predicted changes in f{sub 0}F{sub 2} and h{sub max} near 140{degree}W. Poorer agreement near 70{degree}W may be due to the neglect of electric field perturbations and the approximations inherent in the modeling. The results of these simulations indicate that the major factor influencing the storm time ionospheric behavior in this case is the neutral wind.

  8. Storm flood impacts along the shores of micro-tidal inland seas: A morphological and sedimentological study of the Vesterlyng beach, the Belt Sea, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Kroon, Aart

    2016-01-01

    The morphological and sedimentological impacts of an extreme storm event ('Bodil' in December 2013) were investigated at a mixed sand and gravel beach (Vesterlyng) in a micro-tidal environment along the Belt Sea, Denmark. The storm response was characteristic for mixed sand and gravel beaches: gravelly storm berms with sandy to gravelly washover fans were formed at the upper beach where swash processes dominated during extreme water levels in combination with overtopping and overwash. In addition, storm scarps and gravel flats were formed. The elevation of the storm berm crest was identical to a summation of the still-water level (1.60 m) in the Belt Sea during the storm flood and the wave run-up (0.75 m) at the shore. The crest of 2.35 m is therefore a precise measure of the storm flood level. This storm flood was classified as a large-scale extreme event. In a Holocene perspective it is suggested that storm berm (beach ridge) heights above contemporaneous sea level can be used as a proxy of past flood events along micro-tidal shores.

  9. Unraveling Local Dust Storm Structure on Mars: The Case of Northern Amazonis During Mars Year 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    On an average Martian afternoon, two or three local dust storms are taking place somewhere on the planet. By definition, these storms range in area from a few square kilometers to hundreds of thousands, rarely surviving from sol to the next. After more than 40 years of observation, a great deal is known about where and when they occur, but very little is known about the structure and dynamics of individual storms. This contrast in our knowledge about local dust storms results from how they are observed. Daily global mapping of Mars in the visible has enabled an accurate census of storms as well as observation of their morphological diversity. However, even under ideal conditions, an individual storm is only observed by sounder-type instrumentation once or twice (if it is a large enough), providing an incomplete picture of structure of an individual storm. Early studies of cyclogenesis on Earth had a similar problem. Cyclones were many, but observations of individual cyclones, especially over the ocean, were sparse. The structure and dynamics of cyclones was unraveled by noting similarities in properties between certain classes of cyclones and using observational data to generate composite cyclones that could be analyzed and modeled. Variability within the composite also could be studied. Here I establish the existence of a well-defined class of Martian local dust storms defined by: (1) occurrence along the axis of the dark albedo feature in northern Amazonis Planitia (36 N, 155 W); (2) not being associated with lifting or cloudiness due to a baroclinic wave/frontal boundary at higher latitude; (3) being textured, that is, having dust clouds with sharp, well-defined features that are thought to indicate their clouds are supplied by the active lifting of dust; (4) having dust clouds organized in well-defined streets indicative of convective rolls. In Mars Year 24, such storms developed on thirteen occasions in northern fall and autumn. Using data from the Mars

  10. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  11. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  12. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  13. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  14. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  15. The 1973 dust storm on Mars: Maps from hourly photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The hourly progress of the 1973 major Martian storm was mapped using photographic images from the International Planetary Patrol. Two series of 20 daily maps show the semi-hourly positions of the storm brightenings in red light and blue light. The maps indicate that the 1973 storm had many similarities to the 1971 storm.

  16. Tropical Storm Wali Seen by GOESWest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 15 to 18 shows the birth of Tropical Storm Wali southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii on July 17. Credit: NA...

  17. Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Gordon

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 13-16, 2012, shows the birth of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression that strengthens into Tropical Storm Gordon. This...

  18. Isaac's Remnants; Tropical Storms Kirk, Michael

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of GOES-13 satellite observations from Sept. 1-4, 2012, showing Isaac's remnants move from the central to eastern U.S., Tropical Storm Leslie nearing Bermuda, Kirk fading in the No. Atlan...

  19. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  20. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  1. The Surprising Power of Solar Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-funded researchers say a flurry of solar storms from March 8-10, 2012 dumped enough energy in Earth's upper atmosphere (our thermosphere absorbed 26 billion kWh of energy) to power every resid...

  2. GOES video of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the development of System 91L into Tropical Storm Andrea over the course of 3 days from June 4 to June 6, just after Andrea was officially designated a...

  3. GOES Movie of Tropical Storm Danielle

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from June 18 to 20 shows the development and movement Tropical Storm Danielle from the western Caribbean Sea into the Bay of Campeche/Gulf of Mexic...

  4. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. ); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. . School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. )

    1992-10-20

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  5. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  6. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  7. Satellite Movie Sees Southern California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Jan. 5 through Jan 7 shows the progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that hit southern California and generated flooding a...

  8. TRMM Sees California Storm Move East

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from Feb. 28 to Mar. 3 shows the movement of the rain associated with the storm system that soaked California. On March 3, precipitation (yellow) and snow cover (white/yellow) spread...

  9. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  10. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  11. Hurricane Sandy storm surges observed by HY-2A satellite altimetry and tide gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan; Han, Guoqi; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Dake

    2014-07-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall to the northeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey at 23:30 UTC on 29 October 2012 and caused large storm surges and devastating flooding along the New Jersey and New York coasts. Here we combine sea surface height measurements from the HaiYang-2A (HY-2A) satellite altimeter with coastal tide-gauge data to study the features of the Hurricane Sandy storm surges. The HY-2A altimeter captured the cross-shelf profile of surge at the time of Sandy's peak surge, with a surge magnitude of about 1.83 m at the coast and a cross-shelf decaying scale of 68 km. The altimetric surge magnitude agrees approximately with tide-gauge estimate of 1.73 m at nearby Montauk. Further analysis suggests that continental shelf waves were generated during the passage of Sandy. The continental shelf wave observed by altimetry has a propagating speed of 6.5 m/s. The post landfall free shelf wave at Atlantic City observed by tide gauges has a propagating phase speed of 6.8 m/s and cross-shelf e-folding scale of 75 km. In contrast, the post landfall sea level oscillation at Montauk is not associated with a continental shelf wave. The study indicates that satellite altimetry is capable of observing and useful for understanding features of storm surges, complementing existing coastal tide gauges.

  12. Probabilistic hurricane-induced storm surge hazard assessment in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krien, Y.; Dudon, B.; Roger, J.; Zahibo, N.

    2015-08-01

    Current storm surge hazard maps in the French West Indies are essentially based on simple statistical methods using limited historical data and early low-resolution models which do not take the effect of waves into account. In this paper, we infer new 100-year and 1000-year surge levels in Guadeloupe from the numerical modelling of storm surges induced by a large set of synthetic events that are in statistical agreement with features of historical hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin between 1980 and 2011. Computations are performed using the wave-current coupled model ADCIRC-SWAN with high grid resolutions (up to 40-60 m) in the coastal and wave dissipation areas. This model is validated against observations during past events such as hurricane HUGO (1989). Results are generally found to be in reasonable agreement with past studies in areas where surge is essentially wind-driven, but found to differ significantly in coastal regions where the transfer of momentum from waves to the water column constitutes a non-negligible part of the total surge. The methodology, which can be applied to other islands in the Lesser Antilles, allows storm surge level maps to be obtained that can be of major interest for coastal planners and decision makers in terms of risk management.

  13. Probabilistic hurricane-induced storm surge hazard assessment in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krien, Y.; Dudon, B.; Roger, J.; Zahibo, N.

    2015-01-01

    Current storm surge hazard maps in the French West Indies are essentially based on simple statistical methods using limited historical data and early low-resolution models which do not take the effect of waves into account. In this paper, we infer new 100 and 1000 year surge levels in Guadeloupe from the numerical modelling of storm surges induced by a large set of synthetic events that are in statistical agreement with features of historical hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin between 1980 and 2011. Computations are performed using the wave-current coupled model ADCIRC-SWAN with high grid resolutions (up to 40-60 m) in the coastal and wave dissipation areas. This model is validated against observations during past events such as hurricane HUGO (1989). Results are generally found to be in reasonable agreement with past studies in areas where surge is essentially wind-driven, but to differ significantly in coastal regions where the transfer of momentum from waves to the water column constitutes a non-negligible part of the total surge. The methodology, which can be applied to other islands in the Lesser Antilles, allows to obtain storm surge level maps that can be of major interest for coastal planners and decision makers in terms of risk management.

  14. Criteria of interplanetary parameters causing intense magnetic storms (Dst less than -100nT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    Ten intense storms occurred during the 500 days of August 16, 1978 to December 28, 1979. From the analysis of ISEE-3 field and plasma data, it is found that the interplanetary cause of these storms are long-duration, large and negative IMF B sub Z events, associated with interplanetary duskward-electric fields greater than 5 mV/m. Because a one-to-one relationship was found between these interplanetary events and intense storms, it is suggested that these criteria can, in the future, be used as predictors of intense storms by an interplanetary monitor such as ISEE-3. These B sub Z events are found to occur in association with large amplitudes of the IMF magnitude within two days after the onset of either high-speed solar wind streams or of solar wind density enhancement events, giving important clues to their interplanetary origin. Some obvious possibilities will be discussed. The close proximity of B sub Z events and magnetic storms to the onset of high speed streams or density enhancement events is in sharp contrast to interplanetary Alfven waves and HILDCAA events previously reported, and thus the two interplanetary features corresponding geomagnetic responses can be thought of as being complementary in nature. An examination of opposite polarity B sub Z events with the same criteria show that their occurrence is similar both in number as well as in their relationship to interplanetary disturbances, and that they lead to low levels of geomagnetic activity.

  15. Storm Track Response to Perturbations in Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Cheikh Oumar

    This thesis advances our understanding of midlatitude storm tracks and how they respond to perturbations in the climate system. The midlatitude storm tracks are regions of maximal turbulent kinetic energy in the atmosphere. Through them, the bulk of the atmospheric transport of energy, water vapor, and angular momentum occurs in midlatitudes. Therefore, they are important regulators of climate, controlling basic features such as the distribution of surface temperatures, precipitation, and winds in midlatitudes. Storm tracks are robustly projected to shift poleward in global-warming simulations with current climate models. Yet the reasons for this shift have remained unclear. Here we show that this shift occurs even in extremely idealized (but still three-dimensional) simulations of dry atmospheres. We use these simulations to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for the shift and develop a conceptual model that accounts for it. We demonstrate that changes in the convective static stability in the deep tropics alone can drive remote shifts in the midlatitude storm tracks. Through simulations with a dry idealized general circulation model (GCM), midlatitude storm tracks are shown to be located where the mean available potential energy (MAPE, a measure of the potential energy available to be converted into kinetic energy) is maximal. As the climate varies, even if only driven by tropical static stability changes, the MAPE maximum shifts primarily because of shifts of the maximum of near-surface meridional temperature gradients. The temperature gradients shift in response to changes in the width of the tropical Hadley circulation, whose width is affected by the tropical static stability. Storm tracks generally shift in tandem with shifts of the subtropical terminus of the Hadley circulation. We develop a one-dimensional diffusive energy-balance model that links changes in the Hadley circulation to midlatitude temperature gradients and so to the storm

  16. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  17. Temporal and Spatial Characterization of ULF power and its relation to relativistic electrons in the radiation belts during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Pinto, V. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the inner magnetosphere to different geomagnetic storm and solar wind conditions is still not fully understood. For example, electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt can be enhanced or depleted depending on the energy of the particles, and the phase or driver of the storm. In addition, the time scale of the process can vary from minutes to several days. Wave-particle interactions (such as stochastic diffusion or resonant acceleration) are believed to play an important role regulating the dynamics of the particles. However, despite decades of intense theoretical and observational studies, a definitive framework for the wave-particle interactions and the resulting effects in the magnetospheric dynamics remains an open problem. To progress towards a better understanding of the inner magnetosphere dynamics, we need a complete characterization of the electromagnetic fluctuations during storms. Here, using Van Allen Probe magnetic field and relativistic electron observations, we present an statistical study of the relationship between ULF wave power and relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt during several geomagnetic storms between 2012 and 2015, depending on local time, geocentric distance and storm phase.

  18. Dust Storm, Red Sea and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Outlined against the dark blue water of the Red Sea, a prominent dust storm is making its way across the Red Sea into Saudi Arabia (22.0N, 39.0E) between the Islamic holy cities of Medinah and Mecca. Funneled through a gap in the coastal ranges of southern Sudan near the Ethiopian border, dust storms frequently will blow counter to the prevailing tropical easterly winds of the region.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR COMET STORMS IN METEORITE AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S.; Muller, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Clustering of cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondritic meteorites occurs at 7 {+-} 3 and 30 {+-} 6 Myr ago. There is independent evidence that comet storms have occurred at the same times, based on the fossil record of family and genus extinctions, impact craters and glass, and geomagnetic reversals. We suggest that H chondrites were formed by the impact of shower comets on asteroids. The duration of the most recent comet shower was {le} 4 Myr, in agreement with storm theory.

  20. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. ); Brace, L.H.; Mayr, H.G. ); Carignan, G.R.; Killeen, T.L. ); Klobuchar, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  1. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proelss, G. W.; Brace, L. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Carignan, G. R.; Killeen, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  2. Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian; Minen, Stefanie

    2007-07-11

    A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e storm windows.

  3. Non-storm water discharges technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S.

    1994-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge storm water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity Storm Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-storm water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-storm water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and storm water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-storm water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.

  4. Northern hemisphere dust storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Dust storms in the northern hemisphere of Mars appear to be less common than the more familiar southern hemisphere storms, and essentially, no activity north of about 30 latittude has been documented. The data are, however, subject to an observational bias because Mars is near aphelion during oppositions, which occur during the most likely seasons for dust activity in the north. The amount of dust activity in the northern hemisphere is clearly very relevant to the role of atmospheric transport in the dust cycle. The classic global storms that occur during spring in the southern hemisphere are observed to transport dust from sources in the southern hemisphere to sinks or temporary depositories in the north. The question of whether atmospheric transport can close the dust cycle, i.e., return the dust to the southern hemisphere sources on some timescale, is clearly relevant to the solution of the puzzle of how the dust storm cycle is modulated, i.e., why storms occur in some years but not in others. There are data that suggest that the spring/early summer season in the northern hemisphere of Mars during the year following the major 1977 storms observed by Viking was very dusty. A number of observations of the vicinity of the receding north polar cap showed clear evidence of substantial dust activity in the sub-Arctic region.

  5. Deuterium in North Atlantic storm tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ronald B.

    1992-01-01

    During the ERICA project in 1989, ice crystals were collected from the tops of two winter storms and one broad cirrus cloud. Deuterium concentration in the storm ice samples, together with a model of isotope fractionation, are used to determine the temperature where the ice was formed. Knowledge of the ice formation temperature allows us to determine whether the ice has fallen or been lofted to the altitude of collection. In both storms, the estimated fall distance decreases upward. In the 21 January storm, the fall distance decreases to zero at the cloud top. In the 23 January storm, the fall distance decreases to zero at a point 2 km below the cloud top and appears to become negative above, indicating lofted ice. Cloud particle data from the cloud tops show an ice-to-vapor ratio greater than one and indicate the presence of particles with small terminal velocities; both observations support the idea of ice lofting. The satellite-derived cloud tops lie well below the actual cloud top (e.g., 2.5 km below on 23 January), indicating that the lofted ice in winter storms may not be detectable from space using IR radiance techniques. A comparison of deuterium in cloud-top ice and clear-air vapor suggests that even in winter, when vertical air motions are relatively weak, lofted ice crystals are the dominant source of water vapor in the upper troposphere.

  6. Mapping Hurricane Rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.

  7. Mapping hurricane rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, C.; Mason, R.R., Jr.; Blanchard, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of affected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-h intervals from midnight (00:00 hours) through noon (12:00 hours) on 24 September 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared with the extent of flood inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Scientists Track 'Perfect Storm' on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Two dramatically different faces of our Red Planet neighbor appear in these comparison images showing how a global dust storm engulfed Mars with the onset of Martian spring in the Southern Hemisphere. When NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged Mars in June, the seeds of the storm were caught brewing in the giant Hellas Basin (oval at 4 o'clock position on disk) and in another storm at the northern polar cap.

    When Hubble photographed Mars in early September, the storm had already been raging across the planet for nearly two months obscuring all surface features. The fine airborne dust blocks a significant amount of sunlight from reaching the Martian surface. Because the airborne dust is absorbing this sunlight, it heats the upper atmosphere. Seasonal global Mars dust storms have been observed from telescopes for over a century, but this is the biggest storm ever seen in the past several decades.

    Mars looks gibbous in the right photograph because it is 26 million miles farther from Earth than in the left photo (though the pictures have been scaled to the same angular size), and our viewing angle has changed. The left picture was taken when Mars was near its closest approach to Earth for 2001 (an event called opposition); at that point the disk of Mars was fully illuminated as seen from Earth because Mars was exactly opposite the Sun.

    Both images are in natural color, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  9. Numerical Experiments for Storm Surge Inundation in Korean Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shim, J.; Jun, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rising due to climate change following the global warming and the increased intensity of typhoon are magnifying inundation hazards up to the unpredictable level, resulting from the typhoon surge in Korea and other coastal states around the world. Typhoon is the most serious natural disaster in Korean coastal area. Many people died by storm surge inundation every year. And typhoon caused a lot of damage to property. Climate changes due to global warming are producing a stronger natural disaster. Coastal zones have been damaged by typhoons and accompanying storm surge. Especially, the most serious loss of life and terrible property damage caused by typhoon Maemi in 2003. The typhoon Maemi invaded Korean Peninsula leaving property loss of $ 4 Billion and killing 131 people. After then, there has been an increased interest in these coastal zone problems. If storm surges coincide with high tides, the loss of life and property damage due to high waters arc even worse. Therefore it is desirable to accurately forecast the amount water level increase. In this study, using a numerical model FVCOM(finite volume coastal circulation model, Chen et al.,2004), storm surge was simulated to examine its fluctuation characteristics for the coastal area behind Masan, Yeosu and Busan city in Korea. In the numerical model, a moving boundary condition(wet-dry treatment) was incorporated to explain wave inundation. To simulate the inundation scenario, the model grids were extended up to the area inside the lowland in application of the digital elevation data(DEM) made by precisely combining the aero-LiDAR survey data and bathymetry data for the 3 demonstration regions of Busan, Masan and Yeosu. Minimum grid of 300 m unstructured triangular mesh applied to calculate the storm surge was adopted as a grid system. And the minimum grid size of 30 m was built near Busan, Masan and Yeosu area which are the fine coastal regions and where the inundation is simulated. Numerically

  10. Measuring Bathymetry, Runup, and Beach Volume Change during Storms: New Methodology Quantifies Substantial Changes in Cross-Shore Sediment Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, K. L.; McNinch, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate predictions of beach change during storms are contingent upon a correct understanding of wave-driven sediment exchange between the beach and nearshore during high energy conditions. Conventional storm data sets use “pre” (often weeks to months prior) and “post” (often many days after the storm in calm conditions) collections of beach topography and nearshore bathymetry to characterize the effects of the storm. These data have led to a common theory for wave-driven event response of the nearshore system, wherein bars and shorelines are smoothed and straightened by strong alongshore currents into two-dimensional, linear forms. Post-storm, the shoreline accretes, bars migrate onshore, and three-dimensional shapes begin to build as low-energy swell returns. Unfortunately, these approaches have left us with a knowledge gap of the extent and timing of erosion and accretion during storms, arguably the most important information both for scientists trying to model storm damage or inundation, and homeowners trying to manage their properties. This work presents the first spatially extensive (10 km alongshore) and temporally high-resolution (dt = 12 hours) quantitative data set of beach volume and nearshore bathymetry evolution during a Nor’easter on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. During the Nor’easter, significant wave height peaked at 3.4 m, and was greater than 2 m for 37 hours, as measured by the Duck FRF 8 m array. Data were collected using CLARIS: Coastal Lidar and Radar Imaging System, a mobile system that couples simultaneous observations of beach topography from a Riegl laser scanner and nearshore bathymetry (out to ~1 km offshore) from X-Band radar-derived celerity measurements (BASIR). The merging of foreshore lidar elevations with 6-min averages of radar-derived swash runup also enables mapping of maximum-runup elevations alongshore during the surveys. Results show that during the storm, neither the shoreline nor nearshore bathymetry returned

  11. Variability in storm climate along the Gulf of Cadiz: the role of large scale atmospheric forcing and implications to coastal hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Benavente, Javier; Laiz, Irene; Del Río, Laura

    2015-11-01

    In the context of increased coastal hazards due to variability in storminess patterns, the danger of coastal damages and/or morphological changes is related to the sum of sea level conditions, storm surge, maximum wave height and run up values. In order to better understand the physical processes that cause the variability of the above parameters a 44 years reanalysis record (HIPOCAS) was used. The HIPOCAS time-series was validated with real wave and sea-level data using linear and vector correlation methods. In the present work changes in the magnitude, duration, frequency and approach direction of the Atlantic storms over the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula) were identified by computing various storm characteristics such as maximum wave height, total energy per storm wave direction and storm duration. The obtained time-series were compared with large-scale atmospheric indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the East Atlantic pattern. The results show a good correlation between negative NAO values and increased storminess over the entire Gulf of Cadiz. Furthermore, negative NAO values were correlated with high residual sea level values. Finally, a joint probability analysis of storm and sea level analysis resulted in increased probabilities of the two events happening at the same time indicating higher vulnerability of the coast and increased coastal risks. The above results were compared with coastal inundation events that took place over the last winter seasons in the province of Cadiz.

  12. A comparison of the measured North Sea Andrea rogue wave with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2013-09-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform the 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm are here applied as input to calculate random realizations of sea surface and evolution of its statistical properties associated with this specific wave event by solving the Euler equations with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM). The numerical results are compared with the Andrea wave profile as well as characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at the Ekofisk field.

  13. Field and video observations of morphological change under consecutive storm events (ECORS Truc Vert'08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senechal, Nadia; Rejas, Antoine; Coco, Giovanni; Bryan, Karin; Macmahan, Jamie; Capo, Sylvain; Parisot, Jean-Paul

    2010-05-01

    Morphological changes occurring over short and long temporal scales remain a major challenge in nearshore research. Because of the expected rise in mean sea level and storminess increase, beach response to changing wave conditions is of key interest to coastal managers. Current numerical models of beach change have limited predictive skills and the need to collect field observations to gain insight on processes determining beach response is widely acknowledged. A field experiment was performed in 2008 at Truc Vert, a macrotidal beach on the southern part of the French Atlantic coast. The experiment involved scientists from 6 countries (for a total of 16 institutions) and measurements of waves, currents, sediment transport and morphological changes were collected for a period of 6 weeks. We here focus on the analysis of morphological changes that occurred on the beachface and intertidal area during the experiment. Bed levels over an area spanning about 800 m in the alongshore direction were monitored daily using a DGPS system mounted on an ATV while the lower part of the swash zone was surveyed on foot. Video observations were collected using a 2-camera system deployed on a tower on top of the dunes and provided observations of shoreline and underwater sandbar position. During the field experiment, the beach experienced 2 major storms (offshore significant wave height above 5 m) as well as a period of time when offshore wave height was constantly around or above 3 m (average annual wave height at this site is 1.36 m) for a period of 10 days. Morphological response to storms and subsequent recovery patterns varied in both the alongshore and cross-shore direction and appear to be strongly influenced by the angle of wave approach and pre-existing morphological conditions of the beachface and the intertidal sandbar. Our analysis shows that the response of the upper intertidal part of the beach was very different between the three storms. In particular, whereas the first

  14. Association of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors With Development of Major and Minor Electrocardiographic Abnormalities: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Healy, Caroline F; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are prevalent in middle aged and are associated with risk of adverse cardiovascular events. It is unclear whether and to what extent traditional risk factors are associated with the development of ECG abnormalities. To determine whether traditional cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the presence or development of ECG abnormalities, we performed a systematic review of the English-language literature for cross-sectional and prospective studies examining associations between traditional cardiovascular risk factors and ECG abnormalities, including major and minor ECG abnormalities, isolated nonspecific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, other ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, QT interval, Q waves, and QRS duration. Of the 202 papers initially identified, 19 were eligible for inclusion. We examined data analyzing risk factor associations with ECG abnormalities in individuals free of cardiovascular disease. For composite major or minor ECG abnormalities, black race, older age, higher blood pressure, use of antihypertensive medications, higher body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or higher left ventricular mass are the factors most commonly associated with prevalence and incidence. Risk factor associations differ somewhat according to types of specific ECG abnormalities. Because major and minor ECG abnormalities have important and independent prognostic significance, understanding the groups at risk for their development may inform prevention strategies focused on modifiable risk factors to reduce the burden of ECG abnormalities, which may in turn promote CVD prevention. PMID:27054606

  15. Development of the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting the impact of storms on high-energy, active-margin coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Maarten van Ormondt; Erikson, Li H.; Jodi Eshleman; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Peter Ruggiero; Peter Adams; Foxgrover, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) applies a predominantly deterministic framework to make detailed predictions (meter scale) of storm-induced coastal flooding, erosion, and cliff failures over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers). CoSMoS was developed for hindcast studies, operational applications (i.e., nowcasts and multiday forecasts), and future climate scenarios (i.e., sea-level rise + storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm hazards information that may be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. The prototype system, developed for the California coast, uses the global WAVEWATCH III wave model, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry-based global tide model, and atmospheric-forcing data from either the US National Weather Service (operational mode) or Global Climate Models (future climate mode), to determine regional wave and water-level boundary conditions. These physical processes are dynamically downscaled using a series of nested Delft3D-WAVE (SWAN) and Delft3D-FLOW (FLOW) models and linked at the coast to tightly spaced XBeach (eXtreme Beach) cross-shore profile models and a Bayesian probabilistic cliff failure model. Hindcast testing demonstrates that, despite uncertainties in preexisting beach morphology over the ~500 km alongshore extent of the pilot study area, CoSMoS effectively identifies discrete sections of the coast (100s of meters) that are vulnerable to coastal hazards under a range of current and future oceanographic forcing conditions, and is therefore an effective tool for operational and future climate scenario planning.

  16. The influence of topography on vertical velocity of air in relation to severe storms near the Southern Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Pessano, H.; Hierro, R.; Santos, J. R.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of 180 storms which took place between 2004 and 2011 over the province of Mendoza (Argentina) near to the Andes Range at southern mid-latitudes, we consider those registered in the northern and central crop areas (oases). The regions affected by these storms are currently protected by an operational hail mitigation project. Differences with previously reported storms detected in the southern oasis are highlighted. Mendoza is a semiarid region situated roughly between 32S and 37S at the east of the highest Andes top. It forms a natural laboratory where different sources of gravity waves, mainly mountain waves, occur. In this work, we analyze the effects of flow over topography generating mountain waves and favoring deep convection. The joint occurrence of storms with hail production and mountain waves is determined from mesoscale numerical simulations, radar and radiosounding data. In particular, two case studies that properly represent diverse structures observed in the region are considered in detail. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to each variable and profile to detect the main oscillation modes present. Simulated temperature profiles are validated and compared with radiosounding data. Each first radar echo, time and location are determined. The necessary energy to lift a parcel to its level of free convection is tested from the Convective Available Potential Energy and Convection Inhibition. This last parameter is compared against the mountain waves' vertical kinetic energy. The time evolution and vertical structure of vertical velocity and equivalent potential temperature suggest in both cases that the detected mountain wave amplitudes are able to provide the necessary energy to lift the air parcel and trigger convection. A simple conceptual scheme linking the dynamical factors taking place before and during storm development is proposed.

  17. Paleo-tsunami and storm records inferred from coastal boulders along the Ryukyu Islands, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, K.; Miyagi, K.; Imamura, F.

    2012-12-01

    After the 11 March 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami (Mw=9.0) at off the coast of Tohoku district of Japan, re-evaluation of the occurrence of large earthquake and tsunami along the subduction zone is one of the major issues in Japan. Along the Ryukyu trench, there are no known thrust type earthquakes of magnitude greater than 8.0 in the last 300 years [Ando et al., 2009, 2012], although there is one possible exception: the AD1771 event at the southern Ryukyu Islands which is characterized by the ~30 m run-up heights. Hence, the occurrence of tsunamigenic large earthquake along the Ryukyu trench in the past and future is controversial. The lack of thousands of years geological record of past earthquake and tsunami such as the sandy tsunami deposits along the Ryukyu trench has made the discussion more difficult, because there are very few suitable places to study such deposits. On the other hand, numerous coastal boulders are reported on the fringing reefs of each island [e.g. Goto et al., 2010]. They are mostly composed of the coralline and reef rocks and are regarded as useful markers of the past large tsunamis and storm events. In fact, some of them are fossil Porites sp. and hence 14C dating is possible for determining the depositional age [e.g. Araoka et al., 2010]. Moreover, boulders of tsunami and storm wave origins at Ryukyu Islands can be differentiated because difference of the wave lengths of tsunami and storm wave are affected the clast size and spatial distributions of boulders on the wide fringing reef (~1500 m) [e.g. Goto et al., 2010]. Therefore, presence or absence of tsunami boulders at each island may provide useful information of occurrence of past large tsunamis and the causative earthquakes along the Ryukyu Trench. In this study, we show the clast size and spatial distributions of more than 2,500 boulders at 11 islands along the Ryukyu trench. Based on the geological study and hydrodynamic analyses, boulders on the reefs at the Sakishima

  18. On the Responses of Geomagnetic Field at African and Asian Longitudes during the Storm of April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falayi, E.; Rabiu, A.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Magdas, M.

    2010-12-01

    The geomagnetic horizontal (H) field from the chain of 16 MAGDAS magnetic observatories along African and Asian longitudes are used to study the storm-time and disturbance daily variations. Geomagnetic field components vary when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented in southward direction. Also effect of sudden magnetospheric compression is clearly seen at all latitudes. There is persistent decrease of H of disturbance daily variation during the storm at equatorial latitudes which could be the effect of a westward electric field due to the Disturbance Ionospheric dynamo coupled with abnormally large electrical conductivities in the E region over the equator. Therefore by analysing the data observed in the stations along African and Asian longitudes during the magnetic storm, the variations in electromagnetic environment in the near-earth space could be obtained.

  19. Infragravity waves over a natural barred profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Holman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of cross-shore flow were made across the surf zone during a storm as a nearshore bar became better developed and migrated offshore. Measured infragravity band spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated numerically over the natural barred profile assuming a white run-up spectrum of leaky mode or high-mode edge waves. The dominant wave observed early in the storm was consistent with Symond and Bowen's (1984) theoretical prediction of resonant amplification of discrete frequencies over a barred profile. -from Authors

  20. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.