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Sample records for abnormal storm waves

  1. Levee Scour Protection for Storm Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Sustainable; Resiliency in Levee Scour Protection

    2011-12-01

    Earnest Johnson, Firat Y. Testik *, Nadarajah Ravichandran Civil Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA * Contact author ftestik@clemson.edu Levee failure due to scouring has been a prominent occurrence among intense storm surges and waves, giving rise to the implementation of various scour protection measures over the years. This study is to investigate the levee scour and to compare different scour protection measures on a model-levee system in a laboratory wave tank. The protection measures that are tested and compared for their effectiveness in this study include turf reinforcement mats, woven geotextiles, and core-locs. This is an ongoing research effort and experiments are currently being conducted with model levees constructed based upon the United States Army Corps of Engineers' levee design and construction guidelines under various simulated storm conditions. Parameters such as wave elevations, deformation time history of the floodwall, and the scour depth are measured in each test. The finding of this research will be translated to provide effective scour protection measures for robust levee designs.

  2. Wave runup during extreme storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senechal, Nadia; Coco, Giovanni; Bryan, Karin R.; Holman, Rob A.

    2011-07-01

    Video measurements of wave runup were collected during extreme storm conditions characterized by energetic long swells (peak period of 16.4 s and offshore height up to 6.4 m) impinging on steep foreshore beach slopes (0.05-0.08). These conditions induced highly dissipative and saturated conditions over the low-sloping surf zone while the swash zone was associated with moderately reflective conditions (Iribarren parameters up to 0.87). Our data support previous observations on highly dissipative beaches showing that runup elevation (estimated from the variance of the energy spectrum) can be scaled using offshore wave height alone. The data is consistent with the hypothesis of runup saturation at low frequencies (down to 0.035 Hz) and a hyperbolic-tangent fit provides the best statistical predictor of runup elevations.

  3. Lake Michigan Storm: Wave and Water Level Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    However, this artifact did not affect the integrity of the solution as these apparitions typically occur in deep water and the difference between...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 6 Great Lakes Coastal Flood Study, 2012 Federal Inter-Agency Initiative Lake Michigan Storm: Wave and Water Level...Federal Inter-Agency Initiative ERDC/CHL TR-12-26 November 2012 Modeling of Lake Michigan Storm Waves and Water Levels Robert E. Jensen, Mary A

  4. Modeling Motu Profile Response to Varying Wave and Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. C.; Ashton, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The atolls of the Pacific Ocean are low-lying landforms (less than 5m in elevation), typically consisting of reef-building corals often mounted by subaerial islets, or motu, which encircle a central lagoon. These motu, perched atop old coral reefs, typically consist of sand and gravel, and are sometimes anchored by relict geologic features (highstand coral reefs). Despite the vital role these islets play as home to terrestrial ecosystems and human infrastructure, the morphologic processes responsible for their formation and maintenance remain poorly understood. For example, although extreme events are hypothesized as a formation mechanism, motu are found in regions where hurricanes or tropical cyclones rarely occur and across varying storm gradients and frequency tracks. Here we use hydrodynamic and event-based morphodynamic modeling to better understand the role of storm events on the formation and evolution of motu. Using XBeach, a two-dimensional model of infragravity wave propagation and sediment transport, coupled with the coastal wave model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), we simulate the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic impacts of storm events on the nearshore, beach, and backbarrier portions of atolls. We investigate the effect of different representative profile morphology, for example motu height or the distance from the reef edge to the motu, on storm response. We further test the effect of storm intensity and inundation scenarios (i.e. difference in elevated water levels of the lagoon and ocean) on storm hydrodynamics and morphologic change. Model scenarios are informed and compared to basin-wide analysis of the variation of atoll and motu characteristics, such as reef width, motu width, and motu spacing across the Pacific Ocean. Atoll morphologies and storm responses are affected by both geographic location and, locally, the shoreline orientation (compared to storm tracks). Combining these different model scenarios with measured morphometrics allows

  5. Coastal wave measurements during passage of tropical storm Amy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Aerial photographic and laser profilometer data of waves generated by tropical storm Amy are presented. The data mission consisted primarily of two legs, one in the direction of the wind waves, and the second along the direction of swell propagation, using Jennette's Pier at Nags Head, North Carolina, as a focal point. At flight time, Amy's center was 512 nmi from shore and had maximum winds of 60 knots. The storm's history is presented, along with a satellite photograph, showing the extent of the storm on the day of the flight. Flight ground tracks are presented along with sample aerial photographs of the wave conditions showing approximate wavelength and direction. Sample wave energy spectra are presented both from the laser profilometer onboard the aircraft, and from the Corps of Engineers Research Center (CERC) shore gauge at Nags Head, North Carolina.

  6. Modelling waves and surges during the 1953 storm.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J; Flather, R A

    2005-06-15

    Waves and sea levels have been modelled for the storm of 31 January-1 February 1953. Problems in modelling this event are associated with the difficulty of reconstructing wind fields and validating the model results with the limited data available from 50 years ago. The reconstruction of appropriate wind fields for surge and wave models is examined. The surges and waves are reproduced reasonably well on the basis of tide-gauge observations and the sparse observational information on wave heights. The maximum surge coincided closely in time with tidal high water, producing very high water levels along the coasts of the southern North Sea. The statistics of the 1953 event and the likelihood of recurrence are also discussed. Both surge and wave components were estimated to be approximately 1 in 50 year events. The maximum water level also occurred when the offshore waves were close to their maximum. The estimation of return period for the total water level is more problematic and is dependent on location. A scenario with the 1953 storm occurring in 2075, accounting for the effects of sea level rise and land movements, is also constructed, suggesting that sea level relative to the land could be 0.4-0.5m higher than in 1953 in the southern North Sea, assuming a rise in mean sea level of 0.4m.

  7. Rapid Response Measurements of Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravois, U.

    2010-12-01

    Andrew (1992), Katrina (2005), and Ike (2008) are recent examples of extensive damage that resulted from direct hurricane landfall. Some of the worst damages from these hurricanes are caused by wind driven waves and storm surge flooding. The potential for more hurricane disasters like these continues to increase as a result of population growth and real estate development in low elevation coastal regions. Observational measurements of hurricane waves and storm surge play an important role in future mitigation efforts, yet permanent wave buoy moorings and tide stations are more sparse than desired. This research has developed a rapid response method using helicopters to install temporary wave and surge gauges ahead of hurricane landfall. These temporary installations, with target depths from 10-15 m and 1-7 km offshore depending on the local shelf slope, increase the density of measurement points where the worst conditions are expected. The method has progressed to an operational state and has successfully responded to storms Ernesto (2006), Noel (2007), Fay (2008), Gustav (2008), Hanna (2008) and Ike (2008). The temporary gauges are pressure data loggers that measure at 1 Hz continuously for 12 days and are post-processed to extract surge and wave information. For the six storms studied, 45 out of 49 sensors were recovered by boat led scuba diver search teams, with 43 providing useful data for an 88 percent success rate. As part of the 20 sensor Hurricane Gustav response, sensors were also deployed in lakes and bays inLouisiana, east of the Mississippi river delta. Gustav was the largest deployment to date. Generally efforts were scaled back for storms that were not anticipated to be highly destructive. For example, the cumulative total of sensors deployed for Ernesto, Noel, Fay and Hanna was only 20. Measurement locations for Gustav spanned over 800 km of exposed coastline from Louisiana to Florida with sensors in close proximity to landfall near Cocodrie

  8. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  9. Tide-surge and wave interaction in the Gulf of Maine during an extratropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qingping; Xie, Dongmei

    2016-12-01

    The fully coupled spectral wave and circulation model SWAN + ADCIRC was applied to investigate tide-surge and wave interaction in the Gulf of Maine during the extratropical storm on Patriot's Day of 2007. Significant tide-surge and wave interaction was found over Georges Bank and in the coastal areas. Over Georges Bank, the wave-induced current reached 0.2 m/s at the storm peak, accounting for 17 % of the total depth-averaged current. In Saco Bay, the current was dominated by wave-induced current with a magnitude up to 1.0 m/s during the storm. Two clockwise circulation gyres were found to form and sustain over a period of 26 hours during the storm in the bay. They were driven by spatial variations of wave height, direction and the resulting wave radiation stress gradient. Wave setup reached 0.2 m at the storm peak along the coast of Saco Bay. In Saco Bay, wave energy dissipation was reduced and wave height increased due to the increased water depth at high tide and surge. Therefore, wave height was modulated by tide and surge accordingly along the coast. As a result, wave setup and wave-induced current in the bay were also modulated by tide and surge. During the tidal cycle at the storm peak, wave setup increased with tidal level and the maximum wave setup coincided with high tide.

  10. A preliminary study on the intensity of cold wave storm surges of Laizhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Dong, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Dike failure and marine losses are quite prominent in Laizhou Bay during the period of cold wave storm surges because of its open coastline to the north and flat topography. In order to evaluate the intensity of cold wave storm surge, the hindcast of marine elements induced by cold waves in Laizhou Bay from 1985 to 2004 is conducted using a cold wave storm surge-wave coupled model and the joint return period of extreme water level, concomitant wave height, and concomitant wind speed are calculated. A new criterion of cold wave storm surge intensity based on such studies is developed. Considering the frequency of cold wave, this paper introduces a Poisson trivariate compound reconstruction model to calculate the joint return period, which is closer to the reality. By using the newly defined cold wave storm surge intensity, the `cold wave grade' in meteorology can better describe the severity of cold wave storm surges and the warning level is well corresponding to different intensities of cold wave storm surges. Therefore, it provides a proper guidance to marine hydrological analysis, disaster prevention and marine structure design in Laizhou Bay.

  11. Development of An Unstructured Storm Surge-waves-tide Coupled Model And Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.

    2015-12-01

    An unstructured storm surge-waves-tide coupled model, which was coupled through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT), was developed based on the ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model and SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model. The developed coupled model has high resolution in the coast area and can be run efficiently. By comparing with the existing ADCIRC and SWAN coupled model, which was coupled directly not through the MCT, the newly developed one can increase the simulation efficiency by 26.4 percent, when the computational grid and coupling processes of the two coupled model were the same. The coupled model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the process of typhoon "Usagi" which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and made landfall at Shanwei in Guangdong province. Three numerical experiments were done in the simulation to study the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. Results show that the coupled model can simulate the storm surge and waves well when considering the wave induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on the waves. During the process of typhoon "Usagi" the effect of wave radiation stress can result in a maximum of 0.75m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress can cause a -0.82~0.49m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. This study is valuable to the study of hurricane storm surge disaster assessment and the development of the operational storm surge prediction technique.

  12. Integration of coastal inundation modeling from storm tides to individual waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Roeber, Volker; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Heitmann, Troy W.; Bai, Yefei; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    2014-11-01

    Modeling of storm-induced coastal inundation has primarily focused on the surge generated by atmospheric pressure and surface winds with phase-averaged effects of the waves as setup. Through an interoperable model package, we investigate the role of phase-resolving wave processes in simulation of coastal flood hazards. A spectral ocean wave model describes generation and propagation of storm waves from deep to intermediate water, while a non-hydrostatic storm-tide model has the option to couple with a spectral coastal wave model for computation of phase-averaged processes in a near-shore region. The ocean wave and storm-tide models can alternatively provide the wave spectrum and the surface elevation as the boundary and initial conditions for a nested Boussinesq model. Additional surface-gradient terms in the Boussinesq equations maintain the quasi-steady, non-uniform storm tide for modeling of phase-resolving surf and swash-zone processes as well as combined tide, surge, and wave inundation. The two nesting schemes are demonstrated through a case study of Hurricane Iniki, which made landfall on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai in 1992. With input from a parametric hurricane model and global reanalysis and tidal datasets, the two approaches produce comparable significant wave heights and phase-averaged surface elevations in the surf zone. The nesting of the Boussinesq model provides a seamless approach to augment the inundation due to the individual waves in matching the recorded debris line along the coast.

  13. Extreme storm wave influence on sandy beach macrofauna with distinct human pressures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Phillipe M; Costa, Leonardo L; Suciu, Marjorie C; Tavares, Davi C; Zalmon, Ilana R

    2016-06-15

    We evaluated the influence of storm waves on the intertidal community structure of urbanized and non-urbanized areas of a sandy beach on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The macrofauna was sampled before (PREV) and after two storm wave events (POEV I; POEV II) in 2013 and 2014. Significant differences in community structure between PREV and POEV I in the urbanized sector demonstrate higher macrofauna vulnerability, and the community recovery within 41days on this scenario of less frequent events in 2013. On the other hand, significant differences in the macrofauna only in the urbanized sector between PREV and POEV II also highlight macrofauna vulnerability and community recovery failure within 42days on this scenario of more frequent storm in 2014. Urbanization and wave height were the variables that most influenced species, indicating that high storm wave events and increasing urbanization synergism are a threat to the macrofauna.

  14. Simultaneous observations of storm-generated sprite and gravity wave over Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chien-Chung; Dai, Jeff; Kuo, Cheng-Ling; Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    We report simultaneous observations of sprite and gravity wave generated by a storm over Bangladesh. The origin of a concentric gravity wave can be traced to the storm region on 27 April 2014 over Bangladesh with a low cloud top surface temperature (175 K). After data analysis, the time period of the concentric gravity wave is found to be 8.8-8.9 min. The horizontal wavelength is found to be 50 km for red emissions ( 55 km for green emissions), and the horizontal phase velocity is 94.4 ± 31.7 m s-1 for red emissions (102.6 ± 29.4 m s-1 for green emissions). Using the dispersion relation of gravity wave, the elevation angle of wave propagation direction is found to be 53.3°. The sprite associated with the gravity wave was also recorded at 1534 UT on 27 April 2014. The initiation time of storm-generated gravity wave is estimated to be 1454 UT at which lightning activity was relatively low using lightning data. At time 1534 UT of the recorded sprite, the lightning rate was close to its maximum value. The storm-generated gravity wave could be thought as a precursor phenomenon for lightning and sprites since one of the necessary conditions for gravity wave, lightning, and sprites is strong convection inside storms.

  15. Planetary wave vacillations and storms in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, M.; Dalu, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    The planetary flow in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) is more zonally symmetric than the corresponding flow in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). In the upper troposphere, the wind is largest in the subtropical jet at 30°S stretching across Australia, and in the mid-latitude jet across the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean at 50°S. The sub-tropical jet weakens in the mid-troposphere, and it is absent in the lower troposphere. In the lower troposphere the annual average westerly wind is confined in a relatively narrow latitudinal band around 50°S (Lorenz and Hartmann, 2001). The zonal symmetric mode (ZW0) dominates the seasonal variance. The mode zero is modulated by two standing modes ZW1 and ZW3, which are excited by the continental topographic features and by the heat diabatic fluxes related to the SST gradients and to seasonal sea-land thermal contrast. Even if these modes are relatively weak (van Loon and Jenne, 1972, Hobbs and Raphael, 2007), they are important, since they dominate the seasonal zonal asymmetry of the planetary flow (van Loon and Jenne, 1972), with significant links with El Niño/La Niña southern oscillation (Trenberth, 1980; Renwick and Revell, 1999; Raphael, 2003). Analysis study has shown that mode ZW1 and ZW3 can exhibit chaotic like behaviour (Kidson, 1988, 1999). Vacillations of these modes with a quasi-periodicity of the order of 40 days can occur in regions of strong zonal wind because of non-linear wave-wave interaction (De Gregorio and Dalu, 1984). The onset of these vacillations can be triggered by the arrival of a higher order travelling wave in a region of strong zonal wind. In addition, the presence of these higher order modes shortens the time scale of the vacillations of mode ZW1 and ZW3. Finally an attempt is made to relate these vacillations to the diversion of the Antarctic storms towards the ANZ region.

  16. Rapid wave and storm surge warning system for tropical cyclones in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appendini, C. M.; Rosengaus, M.; Meza, R.; Camacho, V.

    2015-12-01

    The National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, is responsible for the forecast of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific basins. As such, Mexico, Central America and Caribbean countries depend on the information issued by the NHC related to the characteristics of a particular tropical cyclone and associated watch and warning areas. Despite waves and storm surge are important hazards for marine operations and coastal dwellings, their forecast is not part of the NHC responsibilities. This work presents a rapid wave and storm surge warning system based on 3100 synthetic tropical cyclones doing landfall in Mexico. Hydrodynamic and wave models were driven by the synthetic events to create a robust database composed of maximum envelops of wind speed, significant wave height and storm surge for each event. The results were incorporated into a forecast system that uses the NHC advisory to locate the synthetic events passing inside specified radiuses for the present and forecast position of the real event. Using limited computer resources, the system displays the information meeting the search criteria, and the forecaster can select specific events to generate the desired hazard map (i.e. wind, waves, and storm surge) based on the maximum envelop maps. This system was developed in a limited time frame to be operational in 2015 by the National Hurricane and Severe Storms Unit of the Mexican National Weather Service, and represents a pilot project for other countries in the region not covered by detailed storm surge and waves forecasts.

  17. Storm time evolution of ELF/VLF waves observed by DEMETER satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhima, Zeren; Cao, JinBin; Liu, WenLong; Fu, HuiShan; Wang, TieYan; Zhang, XueMin; Shen, XuHui

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, using the data of Sun-synchronous satellite (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Waves Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) DEMETER, we investigated the storm time variations of ELF/VLF waves during the intense coronal mass ejections (CME)-driven storms from 2005 to 2009. The results show that there is a good correlation between the enhancement of ELF/VLF waves and the CME events. Immidately following the enhanced wave activity driven by CMEs at the initial phase, the wave intensity decreases temporarily at the beginning of storm main phase. The strongest waves predominantly occur from the late main phase to early recovery phase. The ELF waves below 3 kHz are significantly intensified during the whole storm time, while the high-frequency waves above 3 kHz seem strengthened predominantly during the late main and early recovery phase. The ELF waves below 3 kHz can exist in a wide L shell range, with the intensity peaking at L ~ 3 and 4. High-frequency waves at f > 9 kHz exist mostly outside the plasmapause. The stronger ELF/VLF waves on the dayside can last longer time than those on the nightside.

  18. Statistics and analysis of storm waves in the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrova, Ksenia; Arkhipkin, Victor; Surkova, Galina

    2013-04-01

    For the study of storm waves in the Sea of Azov spectral wave model of the third-generation SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) was used. The inputs to the model were the bottom topography in grid (pitch axis x 0,02 ° and the axis y 0,01 °) and wind field of a new high-resolution(~ 0.3°) reanalysis NCEP CFSR from 1978 to 2010 with a time step of 1 hour. This model calculates significant wave height, swell height, direction of wave propagation, its length and the period, and the wave energy transport. The time interval output was 3 hours. Results of calculation of the last 2 days of the year are used as input for the next year. Supercomputers of Lomonosov Moscow State University were used for this research. The physical processes such as quadruplet interactions, whitecapping, triads, bottom friction, depth-induced breaking and diffraction are considered. The simulation results were used to calculate the number of storms, their duration, for the period of settlement, and for each month. Total number of storms with significant wave height greater than 2 m was 165. The highest values of calculated parameters are found in the central part of the sea: significant wave height is 3.5 m, a period of waves is 5 seconds, the length is 25 m. According to model simulation, the distribution of waves with 100 years return period were calculated. As a result, it was found that the heights of "100-year" waves in the Sea of Azov do not exceed 5 m. The study presents climatic variability of storms. Found that there was downward trend of storm activity in the Sea of Azov in the simulating period from 1978 to 2010. Synoptic situations that led to increase of storm waves were analyzed for extreme cases. The work is done in Natural Risk Assessment Laboratory under contract G.34.31.0007.

  19. The effect of wave current interactions on the storm surge and inundation in Charleston Harbor during Hurricane Hugo 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lian; Liu, Huiqing; Peng, Machuan

    The effects of wave-current interactions on the storm surge and inundation induced by Hurricane Hugo in and around the Charleston Harbor and its adjacent coastal regions are examined by using a three-dimensional (3-D) wave-current coupled modeling system. The 3-D storm surge and inundation modeling component of the coupled system is based on the Princeton ocean model (POM), whereas the wave modeling component is based on the third-generation wave model, simulating waves nearshore (SWAN). The results indicate that the effects of wave-induced surface, bottom, and radiation stresses can separately or in combination produce significant changes in storm surge and inundation. The effects of waves vary spatially. In some areas, the contribution of waves to peak storm surge during Hurricane Hugo reached as high as 0.76 m which led to substantial changes in the inundation and drying areas simulated by the storm surge model.

  20. 76 FR 74776 - Forum-Trends in Extreme Winds, Waves, and Extratropical Storms Along the Coasts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Forum--Trends in Extreme Winds, Waves, and Extratropical... the forum Web site at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/extreme-winds-waves-extratropical-storms... this forum become available, they may be found at...

  1. Mobility of maerl-siliciclastic mixtures: Impact of waves, currents and storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Siddhi; Duffy, Garret Patrick; Brown, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Maerl beds are free-living, non-geniculate coralline algae habitats which form biogenic reefs with high micro-scale complexity supporting a diversity and abundance of rare epifauna and epiflora. These habitats are highly mobile in shallow marine environments where substantial maerl beds co-exist with siliciclastic sediment, exemplified by our study site of Galway Bay. Coupled hydrodynamic-wave-sediment transport models have been used to explore the transport patterns of maerl-siliciclastic sediment during calm summer conditions and severe winter storms. The sediment distribution is strongly influenced by storm waves even in water depths greater than 100 m. Maerl is present at the periphery of wave-induced residual current gyres during storm conditions. A combined wave-current Sediment Mobility Index during storm conditions shows correlation with multibeam backscatter and surficial sediment distribution. A combined wave-current Mobilization Frequency Index during storm conditions acts as a physical surrogate for the presence of maerl-siliciclastic mixtures in Galway Bay. Both indices can provide useful integrated oceanographic and sediment information to complement coupled numerical hydrodynamic, sediment transport and erosion-deposition models.

  2. Nonlinearity in Chorus Waves During a Geomagnetic Storm on 1 November 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Paulson, K. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Spence, H.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Skoug, R. M.; Larsen, B.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigate possibility of nonlinearity in chorus waves during a geomagnetic storm on 1 November 2012. The data we use are measured by the Van Allen Probes B (RBSP-B). Wave data from the EMFISIS instrument and particle data from the ECT instrument are analyzed. HOPE instrument on ECT provides measurements of plasmasheet electrons. Chorus waves are frequently measured in the morning side during the main phase of this storm. During this storm interval, large amplitude chorus waves are seen with amplitudes of the order of ~0.6 nT and >7 mV/m, which is similar to or larger than the size of ULF waves. The waves quite often consist of rising tones during the burst sampling. Since the rising tone is known as a signature of nonlinearity, the large portion of the waves are considered as nonlinear at least during the burst sampling. These results underline the importance of nonlinearity in the dynamics of chorus waves. We further examine the consistency between the measurement and the nonlinear theory. For example, the relation between wave amplitudes and frequency drift rate is checked.

  3. Tidal and storm wave deposition in Lower Silurian shelf sequences, east Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Driese, S.G.; Fischer, M.W.; Easthouse, K.A.; Schoner, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    Lower Silurian sequences exposed across east Tennessee consist of an easterly quartzarenite (Clinch Sandstone) that grades westward into heterolithic sandstone, siltstone, and shale (Rockwood Formation). Farther west, the sequence intertongues with a cratonic carbonate-shale succession (Brassfield Formation). The Clinch Sandstone represents deposition in shoreface and inner shelf environments. Inferred depositional processes include (1) ebb-dominated tidal currents, (2) wave-induced currents (longshore and shore-oblique), and (3) wave-orbital currents. Strong tidal influence is indicated by abundant medium to large-scale, variably stacked sets of ebb-oriented (west-northwest) cross-strata. These strata exhibit tidal bundling, double clay drapes, reactivation/pause surfaces containing concentrations of shale intraclasts and/or biogenic structures, and shale intraclasts lining deep scours. The cross-strata were produced by migration of large-scale, low-amplitude bed forms (class II, III, and IV sand wave of Allen), and densely bioturbated sequences are interbedded with the cross-strata dominated by Skolithos-assemblage traces. The Rockwood Formation represents deposition in middle to outer shelf environments where storm-induced currents dominated. Possible depositional mechanisms include (1) storm-surge-ebb (relaxation) flows associated with coastal set-up conditions, which may have evolved into geostrophic flows; and (2) turbidity flows initiated by storm-induced liquefaction of shoreface sand. Features suggest deposition above fair-weather wave base (high-angle cross-strata), below fair-weather wave base but within storm wave base (hummocky cross-stratification, microhummocky cross-stratification and wave ripples), and below storm wave base (Bouma bce turbidites). Westerly sand transport was most prevalent, and bioturbation is extensive and dominated by Cruziana-assemblage traces.

  4. Hurricane-induced waves and storm surge modeling for the Mexican coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Padilla, Rafael; Appendini, Christian M.; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrián

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the application of a third-generation wave model and a hydrodynamic model to determine extreme waves and water levels associated to the incidence of tropical cyclones along the Mexican coast. In addition to historical records and to overcome the limitation associated to data scarcity in Mexico, we employ information from 3100 synthetic events generated from a statistical/deterministic hurricane model. This enables the generation of a more robust database for the characterization of extreme water levels along the Mexican coast. The procedure incorporates a storm track modeling approach where, for each hurricane (historic and synthetic), the entire track is numerically reproduced as it crosses the ocean and makes landfall. Extreme values for both, waves and storm surge, are determined through an extreme value analysis at each mesh element, allowing for the identification of their spatial variability. Results for the Gulf of Mexico show that highest waves are expected along both the Caribbean Sea and the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, while extreme water levels due to storm surge are identified in the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula. On the other hand, along the Pacific coast, extreme values for waves are identified at the central mainland Mexico while storm surge is minimal. The methodology is proved to be a good alternative in the reproduction of continuously varying tropical cyclone climatology along the Mexican coastline, and it provides a rational approach for assessing the hurricane-induced risk in coastal areas.

  5. Effect of wave-enhanced bottom friction on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; List, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Massachusetts Bay is a shallow (35 m average depth) semienclosed embayment, roughly 100 ?? 50 km, which opens into the Gulf of Maine at its eastern boundary. Surface waves associated with winter storm winds from the northeast cause large sediment resuspension events, and wave and circulation fields during these events have a quasi-steady response to the wind stress. Coupled wave, circulation, and boundary layer models indicate that wave-enhanced bottom friction has a significant damping effect on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay. The simulated response exhibits significant three-dimensional structure, but still can be fundamentally understood using idealized models. The depth-integrated momentum balance is dominated by along-bay stress, pressure gradient, and bottom stress. The effective bottom drag coefficient during typical storm conditions is increased by a factor of 2-5 when wave effects are included, but the mean bottom stress is relatively unaffected by wave effects due to a reduction in bottom currents by 30-50%. The vertical mixing is also relatively unaffected by the waves, and the result is that the increased drag causes a nearly depth-independent offset of the vertical current profiles. The alongshore transport in the bay is reduced 10-50%, depending on wind direction. ?? ASCE.

  6. Wave-current interaction in the bottom boundary layer during storm and non-storm conditions: observations and model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.E.; Cacchione, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Bottom boundary layer measurements of current velocity profiles and bed response under combined wave and current conditions were obtained at a water depth of 145 m on the shelf off central California during December 1988. High quality logarithmic current profiles, excellent time-series bottom photographs, and a large variation in the relative strengths of the wave-induced oscillatory currents and the quasi-steady low frequency currents provided a dataset that is ideal for examining the effects of wave-current interaction near a rough boundary. During one period of 3 days that included a brief storm event, the wave-induced bottom currents (Ub 1 10) ranged from 2.3 to 22 cm s-1 and the steady currents (Ur) ranged from 1.8 to 28.1 cm s-1 at 0.18 m above the bottom; the ratio Ub U18 varied from below 0.2 to more than 7. Velocity profiles were highly logarithmic (R2 > 0.95) 60% of the time and 27 profiles collected at 2-h intervals had R2 {slanted equal to or greater-than} 0.994 which allowed reliable estimates of the current shear velocity (U*c) and roughness length (zoc). Mean U*c values had magnitudes of 0.3-2.4 cm s-1 and zoc, which ranged from 0.04 to 3.5 cm, was strongly correlated to the Ub U18 ratio. Drag coefficients (CD = ??c/??U1002) ranged from about 2.5 ?? 10-3-12 ?? 10-3 in direct response to the wave-current variation; the use of a constant CD of 3 ?? 10-3 for steady flow over a rough bed would have underpredicted the shear stress by up to four times during the storm event. The large zoc and U*c values cannot be explained by changes in the carefully-observed, small (<1 cm) physical bed roughness elements that covered the mud-rich study site. A side-scan sonar site survey also eliminated the possibility of flow disturbance by larger upstream topography. The observations clearly demonstrate the importance of wave-current interaction near a rough boundary. Comparison of the observations with results of the combined flow models of Grant and Madsen and Glenn

  7. Lake St. Clair: Storm Wave and Water Level Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    speeds. The WAM wave model was validated and applied for production of all wind generated wave results, including ice when applicable . The ADCIRC...midwest ( MW ), southwest (SW), and northeast (NE) STWAVE grids...91  Figure 5-3. STWAVE MW grid bathymetry. ............................................................................................. 91

  8. North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study (NACCS) Coastal Storm Model Simulations: Waves and Water Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 5- 14 North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study (NACCS) Coastal Storm Model Simulations: Waves and Water Levels Co...geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public good...Waves and Water Levels Mary A. Cialone, T. Chris Massey, Mary E. Anderson, Alison S. Grzegorzewski, Robert E. Jensen, Alan Cialone, David J. Mark

  9. Study on the storm surges induced by cold waves in the Northern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Dongxue; Hou, Yijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Yahao

    2016-08-01

    Cold wave, a kind of severe weather system, can bring strong wind and induce significant sea level rise to the Northern East China Sea. Based on CFSR data, the study shows the monthly distributions of invaded days and the spatiotemporal distributions of cold-wave wind direction and wind speed. A three-dimensional numerical model (ROMS) was developed to study storm surges induced by cold waves. The role of wind direction, wind speed, wind duration, extratropical cyclone and tide-surge interaction is investigated by conducting different sensitivity experiments. The results indicate that storm surges mainly happen at the coasts perpendicular to the wind directions. Surge range and time lag are related to the geometry of the basin and the continental shelf. The response of the sea-level fluctuations to cold wave indicates that there is a positive correlation between crests and wind speed, a negative correlation between troughs and wind speed, but no obvious correlations to wind duration. Coupled weather cold waves, which yield a larger range and a multi-peak structure of surges, can be classified according to cold wave tracks and extratropical cyclones. The tide-surge interaction has an obvious and different effect on the magnitudes and phases of storm surges for different tidal stages.

  10. Modeling the influence of storms on sand wave formation: A linear stability approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmans, G. H. P.; Roos, P. C.; de Vriend, H. J.; Hulscher, S. J. M. H.

    2017-04-01

    We present an idealized process-based morphodynamic model to study the effect of storms on sand wave formation. To this end, we include wind waves, wind-driven flow and, in addition to bed load transport, suspended load sediment transport. A linear stability analysis is applied to systematically study the influence of wave and wind conditions on growth and migration rates of small-amplitude wavy bed undulations. The effects of the wind and waves of various magnitudes and directions are investigated. Waves turn out to decrease the growth rate of sand waves, because their effect on the downhill gravitational transport component is stronger than their growth-enhancing effect. The wind wave effect is strongest for wind waves perpendicular to the tidal current. In the case of a symmetrical tidal current, wind-driven flow tends to breach the symmetry, thus causing sand wave migration. Wind effects on sand wave behavior are strongly influenced by the Coriolis effect, in magnitude as well as direction. Stirring due to wind waves enhances sand wave migration. Next to bed load transport, suspended load also has a growing and a decaying mechanism, being the perturbed flow and the perturbed suspended sediment concentration respectively. The decaying mechanism outcompetes the growing mechanism for bed forms with shorter wavelengths, resulting in an increase in the preferred wavelength. Wind waves increase the growth rate due to suspended load, but this is outcompeted by the reduction in growth rate by wind waves due to bed load transport. We conclude that storms significantly influence sand wave dynamics in their formation stage.

  11. Northeast storms ranked by wind stress and wave-generated bottom stress observed in Massachusetts Bay, 1990-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.; Sherwood, C.R.; Dalyander, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Along the coast of the northeastern United States, strong winds blowing from the northeast are often associated with storms called northeasters, coastal storms that strongly influence weather. In addition to effects caused by wind stress, the sea floor is affected by bottom stress associated with these storms. Bottom stress caused by orbital velocities associated with surface waves integrated over the duration of a storm is a metric of storm strength at the sea floor. Near-bottom wave-orbital velocities calculated by using measurements of significant wave height and dominant wave period and the parametric spectral method described in Wiberg and Sherwood [Wiberg, P.L., Sherwood, C.R. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface wave parameters. Computers in Geosciences, in press] compared well with observations in Massachusetts Bay. Integrated bottom-wave stress (called IWAVES), calculated at 30 m water depth, and a companion storm-strength metric, integrated surface wind stress at 10 m (called IWINDS), are used to provide an overview of the strength, frequency, and timing of large storms in Massachusetts Bay over a 17-year period from January 1990 through December 2006. These new metrics reflect both storm duration and intensity. Northeast storms were the major cause of large waves in Massachusetts Bay because of the long fetch to the east: of the strongest 10% of storms (n=38) ranked by IWAVES, 22 had vector-averaged wind stress from the northeast quadrant. The Blizzard of December 1992, the Perfect Storm of October 1991, and a December 2003 storm were the strongest three storms ranked by IWAVES and IWINDS, and all were northeasters. IWAVES integrated over the winter season (defined as October-May) ranged by about a factor of 11; the winters with the highest integrated IWAVES were 1992-1993 and 2004-2005 and the winter with the lowest integrated IWAVES was 2001-2002. May 2005 was the only month in the 17-year record that two of the nine

  12. Wave-driven sediment mobilization on a storm-controlled continental shelf (Northwest Iberia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberle, Ferdinand; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hanebuth, Till

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor sediment mobilization on the inner Northwest Iberian continental shelf is caused largely by ocean surface waves. The temporal and spatial variability in the wave height, wave period, and wave direction has a profound effect on local sediment mobilization, leading to distinct sediment mobilization scenarios. Six grain-size specific sediment mobilization scenarios, representing seasonal average and storm conditions, were simulated with a physics-based numerical model. Model inputs included meteorological and oceanographic data in conjunction with seafloor grain-size and the shelf bathymetric data. The results show distinct seasonal variations, most importantly in wave height, leading to sediment mobilization, specifically on the inner shelf shallower than 30 m water depth where up to 49% of the shelf area is mobilized. Medium to severe storm events are modeled to mobilize up to 89% of the shelf area above 150 m water depth. The frequency of each of these seasonal and storm-related sediment mobilization scenarios is addressed using a decade of meteorological and oceanographic data. The temporal and spatial patterns of the modeled sediment mobilization scenarios are discussed in the context of existing geological and environmental processes and conditions to assist scientific, industrial and environmental efforts that are directly affected by sediment mobilization. Examples, where sediment mobilization plays a vital role, include seafloor nutrient advection, recurrent arrival of oil from oil-spill-laden seafloor sediment, and bottom trawling impacts.

  13. Storm surge and wave simulations in the Gulf of Mexico using a consistent drag relation for atmospheric and storm surge models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatvani, D.; Zweers, N. C.; van Ormondt, M.; Smale, A. J.; de Vries, H.; Makin, V. K.

    2012-07-01

    To simulate winds and water levels, numerical weather prediction (NWP) and storm surge models generally use the traditional bulk relation for wind stress, which is characterized by a wind drag coefficient. A still commonly used drag coefficient in those models, some of them were developed in the past, is based on a relation, according to which the magnitude of the coefficient is either constant or increases monotonically with increasing surface wind speed (Bender, 2007; Kim et al., 2008; Kohno and Higaki, 2006). The NWP and surge models are often tuned independently from each other in order to obtain good results. Observations have indicated that the magnitude of the drag coefficient levels off at a wind speed of about 30 m s-1, and then decreases with further increase of the wind speed. Above a wind speed of approximately 30 m s-1, the stress above the air-sea interface starts to saturate. To represent the reducing and levelling off of the drag coefficient, the original Charnock drag formulation has been extended with a correction term. In line with the above, the Delft3D storm surge model is tested using both Charnock's and improved Makin's wind drag parameterization to evaluate the improvements on the storm surge model results, with and without inclusion of the wave effects. The effect of waves on storm surge is included by simultaneously simulating waves with the SWAN model on identical model grids in a coupled mode. However, the results presented here will focus on the storm surge results that include the wave effects. The runs were carried out in the Gulf of Mexico for Katrina and Ivan hurricane events. The storm surge model was initially forced with H*wind data (Powell et al., 2010) to test the effect of the Makin's wind drag parameterization on the storm surge model separately. The computed wind, water levels and waves are subsequently compared with observation data. Based on the good results obtained, we conclude that, for a good reproduction of the storm

  14. A storm surge intensity classification based on extreme water level and concomitant wave height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sheng; Gao, Junguo; Li, Xue; Wei, Yong; Wang, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Storm surge is one of the predominant natural threats to coastal communities. Qingdao is located on the southern coast of the Shandong Peninsula in China. The storm surge disaster in Qingdao depends on various influencing factors such as the intensity, duration, and route of the passing typhoon, and thus a comprehensive understanding of natural coastal hazards is essential. In order to make up the defects of merely using the warning water level, this paper presents two statistical distribution models (Poisson Bi-variable Gumbel Logistic Distribution and Poisson Bi-variable Log-normal Distribution) to classify the intensity of storm surge. We emphasize the joint return period of typhoon-induced water levels and wave heights measured in the coastal area of Qingdao since 1949. The present study establishes a new criterion to classify the intensity grade of catastrophic storms using the typhoon surge estimated by the two models. A case study demonstrates that the new criterion is well defined in terms of probability concept, is easy to implement, and fits well the calculation of storm surge intensity. The procedures with the proposed statistical models would be useful for the disaster mitigation in other coastal areas influenced by typhoons.

  15. Importance of wave age and resonance in storm surges: The case Xynthia, Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Xavier; Bruneau, Nicolas; Breilh, Jean-François; Fortunato, André B.; Karpytchev, Mikhail

    This study aims to hindcast and analyze the storm surge associated with Xynthia, a mid-latitude depression that severely hit the French central part of the Bay of Biscay on the 27-28th of February 2010. The main losses in human lives and damages were caused by the associated storm surge, which locally exceeded 1.5 m and peaked at the same time as a high spring tide, causing the flooding of low-lying coasts. A new storm surge modeling system was developed, based on the unstructured-grid circulation model SELFE and the spectral wave model WaveWatchIII. The modeling system was implemented over the North-East Atlantic Ocean and resulted in tidal and wave predictions with errors of the order of 3% and 15%, respectively. The storm surge associated with Xynthia was also well predicted along the Bay of Biscay, with only a slight underestimation of the surge peak by 3-8%. Numerical experiments were then performed to analyze the physical processes controlling the development of the storm surge and revealed firstly that the wind caused most of the water level anomaly through an Ekman setup process. The comparison between a wave-dependant and a quadratic parameterization to compute wind stress showed that the storm surge was strongly amplified by the presence of steep and young wind-waves, related to their rapid development in the restricted fetch of the Bay of Biscay. In the central part of the Bay of Biscay, both observed and predicted water level anomalies at landfall displayed ˜6 h oscillations, with amplitudes of up to 0.2 m (10-20% of the surge peak). An analytical shelf resonance model and numerical experiments demonstrated that the period of the observed oscillations corresponds to the resonant mode of the continental shelf in the central part of the Bay of Biscay. It is concluded that these oscillations originate from the interactions between the water level perturbation and the continental shelf and this phenomenon is expected to be relevant at other places along

  16. Gravity shear waves atop the cirrus layer of intense convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent visual satellite photographs of certain intense convective storms have revealed concentric wave patterns. A model for the generation and growth of these waves is proposed. The proposed initial generating mechanism is similar to the effect noticed when a pebble is dropped into a calm pond. The penetration of the tropopause by overshooting convection is analogous to the pebble's penetration of the water's surface. The model for wave growth involves instability due to the wind shear resulting from the cirrus outflow. This model is based on an equation for the waves' phase speed which is similar to the Helmholtz equation. It, however, does not assume an incompressible atmosphere, but rather assumes density is a logarithmic function of height. Finally, the model is evaluated on the two mid-latitude and three tropical cases. The data indicate that shearing instability may be a significant factor in the appearance of these waves.

  17. A case study of gravity waves-convective storms interaction 9 May 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, J. G.; Einaudi, F.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is presented of a series of severe storms which occurred in the north central United States on 9 May 1979 and whose spatial distribution and movement correlate well with observed gravity waves. Two gravity wave trains of 2.1-3 mb amplitude, 2.5-3.3 h period and 240-265 km horizontal wavelength were isolated through power spectra analysis and cross-correlation techniques applied to National Weather Service barograph traces. The wave trains propagated in the 200 deg direction, which coincided with the jet axis, with a phase velocity of 20-30 m/s and within a 300 km wide band. The storms were identified on enhanced infrared GOES satellite pictures with the help of radar summaries. These convective systems initially developed in Nebraska and propagated north-northeast at 25 m/s, revealing wave-like characteristics with a separation of 300-400 km. The convective systems were closely linked to the observed wave trains with cell intensity, height and associated rainfall maximized at the wave ridge. One of the two wave trains developed in regions of weak or no convection and appeared to initiate more intense convective clusters downstream from the point of origin. It is shown that the characteristics of the wave trains are consistent with those of gravity waves generated in a region of strong vertical shear associated with the jet. It is suggested that the wave trains continue to extract energy from the basic state all along their track through critical level interaction.

  18. Parallel Computation of Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Coupled Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Yamashita, T.

    2003-12-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions are very important in the formation and development of tropical storms. These interactions are dominant in exchanging heat, momentum, and moisture fluxes. Heat flux is usually computed using a bulk equation. In this equation air-sea interface supplies heat energy to the atmosphere and to the storm. Dynamical interaction is most often one way in which it is the atmosphere that drives the ocean. The winds transfer momentum to both ocean surface waves and ocean current. The wind wave makes an important role in the exchange of the quantities of motion, heat and a substance between the atmosphere and the ocean. Storm surges can be considered as the phenomena of mean sea-level changes, which are the result of the frictional stresses of strong winds blowing toward the land and causing the set level and the low atmospheric pressure at the centre of the cyclone can additionally raise the sea level. In addition to the rise in water level itself, another wave factor must be considered. A rise of mean sea level due to white-cap wave dissipation should be considered. In bounded bodies of water, such as small seas, wind driven sea level set up is much serious than inverted barometer effects, in which the effects of wind waves on wind-driven current play an important role. It is necessary to develop the coupled system of the full spectral third-generation wind-wave model (WAM or WAVEWATCH III), the meso-scale atmosphere model (MM5) and the coastal ocean model (POM) for simulating these physical interactions. As the component of coupled system is so heavy for personal usage, the parallel computing system should be developed. In this study, first, we developed the coupling system of the atmosphere model, ocean wave model and the coastal ocean model, in the Beowulf System, for the simulation of the storm surge. It was applied to the storm surge simulation caused by Typhoon Bart (T9918) in the Yatsushiro Sea. The atmosphere model and the ocean model have

  19. The link between abnormal calcium handling and electrical instability in acquired long QT syndrome--Does calcium precipitate arrhythmic storms?

    PubMed

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J; Salama, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Release of Ca(2+) ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into myocyte cytoplasm and their binding to troponin C is the final signal form myocardial contraction. Synchronous contraction of ventricular myocytes is necessary for efficient cardiac pumping function. This requires both shuttling of Ca(2+) between SR and cytoplasm in individual myocytes, and organ-level synchronization of this process by means of electrical coupling among ventricular myocytes. Abnormal Ca(2+) release from SR causes arrhythmias in the setting of CPVT (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia) and digoxin toxicity. Recent optical mapping data indicate that abnormal Ca(2+) handling causes arrhythmias in models of both repolarization impairment and profound bradycardia. The mechanisms involve dynamic spatial heterogeneity of myocardial Ca(2+) handling preceding arrhythmia onset, cell-synchronous systolic secondary Ca(2+) elevation (SSCE), as well as more complex abnormalities of intracellular Ca(2+) handling detected by subcellular optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts. The regional heterogeneities in Ca(2+) handling cause action potential (AP) heterogeneities through sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) activation and eventually overwhelm electrical coupling of the tissue. Divergent Ca(2+) dynamics among different myocardial regions leads to temporal instability of AP duration and - on the patient level - in T wave lability. Although T-wave alternans has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, non-alternans lability is observed in pre-clinical models of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) and CPVT, and in LQTS patients. Analysis of T wave lability may provide a real-time window on the abnormal Ca(2+) dynamics causing specific arrhythmias such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP).

  20. Development of an Extratropical Storm Wind, Wave, and Water Level Climatology for the Offshore Mid-Atlantic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 5- 11 Development of an Extratropical Storm Wind, Wave, and Water Level Climatology for the Offshore Mid-Atlantic...challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the...Development of an Extratropical Storm Wind, Wave, and Water Level Climatology for the Offshore Mid-Atlantic Michael F. Forte Field Research Facility

  1. GCM response of northern winter stationary waves and storm tracks to increasing amounts of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.B.; Held, I.M. )

    1993-10-01

    The response of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) coupled ocean-atmosphere R15, 9-level GCM to gradually increasing CO[sub 2] amounts is analyzed with emphasis on the changes in the stationary waves and storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere wintertime troposphere. A large part of the change is described by an equivalent-barotropic stationary wave with a high over eastern Canada and a low over southern Alaska. Consistent with this, the Atlantic jet weakens near the North American coast. Perpetual winter runs of an R15, nine-level atmospheric GCM with sea surface temperature, sea ice thickness, and soil moisture values prescribed from the coupled GCM results are able to reproduce the coupled model's response qualitatively. Consistent with the weakened baroclinicity associated with the stationary wave change, the Atlantic storm track weakens with increasing CO[sub 2] concentrations while the Pacific storm track does not change in strength substantially. An R15, nine-level atmospheric model linearized about the zonal time-mean state is used to analyze the contributions to the stationary wave response. With mountains, diabatic heating, and transient forcings the linear model gives a stationary wave change in qualitative agreement with the change seen in the coupled and perpetual models. Transients and diabatic heating appear to be the major forcing terms, while changes in zonal-mean basic state and topographic forcing play only a small role. A substantial part of the diabatic response is due to changes in tropical latent heating. 25 refs., 36 figs.

  2. Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Seabloom, Eric W; Ruggiero, Peter; Hacker, Sally D; Mull, Jeremy; Zarnetske, Phoebe

    2013-03-01

    The world's coastal habitats are critical to human well-being, but are also highly sensitive to human habitat alterations and climate change. In particular, global climate is increasing sea levels and potentially altering storm intensities, which may result in increased risk of flooding in coastal areas. In the Pacific Northwest (USA), coastal dunes that protect the coast from flooding are largely the product of a grass introduced from Europe over a century ago (Ammophila arenaria). An introduced congener (A. breviligulata) is displacing A. arenaria and reducing dune height. Here we quantify the relative exposure to storm-wave induced dune overtopping posed by the A. breviligulata invasion in the face of projected multi-decadal changes in sea level and storm intensity. In our models, altered storm intensity was the largest driver of overtopping extent, however the invasion by A. breviligulata tripled the number of areas vulnerable to overtopping and posed a fourfold larger exposure than sea-level rise over multi-decadal time scales. Our work demonstrates the importance of a transdisciplinary approach that draws on insights from ecology, geomorphology, and civil engineering to assess the vulnerability of ecosystem services in light of global change.

  3. Abnormal mortality of octopus after a storm water event: Accumulated lead and lead isotopes as fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, J; Ruano, F; Pereira, J; Mil-Homens, M; Brito, P; Vale, C; Caetano, M

    2017-03-01

    Octopus vulgaris is a sedentary organism that inhabits coastal waters being exposed to anthropogenic compounds. Lead concentration in coastal environments reflects many processes and activities namely weathering, industrial and domestic discharges, and atmospheric deposition. Since lead isotopic composition is little affected by kinetic processes occurring between source and sink, its signature has been used to identify different Pb sources. After a short-term heavy rainfall, hundreds of octopus appeared dead in two Portuguese coastal areas. Histopathology and Pb levels and its stable isotopes were determined in tissues, such as digestive gland, of stranded octopus and compared to alive specimens, sediments and runoff material from the same areas. Histology results showed severe damage in stranded octopus tissues suggesting that death was probably associated to multiple organ failure linked to hypertrophy and exudates input. In addition, Pb in stranded specimens reach concentrations up to one order of magnitude above the levels reported for alive octopus. Pb isotopic signatures in stranded organisms were closer to runoff material pointing to a similar origin of Pb. In summary, the results in this study showed that a short-term runoff event might change abruptly the salinity leading to the disruption of the osmoregulation function of octopus and consequently leading to its death. The analyses of stable isotopic Pb signature in octopus tissues corroborate these results and points to a change in the Pb source due to runoff after the storm water event. Pb stable isotopes in octopus proved to be an adequate tool to confirm the cause of death and linking it to the environment conditions.

  4. Characteristics of storms driving wave-induced seafloor mobility on the U.S. East Coast continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between spatial and temporal patterns of wave-driven sediment mobility events on the U.S. East Coast continental shelf and the characteristics of the storms responsible for them. Mobility events, defined as seafloor wave stress exceedance of the critical stress of 0.35 mm diameter sand (0.2160 Pa) for 12 or more hours, were identified from surface wave observations at National Data Buoy Center buoys in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and South Atlantic Bight (SAB) over the period of 1997-2007. In water depths ranging from 36-48 m, there were 4-9 mobility events/year of 1-2 days duration. Integrated wave stress during events (IWAVES) was used as a combined metric of wave-driven mobility intensity and duration. In the MAB, over 67% of IWAVES was caused by extratropical storms, while in the SAB, greater than 66% of IWAVES was caused by tropical storms. On average, mobility events were caused by waves generated by storms located 800+ km away. Far-field hurricanes generated swell 2-4 days before the waves caused mobility on the shelf. Throughout most of the SAB, mobility events were driven by storms to the south, east, and west. In the MAB and near Cape Hatteras, winds from more northerly storms and low-pressure extratropical systems in the mid-western U.S. also drove mobility events. Waves generated by storms off the SAB generated mobility events along the entire U.S. East Coast shelf north to Cape Cod, while Cape Hatteras shielded the SAB area from swell originating to the north offshore of the MAB.

  5. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  6. Pioneer 9 plasma wave and solar plasma measurements for the August 1972 storm period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar disturbances of August 1972 produced large-scale solar wind perturbations that were detected by the Pioneer 9 plasma probe, electric field detector, and magnetometer for an extended time period commencing early on August 3. During this ten-day interval the interplanetary plasma parameters at r approximately equal 0.8 AU varied over unusually wide ranges, so that the conditions for generation of high and low VLF wave levels could be identified fairly readily. It is demonstrated that no measurable signals were detected in the broadband electric field channel (sensitive to waves with f greater than or equal to 100 Hz in the spacecraft frame of reference) unless the proton density was high enough to yield a proton plasma frequency with f greater than or about equal to 100 Hz. The analysis suggests that waves related to ion acoustic oscillations were detected throughout the extended storm period.

  7. Sele coastal plain flood risk due to wave storm and river flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido; Aucelli, Pietro; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Della Morte, Renata; Cozzolino, Luca; Rizzo, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Wind waves, elevated water levels and river discharge can cause flooding in low-lying coastal areas, where the water level is the interaction between wave storm elevated water levels and river flow interaction. The factors driving the potential flood risk include weather conditions, river water stage and storm surge. These data are required to obtain inputs to run the hydrological model used to evaluate the water surface level during ordinary and extreme events regarding both the fluvial overflow and storm surge at the river mouth. In this paper we studied the interaction between the sea level variation and the river hydraulics in order to assess the location of the river floods in the Sele coastal plain. The wave data were acquired from the wave buoy of Ponza, while the water level data needed to assess the sea level variation were recorded by the tide gauge of Salerno. The water stages, river discharges and rating curves for Sele river were provided by Italian Hydrographic Service (Servizio Idrografico e Mareografico Nazionale, SIMN).We used the dataset of Albanella station (40°29'34.30"N, 15°00'44.30"E), located around 7 km from the river mouth. The extreme river discharges were evaluated through the Weibull equation, which were associated with their return period (TR). The steady state river water levels were evaluated through HEC-RAS 4.0 model, developed by Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) of the United States Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center (USACE,2006). It is a well-known 1D model that computes water surface elevation (WSE) and velocity at discrete cross-sections by solving continuity, energy and flow resistance (e.g., Manning) equation. Data requirements for HEC-RAS include topographic information in the form of a series of cross-sections, friction parameter in the form of Manning's n values across each cross-section, and flow data including flow rates, flow change locations, and boundary conditions. For a steady state sub

  8. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The 2-7 May 1998 Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    A complete description of a self-consistent model of magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and back on waves are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under nonsteady state conditions. The developed model is employed to simulate the entire 2-7 May 1998 storm period. First, the trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with comparison with the data measured by the three- dimensional hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Incorporating in the model the wave-particle interaction leads to much better agreement between the experimental data and the model results. Second, examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced by the model during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emission about 2 days after the main phase of the storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Finally, the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates of the wave power spectral densities are studied. It is found that about 2 days after the storm s main phase on 4 May, mainly non-Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  9. Stochastic analysis and modeling of abnormally large waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Shamin, Roman; Yudin, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    In this work stochastics of amplitude characteristics of waves during the freak waves formation was estimated. Also amplitude characteristics of freak wave was modeling with the help of the developed Markov model on the basis of in-situ and numerical experiments. Simulation using the Markov model showed a great similarity of results of in-situ wave measurements[1], results of directly calculating the Euler equations[2] and stochastic modeling data. This work is supported by grant of Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) n°16-35-00526. 1. K. I. Kuznetsov, A. A. Kurkin, E. N. Pelinovsky and P. D. Kovalev Features of Wind Waves at the Southeastern Coast of Sakhalin according to Bottom Pressure Measurements //Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2014, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp. 213-220. DOI: 10.1134/S0001433814020066. 2. R.V. Shamin, V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y 3.E. N. Pelinovsky, K. I. Kuznetsov, J. Touboul, A. A. Kurkin Bottom pressure caused by passage of a solitary wave within the strongly nonlinear Green-Naghdi model //Doklady Physics, April 2015, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 171-174. DOI: 10.1134/S1028335815040035

  10. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans.

  11. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-05

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans.

  12. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans. PMID:26699461

  13. Past, present and future of wave climate, storms and morphological impacts on sandy coasts: Spain and Wales coasts examples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Buitrago, N. G.; Anfuso, G.; Phillips, M.; Thomas, T.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal response to climate events is very important for both socio-economic and environmental reasons. In order to carry out a correct coastal management program, it is important to provide realistic analysis of the natural variability and trend associated with climatic events (i.e. hurricanes, storms). In a scenario of rising sea level and increasing wave heights, the coastline will suffer huge impacts in terms of erosion and flooding especially with respect to low-lying regions that may partly or entirely disappear. This work deals with the analysis of a 22 year long wave buoy dataset recorded at Cadiz (SW Spain) and Tenby (S Wales, UK) with the objective of find the existing relationships between wave climate and coastal response. The analysis consisted in the characterization of winter wave climate, extreme waves and storms characteristics and distribution and their relationships with regional cycles (Teleconnection Patterns) such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) Index, the East Atlantic (EA) pattern and the Arctic Oscillation (AO), among others. Wave climate showed clear cyclic variations in average monthly significant wave height (Hs). Winter waves rapidly increased in height, reaching peak values (Hs = 1.2 m, Cadiz, Hs = 2.1 m, Tenby) between December and January. Energy patterns calculated using the equation of wave energy flux, showed average values of 37 kW/m and 155 kW/m respectively, during winter. In the same way, storm characterization in each study area was carried out using the Storm Power Index (Dolan and Davis, 1992) and five classes were obtained, from class I (weak) to V (extreme). Storm occurrence probability was 95% for class I (i.e. almost one event per year) to 5 % for class V. The return period for class V was 25 years and ranged from 5 to 8 years for classes III and IV storms, e.g. significant and severe events. Classes I and II showed a period of recurrence ranging from 1 to 3 years. For both areas high energy wave values were

  14. Effects of ULF wave power on relativistic radiation belt electrons: 8-9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves are known to play a substantial role in radial transport, acceleration, and loss of relativistic particles trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Using in situ observations by multiple spacecraft operating in the vicinity of outer radiation belts, we analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of ULF waves throughout the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 October 2012 and compare with the dynamics of relativistic electron fluxes on board the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The analysis shows that the relativistic electron fluxes reduce from their prestorm levels during the first phase of the storm and rapidly increase during the second phase of the storm. We demonstrate that the behavior of ULF wave power changes throughout the storm, from ULF oscillations being a mixture of compressional and shear magnetic components during the first phase of the storm to ULF oscillations being dominated by transverse (shear) components during the second phase. We analyze the parameters of ULF-driven radial diffusion throughout the storm and compare the observed diffusion coefficients with their statistical averages. We demonstrate that the observed diffusion coefficients are strong enough to impact the redistribution of relativistic electron fluxes from and to the outer boundary of radiation belts and the diffusion might influence the effects of any local electron acceleration by transporting fluxes inward or outward according to phase space density gradients.

  15. Modeling fresh water lens damage and recovery on atolls after storm-wave washover.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Terry, James P

    2012-01-01

    The principal natural source of fresh water on scattered coral atolls throughout the tropical Pacific Ocean is thin unconfined groundwater lenses within islet substrates. Although there are many threats to the viability of atoll fresh water lenses, salinization caused by large storm waves washing over individual atoll islets is poorly understood. In this study, a mathematical modeling approach is used to examine the immediate responses, longer-term behavior, and subsequent (partial) recovery of a Pacific atoll fresh water lens after saline damage caused by cyclone-generated wave washover under different scenarios. Important findings include: (1) the saline plume formed by a washover event mostly migrates downward first through the top coral sand and gravel substrate, but then exits the aquifer to the ocean laterally through the more permeable basement limestone; (2) a lower water table position before the washover event, rather than a longer duration of storm washover, causes more severe damage to the fresh water lens; (3) relatively fresher water can possibly be found as a preserved horizon in the deeper part of an aquifer after disturbance, especially if the fresh water lens extends into the limestone under normal conditions; (4) post-cyclone accumulation of sea water in the central depression (swamp) of an atoll islet prolongs the later stage of fresh water lens recovery.

  16. Coastal flooding: impact of waves on storm surge during extremes - a case study for the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Wahle, Kathrin; Koch, Wolfgang; Behrens, Arno; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the impact of wind, waves, tidal forcing and baroclinicity on the sea level of the German Bight during extreme storm events. The role of wave-induced processes, tides and baroclinicity is quantified, and the results are compared with in situ measurements and satellite data. A coupled high-resolution modelling system is used to simulate wind waves, the water level and the three-dimensional hydrodynamics. The models used are the wave model WAM and the circulation model GETM. The two-way coupling is performed via the OASIS3-MCT coupler. The effects of wind waves on sea level variability are studied, accounting for wave-dependent stress, wave-breaking parameterization and wave-induced effects on vertical mixing. The analyses of the coupled model results reveal a closer match with observations than for the stand-alone circulation model, especially during the extreme storm Xaver in December 2013. The predicted surge of the coupled model is significantly enhanced during extreme storm events when considering wave-current interaction processes. This wave-dependent approach yields a contribution of more than 30 % in some coastal areas during extreme storm events. The contribution of a fully three-dimensional model compared with a two-dimensional barotropic model showed up to 20 % differences in the water level of the coastal areas of the German Bight during Xaver. The improved skill resulting from the new developments justifies further use of the coupled-wave and three-dimensional circulation models in coastal flooding predictions.

  17. Hindcast and validation of Hurricane Ike (2008) waves, forerunner, and storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, M. E.; Westerink, J. J.; Kennedy, A. B.; Kerr, P. C.; Dietrich, J. C.; Dawson, C.; Bender, C. J.; Smith, J. M.; Jensen, R. E.; Zijlema, M.; Holthuijsen, L. H.; Luettich, R. A.; Powell, M. D.; Cardone, V. J.; Cox, A. T.; Pourtaheri, H.; Roberts, H. J.; Atkinson, J. H.; Tanaka, S.; Westerink, H. J.; Westerink, L. G.

    2013-09-01

    Hurricane Ike (2008) made landfall near Galveston, Texas, as a moderate intensity storm. Its large wind field in conjunction with the Louisiana-Texas coastline's broad shelf and large scale concave geometry generated waves and surge that impacted over 1000 km of coastline. Ike's complex and varied wave and surge response physics included: the capture of surge by the protruding Mississippi River Delta; the strong influence of wave radiation stress gradients on the Delta adjacent to the shelf break; the development of strong wind driven shore-parallel currents and the associated geostrophic setup; the forced early rise of water in coastal bays and lakes facilitating inland surge penetration; the propagation of a free wave along the southern Texas shelf; shore-normal peak wind-driven surge; and resonant and reflected long waves across a wide continental shelf. Preexisting and rapidly deployed instrumentation provided the most comprehensive hurricane response data of any previous hurricane. More than 94 wave parameter time histories, 523 water level time histories, and 206 high water marks were collected throughout the Gulf in deep water, along the nearshore, and up to 65 km inland. Ike's highly varied physics were simulated using SWAN + ADCIRC, a tightly coupled wave and circulation model, on SL18TX33, a new unstructured mesh of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and western Atlantic Ocean with high resolution of the Gulf's coastal floodplain from Alabama to the Texas-Mexico border. A comprehensive validation was made of the model's ability to capture the varied physics in the system.

  18. Modelling the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan storm surge: Effect of waves, offshore winds, tide phase, and translation speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgera, P. H. T.

    2015-12-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan, with wind speeds exceeding 300 km h-1 (160 knots) generated a storm surge in San Pedro Bay reaching heights of more than 6m in Tacloban City. Delft Dashboard (DDB), an open-source standalone Matlab based graphical user interface linked to the FLOW and WAVE modeling software of Deltares, was used to develop a coupled flow and wave storm surge model to understand the Typhoon Haiyan storm surge development and propagation. Various experiments were designed to determine the effect of waves, the occurrence of offshore winds prior to the surge, tidal phase, and typhoon translation speed on the surge height. Wave coupling decreased the surge height by about 0.5m probably due to energy dissipation from white capping, bottom friction, and depth-induced breaking. Offshore-directed winds before the arrival of the storm eye resulted to receding of the water level in San Pedro and Cancabato Bay, corroborated by eyewitness and tide gauge data. The experiment wherein the offshore winds were removed resulted to no water receding and a surge with a smaller and gentler surge front, pointing to the importance of the initial water level drawdown in contributing to the destructive power of the wave front. With regard to tides, the effect in Tacloban was actually neither linear nor additive to the surge, with higher surge coincident to low tides and lower surge coincident to high tides. Lastly, the model run with typhoon having a slower translation speed than Haiyan was found to generate higher surges.

  19. A fully coupled wave resolving hydro-morphodynamical model to predict beachface evolution within a storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incelli, Giorgio; Briganti, Riccardo; Dodd, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Sea storms change the shape of natural beaches, affecting this important environment. The evolution that occurs within a single storm is not yet well understood and modelled. Its knowledge is important in understanding the mechanisms involved in coastal erosion. The present study proposes an accurate and computationally efficient numerical prediction method for beachface evolution during an individual storm. A fully coupled hydro-morphodynamical numerical solver has been developed from the previous work of Briganti et al. (2012). The one-dimensional Non-Linear Shallow Water Equations are coupled with a bed evolution relationship and solved simultaneously by means of a TVD-MacCormack scheme. Preliminary analysis of the accuracy of the model performance was conducted against available analytical solutions and numerical results for single swash event. A suitable hydro-morphodynamic absorbing-generating condition at the seaward boundary has been developed. It prescribes the incoming wave while allows the wave reflected back by the beach to leave the domain. This boundary condition is fully coupled and based on the solution of the Riemann Equations, following previous work by Kelly and Dodd (2009). The performance of this technique was compared with existing, hydrodynamic-only boundary conditions. The evolution of an impermeable beach described by Dodd et al. (2008) was used as a reference case. Here only the bed load is considered in the sediment transport. The evolution of an erodible idealised beach is studied during 4000 regular waves cycles, comparable with the time scale of a storm event. The proposed model proved itself able to describe the shoreline retreat caused by the process of erosion of the beach. It experienced an increasing erosion in the upper (shoreward) and mid parts of the swash zone, with net offshore sediment transport, while the growth of a breaker bar occurred in the lower swash zone. The erosive action resulted of decreasing intensity in time

  20. Evidence for Gravity Wave Seeding of Convective Ionosphere Storms Initiated by Deep Troposphere Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Dao, E. V.; Holzworth, R. H., II

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in solar activity, the Communications/Outage Forecast System satellite (C/NOFS) now goes below the F peak. As such, we now can study the development of Convective Ionospheric Storms (CIS) and, most importantly, large-scale seeding of the low growth-rate Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. Two mechanisms have been suggested for such seeding: the Collisional Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (CKHI) and internal atmospheric gravity waves. A number of observations have shown that the spectrum of fully developed topside structures peaks at 600 km and extends to over 1000 km. These structures are exceedingly difficult to explain by CKHI. Here we show that sinusoidal plasma oscillations on the bottomside during daytime develop classical R-T structures on the nightside with the background 600 km structure still apparent. In two case studies, thunderstorm activity was observed east of the sinusoidal features in the two hours preceding the C/NOFS passes. Thus, we argue that convective tropospheric storms are a likely source of these sinusoidal features.

  1. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  2. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  3. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  4. Cerebral perfusion pressure and abnormal intracranial pressure wave forms: their relation to outcome in birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Raju, T N; Vidyasagar, D; Papazafiratou, C

    1981-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) studies were carried out in 14 infants with severe birth asphyxia and brain damage. A markedly low cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was noted in infants who died and in 1 infant who survived with cerebral palsy. The long-term ICP tracing revealed negative waves and plateau waves in 2 infants. Cushing response was noted in 2 infants who had elevated ICP. The value and significance of evaluated CPP and of abnormal waveforms are discussed.

  5. The simulation of a storm surge and wave due to Typhoon Sarah using an integrally coupled tide-surge-wave model of the Yellow and East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Jin-Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Byung Ho

    2015-12-01

    The Yellow and East China Seas are characterized by shallow shelf seas, seasonal monsoons and typhoons, especially the Korean Peninsula's western coastal area, which features large tides, a complex coastline and many islands. This study implemented an integrally coupled tide-surge-wave model based on an unstructured grid to evaluate the impact of Typhoon Sarah, which occurred in September of 1959, on the Yellow and East China Seas and, specifically, the southern coast of Korea in terms of waves and storm surges. The model results projected a significant wave height of 2-7 m, a mean wave period of 4-14 sec, and positive surge heights that were 0.3-1 m along the southern coast of Korea. Additional model runs included two independent model runs for waves and tides, and one tide-surge model run was conducted to investigate the interactions in the wave, tide and storm surge processes. The coupled tide-surgewave model reasonably reproduced wave properties and storm surges, but uncoupled models, i.e. independent models, slightly overestimated waves and surges. The wave forces associated with the gradient radiation stress resulted in water being elevated into coastal regions, thereby the water elevation increased onshore and the reverse happened offshore. A possible water level change due to a storm equivalent to Typhoon Sarah in the year 2100 was estimated by considering a mean sea level rise of 70 cm and was generally in the range of 70-100 cm in the Yellow and East China Seas and approximately 68 cm along the southern coast of Korea.

  6. A transgressive storm- and fair-weather wave dominated shelf sequence: Cretaceous Nimar Formation, Chakrud, Madhya Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Pradip K.; Das, Nani Gopal

    1986-01-01

    The lithologic assemblage of the Cretaceous Nimar Formation in the area around Chakrud, Madhya Pradesh, India, has been classified in five marine facies: (A) polymictic conglomerate resting on granite basement, largely representing a lag deposit; (B) coarse-grained pebbly sandstone with normal and reverse coarse-tail grading and also frequency grading; (C) sandstone, with alternate hummocky cross-stratified and small-scale wave-rippled units; (D) mudstone; and (E) limestone. Facies C bears the definite stamp of alternations between storm- and fair-weather waves. Probable parameters of the fair-weather waves have been determined from the grain size and morphometric parameters of the wave ripples. The depth of the generation of the wave corresponds to a modern mid-shelf region. Facies B shows gradational contact with facies C and was deposited shoreward above fair-weather wave base. Bed shear stresses calculated from variable grain-size parameters within individual cross-laminae indicate that the nature of the current that deposited the pebbly sands was similar to that of storm currents. It has been postulated that storm ebb surges initially moved as fluid gravity flows pushing ahead the bed loads, and eventually turned into density currents farther offshore carrying most of the sediment in suspension. The other two facies, D and E, were deposited largely below storm wave base. The overall fining-upward sequence reflects gradual deepening of the basin. Local aberrations in the facies sequence as represented by short-phase coarsening-upward sequences suggest temporary reversals of this trend.

  7. Estimating the Power per Mode Number and Power vs L-shell of Broadband, Storm-time ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Liu, W.; Argyriadis, E.

    2013-12-01

    In studies of particles' radial diffusion processes in the magnetosphere it is well known that Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves of frequency m*ωd can resonantly interact with particles of drift frequency ωd, where m is the azimuthal mode number of the waves; however due to difficulties in estimating m an over-simplifying assumption is often made in radial diffusion simulations, namely that all ULF wave power is located at m=1 or, in some cases, m=2. In another assumption that is commonly made, power measured from geosynchronous satellites is assumed to be uniform across L-shells. In the present work, a technique is presented for extracting information on the distribution of ULF wave power in a range of azimuthal mode numbers, through calculations of the cross-power and phase differences between a number of azimuthally aligned pairs of magnetometers, either in space or on the ground. We find that the temporal evolution of power at each mode number gives unique insight into the temporal evolution of ULF waves during a storm as well as a more accurate characterization of broadband ULF waves. Furthermore, using multi-spacecraft measurements during a particular storm, we calculate the L-dependence of ULF wave power. These measurements and calculations can be used in more accurate ULF wave representation in radial diffusion simulations.

  8. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  9. Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

  10. Abnormal Wave Reflections and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Late After Coarctation of the Aorta Repair

    PubMed Central

    Quail, Michael A.; Short, Rebekah; Pandya, Bejal; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Khushnood, Abbas; Taylor, Andrew M.; Segers, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Patients with repaired coarctation of the aorta are thought to have increased afterload due to abnormalities in vessel structure and function. We have developed a novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol that allows assessment of central hemodynamics, including central aortic systolic blood pressure, resistance, total arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, and wave reflections. The main study aims were to (1) characterize group differences in central aortic systolic blood pressure and peripheral systolic blood pressure, (2) comprehensively evaluate afterload (including wave reflections) in the 2 groups, and (3) identify possible biomarkers among covariates associated with elevated left ventricular mass (LVM). Fifty adult patients with repaired coarctation and 25 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Ascending aorta area and flow waveforms were obtained using a high temporal-resolution spiral phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance flow sequence. These data were used to derive central hemodynamics and to perform wave intensity analysis noninvasively. Covariates associated with LVM were assessed using multivariable linear regression analysis. There were no significant group differences (P≥0.1) in brachial systolic, mean, or diastolic BP. However central aortic systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in patients compared with controls (113 versus 107 mm Hg, P=0.002). Patients had reduced total arterial compliance, increased pulse wave velocity, and larger backward compression waves compared with controls. LVM index was significantly higher in patients than controls (72 versus 59 g/m2, P<0.0005). The magnitude of the backward compression waves was independently associated with variation in LVM (P=0.01). Using a novel, noninvasive hemodynamic assessment, we have shown abnormal conduit vessel function after coarctation of the aorta repair, including abnormal wave reflections that are associated with elevated LVM. PMID:28115510

  11. Abnormal Wave Reflections and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Late After Coarctation of the Aorta Repair.

    PubMed

    Quail, Michael A; Short, Rebekah; Pandya, Bejal; Steeden, Jennifer A; Khushnood, Abbas; Taylor, Andrew M; Segers, Patrick; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2017-03-01

    Patients with repaired coarctation of the aorta are thought to have increased afterload due to abnormalities in vessel structure and function. We have developed a novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol that allows assessment of central hemodynamics, including central aortic systolic blood pressure, resistance, total arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, and wave reflections. The main study aims were to (1) characterize group differences in central aortic systolic blood pressure and peripheral systolic blood pressure, (2) comprehensively evaluate afterload (including wave reflections) in the 2 groups, and (3) identify possible biomarkers among covariates associated with elevated left ventricular mass (LVM). Fifty adult patients with repaired coarctation and 25 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Ascending aorta area and flow waveforms were obtained using a high temporal-resolution spiral phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance flow sequence. These data were used to derive central hemodynamics and to perform wave intensity analysis noninvasively. Covariates associated with LVM were assessed using multivariable linear regression analysis. There were no significant group differences (P≥0.1) in brachial systolic, mean, or diastolic BP. However central aortic systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in patients compared with controls (113 versus 107 mm Hg, P=0.002). Patients had reduced total arterial compliance, increased pulse wave velocity, and larger backward compression waves compared with controls. LVM index was significantly higher in patients than controls (72 versus 59 g/m(2), P<0.0005). The magnitude of the backward compression waves was independently associated with variation in LVM (P=0.01). Using a novel, noninvasive hemodynamic assessment, we have shown abnormal conduit vessel function after coarctation of the aorta repair, including abnormal wave reflections that are associated with elevated LVM.

  12. Tropical and extratropical-origin storm wave types and their influence on the East Australian longshore sand transport system under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Ian D.; Mortlock, Thomas R.; Browning, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Tropical expansion is potentially an amplifier of coastal change in the subtropics, through directional wave climate shifts. The storm wave climate and directional wave power distribution along the Southeast Australian Shelf (SEAS) is investigated with respect to tropical extent. Forty years of storm wave observations from nine midshelf wave buoys are evaluated using synoptic storm wave typing. A robust latitudinal and along-shelf gradient in storm wave types and wave propagation patterns exists. The tropical origin storms produce a shore-normal propagation pattern along the SEAS, reduce the connectivity of coastal compartments through minor headland bypassing events or episodically reversing the net northward transport. In contrast, the extratropical origin storms produce a shore-oblique propagation pattern from the Southern Tasman to the Coral Sea, and are an important control on the connectivity of regional longshore sand transport through episodic major headland bypassing events between compartments, and the maintenance of down-drift coastlines in dynamic equilibrium. Future climate change projections indicate that the recent trend in the expansion of the latitudinal extent of the tropics in the south-west Pacific region will continue throughout this century. The combined impacts of a projected 2.5° poleward shift on the storm wave climate is a significant reduction in net northward longshore sand transport and the efficiency of headland bypassing events. On the North and Central Coasts of New South Wales we project a ˜30% reduction in longshore sand transport for the dominant extratropical-origin storm events, together with a ˜5% increase in reversed (net southward) longshore sand transport for tropical-origin storm events.

  13. A modeling study of the impact of major storms on waves, surface and near-bed currents on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Michael Z.; Wu, Yongsheng; Prescott, Robert H.; Tang, Charles C. L.; Han, Guoqi

    2015-08-01

    Waves and current processes, both surface and near-bed were simulated for major storms on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland using integrated wave, 3-D tidal and ocean current models. Most storms track southwest to northeast and pass to the north or northwest of the Grand Banks. Significant wave heights can reach up to ˜14 m and are predominantly to the northeast at the peak of storms. Extreme surface currents reach approximately 1 m s-1 and are largely to the southeast. The strongest bottom currents, up to 0.8 m s-1, occur on St. Pierre Bank and are dominantly to the south and southeast. While wave height and wind-driven current generally increase with wind speed, factors such as storm paths, the relative location of the storm center at the storm peak, and storm translation speed also affect waves and currents. Surface and near-bed wind-driven currents both rotate clockwise and decrease in strength as the storm traverses the Grand Banks. While the spatial variability of the storm impact on surface currents is relatively small, bottom currents show significant spatial variation of magnitude and direction as well as timing of peak current conditions. These spatial variations are controlled by the changes of bathymetry and mixed layer depth over the model domain. The storm-generated currents can be 7 to 10 times stronger than the background mean currents. These strong currents interact with wave oscillatory flows to produce shear velocities up to 15 cm s-1 and cause wide occurrences of strong sediment transport over nearly the entire Grand Banks.

  14. MESSENGER survey of in situ low frequency wave storms between 0.3 and 0.7 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Jian, L. K.; Raines, J. L.; Gershman, D. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Korth, H.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetometer data was surveyed between 0.3 and 0.7 AU from 6 June 2007 to 23 March 2011 for low-frequency wave (LFW) storms, when the magnetometer was sampling at a rate of at least 2 s-1. A total of 12,197 LFW events were identified, of which 5506 lasted 10 min or longer. The events have a high degree of polarization, are circularly polarized, with wave vectors nearly aligned or antialigned with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at frequencies in the vicinity of the proton cyclotron frequency. These events are observed about 6% of the time, preferentially associated with radially directed inward or outward IMF. Their occurrence rate and median duration do not change much with R, where R is the heliocentric radial distance. For a narrow-frequency window in the solar wind frame, left-handed storms in the spacecraft frame have a power drop off that is roughly proportional to R-3 which is consistent with a source close the Sun, while right-handed storms have a power drop off roughly proportional R-1 which is not consistent with a source close to the Sun. The power in the left-handed LFW storms is on average greater than the right-handed ones by a factor of 3. In the solar wind frame, the wave frequency decreases from 0.13 to 0.04 Hz moving from 0.3 to 0.7 AU, but the frequency normalized by the local proton cyclotron frequency does not change much with the running median varying from 0.35 to 0.5. The normalized frequency band widths of the wave power spectra increase slightly with R, possibly associated with energy dissipation.

  15. Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon seep communities. V. Biofacies and shell orientation of autochthonous shell beds below storm wave base

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, W.R.; Staff, G.M.; Powell, E.N.; MacDonald, I.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Clam and mussel assemblages associated with petroleum seepage on the Louisiana continental slope form the only substantial shell accumulations below storm wave base on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope. Four distinct biofacies are present at the seeps, dominated respectively by mussels, lucinid clams, vesicomyid clams and tubeworms. Each primary seep site is typically composed of a series of not necessarily contiguous, autochthonous beds dominated by one biofacies. Mussels and tubeworms often co-occur, but neither normally co-occur with lucinid or vesicomyid clams. Lucinid and vesicomyid clam beds have the best chance of preservation. Despite essentially undisturbed accumulation in quiet water below storm wave base, concavity ratios rarely differ from 1:1 and frequency of articulation may be low. Dominantly concave-up valves previously reported in quiet water may result from man's fishing activities. Significant variability in shell orientation, frequency of articulation and concavity ratio between adjacent samples indicates that many individual stratigraphically-equivalent samples should be used in any taphofacies analysis of assemblages formed in low-energy environments. Lucinid beds which form below the sediment surface and vesicomyid beds which form on the sediment surface differed significantly in shell orientation and articulation frequency. Assemblages forming below storm wave base in low-energy environments may comprise a wide variety of taphofacies depending upon whether formation occurs primarily beneath the sediment surface or on the sediment surface, despite contemporaneous formation under similar environmental conditions.

  16. Data and numerical analysis of astronomic tides, wind-waves, and hurricane storm surge along the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Cox, A. T.; Salisbury, M.; Coggin, D.

    2016-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) is a unique geophysical setting for complex tropical storm-induced hydrodynamic processes that occur across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Each hurricane includes its own distinctive characteristics and can cause unique and devastating storm surge when it strikes within the intricate geometric setting of the NGOM. While a number of studies have explored hurricane storm surge in the NGOM, few have attempted to describe storm surge and coastal inundation using observed data in conjunction with a single large-domain high-resolution numerical model. To better understand the oceanic and nearshore response to these tropical cyclones, we provide a detailed assessment, based on field measurements and numerical simulation, of the evolution of wind waves, water levels, and currents for Hurricanes Ivan (2004), Dennis (2005), Katrina (2005), and Isaac (2012), with focus on Mississippi, Alabama, and the Florida Panhandle coasts. The developed NGOM3 computational model describes the hydraulic connectivity among the various inlet and bay systems, Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, coastal rivers and adjacent marsh, and built infrastructure along the coastal floodplain. The outcome is a better understanding of the storm surge generating mechanisms and interactions among hurricane characteristics and the NGOM's geophysical configuration. The numerical analysis and observed data explain the ˜2 m/s hurricane-induced geostrophic currents across the continental shelf, a 6 m/s outflow current during Ivan, the hurricane-induced coastal Kelvin wave along the shelf, and for the first time a wealth of measured data and a detailed numerical simulation was performed and was presented for Isaac.

  17. STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORT: DYNAMIC WAVE FLOW ROUTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a computer-based tool for simulating storm water runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. In 2002 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Water Supply and Water Resources Division partnered with the consulting firm CDM ...

  18. Storms or cold fronts? What is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    On Friday, 7 March 2009, a 200 m-long section of the tourist pier in Puerto Colombia collapsed under the impact of the waves generated by a cold front in the area. The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms on extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean to determine the degree of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed and the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the wave's height; therefore, it is necessary to definitively know the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. Using Gumbel's extreme value methodology, the significant height values for the study area were calculated. The methodology was evaluated using data from the re-analysis of the spectral NOAA Wavewatch III (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombia Caribbean coast (continental and insular) of the last 15 years. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area formed by Baja Guajira, Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena, the strong influence of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. On the other hand, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast, from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá, even though extreme waves are lower than in the previous regions, extreme waves are dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from that in the continental area due to its geographic location. The wave heights in the extreme regime are

  19. Cliff-top storm deposits on Banneg Island, Brittany, France: Effects of giant waves in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suanez, Serge; Fichaut, Bernard; Magne, Rudy

    2009-09-01

    This study is based on the morphosedimentary analysis of the cliff-top storm deposits accumulated on the coast of Banneg Island located in the archipelago of Molène (Brittany, France). These CTSDs comprise large, tabular clasts quarried from the upper part of the cliff and the backing scoured platform by giant oceanic storm waves impacting directly the western coast of the island. An analysis of the distribution and the geomorphology of these accumulations were carried out using the DGPS topographic surveys. Most of the clasts are organised into imbricate boulder clusters or ridges deposited between 7.5 and 14.5 masl. 52 accumulations were inventoried from the north to the south of the island, representing a global volume of 1000 m 3. The median size of the clasts calculated is equivalent to 0.8 × 0.6 × 0.4 m and a weight of 0.6 t. The largest one measuring 5.3 × 3.9 × 0.5 m (≈ 32 t) is located in the centre of the island (ridge #28). It has been deposited 14 m inland from the edge of the cliff at the elevation of 9 m. Sediment analysis shows that clast sizes become smaller with increasing distance from the shoreline, but there is no relationship between the sorting and the distance inland. A study of the hydrodynamic conditions inducing clast transport was undertaken by an analysis of the wave data from the 1989 to the 1990 winter storms. Models of wave runup indicate that their highest water levels may have reached up to 19 masl, 5 to 10 m higher than the top of the cliff. Submersion by giant storm waves has been more important and frequent in the centre and the south of the island. Wave data over the 1979 to the 2007 period shows that no events as powerful as those of the 1989 to the 1990 winter were recorded during the last 30 years. Yet, it appears that the 1979-1990 decade was characterized by important morphogeneous events while the following period (1990-2007) has experienced a sharp decrease in storm events. These variations could be attributed to

  20. Past analogs of recent climate anomalies and impacts in Portugal. Droughts, storms and heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoforado, M. J.; Nunes, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    An indexed reconstruction of precipitation variability, based on documentary and instrumental data, has been done for southern Portugal starting in 1675. The descriptions of the extreme events in the documentary sources have also supplied information about their impacts. We will compare past and recent extreme weather events in Portugal, their causes and their impacts on society. We have selected periods of winter droughts, of storms that triggered great floods and of heat waves. There are a number of documentary sources dating from 1693-94 indicating that that there was no rainfall from December 1693 to at least November 1694 with the exception of light showers in June. Several pro-pluvia rogations ceremonies took place all over the country, even in the Northwest that is generally rainy. There are numerous descriptions of the impact of droughts on agriculture, of shortage of cereals, of escalating prices and the subsequent generalised famine. An analogy will be made for the 20th century using the 1980-81 winter drought that lasted roughly the same time and which also had severe social and economic impacts. The decrease in production of hydroelectric energy (50% below average) between January and July 1981 is also pointed out. In both cases, the lack of rainfall was partly due to a ridge that stayed over the Eastern Atlantic and kept Iberia in aerologic shelter. Apart from urban flash floods there are two types of floods in Portugal: (i) floods from the big river basins (Tagus, Mondego and Douro) that are due to the frequent passage of westerly frontal depressions during days or weeks; and (ii) floods of the small river basins due to convective depressions that affect small areas. The December 1739 flood, caused by the overflow of the great rivers, will be compared with the ones that occurred in February 1978. Both were caused by intensive precipitation all over the country at a time when the soil was already saturated with water from previous rainfall. The damages

  1. Global ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 and their influence on HF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Daria; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Zakharov, Veniamin

    2013-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the global ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 using GSM TIP (Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere) simulation results. In the GSM TIP storm time model runs, several input parameters such as cross-polar cap potential difference and R2 FAC (Region 2 Field-Aligned Currents) varied as a function of the geomagnetic activity AE-index. Current simulation also uses the empirical model of high-energy particle precipitation by Zhang and Paxton. In this model, the energy and energy flux of precipitating electrons depend on a 3 hour Kp-index. We also have included the 30 min time delay of R2 FAC variations with respect to the variations of cross-polar cap potential difference. In addition, we use the ground-based ionosonde data for comparison our model results with observations. We present an analysis of the physical mechanisms responsible for the ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storms. The obtained simulation results are used by us as a medium for HF radio wave propagation at different latitudes in quiet conditions, and during main and recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. To solve the problem of the radio wave propagation we used Zakharov's (I. Kant BFU) model based on geometric optics. In this model the solution of the eikonal equation for each of the two normal modes is reduced using the method of characteristics to the integration of the six ray equation system for the coordinates and momentum. All model equations of this system are solved in spherical geomagnetic coordinate system by the Runge-Kutta method. This model was tested for a plane wave in a parabolic layer. In this study, the complex refractive indices of the ordinary and extraordinary waves at ionospheric heights was calculated for the first time using the global first-principal model of the thermosphere-ionosphere system that describes the parameters of an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium during a

  2. Global ULF wave analysis of radial diffusion coefficients using a global MHD model for the 17 March 2015 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Paral, Jan; Wiltberger, Michael; Turner, Drew

    2016-07-01

    The 17-18 March 2015 storm is the largest geomagnetic storm in the Van Allen Probes era to date. The Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model has been run for this event using ARTEMIS data as solar wind input. The ULF wave power spectral density of the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field is analyzed in the 0.5-8.3 mHz range. The lowest three azimuthal modes account for 70% of the total power during quiet times. However, during high activity, they are not exclusively dominant. The calculation of the radial diffusion coefficient is presented. We conclude that the electric field radial diffusion coefficient is dominant over the magnetic field coefficient by one to two orders of magnitude. This result contrasts with the dominant magnetic field diffusion coefficient used in most 3-D diffusion models.

  3. Coarse, Intermediate and High Resolution Numerical Simulations of the Transition of a Tropical Wave Critical Layer to a Tropical Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Wang, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from within the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the Kurihara and Tuleya problem examining the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km), intermediate (9 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of rotationally dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation near the center of the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together.

  4. Mean flow-storm track relationship and Rossby wave breaking in two types of El-Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengji; Ren, Xuejuan; Yang, Xiuqun

    2014-01-01

    The features of large-scale circulation, storm tracks and the dynamical relationship between them were examined by investigating Rossby wave breaking (RWB) processes associated with Eastern Pacific (EP) and Central Pacific (CP) El-Niño. During EP El-Niño, the geopotential height anomaly at 500 hPa (Z500) exhibits a Pacific-North America (PNA) pattern. During CP El-Niño, the Z500 anomaly shows a north positive-south negative pattern over the North Pacific. The anomalous distributions of baroclinicity and storm track are consistent with those of upper-level zonal wind for both EP and CP El-Niño, suggesting impacts of mean flow on storm track variability. Anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) occurs less frequently in EP El-Niño years, while cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) occurs more frequently in CP El-Niño years over the North Pacific sector. Outside the North Pacific, more CWB events occur over North America during EP El-Niño. When AWB events occur less frequently over the North Pacific during EP El-Niño, Z500 decreases locally and the zonal wind is strengthened (weakened) to the south (north). This is because AWB events reflect a monopole high anomaly at the centroid of breaking events. When CWB events occur more frequently over the North Pacific under CP El-Niño conditions, and over North America under EP El-Niño condition, Z500 increases (decreases) to the northeast (southwest), since CWB events are related to a northeast-southwest dipole Z500 anomaly. The anomalous RWB events act to invigorate and reinforce the circulation anomalies over the North Pacific-North America region linked with the two types of El-Niño.

  5. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  6. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  7. Properties of Alfven waves in the magnetotail below 9 R(E) and their relation to auroral acceleration and major geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombeck, John Paul

    The presented studies investigate the characteristics of Alfvén wave events in the geomagnetic tail on the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and possibly well within the plasma sheet during substorms and major geomagnetic storms (<- 200 Dst). Such storms are rare but dramatically affect the state of the magnetosphere in ways that we have only recently been capable of investigating with sufficient in situ instrumentation. The first comparative study of major storm PSBL Alfvén waves events is presented. Properties of eight substorm and ten major storm events are compared using a new method, providing new insights into the phenomena, their interactions in the auroral acceleration region (AAR), and their generation. Direct comparison between Polar and FAST indicating a decrease (increase) in low-(high-)frequency shear (kinetic) earthward Alfvénic Poynting flux and an increase in earthward electron energy flux strongly suggests transfer of shear Alfvén wave Poynting flux to kinetic Alfvén waves which then accelerate auroral electrons. Polar observations also suggest a broadband source and indicate that small-scale, temporally/spatially variable factors, likely including density cavities and ionospheric conductivity structure, strongly affect the reflectivity/dissipation properties, as the waves in each frequency band contain a mixture of earthward, tailward, reflecting and incoherent wave intervals. Averages of these properties are consistent with theory, but the detailed structure has not been predicted. Tailward intervals also suggest ionospheric field line shear. Most major storm events were found have similar properties to substorm events with a few notable differences, consistent with effects related to the extended duration of storms. Low-latitude broadband auroral electrons and high-frequency Alfvén waves along with properties of a unique Alfvén wave event, related to a major storm tail reconfiguration, with very intense Poynting flux and the first

  8. Moderate geomagnetic storms of January 22-25, 2012 and their influences on the wave components in ionosphere and upper stratosphere-mesosphere regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu Tsidu, Gizaw; Abraha, Gebregiorgis

    2014-11-01

    Moderate geomagnetic storms occurred during January 22-25, 2012 period. The geomagnetic storms are characterized by different indices and parameters. The SYM-H value on January 22 increased abruptly to 67 nT at sudden storm commencement (SSC), followed by a sharp decrease to -87 nT. A second SSC on January 24 followed by a shock on January 25 was also observed. These SSCs before the main storms and the short recovery periods imply the geomagnetic storms are CME-driven. The sudden jump of solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF Bz are also consistent with occurrence of CMEs. This is also reflected in the change in total electron content (TEC) during the storm relative to quiet days globally. The response of the ionospheric to geomagnetic storms can also be detected from wave components that account for the majority of TEC variance during the period. The dominant coherent modes of TEC variability are diurnal and semidiurnal signals which account upto 83% and 30% of the total TEC variance over fairly exclusive ionospheric regions respectively. Comparison of TEC anomalies attributed to diurnal (DW1) and semidiurnal (SW2) tides, as well as stationary planetary waves (SPW1) at 12 UTC shows enhancement in the positive anomalies following the storm. Moreover, the impact of the geomagnetic storms are distinctly marked in the daily time series of amplitudes of DW1, SW2 and SPW1. The abrupt changes in amplitudes of DW1 (5 TECU) and SW2 (2 TECU) are observed within 20°S-20°N latitude band and along 20°N respectively while that of SPW1 is about 3 TECU. Coherent oscillation with a period of 2.4 days between interplanetary magnetic field and TEC was detected during the storm. This oscillation is also detected in the amplitudes of DW1 over EIA regions in both hemispheres. Eventhough upward coupling of quasi two day wave (QTDWs) of the same periodicity, known to have caused such oscillation, are detected in both ionosphere and upper stratosphere, this one can likely be attributed to

  9. Van Allen Probes observations of unusually low frequency whistler mode waves observed in association with moderate magnetic storms: Statistical study

    PubMed Central

    Breneman, A. W.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We show the first evidence for locally excited chorus at frequencies below 0.1 f ce (electron cyclotron frequency) in the outer radiation belt. A statistical study of chorus during geomagnetic storms observed by the Van Allen Probes found that frequencies are often dramatically lower than expected. The frequency at peak power suddenly stops tracking the equatorial 0.5 f ce and f/f ce decreases rapidly, often to frequencies well below 0.1 f ce (in situ and mapped to equator). These very low frequency waves are observed both when the satellites are close to the equatorial plane and at higher magnetic latitudes. Poynting flux is consistent with generation at the equator. Wave amplitudes can be up to 20 to 40 mV/m and 2 to 4 nT. We conclude that conditions during moderate to large storms can excite unusually low frequency chorus, which is resonant with more energetic electrons than typical chorus, with critical implications for understanding radiation belt evolution. PMID:27667871

  10. Extreme ionospheric ion energization and electron heating in Alfvén waves in the storm time inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Gerrard, A.; Lanzerotti, L.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We report measurements of energized outflowing/bouncing ionospheric ions and heated electrons in the inner magnetosphere during a geomagnetic storm. The ions arrive in the equatorial plane with pitch angles that increase with energy over a range from tens of eV to > 50 keV while the electrons are field aligned up to ~1 keV. These particle distributions are observed during intervals of broadband low-frequency electromagnetic field fluctuations consistent with a Doppler-shifted spectrum of kinetic Alfvén waves and kinetic field line resonances. The fluctuations extend from L ≈ 3 out to the apogee of the Van Allen Probes spacecraft at L ≈ 6.5. They thereby span most of the L shell range occupied by the ring current. These measurements suggest a model for ionospheric ion outflow and energization driven by dispersive Alfvén waves that may account for the large storm time contribution of ionospheric ions to magnetospheric energy density.

  11. On the use of wave parameterizations and a storm impact scaling model in National Weather Service Coastal Flood and decision support operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignone, Anthony; Stockdon, H.; Willis, M.; Cannon, J.W.; Thompson, R.

    2012-01-01

    National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) are responsible for issuing coastal flood watches, warnings, advisories, and local statements to alert decision makers and the general public when rising water levels may lead to coastal impacts such as inundation, erosion, and wave battery. Both extratropical and tropical cyclones can generate the prerequisite rise in water level to set the stage for a coastal impact event. Forecasters use a variety of tools including computer model guidance and local studies to help predict the potential severity of coastal flooding. However, a key missing component has been the incorporation of the effects of waves in the prediction of total water level and the associated coastal impacts. Several recent studies have demonstrated the importance of incorporating wave action into the NWS coastal flood program. To follow up on these studies, this paper looks at the potential of applying recently developed empirical parameterizations of wave setup, swash, and runup to the NWS forecast process. Additionally, the wave parameterizations are incorporated into a storm impact scaling model that compares extreme water levels to beach elevation data to determine the mode of coastal change at predetermined “hotspots” of interest. Specifically, the storm impact model compares the approximate storm-induced still water level, which includes contributions from tides, storm surge, and wave setup, to dune crest elevation to determine inundation potential. The model also compares the combined effects of tides, storm surge, and the 2 % exceedance level for vertical wave runup (including both wave setup and swash) to dune toe and crest elevations to determine if erosion and/or ocean overwash may occur. The wave parameterizations and storm impact model are applied to two cases in 2009 that led to significant coastal impacts and unique forecast challenges in North Carolina: the extratropical “Nor'Ida” event during 11-14 November and

  12. Comparison of wave propagation through ice covers in calm and storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingkai; Kohout, Alison L.; Shen, Hayley H.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by a dramatic reduction in Arctic sea ice cover, interest in the field of wave-ice interaction has accelerated over the past few years. Recent observations have identified that large waves (>3 m) have a linear attenuation rate, rather than the previously assumed exponential rate that is found for small waves. This suggests that waves penetrate further into the ice cover than previously expected. To explore this further we tested two exponentially decaying wave models. Contributions from nonlinear and wind generation source terms enabled both models to reproduce the observed regime shift. Essentially, the accumulation of nonlinear and wind energy contributions to long (and thus higher amplitude) waves can offset the ice damping, thus reducing the apparent attenuation. This study highlights the relevance of considering frequency dependence when analyzing wave attenuation in sea ice field data.

  13. Intermediate and high resolution numerical simulations of the transition of a tropical wave critical layer to a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis that typifies the trade wind belt. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the problem of the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of a vorticity dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation within the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together. Implications of these findings are

  14. Coarse, intermediate and high resolution numerical simulations of the transition of a tropical wave critical layer to a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent work has hypothesized that tropical cyclones in the deep Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins develop from within the cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer located equatorward of the easterly jet axis. The cyclonic critical layer is thought to be important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the resolved flow, (ii) containment of moisture entrained by the developing flow and/or lofted by deep convection therein, (iii) confinement of mesoscale vortex aggregation, (iv) a predominantly convective type of heating profile, and (v) maintenance or enhancement of the parent wave until the developing proto-vortex becomes a self-sustaining entity and emerges from the wave as a tropical depression. This genesis sequence and the overarching framework for describing how such hybrid wave-vortex structures become tropical depressions/storms is likened to the development of a marsupial infant in its mother's pouch, and for this reason has been dubbed the "marsupial paradigm". Here we conduct the first multi-scale test of the marsupial paradigm in an idealized setting by revisiting the Kurihara and Tuleya problem examining the transformation of an easterly wave-like disturbance into a tropical storm vortex using the WRF model. An analysis of the evolving winds, equivalent potential temperature, and relative vertical vorticity is presented from coarse (28 km), intermediate (9 km) and high resolution (3.1 km) simulations. The results are found to support key elements of the marsupial paradigm by demonstrating the existence of a rotationally dominant region with minimal strain/shear deformation near the center of the critical layer pouch that contains strong cyclonic vorticity and high saturation fraction. This localized region within the pouch serves as the "attractor" for an upscale "bottom up" development process while the wave pouch and proto-vortex move together

  15. Using IRI and GSM TIP model results as environment for HF radio wave propagation model during the geomagnetic storm occurred on September 26-29, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, D. S.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Zakharov, V. E.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Nosikov, I. A.; Zhao, B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyses the geomagnetic storm on September 26-29, 2011. We compare the calculation results obtained using the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) and IRI-2012 (Bilitza et al., 2014) model with ground-based ionosonde data of stations at different latitudes and longitudes. We examined physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of ionospheric effects during the main phase of geomagnetic storm that occurred at the rising phase of the 24th solar cycle. We used numerical results obtained from IRI-2012 and GSM TIP models as propagation environment for HF signals from an equatorial transmitter during quiet and disturbed conditions. We used the model of HF radio wave propagation developed in I. Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) that is based on the geometrical optics approximation. We compared the obtained radio paths in quiet conditions and during the main and recovery storm phases and evaluated radio wave attenuation in different media models.

  16. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  17. Coarse-clast ridge complexes of the Caribbean: A preliminary basis for distinguishing tsunami and storm-wave origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal gravel-ridge complexes deposited on islands in the Caribbean Sea are recorders of past extreme-wave events that could be associated with either tsunamis or hurricanes. The ridge complexes of Bonaire, Jamaica, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona), and Guadeloupe consist of polymodal clasts ranging in size from sand to coarse boulders that are derived from the adjacent coral reefs or subjacent rock platforms. Ridge-complex morphologies and crest elevations are largely controlled by availability of sediments, clast sizes, and heights of wave runup. The ridge complexes are internally organized, display textural sorting and a broad range of ages including historical events. Some display seaward-dipping beds and ridge-and-swale topography, and some terminate in fans or steep avalanche slopes. Together, the morphologic, sedimentologic, lithostratigraphic, and chronostratigraphic evidence indicates that shore-parallet ridge complexes composed of gravel and sand that are tens of meters wide and several meters thick are primarily storm-constructed features that have accumulated for a few centuries or millennia as a result of multiple high-frequency intense-wave events. They are not entirely the result of one or a few tsunamis as recently reported. Tsunami deposition may account for some of the lateral ridge-complex accretion or boulder fields and isolated blocks that are associated with the ridge complexes. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  18. Ray tracing of gravity waves as a possible warning system for tornadic storms and hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gravity waves with wave periods of 13 to 15 min and horizontal phase velocities of 90 to 220 m/sec were present in ground-based observations of the upper atmosphere during time periods when tornadoes were occurring and gravity waves with wave periods of 20 to 25 min and horizontal phase velocities of 100 to 200 m/sec were detected when a hurricane was present. Combinations of available neutral atmosphere data and model parameter values were used with a group ray tracing technique in an attempt to locate the sources of these waves. Computed sources of the waves with periods of 13 to 15 min were located within 50 km of the locations where tornadoes touched down from 2 to 4 h later. In the case of the waves with periods of 20 to 25 min it was found that the computed location of the source was roughly where the hurricane would be located 3 h after the waves were excited. The applicability of the present study to a tornado and hurricane warning system is noted.

  19. The role of gravity waves in solar-terrestrial atmosphere coupling and severe storm detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The role that gravity waves play in the coupling of the solar wind and the ionosphere, the coupling of high and low latitude ionospheres, and the coupling of the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere are discussed. Examples are given of the detection of tornado touchdowns from locating the sources of the gravity waves.

  20. RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Tu, W.; Chen, Y.; Morley, S. K.; Panaitescu, A.-D.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm using our ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT)-dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science observations. The dynamics of the source (approximately tens of keV) and seed (approximately hundreds of keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA 15 satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E< 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E≥50 keV considerably, and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the precipitating fluxes simulated with RAM-SCB are weaker, and their temporal and spatial evolutions agree well with POES/Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors data.

  1. RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm.

    PubMed

    Jordanova, V K; Tu, W; Chen, Y; Morley, S K; Panaitescu, A-D; Reeves, G D; Kletzing, C A

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm using our ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT)-dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science observations. The dynamics of the source (approximately tens of keV) and seed (approximately hundreds of keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA 15 satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E< 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E≥50 keV considerably, and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the precipitating fluxes simulated with RAM-SCB are weaker, and their temporal and spatial evolutions agree well with POES/Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors data.

  2. The Electric Field Wave Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Dombeck, J.; Bonnell, J.; Mozer, F.; Bale, S.; Chaston, C.; Ergun, B.; Baker, D.; Li, X.; Hudson, M. K.; Strangeway, R.; Alpert, J.; Brautigam, D.; Mann, I.; Foster, J.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the Electric Field-Wave Instrument on the two RBSP spacecraft is to investigate the role of plasma structures and waves in the physical processes responsible for the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. Some of these processes include: prompt acceleration induced by powerful interplanetary shocks, acceleration by the large scale convection electric field, abrupt energization by intense substorm injection fronts propagating in from the tail, coherent and stochastic radial transport by large scale MHD fluctuations, multi-step local energization and cattering by whistler waves, and scattering and energization by kinetic Alfven waves, ion cycltron waves, and other small scale waves and structures. In order to understand the role of these processes in accelerating particles, the EFW instrument measures the three dimensional electric field from dc to greater than 500 kHz. The spin plane electric field vector is obtained from spherical sensors at the ends of two pair of orthogonal booms with tip-to- tip separations of 80 and 100 m. The spin axis measurement is obtained by opposed stacer booms with a tip- to-tip separation of 12 meters or greater. The electric field below 12 Hz is telemetered continuously while higher time resolution is obtained from a programmable burst memory with a maximum sampling rate for six quantities of greater 30,000 samples/s each. DC magnetic fields from the fluxgate magnetometer and wave magnetic fields from the search coil, both associated with the University of Iowa Instrument are input into the EFW instrument for processing in the burst memory and in the Digital Signal Processing Board (DSP). The DSP provides wave spectra and cross spectra of electric and magnetic field data over the frequency range between 50 Hz and 10 kHz with a typical cadence of once per 12 seconds with a maximum rate of ~ 1 Hz in order to provide continuous information on wave properties

  3. Comprehensive Condition Survey and Storm Waves, Circulation, and Sedimentation Study, Dana Point Harbor, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Extreme Wave Height Distribution at Location 6 Figure 4-1 Sketch of Wave Transmission and Flow Penetration through a Permeable Structure Figure 4-2...Forcing Figure 4-7 Comparisons between Simulated and Measured Currents at the Inside and Outside ADCP Stations with Different Permeable Breakwater...Segments Figure 4-8 Simulated Depth Averaged Current Fields for Non- Permeable Breakwaters Figure 4-9 Simulated Depth Averaged Current Fields with a

  4. Determination of Effects of Coastal Deformation Caused by Waves and Storms at Black Sea Coast of Turkey utilizing InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, D. Z.; Direk, S.; Musaoglu, N.; Gazioglu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many pressures are exerted on the coastal zones. Winds and waves effect the landscapes mainly on coastal areas. More dramatic deformation occurs with coastal storms like hurricanes which bring strong winds and waves to change the topography of coast. The coastal areas at Black Sea are under pressure of strong wind, waves and storms. Sometimes waves reaches to 10 m height, thus the landscapes of the coastal areas change very dramatically. Advances in Space geodesy have made it possible to determine variations on the Earth with high precision especially by using InSAR technique. InSAR technique is able to cover large areas and can be used in all weather conditions at high spatial resolution. With InSAR technique sub-cm level surface deformation can be determined. Recently, InSAR is the most often used technique to monitor crustal deformation, subsidence and landslides. The aim of this study is to make temporal and spatial analysis and determine the effects of strong wind and wave storms on the coast of Karasu in Black Sea Region of Turkey. By temporal analysis will be able to see the deformation on coast of Karasu in time domain where spatial analysis will show us the changes in landscapes.

  5. Decadal variability of extreme wave height representing storm severity in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea since the foundation of the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, H.; Taylor, P. H.; Gibson, R.

    2016-09-01

    Long-term estimation of extreme wave height remains a key challenge because of the short duration of available wave data, and also because of the possible impact of climate variability on ocean waves. Here, we analyse storm-based statistics to obtain estimates of extreme wave height at locations in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea using the NORA10 wave hindcast (1958-2011), and use a 5 year sliding window to examine temporal variability. The decadal variability is correlated to the North Atlantic oscillation and other atmospheric modes, using a six-term predictor model incorporating the climate indices and their Hilbert transforms. This allows reconstruction of the historic extreme climate back to 1661, using a combination of known and proxy climate indices. Significant decadal variability primarily driven by the North Atlantic oscillation is observed, and this should be considered for the long-term survivability of offshore structures and marine renewable energy devices. The analysis on wave climate reconstruction reveals that the variation of the mean, 99th percentile and extreme wave climates over decadal time scales for locations close to the dominant storm tracks in the open North Atlantic are comparable, whereas the wave climates for the rest of the locations including the North Sea are rather different.

  6. Decadal variability of extreme wave height representing storm severity in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea since the foundation of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Santo, H; Taylor, P H; Gibson, R

    2016-09-01

    Long-term estimation of extreme wave height remains a key challenge because of the short duration of available wave data, and also because of the possible impact of climate variability on ocean waves. Here, we analyse storm-based statistics to obtain estimates of extreme wave height at locations in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea using the NORA10 wave hindcast (1958-2011), and use a 5 year sliding window to examine temporal variability. The decadal variability is correlated to the North Atlantic oscillation and other atmospheric modes, using a six-term predictor model incorporating the climate indices and their Hilbert transforms. This allows reconstruction of the historic extreme climate back to 1661, using a combination of known and proxy climate indices. Significant decadal variability primarily driven by the North Atlantic oscillation is observed, and this should be considered for the long-term survivability of offshore structures and marine renewable energy devices. The analysis on wave climate reconstruction reveals that the variation of the mean, 99th percentile and extreme wave climates over decadal time scales for locations close to the dominant storm tracks in the open North Atlantic are comparable, whereas the wave climates for the rest of the locations including the North Sea are rather different.

  7. Decadal variability of extreme wave height representing storm severity in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea since the foundation of the Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P. H.; Gibson, R.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term estimation of extreme wave height remains a key challenge because of the short duration of available wave data, and also because of the possible impact of climate variability on ocean waves. Here, we analyse storm-based statistics to obtain estimates of extreme wave height at locations in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea using the NORA10 wave hindcast (1958–2011), and use a 5 year sliding window to examine temporal variability. The decadal variability is correlated to the North Atlantic oscillation and other atmospheric modes, using a six-term predictor model incorporating the climate indices and their Hilbert transforms. This allows reconstruction of the historic extreme climate back to 1661, using a combination of known and proxy climate indices. Significant decadal variability primarily driven by the North Atlantic oscillation is observed, and this should be considered for the long-term survivability of offshore structures and marine renewable energy devices. The analysis on wave climate reconstruction reveals that the variation of the mean, 99th percentile and extreme wave climates over decadal time scales for locations close to the dominant storm tracks in the open North Atlantic are comparable, whereas the wave climates for the rest of the locations including the North Sea are rather different. PMID:27713662

  8. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/14 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-10-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/14 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. Coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. This paper provides these levels for the winter storms, and discusses their application to the given data sets for two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England, and Suffolk, east England. Tide gauge records and wave buoy data were used to compare the 2013/14 storms with return periods from a national data set, and also joint probabilities of sea level and wave heights were generated, incorporating the recent events. The 2013/14 high waters and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a high return period at both case study sites. The national-scale impact of this event was due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment could in the future be recorded alongside defence performance and upgrade. Ideally other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) would also be included, and with appropriate offsetting for local trends (e.g. mean sea-level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. This could allow long-term comparison of storm severity, and an assessment of how sea-level rise influences return levels over time, which is important for consideration of coastal resilience in strategic management plans.

  9. Parameter sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a storm surge and wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, Luis A.; Knighton, James; Kline, Shaun W.

    2016-09-01

    Development and simulation of synthetic hurricane tracks is a common methodology used to estimate hurricane hazards in the absence of empirical coastal surge and wave observations. Such methods typically rely on numerical models to translate stochastically generated hurricane wind and pressure forcing into coastal surge and wave estimates. The model output uncertainty associated with selection of appropriate model parameters must therefore be addressed. The computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates is exacerbated by the high dimensionality of numerical surge and wave models. We present a model parameter sensitivity analysis of the Delft3D model for the simulation of hazards posed by Hurricane Bob (1991) utilizing three theoretical wind distributions (NWS23, modified Rankine, and Holland). The sensitive model parameters (of 11 total considered) include wind drag, the depth-induced breaking γB, and the bottom roughness. Several parameters show no sensitivity (threshold depth, eddy viscosity, wave triad parameters, and depth-induced breaking αB) and can therefore be excluded to reduce the computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates. The sensitive model parameters also demonstrate a large number of interactions between parameters and a nonlinear model response. While model outputs showed sensitivity to several parameters, the ability of these parameters to act as tuning parameters for calibration is somewhat limited as proper model calibration is strongly reliant on accurate wind and pressure forcing data. A comparison of the model performance with forcings from the different wind models is also presented.

  10. Parameter sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a storm surge and wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, L. A.; Knighton, J.; Kline, S. W.

    2015-10-01

    Development and simulation of synthetic hurricane tracks is a common methodology used to estimate hurricane hazards in the absence of empirical coastal surge and wave observations. Such methods typically rely on numerical models to translate stochastically generated hurricane wind and pressure forcing into coastal surge and wave estimates. The model output uncertainty associated with selection of appropriate model parameters must therefore be addressed. The computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates is exacerbated by the high dimensionality of numerical surge and wave models. We present a model parameter sensitivity analysis of the Delft3D model for the simulation of hazards posed by Hurricane Bob (1991) utilizing three theoretical wind distributions (NWS23, modified Rankine, and Holland). The sensitive model parameters (of eleven total considered) include wind drag, the depth-induced breaking γB, and the bottom roughness. Several parameters show no sensitivity (threshold depth, eddy viscosity, wave triad parameters and depth-induced breaking αB) and can therefore be excluded to reduce the computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates. The sensitive model parameters also demonstrate a large amount of interactions between parameters and a non-linear model response. While model outputs showed sensitivity to several parameters, the ability of these parameters to act as tuning parameters for calibration is somewhat limited as proper model calibration is strongly reliant on accurate wind and pressure forcing data. A comparison of the model performance with forcings from the different wind models is also presented.

  11. The Electric Fields and Waves Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, John

    The purpose of the Electric Field-Wave (EFW) Instrument on the two RBSP spacecraft is to investigate the role of electric field structures and waves in the physical processes responsible for the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. The RBSP spacecraft apogee will be at about 5.8 Re near the equatorial plane. Perigee will be at about 400 kms altitude. Some of processes that will be investigated by the RBSP-EFW instrument include: prompt acceleration induced by powerful interplanetary shocks, acceleration by the large scale convection electric field, abrupt energization by intense substorm injection fronts propagating in from the tail, coherent and stochastic radial transport by large scale MHD fluctuations, and multi-step local energization and loss by whistler waves. In order to understand the role of these processes in accelerating particles, the EFW instrument measures the three dimensional electric field and cold plasma density estimates from the spacecraft potential all over a frequency range from dc to ˜500 kHz. Measurements from the spatially separated spacecraft will provide information on azimuthal and radial spatial scales and propagation velocities of large scale structures. The spin plane electric field vector is obtained from spherical sensors at the ends of two pair of orthogonal booms with tip to tip separations of 80 and 100 m. The spin axis measurement is obtained from a pair of stace booms with a tip to tip separation of ˜12 meters. The electric field below 12 Hz is telemetered continuously while higher time resolution is obtained from a programmable burst memory with a maximum sampling rate for six quantities of ˜ 30,000 samples/s. High time resolution data includes interferometric timing measurements between individual probe at the ends of the booms which provide information on small scale structures and phase velocities. DC magnetic fields from the fluxgate magnetometer and wave

  12. Acoustic and gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere, generated by severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandran, N. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and their propagation in the ionosphere and the study of infrasonic signals from thunder were investigated. Doppler shifts of the order of 0.1 Hz are determined and they provide high-resolution measurements of the movements in the ionosphere. By using an array of transmitters with different frequencies and at different locations, the horizontal and vertical propagation vectors of disturbances propagating through the ionosphere are determined.

  13. Toroidal standing waves excited by a storm sudden commencement: DE 1 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Lin, N.G.; Engebretson, M.J. ); Waite, J.H. ); Sugiura, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 74-nT sudden commencement on July 13, 1982, was observed in the magnetosphere with instruments on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite. Inbound, near L = 4.5, the satellite was located at 1,524 magnetic local time and 20{degree} magnetic latitude. The sudden commencement established a strong, ease-west oscillation, with 100-s period, which was observed in the magnetic field, the electric field, and the plasma flow velocity records. There was also a compressional component of this 100-s oscillation and a rapidly damped 300-s compressional pulsation. The compressional oscillations may be evidence of cavity resonances, excited by the sudden commencement. The cavity waves may, in turn, couple to toroidal waves in field line resonance at the satellite location. In addition the sudden commencement caused the onset of waves with frequencies from 0.1 up to at least 0.5 Hz. The observations are compared with similar reports from earlier pulsations related to sudden commencements.

  14. Assessment and comparison of extreme sea levels and waves during the 2013/2014 storm season in two UK coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, M. P.; Brown, J. M.; Haigh, I. D.; Dolphin, T.; Wisse, P.

    2015-04-01

    The extreme sea levels and waves experienced around the UK's coast during the 2013/2014 winter caused extensive coastal flooding and damage. In such circumstances, coastal managers seek to place such extremes in relation to the anticipated standards of flood protection, and the long-term recovery of the natural system. In this context, return periods are often used as a form of guidance. We therefore provide these levels for the winter storms, as well as discussing their application to the given data sets and case studies (two UK case study sites: Sefton, northwest England; and Suffolk, east England). We use tide gauge records and wave buoy data to compare the 2013/2014 storms with return periods from a national dataset, and also generate joint probabilities of sea level and waves, incorporating the recent events. The UK was hit at a national scale by the 2013/2014 storms, although the return periods differ with location. We also note that the 2013/2014 high water and waves were extreme due to the number of events, as well as the extremity of the 5 December 2013 "Xaver" storm, which had a very high return period at both case study sites. Our return period analysis shows that the national scale impact of this event is due to its coincidence with spring high tide at multiple locations as the tide and storm propagated across the continental shelf. Given that this event is such an outlier in the joint probability analyses of these observed data sets, and that the season saw several events in close succession, coastal defences appear to have provided a good level of protection. This type of assessment should be recorded alongside details of defence performance and upgrade, with other variables (e.g. river levels at estuarine locations) included and appropriate offsetting for linear trends (e.g. mean sea level rise) so that the storm-driven component of coastal flood events can be determined. Local offsetting of the mean trends in sea level allows long-term comparison of

  15. Double jeopardy: Concurrent arrival of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami and storm-generated waves on the Atlantic coast of the United States and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Krassovski, Maxim V.

    2007-08-01

    A detailed analysis of over one hundred tide gauge records from the Atlantic coast of North America reveals that the arrival of the 26 December 2004 Sumatra tsunami on this coast coincided with the presence of tsunami-like waves being generated by a major storm tracking northward along the eastern seaboard of the United States. According to the tide gauge records, waves from the two events coalesced along the shores of Maine and Nova Scotia on 27 December where they produced damaging waves with heights in excess of 1 m. Tsunami waves were identified in almost all outer tide gauges from Florida to Nova Scotia with maximum tsunami heights for the northern regions estimated to be 32-39 cm. In the south, maximum tsunami wave heights were in the range of 15 to 33 cm.

  16. Green roof and storm water management policies: monitoring experiments on the ENPC Blue Green Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Gires, Auguste; Fitton, George; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Currently widespread in new urban projects, green roofs have shown a positive impact on urban runoff at the building/parcel scale. Nevertheless, there is no specific policy promoting their implementation neither in Europe nor in France. Moreover they are not taken into account (and usually considered as an impervious area) in the sizing of a retention basin for instance. An interesting example is located in the heart of the Paris-East Cluster for Science and Technology (Champs-sur-Marne, France). Since 2013 a large (1 ha) wavy-form vegetated roof (called bleu green wave) is implemented. Green roof area and impervious areas are connected to a large retention basin, which has been oversized. The blue green wave represents a pioneering site where an initially amenity (decorative) design project has been transformed into a research oriented one. Several measurement campaigns have been conducted to investigate and better understand the hydrological behaviour of such a structure. Rainfall, humidity, wind velocity, water content and temperature have been particularly studied. The data collected are used for several purposes: (i) characterize the spatio-temporal variability of the green roof response, (ii) calibrate and validate a specific model simulating its hydrological behavior. Based on monitoring and modeling results, green roof performances will be quantified. It will be possible to estimate how they can reduce stormwater runoff and how these performances can vary in space and in time depending on green roof configuration, rainfall event characteristics and antecedent conditions. These quantified impacts will be related to regulation rules established by stormwater managers in order to connect the parcel to the sewer network. In the particular case of the building of a retention basin, the integration of green roof in the sizing of the basin will be studied. This work is funded by the European Blue Green Dream project (http://bgd.org.uk/, funded by Climate

  17. Potential Climate Change Health Risks from Increases in Heat Waves: Abnormal Birth Outcomes and Adverse Maternal Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cil, Gulcan; Cameron, Trudy Ann

    2017-02-23

    We investigate the risks presented by heat waves for adverse health conditions for babies and expectant mothers when these mothers have been exposed to heat waves during gestation or during the period just prior to conception. Rather than just birth weight and gestational age, we focus on less common metrics such as abnormal conditions in the newborn (fetal distress, reliance on a ventilator, and meconium aspiration) and adverse health conditions in the mother (pregnancy-related hypertension, uterine bleeding during pregnancy, eclampsia, and incompetent cervix). We use monthly panel data for over 3,000 U.S. counties, constructed from the confidential version of the U.S. Natality Files for 1989-2008. Our models control for sociodemographic factors and include county, month, and state-by-year fixed effects to control for unobserved spatial and timewise heterogeneity in the data. Even within the United States, where there is widespread access to air conditioning, heat waves increase the fraction of babies with abnormal conditions related to maternal stress, as well as the fraction of mothers who experience pregnancy-related adverse health conditions. The scope for these risks in developing countries is likely to be even greater.

  18. Field observation of morpho-dynamic processes during storms at a Pacific beach, Japan: role of long-period waves in storm-induced berm erosion.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Masaru; Seki, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Many ultrasonic wave gages were placed with a small spacing across the swash zone to monitor either sand level or water level. Continuous monitoring conducted for a few years enabled the collection of data on the change in wave properties as well as swash-zone profiles. Data sets including two cases of large-scale berm erosion were analyzed. The results showed that 1) shoreline erosion started when high waves with significant power in long-period (1 to 2 min.) waves reached the top of a well-developed berm with the help of rising tide; 2) the beach in the swash zone was eroded with higher elevation being more depressed, while the bottom elevation just outside the swash zone remained almost unchanged; and 3) erosion stopped in a few hours after the berm was completely eroded or the swash-zone slope became uniformly mild. These findings strongly suggest that long waves play a dominant role in the swash-zone dynamics associated with these erosional events.

  19. Defining Coastal Storm and Quantifying Storms Applying Coastal Storm Impulse Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudpour, Nader

    2014-05-01

    What defines a storm condition and what would initiate a "storm" has not been uniquely defined among scientists and engineers. Parameters that have been used to define a storm condition can be mentioned as wind speed, beach erosion and storm hydrodynamics parameters such as wave height and water levels. Some of the parameters are storm consequential such as beach erosion and some are not directly related to the storm hydrodynamics such as wind speed. For the purpose of the presentation, the different storm conditions based on wave height, water levels, wind speed and beach erosion will be discussed and assessed. However, it sounds more scientifically to have the storm definition based on the hydrodynamic parameters such as wave height, water level and storm duration. Once the storm condition is defined and storm has initiated, the severity of the storm would be a question to forecast and evaluate the hazard and analyze the risk in order to determine the appropriate responses. The correlation of storm damages to the meteorological and hydrodynamics parameters can be defined as a storm scale, storm index or storm parameter and it is needed to simplify the complexity of variation involved developing the scale for risk analysis and response management. A newly introduced Coastal Storm Impulse (COSI) parameter quantifies storms into one number for a specific location and storm event. The COSI parameter is based on the conservation of linear, horizontal momentum to combine storm surge, wave dynamics, and currents over the storm duration. The COSI parameter applies the principle of conservation of momentum to physically combine the hydrodynamic variables per unit width of shoreline. This total momentum is then integrated over the duration of the storm to determine the storm's impulse to the coast. The COSI parameter employs the mean, time-averaged nonlinear (Fourier) wave momentum flux, over the wave period added to the horizontal storm surge momentum above the Mean High

  20. Observations of storm morphodynamics using Coastal Lidar and Radar Imaging System (CLARIS): Importance of wave refraction and dissipation over complex surf-zone morphology at a shoreline erosional hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, Katherine L.

    Elevated water levels and large waves during storms cause beach erosion, overwash, and coastal flooding, particularly along barrier island coastlines. While predictions of storm tracks have greatly improved over the last decade, predictions of maximum water levels and variations in the extent of damage along a coastline need improvement. In particular, physics based models still cannot explain why some regions along a relatively straight coastline may experience significant erosion and overwash during a storm, while nearby locations remain seemingly unchanged. Correct predictions of both the timing of erosion and variations in the magnitude of erosion along the coast will be useful to both emergency managers and homeowners preparing for an approaching storm. Unfortunately, research on the impact of a storm to the beach has mainly been derived from "pre" and "post" storm surveys of beach topography and nearshore bathymetry during calm conditions. This has created a lack of data during storms from which to ground-truth model predictions and test hypotheses that explain variations in erosion along a coastline. We have developed Coastal Lidar and Radar Imaging System (CLARIS), a mobile system that combines a terrestrial scanning laser and an X-band marine radar system using precise motion and location information. CLARIS can operate during storms, measuring beach topography, nearshore bathymetry (from radar-derived wave speed measurements), surf-zone wave parameters, and maximum water levels remotely. In this dissertation, we present details on the development, design, and testing of CLARIS and then use CLARIS to observe a 10 km section of coastline in Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills on the Outer Banks of North Carolina every 12 hours during a Nor'Easter (peak wave height in 8 m of water depth = 3.4 m). High decadal rates of shoreline change as well as heightened erosion during storms have previously been documented to occur within the field site. In addition, complex

  1. Clinical implications of the P wave duration and dispersion: relationship between atrial conduction defects and abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms.

    PubMed

    Centurión, Osmar Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Atrial conduction disease provides a suitable substrate for reentry and appears to be a major predisposing factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. It was demonstrated that when depressed conduction was observed in recordings from human atrial muscle, the ultra-structure was usually abnormal. Areas of poorly coupled fibers in diseased atrial tissue with progressive fibro-degenerative changes may lead to abnormal electrophysiological characteristics. Structural inhomogeneity or local differences in electrophysiological or ultra-structural properties are considered to play a major role in the initiation of reentrant circuits due to the increased likelihood of unidirectional block of the premature impulse. The P wave of the electrocardiogram may show alterations that can be associated with atrial arrhythmias. It was shown that there is a statistical association between the low resting membrane potential and a prolonged P wave duration. Also a prolonged inter-atrial conduction time was significantly related to abnormal P wave morphology. In the evaluation of patients with altered P waves in the electrocardiogram, it is very important to keep in mind that, patients who have a great susceptibility to develop AF possess abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms in sinus rhythm within the right atrium, a significantly longer P wave duration, a significantly longer intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time of sinus impulses; and a significantly greater sinus node dysfunction and higher incidence of induction of sustained atrial fibrillation. Awareness of this strong association may lead to a better therapeutic management in individual patients.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Coastal Inundation and Sedimentation by Storm Surge, Tides, and Waves at Norfolk, Virginia, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    and the passage of a storm. DATA A collection of detail coastline information, accurate topographic data, and land surface features in the... Coastline information around the Naval Station Norfolk and the Hampton Roads area, Virginia, was extracted for this study from the shoreline database of the...Google Earth Pro 5.1 (http://earth.google.com). LIDAR network provides the land detail topography in the Naval Station Norfolk. The data at a 1- m

  3. Distribution of stable isotopes in arid storms . II. A double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, Alexander; Dody, Avraham; Adar, Eilon M.; Borisov, Viacheslav; Geyh, Mebus

    A new mathematical method based on a double-component model of kinematic wave flow and approach assesses the dynamic isotopic distribution in arid rain storms and runoff. This model describes the transport and δ18O evolution of rainfall to overland flow and runoff in an arid rocky watershed with uniformly distributed shallow depression storage. The problem was solved numerically. The model was calibrated using a set of temporal discharge and δ18O distribution data for rainfall and runoff collected on a small rocky watershed at the Sede Boker Experimental Site, Israel. Simulation of a reliable result with respect to observation was obtained after parameter adjustment by trial and error. Sensitivity analysis and model application were performed. The model is sensitive to changes in parameters characterizing the depression storage zones. The model reflects the effect of the isotopic memory in the water within the depression storage between sequential rain spells. The use of the double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport provides an appropriate qualitative and quantitative fitting between computed and observed δ18O distribution in runoff. RésuméUne nouvelle méthode mathématique basée sur un modèle à double composante d'écoulement et de transport par une onde cinématique a été développée pour évaluer la distribution dynamique en isotopes dans les précipitations et dans l'écoulement en région aride. Ce modèle décrit le transport et les variations des δ18O de la pluie vers le ruissellement et l'écoulement de surface dans un bassin aride rocheux où le stockage se fait dans des dépressions peu profondes uniformément réparties. Le problème a été résolu numériquement. Le modèle a été calibré au moyen d'une chronique de débits et d'une distribution des δ18O dans la pluie et dans l'écoulement de surface sur un petit bassin versant rocheux du site expérimental de Sede Boker (Israël). La simulation d'un résultat cr

  4. Multi-decadal shoreline changes on Takú Atoll, Papua New Guinea: Observational evidence of early reef island recovery after the impact of storm waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Thomas; Westphal, Hildegard

    2016-03-01

    Hurricanes, tropical cyclones and other high-magnitude events are important steering mechanisms in the geomorphic development of coral reef islands. Sandy reef islands located outside the storm belts are strongly sensitive to the impact of occasional high-magnitude events and show abrupt, commonly erosive geomorphic change in response to such events. Based on the interpretation of remote sensing data, it is well known that the process of landform recovery might take several decades or even longer. However, despite the increasing amount of scientific attention towards short- and long-term island dynamics, the lack of data and models often prevent a robust analysis of the timing and nature of recovery initiation. Here we show how natural island recovery starts immediately after the impact of a high-magnitude event. We analyze multi-temporal shoreline changes on Takú Atoll, Papua New Guinea and combine our findings with a unique set of published field observations (Smithers and Hoeke, 2014). Trends of shoreline change since 1943 and changes in planform island area indicate a long-term accretionary mode for most islands. Apparent shoreline instability is detected for the last decade of analysis, however this can be explained by the impact of storm waves in December 2008 that (temporarily?) masked the long-term trend. The transition from negative to positive rates of change in the aftermath of this storm event is indicative of inherent negative feedback processes that counteract short-term changes in energy input and represent the initiation of island recovery. Collectively, our results support the concept of dynamic rather than static reef islands and clearly demonstrate how short-term processes can influence interpretations of medium-term change.

  5. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  6. Climate Projection of Maximum Water Level accounting for the Effect of Waves, Storm Surges and Mean Sea Level Changes: an Application to Climate Projections along the Coastline of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, P.; Conte, D.; Marzo, L.; Scarascia, L.

    2014-12-01

    The maximum level that water reaches during a storm depends on changes of mean sea level and storminess. Increase of mean sea level can be caused by mass addition, steric effects and land subsidence. Changes of storminess will change the height of ocean waves and storm surges. This study proposes a methodology for estimating the change of maximum water level at the coast as it results from the superposition of these different factors, and applies it to climate change scenario simulations in the Mediterranean Sea. The analysis is based on a 7-member ensemble of regional climate model simulations covering the period 1951-2050 under the A1B emission scenario. Models that include a high resolution Mediterranean Sea circulation component have been used for diagnosing the steric sea level change. Model sea level pressure and wind fields are used for forcing a hydro-dynamical shallow water model (HYPSE), wind fields are used for forcing a wave model (WAM), obtaining estimates of storm surges and ocean waves, respectively. The climate change signal is computed as the difference between water level maxima in the 1971-2000 and 2021-2050 period. Results show that in the next decades storm surge level and wave height will decrease and partially compensate for the increase of maximum water level produced by the positive steric effect.

  7. Field-Aligned Structure of the Storm Time Pc 5 Wave of November 14-15, 1979,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    Corporation El Segundo, CA 90245 and E. AMATA Instituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario Rome, Italy I February 1988 Prepared for SPACE DIVISION AIR...UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) (Continued) The Aerospace Corporation; and Amata, E., Instituto di Fisica dello...between a drift-mirror wave and a shear Alfven wave, as discussed by Walker and coworkers. ’ .,1 :.x UNCLASSIFIED I 18CURIITY CLAS SIFICATION OF TIS

  8. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, Heather; Palmer, Matthew D.; Howard, Tom; Bricheno, Lucy; Calvert, Daley; Krijnen, Justin; Wood, Richard; Tinker, Jonathan; Bunney, Chris; Harle, James; Saulter, Andrew; O'Neill, Clare; Bellingham, Clare; Lowe, Jason

    2016-05-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time-mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5). Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ˜ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled ( ˜ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980 to 2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea-surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data, respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)4.5 (8.5) scenarios. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2-year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically

  9. Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, H.; Palmer, M. D.; Howard, T.; Bricheno, L.; Calvert, D.; Krijnen, J.; Wood, R.; Tinker, J.; Bunney, C.; Harle, J.; Saulter, A.; O'Neill, C.; Bellingham, C.; Lowe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Singapore is an island state with considerable population, industries, commerce and transport located in coastal areas at elevations less than 2 m making it vulnerable to sea-level rise. Mitigation against future inundation events requires a quantitative assessment of risk. To address this need, regional projections of changes in (i) long-term mean sea level and (ii) the frequency of extreme storm surge and wave events have been combined to explore potential changes to coastal flood risk over the 21st century. Local changes in time mean sea level were evaluated using the process-based climate model data and methods presented in the IPCC AR5. Regional surge and wave solutions extending from 1980 to 2100 were generated using ~ 12 km resolution surge (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean - NEMO) and wave (WaveWatchIII) models. Ocean simulations were forced by output from a selection of four downscaled (~ 12 km resolution) atmospheric models, forced at the lateral boundaries by global climate model simulations generated for the IPCC AR5. Long-term trends in skew surge and significant wave height were then assessed using a generalised extreme value model, fit to the largest modelled events each year. An additional atmospheric solution downscaled from the ERA-Interim global reanalysis was used to force historical ocean model simulations extending from 1980-2010, enabling a quantitative assessment of model skill. Simulated historical sea surface height and significant wave height time series were compared to tide gauge data and satellite altimetry data respectively. Central estimates of the long-term mean sea level rise at Singapore by 2100 were projected to be 0.52 m (0.74 m) under the RCP 4.5 (8.5) scenarios respectively. Trends in surge and significant wave height 2 year return levels were found to be statistically insignificant and/or physically very small under the more severe RCP8.5 scenario. We conclude that changes to long-term mean sea level constitute the

  10. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  11. Geomorphological impacts of high-latitude storm waves on low-latitude reef islands - Observations of the December 2008 event on Nukutoa, Takuu, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithers, S. G.; Hoeke, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    Low-latitude reefs and reef islands usually experience relatively benign climatic and hydrodynamic conditions due to their location near to the equator, outside of the major storm belts, and they typically exhibit geomorphological traits that reflect the prevailing low-energy conditions. For example, algal ridges are poorly developed, reef flat boulder zones are modest or lacking, rubble banks are rare, and reef islands tend to be low and dominated by sand. Nukutoa is a low-lying triangular-shaped reef island of ~ 6 ha located on the eastern rim of Takuu atoll (4°45‧S, 157°2‧E), Papua New Guinea, approximately 300 km northeast of Bougainville. The approximately 450 residents of Takuu all live on Nukutoa. In December 2008 Takuu was struck by several days of very high water levels and waves, which washed completely over approximately 50% of Nukutoa. GPS shoreline mapping and topographic surveys of the island were undertaken in the days immediately prior to the event, and were repeated immediately after. Homes and village infrastructure were damaged during this event, which eroded around 60% of the shoreline, and deposited a sand sheet averaging around 50 mm thick over approximately 13% of the island. This event was generated by two distant storms - one located > 6000 km away near 50°N, and affected a wide area of the Western Pacific. Oral histories record at least five similar events since the 1940s. In this paper we document the geomorphic impacts of the December 2008 event and discuss the possible significance of similar events in the past, and in the future.

  12. Extreme Wave Deposits On The Pacific Coast Of Mexico: Tsunamis Or Storms? - A Multi-Proxy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Herrera, M.; Lagos, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Chague-Goff, C.; Kostoglodov, V.; Goff, J. R.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A.; Machain, M.; Caballero, M.; Goguitchaichrili, A.; Aguilar, B.; Urquijo, P.; Laboratorio Universitario de Geofísica Ambiental (Luga)

    2011-12-01

    Historical and instrumental data show that the Pacific coast of Mexico has been exposed to destructive tsunamis over at least the past 500 years. This coast is also affected by hurricanes generated in the eastern Pacific. The great 1985 Mexico earthquake and its aftershock generated tsunamis that affected the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo and Michoacán coast. The purpose of our study was two-fold, a) to determine whether we could distinguish storm from tsunami deposits, and b) whether tsunami deposits from historical events are preserved in the tropical environments of the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo coast. Two anomalous sand units in the Ixtapa estuary are interpreted as the result of high-energy marine inundation events that occurred in the last century. Several lines of evidence using a multi-proxy approach (historical studies, interviews with local witnesses, geomorphological and geological surveys, coring and trenching, and laboratory analyses including grain size, micropaleontology, geochemistry, magnetic susceptibility and radiometric dating) indicate the occurrence of two tsunamis that we link to local events: the 1985 Mexico and possibly the 1979 Petatlan earthquakes. We thereby provide the first onshore geological evidence of historical tsunamis on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  13. Extreme wave deposits on the Pacific coast of Mexico: Tsunamis or storms? — A multi-proxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Herrera, María-Teresa; Lagos, Marcelo; Hutchinson, Ian; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Machain, Maria Luisa; Caballero, Margarita; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Aguilar, Bertha; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana-Carolina; Ortiz, Modesto; Nava, Hector; Bautista, Francisco; Lopez, Gloria I.; Quintana, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Historical and instrumental data show that the Pacific coast of Mexico has been exposed to destructive tsunamis over at least the past 500 years. This coast is also affected by hurricanes generated in the eastern Pacific. The great 1985 Mexico earthquake and its aftershock generated tsunamis that affected the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo and Michoacán coast. The purpose of our study was two-fold — a) to determine whether storm and tsunami deposits could be distinguished, and b) whether tsunami deposits from historical events are preserved in the tropical environments of the Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo coast. Two anomalous sand units in the Ixtapa estuary are interpreted to be the result of high-energy marine inundation events that occurred in the last century. Several lines of evidence using a multi-proxy approach (historical studies, interviews with local witnesses, geomorphological and geological surveys, coring and trenching, laboratory analyses including grain size, micropaleontology, geochemistry, magnetic susceptibility and radiometric dating, and numerical modeling) indicate the occurrence of two tsunamis that we link to local events: the 21st September 1985 Mexico and possibly the 14th March 1979 Petatlan earthquakes. We thereby provide the first onshore geological evidence of historical tsunamis on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  14. The perfect storm: Unusual synchronisation of the components of wave energy spectra dominates episodic soft-cliff erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, Christopher; Darby, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Between December 2013 and February 2014 the United Kingdom experienced the stormiest winter on record. The persistent low pressure systems arriving from the North Atlantic during this period resulted in some of the most energetic maritime conditions ever recorded along the English Channel. The unprotected soft cliffs which comprise the south west Isle of Wight coastline were highly exposed to these conditions, facing the full force of extreme sea-levels and significant wave heights. Although long term rates of soft-cliff erosion have previously been defined for this coastline, the role of such extreme forcings on rates of soft-cliff erosion has not previously been document, and is therefore relatively poorly understood. We employed pre-event LIDAR and post-event RTK-GPS shoreline surveys in tandem with hourly sea-levels and significant wave height records from the English Channel to build an unprecedented data set that we use here to determine the response of this soft-cliff coastline to the extreme forcings of the 2013/2014 winter. It was found that the between October 2013 and March 2014, the south west Isle of Wight eroded, on average 4.25 m (σ = 3.6m). Such a high degree of erosion is approximately a factor of nine times greater than the long term average retreat rate of ~0.5 m/yr for this coastline and is the largest recorded erosion event since the start of reliable records began. The extreme erosion observed is shown to be a result of the synchronisation between sea-levels and wave heights. Indeed, we show that a 7-hour lag of the wave height record relative to background sea-level would have resulted in only half (2.1 m) of the observed erosion. An analysis of the historical record implies that previous extreme erosion events were a function of similar synchronisation between sea-levels and wave heights, thus it is likely that future changes in the timing of peak sea-levels and wave heights have the potential to outweigh changes in magnitude in terms of

  15. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A.; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W.; Chang, Douglas G.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M.; Christopher Edgar, J.; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  16. Extreme wave parameters under North Atlantic extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, S.; Guedes Soares, C.

    2014-09-01

    A characterization of extreme wave parameters during extratropical cyclones in the Northern hemisphere is made from WAM wave model hindcasts. In February 2007 two extratropical storms were observed in the North Atlantic and the wave fields associated with them are modeled in this paper. Wave buoy and satellite altimetry data were used to validate the WAM hindcast results. The distribution of the Benjamin-Feir index (BFI), kurtosis and the ratio of maximum wave height to significant wave height (abnormality index) around the eye of the two extratropical cyclones is studied. It is found that under these conditions the BFI and kurtosis are significantly larger mainly in the fourth quadrant and also when the wind direction is aligned with the wave propagation direction. In these regions the probability of occurrence of abnormal waves is higher.

  17. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  18. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  19. Relations between depressive symptoms, anxiety, and T Wave abnormalities in subjects without clinically-apparent cardiovascular disease (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Whang, William; Peacock, James; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Alcantara, Carmela; Nazarian, Saman; Shah, Amit J; Davidson, Karina W; Shea, Steven; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that depression and anxiety are associated with electrocardiographic (ECG) repolarization abnormalities in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a cohort free of symptomatic cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms were assessed by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and trait anxiety symptoms by using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; both were categorized according to uppermost quartile. T-wave inversions in ECG leads other than V1 to V3 were obtained from electrocardiograms obtained at rest during the baseline examination. Participants with major intraventricular conduction abnormalities and those taking antiarrhythmics, antidepressants, and/or antipsychotics were excluded. Logistic regression models were estimated with multivariable adjustment for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Among 5,906 participants, elevated depressive symptoms were associated with increased odds of T-wave inversion after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 3.06, p = 0.001), whereas greater trait anxiety was associated with reduced odds of T-wave inversion (odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 0.77, p = 0.003). The divergent associations of depressive symptoms and trait anxiety with ECG T-wave inversions were similar in men and women, and these associations were present across the racial and ethnic subgroups (non-Hispanic white, African-American, Hispanic, and Chinese). In conclusion, symptoms of depression and anxiety were independently yet oppositely associated with ECG T-wave inversions. Negative emotions may have a differential impact on cardiovascular mortality through unique relations with cardiac repolarization.

  20. The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Science Operations Center, Operational Modes, and Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Ergun, R. E.; Schroeder, P. C.; Rachelson, W.; Tao, J.; Vernetti, J.; Mozer, F.; Kersten, K.; Breneman, A. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; MacDowall, R. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument on the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) observatories provides measurement of 3D DC and AC E-fields, as well as 3D AC magnetic fields as provided on board from the EMFISIS tri-axial searchcoil magnetometer (MSC). Two 100-m tip-to-tip spin plane and 12 to 14-m tip-to-tip axial E-field antennas are deployed on each of the two RBSP observatories, with all instrument operations controlled on board via the EFW Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). Both continuous waveform and spectral data products from DC up to 8 kHz, as well as high-rate burst waveforms (E-field and interferometric modes) are produced on-board through a highly-configurable digital signal processing system. A large-capacity waveform burst memory (32 GB) with human-in-the-loop playback selection is also included in the EFW instrument, allowing for days to tens of days of lookback and playback of selected time intervals of burst data. EFW also provides higher-frequency 3D E-field signals to the EMFISIS suite, providing waveform coverage up to 12 kHz and spectral coverage to over 400 kHz. A description of all the EFW operational modes and data products is presented. Access tot he ISTP-compliant CDF datasets served from the primary EFW Science Operations Center (SOC) at the University of California, Berkeley is shown, along with support for data acquisition and analysis under the IDL THEMIS Data Analysis Software (TDAS) and Science Data Tool (SDT) packages.

  1. A simplified wave enhancement criterion for moving extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Golubkin, Pavel; Chapron, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    An analytical model is derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution along the main transects of a moving extreme weather event. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves defined as gr/ur2≈cT>(ur/V>)1/q, with r, u, and V, radial distance, average sustained wind speed, and translation velocity, respectively. Constants q and cT follow the fetch-law definitions. If forced during a sufficient time scale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely related to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Compared to altimeter satellite measurements, the proposed analytical solutions for the wave energy distribution demonstrate convincing agreement. As analytically developed, the wave enhancement criterion can provide a rapid evaluation to document the general characteristics of each storm, especially the expected wavefield asymmetry.

  2. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  3. Numerical Simulations of 1990 Saturn's Giant Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, E.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present here a study of the Saturn's 1990 equatorial major storm based on numerical simulations. Six planetary scale storms, nicknamed as Great White Spots (GWS) have been observed since the nineteenth century, three of them at the equatorial region in 1876 (~ +8º), 1933 (~ +2º), and 1990 (+12º), on the broad prograde equatorial jet where equatorial dynamics dominated producing a storm nucleus, with rapid expansion to the east and west to become a planetary-scale disturbance (Sánchez-Lavega, CHAOS 4, 341-353, 1994). We have detailed information, ground-based CCD imaging and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, for the 1990 event. Numerical experiments on the 1990 storm indicate that the onset of the storm can only be reproduced if the Voyager era background zonal flow is used, which suggests that it dominated the circulation dynamics at the storm's outbreak region at that time. We review the possible impact of the 1990 storm on the equatorial jet, storm dynamics, and how it relates to the observed storm morphology and zonal wind measurements derived from HST observations (Barnet et al., Icarus 100, 499-511, 1992). Observations also describe the formation of equatorial planetary waves and instabilities during the disturbance. We discuss the impact of major energy and mass injection by a planetary-scale convective event on the equatorial dynamics following our simulation results.

  4. Solar radio continuum storms and a breathing magnetic field model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Radio noise continuum emissions observed in metric and decametric wave frequencies are, in general, associated with actively varying sunspot groups accompanied by the S-component of microwave radio emissions. These continuum emission sources, often called type I storm sources, are often associated with type III burst storm activity from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. This storm activity is, therefore, closely connected with the development of these continuum emission sources. It is shown that the S-component emission in microwave frequencies generally precedes, by several days, the emission of these noise continuum storms of lower frequencies. In order for these storms to develop, the growth of sunspot groups into complex types is very important in addition to the increase of the average magnetic field intensity and area of these groups. After giving a review on the theory of these noise continuum storm emissions, a model is briefly considered to explain the relation of the emissions to the storms.

  5. Maps of the MY 25 Planet-encircling Dust Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Cantor, B. A.; Wilson, R. J.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Barnes, J.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created 42 daily maps of the MY 25 planet-encircling dust storm (Ls=165-188) in order to better delimit the areal extent of storms observed by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). These maps allow us to better compare storm evolution with eddies observed in Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward traveling waves from 40 - 60° S with a period of about three sols. These maps use a new dust characterization scheme that categorizes dust storms and dust entrained in gravity waves by degree of (visual) structure. Preliminary analysis of these data indicate concurrent eastward migration of both storms and eddies. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas.

  6. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  7. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  8. Interactive modeling of storm impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooijen, A.; Baart, F.; Roelvink, J. A.; Donchyts, G.; Scheel, F.; de Boer, W.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decades the impact of storms on the coastal zone has increasingly drawn the attention of policy makers and coastal planners, engineers and researchers. The mean reason for this interest is the high density of the world's population living near the ocean, in combination with climate change. Due to sea level rise and extremer weather conditions, many of the world's coastlines are becoming more vulnerable to the potential of flooding. Currently it is common practice to predict storm impact using physics-based numerical models. The numerical model utilizes several inputs (e.g. bathymetry, waves, surge) to calculate the impact on the coastline. Traditionally, the numerical modeller takes the following three steps: schematization/model setup, running and post-processing. This process generally has a total feedback time in the order of hours to days, and is suitable for so-called confirmatory modelling.However, often models are applied as an exploratory tool, in which the effect of e.g. different hydraulic conditions, or measures is investigated. The above described traditional work flow is not the most efficient method for exploratory modelling. Interactive modelling lets users adjust a simulation while running. For models typically used for storm impact studies (e.g. XBeach, Delft3D, D-Flow FM), the user can for instance change the storm surge level, wave conditions, or add a measure such as a nourishment or a seawall. The model will take the adjustments into account immediately, and will directly compute the effect. Using this method, tools can be developed in which stakeholders (e.g. coastal planners, policy makers) are in control and together evaluate ideas by interacting with the model. Here we will show initial results for interactive modelling with a storm impact model.

  9. Sporadic Geomagnetic Pulsations at Frequencies of up to 15 HZ in the Magnetic Storm of November 7-14, 2004: Features of the Amplitude and Polarization Spectra and their Connection with Ion-Cyclotron Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E. N.; Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Demekhov, A. G.; Kotik, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the geomagnetic-pulsation spectra at unusually high frequencies (including the frequencies exceeding the Schumann resonance frequency 8 Hz), which were detected for the first time at the Novaya Zhizn' midlatitude station (the McIlwain parameter L = 2.6) at the time of a strong magnetic storm on November 07-14, 2004. To interpret the observed pulsation frequencies, we used the data from the NOAA low-orbit satellites which recorded localized precipitations of energetic protons (with energies of 30 to 80 keV) and calculations of the singlepass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Amplitude and polarization characteristics of the radiation spectra at frequencies of up to 15 Hz at the Novaya Zhizn' and Lovozero stations (L = 5.2) are compared. It is shown that the magnetic field oscillations in the frequency range 7-15 Hz correlate with proton precipitations and proton auroras at geomagnetic latitudes 50°-57° (L = 2.42-3.37). It is also shown that for a high anisotropy of the pitch-angle distribution of the ring-current protons at such low geomagnetic latitudes, the frequency spectrum of observed high-frequency radiation agrees well with the calculated location of the maximum of the single-pass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Analysis of the data and calculation results has led to the conclusion that inherently the recorded signals are a high-frequency counterpart of the Pc1 pulsations and are due to the generation of ion-cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere at unusually low latitudes, which are probably stipulated by the shift of the plasma pause to these latitudes during a strong magnetic storm.

  10. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The effects of storms and storm-generated currents on sand beaches in Southern Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, H.W.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.; Dickson, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Storms are one of the most important controls on the cycle of erosion and accretion on beaches. Current meters placed in shoreface locations of Saco Bay and Wells Embayment, ME, recorded bottom currents during the winter months of 2000 and 2001, while teams of volunteers profiled the topography of nearby beaches. Coupling offshore meteorological and beach profile data made it possible to determine the response of nine beaches in southern Maine to various oceanographic and meteorological conditions. The beaches selected for profiling ranged from pristine to completely developed and permitted further examination of the role of seawalls on the response of beaches to storms. Current meters documented three unique types of storms: frontal passages, southwest storms, and northeast storms. In general, the current meter results indicate that frontal passages and southwest storms were responsible for bringing sediment towards the shore, while northeast storms resulted in a net movement of sediment away from the beach. During the 1999-2000 winter, there were a greater percentage of frontal passages and southwest storms, while during the 2000-2001 winter, there were more northeast storms. The sediment that was transported landward during the 1999-2000 winter was reworked into the berm along moderately and highly developed beaches during the next summer. A northeast storm on March 5-6, 2001, resulted in currents in excess of 1 m s-1 and wave heights that reached six meters. The storm persisted over 10 high tides and caused coastal flooding and property damage. Topographic profiles made before and after the storm demonstrate that developed beaches experienced a loss of sediment volume during the storm, while sediment was redistributed along the profile on moderately developed and undeveloped beaches. Two months after the storm, the profiles along the developed beaches had not reached their pre-storm elevation. In comparison, the moderately developed and undeveloped beaches

  12. The threshold between storm overwash and inundation and the implication to paleo-storm records and climate signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. G.; Long, J.; Osterman, L. E.; Plant, N. G.; Marot, M. E.; Bernier, J.; Flocks, J. G.; Adams, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    In modern coastal systems, the sensitivity of a coastal site to erosion or deposition during storm conditions depends largely on the geomorphic configuration (e.g. dune or beach height and width) and the storm-induced oceanographic processes (surge and waves). Depending on the magnitude of these variables, coastal systems may be eroded, overwashed, breached, and/or inundated during the storm. To date, there has been no attempt to evaluate how these observable modern differences in storm-impact regimes might be utilized to interpret paleo-storm intensities and frequencies. Time-series of sediment texture, radioisotopic, and foraminiferal data from back-barrier environments along the Chandeleur Islands (Louisiana, USA) document the emplacement of a storm event deposit from Hurricane Isaac and we use this event to test paleo-storm intensity reconstruction methods. Water level reconstructed for the event layer using an advection (grain-size) settling model are 2 - 3 times greater than measured during the storm. The over-estimation is linked to the reconstruction model's assumptions concerning sediment transport during storms (i.e., overwash only), while actual processes included inundation as well. These contrasts may result in misidentification (i.e., presence/absence) and/or misclassification (i.e., intensity) of storms in the geologic record (e.g., low geomorphic conditions and high water levels) that would in turn affect the ability to link storm frequency or intensity to climatic drivers.

  13. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  14. Coastal Storm Hazards from Virginia to Maine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    engineering and environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources...climate and statistical analysis of coastal storm hazards for the NACCS. The overall NACCS wave and water level modeling goals included simulating an...117 8.7.1 Historical water levels

  15. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  16. Coastal Storm Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    MILL IBARS I ~ 1022.8. 0 SEA I LND 0’ 100 A-STORM TRACK 200 :km. NORTH; B-STORM TRACK 0_____. T% WO - X00 SHORE SITEI C-STORM TRACK 300 SOU 00 .) -400 0...SCOTIA CANADA PRUF. C. . A. M._KING D PARTMENT IF GFOGRAPHY JR. H. J. SCHOEMAKER _1,NIVELSITY UF NOTT INGHAM . ... W ATFRLOUPKUNDIG LARIORATORIUM TE

  17. Investigating the impact of surface wave breaking on modeling the trajectories of drifters in the northern Adriatic Sea during a wind-storm event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carniel, S.; Warner, J.C.; Chiggiato, J.; Sclavo, M.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate numerical prediction of the oceanic upper layer velocity is a demanding requirement for many applications at sea and is a function of several near-surface processes that need to be incorporated in a numerical model. Among them, we assess the effects of vertical resolution, different vertical mixing parameterization (the so-called Generic Length Scale -GLS- set of k-??, k-??, gen, and the Mellor-Yamada), and surface roughness values on turbulent kinetic energy (k) injection from breaking waves. First, we modified the GLS turbulence closure formulation in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to incorporate the surface flux of turbulent kinetic energy due to wave breaking. Then, we applied the model to idealized test cases, exploring the sensitivity to the above mentioned factors. Last, the model was applied to a realistic situation in the Adriatic Sea driven by numerical meteorological forcings and river discharges. In this case, numerical drifters were released during an intense episode of Bora winds that occurred in mid-February 2003, and their trajectories compared to the displacement of satellite-tracked drifters deployed during the ADRIA02-03 sea-truth campaign. Results indicted that the inclusion of the wave breaking process helps improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations, subject to an increase in the typical value of the surface roughness z0. Specifically, the best performance was obtained using ??CH = 56,000 in the Charnok formula, the wave breaking parameterization activated, k-?? as the turbulence closure model. With these options, the relative error with respect to the average distance of the drifter was about 25% (5.5 km/day). The most sensitive factors in the model were found to be the value of ??CH enhanced with respect to a standard value, followed by the adoption of wave breaking parameterization and the particular turbulence closure model selected. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Comparison of Probabilistic Coastal Inundation Maps Based on Historical Storms and Statistically Modeled Storm Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Sheng, Y.; Condon, A. J.; Paramygin, V. A.; Hall, T.

    2012-12-01

    A cost effective method, JPM-OS (Joint Probability Method with Optimal Sampling), for determining storm response and inundation return frequencies was developed and applied to quantify the hazard of hurricane storm surges and inundation along the Southwest FL,US coast (Condon and Sheng 2012). The JPM-OS uses piecewise multivariate regression splines coupled with dimension adaptive sparse grids to enable the generation of a base flood elevation (BFE) map. Storms are characterized by their landfall characteristics (pressure deficit, radius to maximum winds, forward speed, heading, and landfall location) and a sparse grid algorithm determines the optimal set of storm parameter combinations so that the inundation from any other storm parameter combination can be determined. The end result is a sample of a few hundred (197 for SW FL) optimal storms which are simulated using a dynamically coupled storm surge / wave modeling system CH3D-SSMS (Sheng et al. 2010). The limited historical climatology (1940 - 2009) is explored to develop probabilistic characterizations of the five storm parameters. The probability distributions are discretized and the inundation response of all parameter combinations is determined by the interpolation in five-dimensional space of the optimal storms. The surge response and the associated joint probability of the parameter combination is used to determine the flood elevation with a 1% annual probability of occurrence. The limited historical data constrains the accuracy of the PDFs of the hurricane characteristics, which in turn affect the accuracy of the BFE maps calculated. To offset the deficiency of limited historical dataset, this study presents a different method for producing coastal inundation maps. Instead of using the historical storm data, here we adopt 33,731 tracks that can represent the storm climatology in North Atlantic basin and SW Florida coasts. This large quantity of hurricane tracks is generated from a new statistical model

  19. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  20. Dynamics of severe storms through the study of thermospheric-tropospheric coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe local thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes can be studied through the coupling between the thermosphere and the troposphere. Reverse group ray tracing computations of acoustic-gravity waves, observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array, show that the wave sources are in the neighborhood of storm systems and the waves are excited prior to the storms. It is suggested that the overshooting and ensuing collapse of convective turrets may be responsible for generating the acoustic-gravity waves observed. The results of this study also show that the study of wave-wave resonant interactions may be a potential tool for investigating the dynamical behavior of severe storm systems using ionospheric observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe storms.

  1. Storm surge along the Pacific coast of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, Peter D.; Flick, Reinhard E.; Miller, Arthur J.

    2017-01-01

    Storm surge is an important factor that contributes to coastal flooding and erosion. Storm surge magnitude along eastern North Pacific coasts results primarily from low sea level pressure (SLP). Thus, coastal regions where high surge occurs identify the dominant locations where intense storms make landfall, controlled by storm track across the North Pacific. Here storm surge variability along the Pacific coast of North America is characterized by positive nontide residuals at a network of tide gauge stations from southern California to Alaska. The magnitudes of mean and extreme storm surge generally increase from south to north, with typically high amplitude surge north of Cape Mendocino and lower surge to the south. Correlation of mode 1 nontide principal component (PC1) during winter months (December-February) with anomalous SLP over the northeast Pacific indicates that the dominant storm landfall region is along the Cascadia/British Columbia coast. Although empirical orthogonal function spatial patterns show substantial interannual variability, similar correlation patterns of nontide PC1 over the 1948-1975 and 1983-2014 epochs with anomalous SLP suggest that, when considering decadal-scale time periods, storm surge and associated tracks have generally not changed appreciably since 1948. Nontide PC1 is well correlated with PC1 of both anomalous SLP and modeled wave height near the tide gauge stations, reflecting the interrelationship between storms, surge, and waves. Weaker surge south of Cape Mendocino during the 2015-2016 El Niño compared with 1982-1983 may result from changes in Hadley circulation. Importantly from a coastal impacts perspective, extreme storm surge events are often accompanied by high waves.

  2. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  3. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  4. Observing storm surges from space: Hurricane Igor off Newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Dake; Deyoung, Brad; Chen, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Coastal communities are becoming increasingly more vulnerable to storm surges under a changing climate. Tide gauges can be used to monitor alongshore variations of a storm surge, but not cross-shelf features. In this study we combine Jason-2 satellite measurements with tide-gauge data to study the storm surge caused by Hurricane Igor off Newfoundland. Satellite observations reveal a storm surge of 1 m in the early morning of September 22, 2010 (UTC) after the passage of the storm, consistent with the tide-gauge measurements. The post-storm sea level variations at St. John's and Argentia are associated with free equatorward-propagating continental shelf waves (with a phase speed of ~10 m/s and a cross-shelf decaying scale of ~100 km). The study clearly shows the utility of satellite altimetry in observing and understanding storm surges, complementing tide-gauge observations for the analysis of storm surge characteristics and for the validation and improvement of storm surge models.

  5. 2001 Leonid Meteoroid Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and discuss their possible consequences and mitigation strategies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Meteors , Leonids, Meteoroids, Spacecraft, Meteor showers , Impact...release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We present the latest predictions about the November 2001 Leonid Meteor storms

  6. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  7. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  8. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  9. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  10. Mapping Hurricane Inland-Storm Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; East, J. W.; Dorsey, M. E.; McGee, B. D.; McCallum, B. E.; Pearman, J. L.; Sallenger, A. H.; Holmes, R. R.; Berembrock, C. E.; Turnipseed, D. P.; Mason, R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Historically, hurricane-induced storm-tides were documented through analysis of structural or vegetative damage and high-water marks. However, these sources rarely provided quantitative information about the timing of the flooding, the sequencing of multiple paths by which the storm-surge waters arrived, or the magnitude of waves and wave run-up comprising floodwaters. In response to these deficiencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed and deployed an experimental mobile storm-surge network to provide detailed time-series data for selected hurricane landfalls. The USGS first deployed the network in September 2005 as Hurricane Rita approached the Texas and Louisiana coasts. The network for Rita consisted of 32 water-level and 14 barometric-pressure monitoring sites. Sensors were located at distances ranging from a few hundred feet to approximately 30 miles inland and sampled 4,000 square miles. Deployments have also occurred for Hurricanes Wilma, Gustav, and Ike. For Hurricane Gustav, more than 100 water level sensors were deployed. Analysis of the water-level data enable construction of maps depicting surge topography through time and space, essentially rendering elements of a 3-dimensional view of the storm-surge dome as it moves on- shore, as well as a map of maximum water-level elevations. The USGS also acquired LIDAR topographic data from coasts impacted by hurricanes. These data reveal extreme changes to the beaches and barrier islands that arise from hurricane storm surge and waves. By better understanding where extreme changes occur along our coasts, we will be able to position coastal structures away from hazards.

  11. An Evaluation of a High-Resolution Operational Wave Forecasting System in the Adriatic Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    while at sea, allowing five ADCP moorings to be deployed just before a bora storm and associated storm waves arrived. The model was also able to...simulate the spatial gradients in significant wave height observed by in-situ and remote-sensing measurements for a particular sirocco storm case study...sea, allowing five ADCP moorings to be deployed just before a bora storm and associated storm waves arrived. The model was also able to simulate the

  12. Seismological Evidence for Increasing Oceanic Storm Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Aster, R.; Bromirski, P.; Hutt, C.; Gee, L.

    2007-12-01

    Several major tropical cylones during the 2007 hurricane season have generated wave-induced seismic signals detectable by seismic instrumentation in the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) (ex. Flossy, Dean, Felix, Henrietta). From these storms, seismic background energy "noise" between 6 and 25 s period is dominated by a persistent "microseism" arising from energy transferred from ocean gravity waves to elastic Rayleigh waves. Microseism power spectral density (PSD) is dominated by a primary peak (10-20s) that is generated by waves breaking on coastlines and by a (much stronger) secondary peak centered near (5-10s) that is generated by the half-period periodic variation of sea bottom pressure due to standing wave components generated from wave-wave interaction of the ocean gravity wave field. The microseism peaks can vary in amplitude by several orders of magnitude due to station proximity to coastlines and wave amplitudes, which have a strong seasonal dependence. Such observations demonstrate the utility of microseisms as an integrative proxy for assessing long-term and regional scale sea swell changes induced by changes in global storm activity. We examine changes in the microseism amplitude and use it as a proxy for decadal-scale changes in storm-wave amplitude, a topic of considerable interest in the debate about the impact of global climate change on oceanic storm frequency and intensity. High-quality continuous digital records from the GSN and its precursor networks now extend back over 30 years at the longest-operational sites. In this abstract, we demonstrate the development of an oceanic storm trigger algorithm by observing the current storm season using data from the ANSS and GSN and then apply the resulting methods to an investigation of oceanic wave climate changes over three decades. Limited spatial distribution and length of long-term seismic observational records causes some ambiguity for climate change

  13. Climatic aspects of the variability of extreme storm occurrence and intensity in the western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Nikolay; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Nataliya; Eftimova, Petya

    2010-05-01

    The study considers potential changes in the storm occurrence and intensity over the western Black Sea through analysis of long term series of wind and wave conditions simulated with relatively high resolution. It is a result of coupling of atmospheric and wave models and spans period of more than 62 years (1948-2009). The wave hincast is driven with the global reanalysis data produced by ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR. The continuous dataset is reduced to a series of storms of considerable intensity and/or destructive potential through application of thresholds for filtration of weak seas. They are primarily based on storm impact on the coastal environment and principles for statistical representativeness. The climatic variability of occurrence and intensity of the selected extreme events is analyzed using different criteria such as number of stormy days, wind speed and wave height extremes. Particular consideration is paid to the mean wave energy per storm season and specific storm energy that are found to be more indicative for understanding of the storm pattern variability. Despite of the overall tendency for storminess decrease, there are no incontestable evidences corroborating a marked reduction of the storm intensity. While the total number of stormy hours diminishes, an increase of the mean wave energy is discernible. This is found to be caused by a change of the storm pattern: storms with short growth stage, energetic stage of full development and fast decay are more frequently observed. This storm type still provides significant energy input in the coastal zone and is able of producing considerable morphological impact, including damages. Such storms develop abruptly, therefore, timely prediction and mitigation of hazard effects become more complex to tackle with. Hence, little potential seems to exist for reducing the vulnerability to storms in the western Black Sea. That means the societies must begin to take such far-reaching implications into serious

  14. National Economic Development Procedures Manual. Coastal Storm Damage and Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    information on precipitation, temperature and river levels is more institutionalized than gathering and recording of coastal storm events. Coastal events may...be linked to a combination of events such as local wind-driven 9 waves, ocean swells, extremely high tides, and high river flows in adjacent coastal...streams. D. EROSION LOSSES OF A SINGLE EVENT - River bank erosion is often not storm- or flood-related. Bank erosion in meandering streams, for example

  15. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  16. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  17. Great magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Lee, Yen T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tang, Frances

    1992-01-01

    The five largest magnetic storms that occurred between 1971 to 1986 are studied to determine their solar and interplanetary causes. All of the events are found to be associated with high speed solar wind streams led by collisionless shocks. The high speed streams are clearly related to identifiable solar flares. It is found that: (1) it is the extreme values of the southward interplanetary magnetic fields rather than solar wind speeds that are the primary causes of great magnetic storms, (2) shocked and draped sheath fields preceding the driver gas (magnetic cloud) are at least as effective in causing the onset of great magnetic storms (3 of 5 events) as the strong fields within the driver gas itself, and (3) precursor southward fields ahead of the high speed streams allow the shock compression mechanism (item 2) to be particularly geoeffective.

  18. Storms and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and 'greater' counterpart.

  19. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Wilson, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Barnes, J.; Cantor, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.

  20. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Wilson, R.; Barnes, J.; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M. A.; Cantor, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward-traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.lt;img border=0 src="images/P22A-03_B.jpg">

  1. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  2. Critical storm thresholds for morphological changes in the western Black Sea coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Ekaterina V.; Valchev, Nikolay N.; Andreeva, Nataliya K.; Eftimova, Petya T.

    2012-03-01

    Storms are one of the phenomena determining the short-term evolution of coasts by influencing the erosion and accretion patterns of the beaches. Some severe storms could cause loss of beach sediments, partial or complete destruction of coastal structures and even threaten human life and occupation. Bearing this in mind, it is essential to comprehend, which storms could evoke transient, although in some instances, significant morphological changes, and which could be considered as hazardous and result in catastrophic damage. This issue implies establishment of a set of critical thresholds for storm impact on coastal morphology. The paper presents a regional scale analysis of the near-shore morphological response of five beaches to storms of varying intensity. The analysis is accomplished by coupling of offshore wave and cross-shore profile data obtained for the Bulgarian Black sea coast. The historical storm pattern is reconstructed through hindcast using a coupled wave model system, while resulting morphological changes, such as shoreline alteration and cross-shore profile evolution, are estimated by analysis of long-term series of coastal measurements performed in 1970-1977 and 2008-2010. The storm impact thresholds are set in terms of integral wave energy taking into account both storm pattern and duration. It was found that the morphological response to storm impact is site specific and single-value thresholds are difficult to be established even at regional scale. Nevertheless, a range of critical storm thresholds is proposed. Thus, storms with integral wave energy varying within threshold values 0.4-0.7 × 106 J m-2 are regarded as capable of significant morphological changes, while less energetic events are supposed to influence predominately the seasonal beach dynamics. Furthermore, storms with integral wave energy higher than 0.7 × 106 J m-2 represent potentially destructive events that can change irreversibly the beach pattern or damage impact.

  3. Observing Storm Surges from Space: A New Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Dake; de Young, Brad; Chen, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    Coastal tide gauges can be used to monitor variations of a storm surge along the coast, but not in the cross-shelf direction. As a result, the cross-shelf structure of a storm surge has rarely been observed. In this study we focus on Hurricane Igor-induced storm surge off Newfoundland, Canada. Altimetric observations at about 2:30, September 22, 2010 UTC (hours after the passage of Hurricane Igor) reveal prominent cross-shelf variation of sea surface height during the storm passage, including a large nearshore slope and a mid-shelf depression. A significant coastal surge of 1 m derived from satellite altimetry is found to be consistent with tide-gauge measurements at nearby St. John's station. The post-storm sea level variations at St. John's and Argentia are argued to be associated with free equatorward-propagating continental shelf waves (with phase speeds of 11-13 m/s), generated along the northeast Newfoundland coast hours after the storm moved away from St. John's. The cross-shelf e-folding scale of the shelf wave was estimated to be ~100 km. We further show approximate agreement of altimetric and tide-gauge observations in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Isaac (2012). The study for the first time in the literature shows the robustness of satellite altimetry to observe storm surges, complementing tide-gauge observations for the analysis of storm surge characteristics and for the validation and improvement of storm surge models.

  4. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  5. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  6. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are ... nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper ...

  7. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  8. Recovery from major storms

    SciTech Connect

    Holeman, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Public Service Company of Oklahoma's transmission and distribution system is in tornado alley, and it seems the number of tornados hitting some part of the system is increasing each year. In the past 30 years, Tulsa his been hit 7 times, and experienced 3 very wide and destructive tornado storm systems between 1971 and 1975.

  9. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  10. Thresholds for storm impacts on an exposed sandy coastal area in southern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, L. P.; Vousdoukas, M. V.; Ferreira, Ó.; Rodrigues, B. A.; Matias, A.

    2012-03-01

    Storms are one of the most important phenomena responsible for coastal erosion. Their destructive power presents major challenges for coastal management, and knowledge of their characteristics and associated consequences is therefore of paramount importance. In this study, thresholds for storm impacts are defined for a sandy coast in southern Portugal (Faro beach, Ria Formosa) using two different approaches: i) hydrodynamic conditions associated with historical storm impacts (i.e., infrastructural damage); and (ii) computed maximum wave run-up values (RHIGH) compared with beach morphology. Damage thresholds are defined as limits above which the action of a storm exceeds beach front response capability and starts to act directly on human infrastructures. According to method (i), four different thresholds were defined. For individual storms directed from the SW the threshold is a significant wave height of 4.7 m with a storm duration of 2 days, and for storms directed from the SE is a significant wave height of 6 m with a storm duration of at least 2 days. Regarding storm groups, for those directed from the SW the threshold is 2 storms lasting at least 2 days each with significant wave heights greater than 3.5 m, whilst for those directed from the SE the threshold is 3 short storms (lasting 1 day each) with significant wave height over 3.9 m. The return period for the SW storm group threshold is just 1.7 years. For method (ii), beach morphological parameters (DHIGH — highest elevation of the frontal dune; DLOW — elevation of the dune base; and tanβf — foreshore slope) were determined for five chosen cross-shore profiles along the study area, and RHIGH computed for different hydrodynamic conditions. Results were validated through field observations of storm impacts. The lowest thresholds for overwash are along the central part of the study area where a dune crest is absent due to human occupation. The highest thresholds for overwash are on those profiles where

  11. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  12. Facilitating Adaptation to Changing Storm Surge Patterns in Western Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. A.; Holman, A.; Reynolds, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal regions of North America are already experiencing the effects of climate change and the consequences of new storm patterns and sea level rise. These climate change effects are even more pronounced in western Alaska where the loss of sea ice in early winter and spring are exposing the coast to powerful winter storms that are visibly altering the landscape, putting coastal communities at risk, and are likely impacting important coastal wildlife habitat in ways we don't yet understand. The Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative has funded a suite of projects to improve the information available to assist managers and communities to adapt changes in coastal storms and their impacts. Projects range from modeling tide, wave and storm surge patters, to ShoreZone and NHD mapping, to bathymetry mapping, community vulnerability assessments and risks to important wildlife habitat. This group of diverse projects has helped stimulate momentum among partners which will lead to better tools for communities to respond to dangerous storms. For example, the State of Alaska and NOAA are working together to compile a series of community-scale maps that utilize best-available datasets to streamline communication about forecasted storm surges, local elevations and potentially impacted infrastructure during storm events that may lead to coastal flooding.

  13. Abnormal Central Pulsatile Hemodynamics in Adolescents With Obesity: Higher Aortic Forward Pressure Wave Amplitude Is Independently Associated With Greater Left Ventricular Mass.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; DiPietro, Amy; Darracott-Woei-A-Sack, Kathryn; Kapuku, Gaston K

    2016-11-01

    We hypothesized that increased aortic forward pressure wave amplitude (Pf), which is determined by characteristic impedance (Zc) in the proximal aorta, is the primary hemodynamic determinant of obesity-associated higher left ventricular (LV) mass in adolescents. Aortic pulsatile hemodynamics were measured noninvasively in 60 healthy adolescents (age 14-19 years; 42% male; 50% black) by sequential recordings of pulse waveforms via tonometry, brachial blood pressure, and pulsed Doppler and diameter of the LV outflow tract using 2-dimensional echocardiography. Adolescents who were overweight/obese (n=23; age 16.0±0.3 years; body mass index ≥85th percentile) had higher LV mass index, brachial and carotid systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, normalized Zc and Pf compared with adolescents with healthy weight (n=37; 16.7±0.3 years; body mass index <85th percentile, all P<0.01). In contrast, there was no difference in mean or diastolic blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, or aortic backward wave amplitude (all P>0.05). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis that included age, sex, race, normalized Zc, and brachial systolic blood pressure revealed that body mass index (B±SE; 0.49±0.20, P=0.02, R(2)=0.26), aortic Pf (0.22±0.07; P<0.02, R(2) change=0.11), and cardiac output (2.82±1.02, P<0.01; R(2) change=0.08) were significant correlates of LV mass index (total R(2)=0.44, P<0.01). These findings suggest that higher aortic Pf is a major hemodynamic determinant of increased LV mass in adolescents with elevated adiposity. Improper matching between aortic diameter and pulsatile flow during early systole potentially contributes to the early development of LV hypertrophy in childhood obesity.

  14. Impacts of storm chronology on the morphological changes of the Formby beach and dune system, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, P.; Brown, J.; Karunarathna, H.

    2015-07-01

    Impacts of storm chronology within a storm cluster on beach/dune erosion are investigated by applying the state-of-the-art numerical model XBeach to the Sefton coast, northwest England. Six temporal storm clusters of different storm chronologies were formulated using three storms observed during the 2013/2014 winter. The storm power values of these three events nearly halve from the first to second event and from the second to third event. Cross-shore profile evolution was simulated in response to the tide, surge and wave forcing during these storms. The model was first calibrated against the available post-storm survey profiles. Cumulative impacts of beach/dune erosion during each storm cluster were simulated by using the post-storm profile of an event as the pre-storm profile for each subsequent event. For the largest event the water levels caused noticeable retreat of the dune toe due to the high water elevation. For the other events the greatest evolution occurs over the bar formations (erosion) and within the corresponding troughs (deposition) of the upper-beach profile. The sequence of events impacting the size of this ridge-runnel feature is important as it consequently changes the resilience of the system to the most extreme event that causes dune retreat. The highest erosion during each single storm event was always observed when that storm initialised the storm cluster. The most severe storm always resulted in the most erosion during each cluster, no matter when it occurred within the chronology, although the erosion volume due to this storm was reduced when it was not the primary event. The greatest cumulative cluster erosion occurred with increasing storm severity; however, the variability in cumulative cluster impact over a beach/dune cross section due to storm chronology is minimal. Initial storm impact can act to enhance or reduce the system resilience to subsequent impact, but overall the cumulative impact is controlled by the magnitude and number

  15. Impacts of storm chronology on the morphological changes of the Formby beach and dune system, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, P.; Brown, J.; Karunarathna, H.

    2015-04-01

    Impacts of storm chronology within a storm cluster on beach/dune erosion are investigated by applying the state-of-the-art numerical model XBeach to the Sefton coast, northwest England. Six temporal storm clusters of different storm chronologies were formulated using three storms observed during the 2013/14 winter. The storm power values of these three events nearly halve from the first to second event and from the second to third event. Cross-shore profile evolution was simulated in response to the tide, surge and wave forcing during these storms. The model was first calibrated against the available post-storm survey profiles. Cumulative impacts of beach/dune erosion during each storm cluster were simulated by using the post-storm profile of an event as the pre-storm profile for each subsequent event. For the largest event the water levels caused noticeable retreat of the dune toe due to the high water elevation. For the other events the greatest evolution occurs over the bar formations (erosion) and within the corresponding troughs (deposition) of the upper beach profile. The sequence of events impacting the size of this ridge-runnel feature is important as it consequently changes the resilience of the system to the most extreme event that causes dune retreat. The highest erosion during each single storm event was always observed when that storm initialised the storm cluster. The most severe storm always resulted in the most erosion during each cluster, no matter when it occurred within the chronology, although the erosion volume due to this storm was reduced when it was not the primary event. The greatest cumulative cluster erosion occurred with increasing storm severity; however, the variability in cumulative cluster impact over a beach/dune cross-section due to storm chronology is minimal. Initial storm impact can act to enhance or reduce the system resilience to subsequent impact, but overall the cumulative impact is controlled by the magnitude and number of

  16. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  17. Distant storms as drivers of environmental change at Pacific atolls.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Garton, David W; Collen, John D; Zwartz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The central Pacific Ocean with its many low lying islands and atolls is under threat from sea level rise and increased storm activity. Here, we illustrate how increasing frequency and severity of large scale storm events associated with global climate change may be particularly profound at the local scale for human populations that rely on lagoon systems for provision of a variety of goods and services. In August 2011 a storm originating in the Southern Ocean caused a large amplitude ocean swell to move northward through the Pacific Ocean. Its arrival at Palmyra Atoll coincided with transient elevated sea surface height and triggered turnover of the lagoon water column. This storm-induced change to the lagoon reflects long distance connectivity with propagated wave energy from the Southern Ocean and illustrates the increasing threats generated by climate change that are faced by human populations on most low-lying Pacific islands and atolls.

  18. Distant Storms as Drivers of Environmental Change at Pacific Atolls

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jonathan P. A.; Garton, David W.; Collen, John D.; Zwartz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The central Pacific Ocean with its many low lying islands and atolls is under threat from sea level rise and increased storm activity. Here, we illustrate how increasing frequency and severity of large scale storm events associated with global climate change may be particularly profound at the local scale for human populations that rely on lagoon systems for provision of a variety of goods and services. In August 2011 a storm originating in the Southern Ocean caused a large amplitude ocean swell to move northward through the Pacific Ocean. Its arrival at Palmyra Atoll coincided with transient elevated sea surface height and triggered turnover of the lagoon water column. This storm-induced change to the lagoon reflects long distance connectivity with propagated wave energy from the Southern Ocean and illustrates the increasing threats generated by climate change that are faced by human populations on most low-lying Pacific islands and atolls. PMID:24498232

  19. Coastal Storm Surge Analysis: Storm Forcing. Report 3. Intermediate Submission No. 1.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    evident in the 156 equally spaced storm set. The distribution of the differences has a long positive (overestimate) tail that is not evident in the...Research and Development Center 1261 Duck Road Kitty Hawk, NC 27949 Brian Blanton Renaissance Computing Institute 100 Europa Drive, Suite 540...estimate flood risk, wave height risk, wind speed risk, etc. For coastal risk assessment, the introduction of long duration synthetic tracks that

  20. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  1. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  2. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  3. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  4. Storm Surge Simulation and Ensemble Forecast for Hurricane Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricane Irene, raking the U.S. East Coast during the period of 26-30 August 2011, caused widespread damage estimated at $15.8 billion and was responsible for 49 direct deaths (Avila and Cangialosi, 2011). Although the most severe impact in the northeastern U.S. was catastrophic inland flooding, with its unusually large size, Irene also generated high waves and storm surges and caused moderate to major coastal flooding. The most severe surge damage occurred between Oregon Inlet and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina (NC). Significant storm surge damage also occurred along southern Chesapeake Bay, and moderate and high surges were observed along the coast from New Jersey (NJ) northward. A storm surge of 0.9-1.8 m caused hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage in New York City (NYC) and Long Island, despite the fact that the storm made landfall to the west of NYC with peak winds of no more than tropical storm strength. Making three U.S. landfalls (in NC, NJ, and NY), Hurricane Irene provides a unique case for studying storm surge along the eastern U.S. coastline. We apply the hydrodynamic model ADCIRC (Luettich et al. 1992) to conduct surge simulations for Pamlico Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and NYC, using best track data and parametric wind and pressure models. The results agree well with tidal-gauge observations. Then we explore a new methodology for storm surge ensemble forecasting and apply it to Irene. This method applies a statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to generate large numbers of storm ensembles under the storm environment described by the 51 ECMWF ensemble members. The associated surge ensembles are then generated with the ADCIRC model. The numerical simulation is computationally efficient, making the method applicable to real-time storm surge ensemble forecasting. We report the results for NYC in this presentation. The ADCIRC simulation using the best track data generates a storm surge of 1.3 m and a storm tide of 2.1 m

  5. Unsteady Storm Drainage Modeling Within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers GSSHA Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    13 SWMM ...and flood magnitudes. Using the storm sewer module of SWMM and a two-dimensional diffusive wave overland flow routine, the authors showed that the...inability to model supercritical flow (NWS, 2003). SWMM Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Storm Water Management Model ( SWMM

  6. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. A methodology for modeling barrier island storm-impact scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mickey, Rangley C.; Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2017-02-16

    A methodology for developing a representative set of storm scenarios based on historical wave buoy and tide gauge data for a region at the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The total water level was calculated for a 10-year period and analyzed against existing topographic data to identify when storm-induced wave action would affect island morphology. These events were categorized on the basis of the threshold of total water level and duration to create a set of storm scenarios that were simulated, using a high-fidelity, process-based, morphologic evolution model, on an idealized digital elevation model of the Chandeleur Islands. The simulated morphological changes resulting from these scenarios provide a range of impacts that can help coastal managers determine resiliency of proposed or existing coastal structures and identify vulnerable areas within those structures.

  9. Scaling coastal dune elevation changes across storm-impact regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Joseph W.; de Bakker, Anouk T. M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme storms drive change in coastal areas, including destruction of dune systems that protect coastal populations. Data from four extreme storms impacting four geomorphically diverse barrier islands are used to quantify dune elevation change. This change is compared to storm characteristics to identify variability in dune response, improve understanding of morphological interactions, and provide estimates of scaling parameters applicable for future prediction. Locations where total water levels did not exceed the dune crest experienced elevation change of less than 10%. Regions where wave-induced water levels exceeded the dune crest exhibited a positive linear relationship between the height of water over the dune and the dune elevation change. In contrast, a negative relationship was observed when surge exceeded the dune crest. Results indicate that maximum dune elevation, and therefore future vulnerability, may be more impacted from lower total water levels where waves drive sediment over the dune rather than surge-dominated flooding events.

  10. Morphological impacts of extreme storms on sandy beaches and barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Sallenger, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Historical extreme storms that struck the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast regions of the United States caused several different styles of morphological response and resulted in a wide range of washover penetration distances. The post- storm erosional responses included dune scarps, channel incisions, and washouts, whereas depositional responses included perched fans, washover terraces, and sheetwash lineations. Maximum inland extent of washover penetration ranged from approximately 100 to 1000 m and estimated sediment volumes associated with these deposits ranged from about 10 to 225 m 3/m of beach. Unusual styles of morphological response (sheetwash lineations and incised channels) and maximum washover penetration distances are closely correlated, and they also correspond to storm intensity as denned by the Saffir-Simpson wind-speed scale. The regional morphological responses and washover penetration distances are controlled primarily by the interactions among heights and durations of storm surge relative to adjacent land elevations, differences in water levels between the ocean and adjacent lagoon, constructive and destructive interference of storm waves, and alongshore variations in nearshore bathymetry. For barrier segments that are entirely submerged during the storm, impacts can be enhanced by the combined influences of shallow water depths and organized flow within the wind field. The greatest washover penetrations and sediment accumulations are products of shallow water, confined flow, and high wind stress. Transport and deposition of washover sediments across barrier islands and into the adjacent lagoon are common processes along the Gulf of Mexico but not along the western Atlantic Ocean. This fundamental difference in storm impact underscores how microtidal and mesotidal barriers respond respectively to extreme storms, and provides insight into how different types of barrier islands will likely respond to future extreme storms and to a relative rise in sea

  11. Factors controlling storm impacts on coastal barriers and beaches - A preliminary basis for near real-time forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of ground conditions and meteorological and oceanographic parameters for some of the most severe Atlantic and Gulf Coast storms in the U.S. reveals the primary factors affecting morphological storm responses of beaches and barrier islands. The principal controlling factors are storm characteristics, geographic position relative to storm path, timing of storm events, duration of wave exposure, wind stress, degree of flow confinement, antecedent topography and geologic framework, sediment textures, vegetative cover, and type and density of coastal development. A classification of commonly observed storm responses demonstrates the sequential interrelations among (1) land elevations, (2) water elevations in the ocean and adjacent lagoon (if present), and (3) stages of rising water during the storm. The predictable coastal responses, in relative order from high frequency beach erosion to low frequency barrier inundation, include: beach erosion, berm migration, dune erosion, washover terrace construction, perched fan deposition, sheetwash, washover channel incision, washout formation, and forced and unforced ebb flow. Near real-time forecasting of expected storm impacts is possible if the following information is available for the coast: a detailed morphological and topographic characterization, accurate storm-surge and wave-runup models, the real-time reporting of storm parameters, accurate forecasts of the storm position relative to a particular coastal segment, and a conceptual model of geological processes that encompasses observed morphological changes caused by extreme storms.

  12. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kyle R; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Sibeck, David G; Watt, Clare E J

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  13. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  14. On the Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Projections for Infrastructure Risk Analysis and Adaptation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storm surge can cause coastal hydrology changes, flooding, water quality changes, and even inundation of low-lying terrain. Strong wave actions and disruptive winds can damage water infrastructure and other environmental assets (hazardous and solid waste management facilities, w...

  15. Morphological response and coastal dynamics associated with major storm events along the Gulf of Lions Coastline, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, M.; Balouin, Y.; Belon, R.

    2012-03-01

    Along the coast, anticipating the different morphological responses induced by storm events is crucial for managers to evaluate coastal risks and to develop the best measures to mitigate them. In this paper, a methodology is developed to determine the best storm intensity parameter to derive storm thresholds for different morphological responses. The methodology is applied to the northern part of the Gulf of Lions coastline where storm events can induce important morphological changes. These include shoreline retreat, beach and dune erosion, significant migration of nearshore bars, overwashes and even breaches of coastal barriers, as well as damage to coastal defences and coastal infrastructure. In order to evaluate historical storm characteristics and impact, an extensive review was undertaken to obtain quantitative datasets (beach profiles, wave records), aerial photographs and more qualitative information on morphological evolution and coastal damage. Re-analysis of hydrodynamic and morphology data was undertaken, and hindcast wave modelling results were used to characterised storm intensities. The methodology developed to evaluate storm thresholds consists of obtaining morphological evolution indicators (evidence of breaching, overwash processes, volume variations and migration of morphological patterns) that can be directly linked to a storm event and its characteristics. Results demonstrate that in such a quasi-non-tidal wave-dominated environment, with intermediate double-barred beach shoreface morphology, major coastal changes occur following the maximum significant wave height reached during the storm, or else according to maximum wave run-up elevation regarding upper beach impact, a wave height dependant parameter. Inversely storm surge (and water level) alone, as well as total storm energy, do not explain any storm impact scale. Storm-specific datasets indicate that important morphological evolution is observed during moderate storm events (significant

  16. Storm surges formation in the White and Barents Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobrolyubov, Sergey; Korablina, Anastasia; Myslenkov, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of storm surges in the Arctic seas are of high priority in Russia due to the active development of offshore oil and gas, construction of facilities in the coastal zone, as well as for the safety of navigation. It is important to study the variability of surges, to predict this phenomena and subsequent economic losses, thus including such information into the Russian Arctic Development Program 2020. Surges in the White and Barents Seas are caused mainly by deep cyclones of two types: "diving" from the north (88% of all cyclones) and western. The average height of the storm surges in the White Sea is 0.6-0.9 m. An average duration of storm surges is about 80 hours. Mathematical modeling is used to analyze the characteristics of storm surges formation in the Dvina Bay of the White Sea, and in the Varandey village on the Barents Sea coast. Calculating storm surge heights in the White and Barents seas is performed using the ADCIRC model on an unstructured grid with a step from 20 km in the Barents Sea to 100 m in the White Sea. Unstructured grids allowed keeping small features of the coastline of the White and Barents seas, small islands and shallow banks, and assessing their impact on the development and transformation of wind-generated waves. The ADCIRC model used data of wind field reanalysis CFSv2. The storm surges were simulated for the time period from 1979 to 2010 and included scenarios with / without direct atmospheric pressure forcing, waves and tides. Numerical experiments have revealed distribution of storm surges in channels of the Northern Dvina River delta. The storm surges spreads in the model from the north-north-west of the Dvina Bay. As storm surge moves from the wellhead to the seaside estuary of the Northern Dvina (district Solombala), its height increases from 0.5 to 2 m. We also found a non-linear interaction of the surge and tide during the phase of surge destruction. This phenomenon is the highest in the period of low water, and the

  17. Ionospheric and satellite observations for studying the dynamic behavior of typhoons and the detection of severe storms and tsunamis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, typhoons (hurricanes) and tsunamis can be studied through the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere. Reverse ray tracing computations of acoustic-gravity waves observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array show that wave sources are in the nearby storm systems and that the waves are excited prior to the storms. Results show that ionospheric observations, together with satellite observations, can contribute to the understanding of the dynamical behavior of typhoons, severe storms and tsunamis.

  18. [Electrodiagnosis of neuromuscular diseases--a syndrome of monomelic amyotrophy with spinal hemiatrophy, anti-GM1 antibodies and abnormal F-waves (MASH)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R

    1994-12-01

    Electrodiagnosis rests upon sound anatomical and physiological bases of the peripheral nervous system, which are utilized for the dynamic process of differential diagnosis. If clinical and electrophysiological findings do not conform to any of the previously known diseases, there may be a chance of identifying a new entity. As an example, we report nine Japanese patients with unilateral atrophy of the distal upper limb and the cervical cord. Symptoms typically began insideously in young adulthood, progressed for a few years and then stabilized. Distribution of the muscle weakness usually corresponded to the territories of a few peripheral nerves, although not accompanied by sensory deficits. Serum anti-GM1 IgG antibodies were elevated in 6 out of 9 patients. Electrophysiological testings disclosed absent or delayed F-waves in the nerve involved. No long tract signs of the cord were demonstrated, although the spinal cord atrophy was extensive in some patients. Three showed partial clinical improvement after cyclophosphamide therapy or intravenous immunoglobulin. These findings may suggest that this entity is immune-mediated as in multifocal motor neuropathy, with its blunt of immune attack directed not only to peripheral motor nerves but also to spinal motor neurons.

  19. Dawn-dusk asymmetry and adiabatic dynamic of the radiation belt electrons during magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid L.

    2016-09-01

    The changes of the latitudinal profiles of outer belt energetic electrons during magnetic storms are mostly explained by the precipitation into the loss cone caused by VLF and EMIC waves or by the scattering into the magnetopause. In present work, energetic electron dynamics during magnetic storm of August 29-30, 2004 we attributed at most to the adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories and Dst effect. This conclusion was based on the analysis of dawn-dusk asymmetry of the electron latitudinal profiles measured by low altitude polar orbiter SERVIS-1 and on the coincidence of pre-storm and after-storm profiles of radiation belt electrons and protons.

  20. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  1. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  2. The Cause of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, T.

    2001-12-01

    Although the cause of magnetic storms is important issue, the exact mechanism of the storm development is still controversial. Two mechanisms of storm development are considered. One is that the frequent substorm activity injects high-energy particles to the inner magnetosphere; the other is that the enhanced convection plays a role. Further, Iyermori and Rao [1996] shows that the substorm reduces the development of storms. On the contrary, magnetospheric convections and magnetic storms correspond different solar wind parameter. It is well known that the variations of the magnetospheric convection correspond to merging electric field (Em) by Kan and Lee [1979]. However, the variations of the magenetic storm correspond Ey [e.g. Burton et al., 1975]. This suggests that magnetospheric convection and magnetic storm are independent phenomena. However, we cannot discuss the independency of two phenomena since the difference between Em and Ey is small, under usual solar wind condition. We have analyzed Nov. 8, 1998 storm event, since the big difference between Em and Ey exists during 6 hours. The enhancement of Ey terminates first, and Em continues to enhance more than 6 hours after that. Although the variation of the storm estimated from SYM-H(Dst) index corresponds to Ey, that of the magnetospheric convection estimated from PC index corresponds to Em. This shows that the development of the storm terminate although the magnetospheric convection still enhances. This result suggests that the development of magnetic storms is independent from enhanced convection and the magnetic storm is directly caused by the enhancement of Ey in the solar wind.

  3. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  4. Empirical STORM-E Model. [I. Theoretical and Observational Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Xu, Xiaojing; Bilitza, Dieter; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2013-01-01

    Auroral nighttime infrared emission observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite is used to develop an empirical model of geomagnetic storm enhancements to E-region peak electron densities. The empirical model is called STORM-E and will be incorporated into the 2012 release of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). The proxy for characterizing the E-region response to geomagnetic forcing is NO+(v) volume emission rates (VER) derived from the TIMED/SABER 4.3 lm channel limb radiance measurements. The storm-time response of the NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER is sensitive to auroral particle precipitation. A statistical database of storm-time to climatological quiet-time ratios of SABER-observed NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER are fit to widely available geomagnetic indices using the theoretical framework of linear impulse-response theory. The STORM-E model provides a dynamic storm-time correction factor to adjust a known quiescent E-region electron density peak concentration for geomagnetic enhancements due to auroral particle precipitation. Part II of this series describes the explicit development of the empirical storm-time correction factor for E-region peak electron densities, and shows comparisons of E-region electron densities between STORM-E predictions and incoherent scatter radar measurements. In this paper, Part I of the series, the efficacy of using SABER-derived NO+(v) VER as a proxy for the E-region response to solar-geomagnetic disturbances is presented. Furthermore, a detailed description of the algorithms and methodologies used to derive NO+(v) VER from SABER 4.3 lm limb emission measurements is given. Finally, an assessment of key uncertainties in retrieving NO+(v) VER is presented

  5. Communicating Storm Surge Forecast Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, J. A.; Rhome, J.

    2015-12-01

    When it comes to tropical cyclones, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property along the coastal United States. The coastal population density has dramatically increased over the past 20 years, putting more people at risk. Informing emergency managers, decision-makers and the public about the potential for wind driven storm surge, however, has been extremely difficult. Recently, the Storm Surge Unit at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida has developed a prototype experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to help communicate this threat more effectively by identifying areas most at risk for life-threatening storm surge. This prototype is the initial step in the transition toward a NWS storm surge watch/warning system and highlights the inundation levels that have a 10% chance of being exceeded. The guidance for this product is the Probabilistic Hurricane Storm Surge (P-Surge) model, which predicts the probability of various storm surge heights by statistically evaluating numerous SLOSH model simulations. Questions remain, however, if exceedance values in addition to the 10% may be of equal importance to forecasters. P-Surge data from 2014 Hurricane Arthur is used to ascertain the practicality of incorporating other exceedance data into storm surge forecasts. Extracting forecast uncertainty information through analyzing P-surge exceedances overlaid with track and wind intensity forecasts proves to be beneficial for forecasters and decision support.

  6. Analysis of a Storm-induced Surge Anomaly Under Climate Change with Focus on Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.; Bilskie, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of sea level rise (SLR) on hurricane storm surge and wind-waves is a non-linear process (Bilskie et al., 2014). Using a high-resolution physics-based numerical model, we examine shelf wave dynamics in general and a shelf anomaly in particular under global climate change scenarios, which include SLR and potential hurricane intensification. To begin it is noted that Hurricane Dennis (2005) produced local storm surge in Apalachee Bay of six to ten feet, but the National Hurricane Center advisory for the region forecast only four to six feet of storm surge. This forecast was based on the relatively weak wind forcing along the west Florida shelf, but the additional storm-induced surge was caused by a remotely forced shelf wave that propagated along the Florida shelf as a topographic Rossby wave (Morey et al.,2006).These mesoscale processed are studied under climate change scenarios using a state-of-the-art wind-waved hurricane storm surge model (SWAN+ADCIRC) of the northern Gulf of Mexico that encompasses the off-shore regions including the western North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. The finitie element model penetrates the shoreline along Florida's "Big Bend" region, the Florida panhandle, Alabama, and the Mississippi coast with high resolution that is sufficient to describe the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, for example. The large domain and fine mesh resolution included in the model permits the description, and non-linear interaction, of the physics associated with wind-generated waves and hurricane storm surge that produce storm-induced anomalies such as the Rossby wave generated during Hurricane Dennis. Examination of various wave statistics such as significant wave height, mean wave period and direction, and wave radiation stress gradients provide insight into future behavior of storm-induced shelf wave dynamics under global climate change scenarios. This study may impact future statistics and probability distributions for analysis of

  7. Risk Assessment of Hurricane Storm Surge for Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States and many other coastal areas around the world. Risk assessment of current and future hurricane storm surge provides the basis for risk mitigation and related decision making. This study investigates the hurricane surge risk for Tampa Bay, located on the central west coast of Florida. Although fewer storms have made landfall in the central west Florida than in regions farther west in the Gulf of Mexico and the east coast of U.S., Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge due to its geophysical features. It is surrounded by low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. Also, edge waves trapped on the west Florida shelf can propagate along the coastline and affect the sea level outside the area of a forced storm surge; Tampa Bay may be affected by storms traversing some distance outside the Bay. Moreover, when the propagation speed of the edge wave is close to that of a storm moving parallel to the coast, resonance may occur and the water elevation in the Bay may be greatly enhanced. Therefore, Tampa Bay is vulnerable to storms with a broad spectrum of characteristics. We apply a model-based risk assessment method to carry out the investigation. To estimate the current surge risk, we apply a statistical/deterministic hurricane model to generate a set of 1500 storms for the Tampa area, under the observed current climate (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) estimated from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis. To study the effect of climate change, we use four climate models, CNRM-CM3, ECHAM, GFDL-CM2.0, and MIROC3.2, respectively, to drive the hurricane model to generate four sets of 1500 Tampa storms under current climate conditions (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) and another four under future climate conditions of the IPCC-AR4 A1B emission scenario (represented by 2081-2100 statistics). Then, we apply two hydrodynamic models, the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model and the Sea

  8. The reduction of storm surge by vegetation canopies: Three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Lapetina, Andrew; Ma, Gangfeng

    2012-10-01

    Significant buffering of storm surges by vegetation canopies has been suggested by limited observations and simple numerical studies, particularly following recent Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. Here we simulate storm surge and inundation over idealized topographies using a three-dimensional vegetation-resolving storm surge model coupled to a shallow water wave model and show that a sufficiently wide and tall vegetation canopy reduces inundation on land by 5 to 40 percent, depending upon various storm and canopy parameters. Effectiveness of the vegetation in dissipating storm surge and inundation depends on the intensity and forward speed of the hurricane, as well as the density, height, and width of the vegetation canopy. Reducing the threat to coastal vegetation from development, sea level rise, and other anthropogenic factors would help to protect many coastal regions against storm surges.

  9. Laboratory measurements of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation a...

  10. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  11. Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S. A.; Newman, P. A.; Vasques, M.

    2010-12-01

    HS3 is one of five projects in NASA's Earth Venture program. The goal of HS3 is to enhance our understanding of the processes that underlie hurricane intensity change in the Atlantic Ocean basin. HS3 is motivated by hypotheses related to the roles of the large-scale environment and storm internal processes in hurricane intensity change as well as the controversial role of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) in tropical storm formation and intensification, the role of deep convection in the inner-core region of storms, and the evolution of storm structure and intensity during the process of transition into a more extratropical system. The HS3 objectives are: (1) to obtain critical measurements in the hurricane environment in order to identify the role of key factors such as large-scale wind systems (troughs, jet streams), Saharan air masses, African Easterly Waves and their embedded critical layers and (2) to observe and understand the three-dimensional mesoscale and convective-scale internal structures of tropical disturbances and cyclones and their role in intensity change. Past hurricane field campaigns have all faced the limitation of a relatively small sample of storms forming under a variety of scenarios and undergoing widely varying evolutions. The small sample is not only a function of tropical storm activity in any given year, but also the distance of storms from the base of operations. Addressing the science questions posed by HS3 requires sustained measurements over several years. HS3 will conduct a total of ten 30-hour flights during each of three one-month deployments using two NASA Global Hawk UASs. From mid-August to mid-September during 2012-2014, HS3 will be deployed from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, providing access to unrestricted air space and unprecedented access to hurricanes over the Atlantic ocean. HS3 utilizes a suite of advanced instruments to measure key characteristics of the storm environment and the hurricane’s internal structures. The

  12. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  13. Storm-induced response of a nearshore-bar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Holman, R.A.; Birkemeier, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    A nearshore-bar system was surveyed periodically through a storm and the following recovery period. The data showed a very rapid response of morphology to changing wave conditions and allowed various models on bar formation to be tested. Under low-energy conditions prior to the storm a small bar was surveyed 13 m offshore. Both the high reflectivity of the beach and the cross-shore distance to the bar are consistent with a model of sediment convergence at the node or antinode of a standing wave of incident period. Such a small-scale bar may be a common feature on beaches with steep foreshores and more gentle offshore slopes. With the increase in wave height during the storm, the bar became better developed and migrated offshore at rates up to 2.2 m h-1. The bar maintained its form in that the ratio of trough depth to crest depth ( ht hc) remained roughly constant. The bar was in no way related to processes which would cause the convergence of sediment in the breaker zone; through most of the storm the bar-crest distance offshore was typically only 10% of the surf-zone width. Analysis of the bar distance offshore in terms of a standing wave motion showed that the causative wave period must have been much longer than that of incident waves, probably on the order of a minute. Surf-zone wave data showed significant energy in the infragravity band at these periods although no definite link has been made. After the height of the storm, the bar had a crescentic morphology. The development of this morphology occurred very rapidly with parts of the bar migrating onshore at rates up to 1.2 m h-1. In contrast to the storm, during the recovery period ht hc varied by nearly a factor of three. Analysis of the offshore and longshore length scales showed the bar to be similar to one which would be generated by a standing mode 1 edge wave of period on the order of one minute. ?? 1985.

  14. Storms on Venus: Lightning-induced chemistry and predicted products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, K. H.

    2015-08-01

    Observations by many spacecraft that have visited Venus over the last 40 years appear to confirm the presence of lightning storms in the Venus atmosphere. Recent observations by Venus Express indicate that lightning frequency and power is similar to that on Earth. While storms are occurring, energy deposition by lightning into Venus atmospheric constituents will immediately dissociate molecules into atoms, ions and plasma from the high temperatures in the lightning column (>30,000 K) and the associated shock waves and heating, after which these atom and ion fragments of C,O,S,N,H-containing molecules will recombine during cooldown to form new sets of molecules. Spark and discharge experiments in the literature suggest that lightning effects on the main atmospheric molecules CO2, N2, SO2, H2SO4 and H2O will yield carbon oxides and suboxides (COm, CnOm), sulfur oxides (SnO, SnOm), oxygen (O2), elemental sulfur (Sn), nitrogen oxides (NO, N2O, NO2), sulfuric acid clusters (HnSmOx-.aHnSmOx e.g. HSO4-.mH2SO4), polysulfur oxides, carbon soot and other exotic species. While the amounts generated in lightning storms would be much less than that derived from photochemistry, during storms these species can build up in a small area and so their local concentrations may increase significantly. For a storm of 100×100 km, the increase could be ~5 orders of magnitude if they remain in the storm region for a period before becoming well-mixed. Some of these molecular species may be detectable by instruments onboard Venus Express while they are concentrated in the storm regions. We explore the diversity of new products likely created in lightning storms on Venus.

  15. Response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Codrescu, M. V.; Moffett, R. J.; Quegan, S.

    1994-01-01

    Four numerical simulations have been performed, at equinox, using a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model, to illustrate the response of the upper atmosphere to geomagnetic storms. The storms are characterized by an increase in magnetospheric energy input at high latitude for a 12-hour period; each storm commences at a different universal time (UT). The initial response at high latitude is that Joule heating raises the temperature of the upper thermosphere and ion drag drives high-velocity neutral winds. The heat source drives a global wind surge, from both polar regions, which propagates to low latitudes and into the opposite hemisphere. The surge has the character of a large-scale gravity wave with a phase speed of about 600 m/s. Behind the surge a global circulation of magnitude 100 m/s is established at middle latitudes, indicating that the wave and the onset of global circulation are manifestations of the same phenomena. A dominant feature of the response is the penetration of the surge into the opposite hemisphere where it drives poleward winds for a few hours. The global wind surge has a preference for the night sector and for the longitude of the magnetic pole and therefore depends on the UT start time of the storm. A second phase of the meridional circulation develops after the wave interaction but is also restricted, in this case by the buildup of zonal winds via the Coriolis interaction. Conservation of angular momentum may limit the buildup of zonal wind in extreme cases. The divergent wind field drives upwelling and composition change on both height and pressure surfaces. The composition bulge responds to both the background and the storm-induced horizontal winds; it does not simply rotate with Earth. During the storm the disturbance wind modulates the location of the bulge; during the recovery the background winds induce a diurnal variation in its position. Equatorward winds in sunlight produce positive ionospheric changes during the main driving

  16. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<-100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  17. Clouds and Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with

  18. The Study of Insurance Premium Rate GIS Mapping Considering the Storm and Flood Hazard Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, I. S.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the number of natural disaster occurrence is increasing because of abnormal changes of weather in Korea. In Korea the storm and flood insurance system is in effect to prevent these natural disasters. The national storm and flood insurance Premium rate is very low and the risk of adverse selection resides because of choosing by who lives in high risk area. To solve these problems, the storm and flood insurance rate map are required. In this study, the prototype of storm and flood insurance premium rate map of the Ulsan, Korea was made and the method of GIS analysis for the insurance premium rate calculating and the procedure of the Ulsan storm and flood insurance rate map were researched.

  19. Dust storm in Chad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Chad (lower left) and the surrounding wetlands are under increasing pressure from desertification. The encroachment of the Sahara occurs with creeping sand dunes and major dust storms, such as the one pictured in this MODIS image from October 28, 2001. The amount of open water (lighter green patch within the darker one) has declined markedly over the last decades and the invasion of dunes is creating a rippled effect through the wetlands that is all too clear in the high-resolution images. Growing population and increasing demands on the lake give it an uncertain future. The loss of such an important natural resource will have profound effects on the people who depend on the rapidly diminishing source of fresh water. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  1. Untangling boulder dislodgement in storms and tsunamis: Is it possible with simple theories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R.; Diplas, P.

    2015-03-01

    Boulders can move during storms and tsunamis. It is difficult to find a simple method to distinguish boulders moved by tsunami waves from those moved during storms in the field. In this contribution, we explore boulder dislodgement by storm and tsunami waves by solving an adapted version of Newton's Second Law of Motion in polar coordinates and defining a critical position for boulder dislodgement. We find that the boulder dislodgement is not only a function of the causative wave, but also of the roughness in the vicinity of the boulder and the slope angle. We employ the amplitude of storm and tsunami waves to dislodge boulders of given masses to evaluate if boulder dislodgement in storms can be untangled from boulder transport in tsunamis. As the main result of our numerical experiments, we find a significant difference between storm and tsunami waves to dislodge the same boulder for large masses and large roughness values. This allows us to conclude that simple theories are applicable to answer the questions asked in the title, but we argue only if they contain a critical dislodgement condition like the one presented here.

  2. Thermal Tides During the 2001 Martian Global-Scale Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Wilson, R. John; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Bandfield, Donald J.; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 (Mars Year 25) global dust storm radically altered the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. Using observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and Mars WRF general circulation model simulations, we examine the changes to thermal tides and planetary waves caused by the storm. We find that the extratropical diurnal migrating tide is dramatically enhanced during the storm, particularly in the southern hemisphere, reaching amplitudes of more than 20 K. The tropical diurnal migrating tide is weakened to almost undetectable levels. The diurnal Kelvin waves are also significantly weakened, particularly during the period of global expansion at Ls=200deg-210deg. In contrast, the westward propagating diurnal wavenumber 2 tide strengthens to 4-8 K at altitudes above 30km. The wavenumber 1 stationary wave reaches amplitudes of 10-12 K at 50deg-70degN, far larger than is typically seen during this time of year. The phase of this stationary wave and the enhancement of the diurnal wavenumber 2 tide appear to be responses to the high-altitude westward propagating equatorial wavenumber 1 structure in dust mixing ratio observed during the storm in previous works. This work provides a global picture of dust storm wave dynamics that reveals the coupling between the tropics and high-latitude wave responses. We conclude that the zonal distribution of thermotidal forcing from atmospheric aerosol concentration is as important to understanding the atmospheric wave response as the total global mean aerosol optical depth.

  3. Storm surge and river interaction in etuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskell, J.

    2012-04-01

    In coastal areas, particularly in regions developed on estuaries, extreme river flow can combine with storm surges to present a combined hazard. This combined risk is likely to be more prominent in estuaries where fluvial fresh water input comes from catchments in hilly regions where the dependence of extreme river discharge and sea level elevation can be most statistically significant (Svensson and Jones, 2004). The risk associated with these combined coastal hazards could increase due to climate change if there were an increase in the frequency of extreme weather events. The global (IPCC, 2007) and local (Woodworth et al., 2009) rise in mean sea-level will increase the magnitude of extreme sea levels and surges will act on a higher coastal sea level and therefore increase the risk to coastal property and infrastructure. This may be associated with an increase in precipitation during extreme storm events which will have a large impact on river flooding. Therefore, the need for accurate operational forecasting of storm events will increase with the focus shifting to changes in the extreme 'tail end' of the distribution of storm events. Ideally an operational model that integrates storm surge, wave and fluvial forecasting with inundation and simulates their combined influence would be most effective for planning with respect to flood plain development, evacuation and flood defence. Current operational storm surge models are typically based on two-dimensional depth-averaged shallow water equations (Flather, 2000). Inundation models often use an approximation of the original shallow water equations which neglect the inertial terms (Prestininzi et al., 2011). These 2D flood plain inundation models are often coupled with a 1D model of the main channel of a river or estuary which permits the exchange of mass but assumes a limited exchange of momentum (Bates et al., 2005). A finite volume model (FVCOM) is used to investigate the combined influence of storm surge and river

  4. Shoreline Change and Storm-Induced Beach Erosion Modeling: A Collection of Seven Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    seasonal variations in wave climate , such as changes in predominant direction and wave steepness, on shoreline position. Duration of Simulation The...used by both the shoreline change model and the nearshore wave transformation model to describe the characteristics of the wave climate . These are the...DTEC FpLE copy MISCELLANEOUS PAPER CERC-90-2 DSHORELINE CHANGE AND STORM-INDUCED BEACH EROSION MODELING: A COLLECTION OF SEVEN PAPERS Edited by

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  8. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  9. Effect of magnetic storms (substorms) on HF propagation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2013-07-01

    The manifestations of the so-called main ionospheric effect during geomagnetic storms (substorms) in the character of decameter-wave propagation are analyzed. On HF radio paths, the main effect is observed as variations in the signal amplitude and the MOF-LOF working frequency band similarly to the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer. Specifically, these parameters increase before the disturbance active phase, decrease during the active phase, and increase again after this phase. The propagation outside the great circle arc, the change in the propagation processes, and the HF radio noise behavior were also considered on these paths during storms (substorms). It is assumed that the storm (substorm) development onset can be predicted.

  10. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  11. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  13. Understanding the variability of an extreme storm tide along a coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M.; Schumann, G.; Bates, P.; Horsburgh, K.

    2013-05-01

    Correctly determining the peak storm tide height along the coastline, and expressing the associated natural variability, is essential for a robust prediction of coastal flood risk. A new approach is proposed that calculates a storm tide relationship (relative to a tide gauge) by using a storm surge model to describe the natural spatial variability based on the features of a large number of very high storm tides. Two historic flood events (1953 and 2007) were used to validate this characteristics approach along the East Anglia coastline (U.K.), and predicted water-levels were found to be in good agreement with tide gauge observations (Root Mean Squared Error of 36 cm), especially when compared to the method of assuming a storm tide of constant return period (Root Mean Squared Error of 59 cm). Detailed observations of storm tide height between tide gauge locations are rare; therefore, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was employed to calculate the LiDAR geo-referenced storm tide height along the North Somerset coastline of the Bristol Channel (U.K.). Two SAR observed "extreme" storm tide events were used to validate the characteristics approach between tide gauges (Root Mean Squared Error of 1.2 m and 0.7 m), and indicated the presence of localised wave effects to the observed storm tide height that could have a significant effect to flood risk estimates.

  14. Forecasting of Storm Surge Floods Using ADCIRC and Optimized DEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of storm surge flood forecasts is essential for improving preparedness for hurricanes and other severe storms and, in particular, for optimizing evacuation scenarios. An interactive database, developed by WorldWinds, Inc., contains atlases of storm surge flood levels for the Louisiana/Mississippi gulf coast region. These atlases were developed to improve forecasting of flooding along the coastline and estuaries and in adjacent inland areas. Storm surge heights depend on a complex interaction of several factors, including: storm size, central minimum pressure, forward speed of motion, bottom topography near the point of landfall, astronomical tides, and most importantly, maximum wind speed. The information in the atlases was generated in over 100 computational simulations, partly by use of a parallel-processing version of the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model. ADCIRC is a nonlinear computational model of hydrodynamics, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the US Navy, as a family of two- and three-dimensional finite element based codes. It affords a capability for simulating tidal circulation and storm surge propagation over very large computational domains, while simultaneously providing high-resolution output in areas of complex shoreline and bathymetry. The ADCIRC finite-element grid for this project covered the Gulf of Mexico and contiguous basins, extending into the deep Atlantic Ocean with progressively higher resolution approaching the study area. The advantage of using ADCIRC over other storm surge models, such as SLOSH, is that input conditions can include all or part of wind stress, tides, wave stress, and river discharge, which serve to make the model output more accurate.

  15. The responses of artificial embayed beaches to storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.

    2009-09-01

    The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy beaches largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy beaches and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain beach. With increasing wave energy, the beach will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and Beach, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative beach state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed beaches, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the beach from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) beaches due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged beach profile of two of the artificial embayed beaches of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed beaches under study are single-barred beaches subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The

  16. Storm-driven sediment transport in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Butman, B.; Dalyander, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Massachusetts Bay is a semi-enclosed embayment in the western Gulf of Maine about 50 km wide and 100 km long. Bottom sediment resuspension is controlled predominately by storm-induced surface waves and transport by the tidal- and wind-driven circulation. Because the Bay is open to the northeast, winds from the northeast ('Northeasters') generate the largest surface waves and are thus the most effective in resuspending sediments. The three-dimensional oceanographic circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is used to explore the resuspension, transport, and deposition of sediment caused by Northeasters. The model transports multiple sediment classes and tracks the evolution of a multilevel sediment bed. The surficial sediment characteristics of the bed are coupled to one of several bottom-boundary layer modules that calculate enhanced bottom roughness due to wave-current interaction. The wave field is calculated from the model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Two idealized simulations were carried out to explore the effects of Northeasters on the transport and fate of sediments. In one simulation, an initially spatially uniform bed of mixed sediments exposed to a series of Northeasters evolved to a pattern similar to the existing surficial sediment distribution. A second set of simulations explored sediment-transport pathways caused by storms with winds from the northeast quadrant by simulating release of sediment at selected locations. Storms with winds from the north cause transport southward along the western shore of Massachusetts Bay, while storms with winds from the east and southeast drive northerly nearshore flow. The simulations show that Northeasters can effectively transport sediments from Boston Harbor and the area offshore of the harbor to the southeast into Cape Cod Bay and offshore into Stellwagen Basin. This transport pattern is consistent with Boston Harbor as the source of silver found in the surficial sediments of Cape Cod Bay and

  17. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  18. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  19. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  20. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  1. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used throughout the world for planning, analysis and design related to stormwater runoff, combined and sanitary sewers, and other drainage systems in urban areas.

  2. Cloudsat Dissects Tropical Storm Ileana

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Tropical Storm Ileana on Aug. 27 at 20:40 UTC. The colors indicate intensity of reflected radar energy. The blue ar...

  3. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  4. Tropical Storm Faxai's Rainfall Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows Tropical Storm Faxai's rainfall rates on March 2 from a TRMM TMI/PR rainfall analysis being faded in over infrared cloud data from the TRMM VIRS instrument. Credit: SSAI/NASA, ...

  5. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Social Media Contact Us FAQS Publications Emergency Alerts Home Search × Close Search Enter Search Term(s): Languages × ... take when you receive a winter weather storm alert from the National Weather Service for your local ...

  6. Storm and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Yesterday's storm front was moving westward, today's moves eastward. Note the thick cloud cover and beautifully delineated cloud tops.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 72.1, Longitude 308.3 East (51.7 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Riding the storm out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, Josh

    2009-04-01

    I am standing on a bridge near the North Carolina coast. There is a light breeze, and I am enjoying some hazy sunshine. But this calm is an illusion: in a few minutes winds of up to 45ms-1 (100 mph) will sweep in again. The approaches to my section of the bridge are already drowned under 2.5 m of water, and my companions on this island are an eclectic mix of traumatized animals, including snakes, rats, wounded pelicans and frogs. Earlier, one of the snakes flew through the air past my truck. The animals and I have been drawn to this bridge by Hurricane Isabel, which has just slammed into the coastal islands of North Carolina, and at the moment we are in the calm, sunny eye of the storm. The animals are just trying to survive on the area's only dry ground. But I have come to the bridge with a radar system on a truck and have spent a night and a day on it because I want to know what is happening inside this hurricane.

  8. Stability of a coral reef fish community following a catastrophic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, William J.

    1983-08-01

    In January 1980, a severe 3 day storm struck the normally protected leeward coral reefs of Kona, Hawaii. Waves generated by the storm, which was estimated to be a once in 20 40 year occurrence, were in excess of 6 m and caused extensive reef destruction and shoreline alteration. Shallow nearshore areas were denuded of most bottom cover and marine life. Damage to corals was extensive with broken colonies of the coral Porites compressa occurring down to depths of 27 m. Pronounced algal blooms occurred in a clearly defined sequence subsequent to the storm. The patterns of both coral destruction and algal succession were similar to those described on other storm damaged reefs. Fish mortality directly attributable to the storm was slight and the few dead fishes noted were either surge zone or tide pool species. After the storm the shallow reef flat was devoid of resident fishes while deeper areas contained many fishes which had moved from shallower water. This habitat shift substantially reduced the immediate impact of the storm on the fish community. Despite considerable habitat destruction that resulted from the storm, there were no decreases in species or population abundances on five 25 m2 quadrats monitored for 23 months before and 16 months after the storm. Similarly, the numbers of triggerfish sheltering within an area increased even though the storm reduced the number of available shelter holes. The shelter and space-related carrying capacity of these areas prior to the storm may therefore not have been reached. Recolonization of evacuated areas by fishes began shortly after the storm and within 16 months many areas had regained their prestorm appearances. Large numbers of individuals remained however, in their shifted locations.

  9. Role of wetlands in attenuation of storm surges using coastal circulation model (ADCIRC), Chesapeake Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Mithun; Ferreira, Celso; Lawler, Seth

    2014-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia is subject to storm surge from extreme weather events nearly year-round; from tropical storms and hurricanes during the summer and fall, (e.g., hurricanes Isabel [2003] and Sandy [2012]), and from nor'easters during the winter (e.g., winter storms Nemo and Saturn [2013]). Coastal wetlands can deliver acute fortification against incoming hurricane storm surges. Coastal wetlands and vegetation shape the hydrodynamics of storm surge events by retaining water and slowing the propagation of storm surge, acting as a natural barrier to flooding. Consequently, a precise scheme to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels was also prerequisite. Two wetland sites were chosen in the Chesapeake Bay region for detailed cataloging of vegetation characteristics, including: height, stem diameter, and density. A framework was developed combining these wetlands characterizations with numerical simulations. Storms surges were calculated using Coastal circulation model (ADCIRC) coupled to a wave model (SWAN) forced by an asymmetric hurricane vortex model using an unstructured mesh (comprised of 1.8 million nodes) under a High Performance Computing environment. The Hurricane Boundary Layer (HBL) model was used to compute wind and pressure fields for historical tropical storms and for all of the synthetic storms. Wetlands were characterized in the coupled numerical models by bathymetric and frictional resistance. Multiple model simulations were performed using historical hurricane data and hypothetical storms to compare the predicted storm surge inundation resulting from various levels of wetlands expansion or reduction. The results of these simulations demonstrate the efficacy of wetlands in storm surge attenuation and also the outcome will scientifically support planning of wetlands restoration projects with multi-objective benefits for society.

  10. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  11. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  12. Association of Isolated Minor Non-specific ST-Segment and T-Wave Abnormalities with Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged, Biracial Population: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Liu, Kiang; Ning, Hongyan; Daviglus, Martha L.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Isolated minor non-specific ST segment and T wave abnormalities (NSSTTA) are common and known to be independent electrocardiographic risk markers for future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The association of NSSTTA with subclinical atherosclerosis is not well defined, but has been postulated as a potential mechanism of association with future clinical events. Methods and Results We studied participants from the Year 20 examination of the middle-aged, biracial CARDIA cohort. This examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG), coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). ECGs were coded using both Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC) criteria. Isolated minor STTA was defined by MC as presence of MC 4-3, 4-4, 5-3, or 5-4, and by NC as presence of NC 5.8. ECGs with secondary causes of STTA (i.e. LVH) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the cross-sectional association of isolated minor NSSTTA with CAC and CC-IMT. The study sample consisted of 2175 participants with an average age of 45 years (57% women and 43% black). No association was observed between NSSTTA and CAC. After multivariable-adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors, the presence of isolated minor NSSTTA remained significantly associated with the extent of CCIMT (OR 1.25 (1.06 – 1.48), p < 0.01). This association remained significant after further adjustment for CAC. Conclusions Isolated minor NSSTTA were associated with the extent of CCIMT, but not with CAC, in this middle-aged biracial cohort. Further study is needed to elucidate potential mechanisms for these findings. PMID:22952292

  13. Forecasting the impact of storm waves and sea-level rise on Midway Atoll and Laysan Island within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—a comparison of passive versus dynamic inundation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Berkowitz, Paul; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    Two inundation events in 2011 underscored the potential for elevated water levels to damage infrastructure and affect terrestrial ecosystems on the low-lying Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The goal of this study was to compare passive "bathtub" inundation models based on geographic information systems (GIS) to those that include dynamic water levels caused by wave-induced set-up and run-up for two end-member island morphologies: Midway, a classic atoll with islands on the shallow (2-8 m) atoll rim and a deep, central lagoon; and Laysan, which is characterized by a deep (20-30 m) atoll rim and an island at the center of the atoll. Vulnerability to elevated water levels was assessed using hindcast wind and wave data to drive coupled physics-based numerical wave, current, and water-level models for the atolls. The resulting model data were then used to compute run-up elevations using a parametric run-up equation under both present conditions and future sea-level-rise scenarios. In both geomorphologies, wave heights and wavelengths adjacent to the island shorelines increased more than three times and four times, respectively, with increasing values of sea-level rise, as more deep-water wave energy could propagate over the atoll rim and larger wind-driven waves could develop on the atoll. Although these increases in water depth resulted in decreased set-up along the islands’ shorelines, the larger wave heights and longer wavelengths due to sea-level rise increased the resulting wave-induced run-up. Run-up values were spatially heterogeneous and dependent on the direction of incident wave direction, bathymetry, and island configuration. Island inundation was modeled to increase substantially when wave-driven effects were included, suggesting that inundation and impacts to infrastructure and terrestrial habitats will occur at lower values of predicted sea-level rise, and thus sooner in the 21st century, than suggested

  14. Temperature changes over storms from measurements of spacecraft TIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypenko, S. Motsyk, O.; Kozak, L.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we have studied changes of mesospheric temperature over the powerful storms Wilma, Haitang, and Katrina using measurements of the space vehicle TIMED. We have found the temperature increasing at the altitude range 80-100 km. We have found the explanations for the obtained results by the dissipation of the gravity waves. Propagation of atmospheric gravity waves in a non-isothermal, windless atmosphere, with taking into account the viscosity and the thermal conductivity, has also been modelled in this work. We have determined that the maximum of amplitude of the atmospheric-gravity waves at the considered characteristics corresponds to altitudes of near 90 km (mesopause). It was found that the main factor influencing propagation and dissipation of the wave in such cases is the vertical temperature gradient. Viscosity and thermal conductivity have less influence on the wave amplitude.

  15. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  16. Shallow water simulations of Saturn's giant storms at different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Melendo, E.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-04-01

    Shallow water simulations are used to present a unified study of three major storms on Saturn (nicknamed as Great White Spots, GWS) at different latitudes, polar (1960), equatorial (1990), and mid-latitude (2010) (Sánchez-Lavega, 2004; Sánchez-Lavega et al., 2011). In our model, the three GWS are initiated by introducing a Gaussian function pulse at the latitude of the observed phenomena with controlled horizontal size and amplitude. This function represents the convective source that has been observed to trigger the storm. A growing disturbance forms when the pulse reacts to ambient winds, expanding zonally along the latitude band of the considered domain. We then compare the modeled potential vorticity with the cloud field, adjusting the model parameters to visually get the closest aspect between simulations and observations. Simulations of the 2010 GWS (planetographic latitude ∼+40º, zonal velocity of the source ∼-30 m s-1) indicate that the Coriolis forces and the wind profile structure shape the disturbance generating, as observed, a long region to the east of the convective source with a high speed peripheral anticyclonic circulation, and a long-lived anticyclonic compact vortex accompanied by strong zonal advection on the southern part of the storm forming a turbulent region. Simulations of the equatorial 1990 GWS (planetographic latitude +12º-+5º, zonal velocity of the source 365-400 m s-1) show a different behavior because of the intense eastward jet, meridional shear at the equatorial region, and low latitude dynamics. A round shaped source forms as observed, with the rapid growth of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the north side of the source due to advection and to the strong meridional wind shear, whereas at the storm latitude the disturbance grows and propagates eastward. The storm nucleus is the manifestation of a Rossby wave, while the eastward propagating planetary-scale disturbance is a gravity-Rossby wave trapped around the equator

  17. Comparisons of hurricane-induced storm surge models and their operational use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Gay, P.; Rigney, J. P.; Doody, M.

    2010-12-01

    The most devastating hazard to human life, habitat and property associated with hurricanes is due to storm surge. The US Navy is often called upon to render humanitarian assistance and aid in disaster recovery in the wake of storm surge events. It is imperative, therefore, that the US Navy, as well as other agencies responsible for national security and safeguarding life and property, evaluate the options available for improvements to operational modeling capabilities. Improvement of storm surge forecast skill has advanced significantly during the past couple of decades as a result of finer resolution, more robust physics, and the inclusion of wave setup and wave-current interaction. Current storm surge models used by United States government agencies, the SLOSH model used by the National Hurricane Center, PCTides by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO), and ADCIRC by the US Army Corps of Engineers, have several drawbacks such as neglect of tides, wave effects, and insufficient spatial resolution. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare available hurricane-induced storm surge models in order to inform the selection of the optimal storm surge model for operational use at NAVOCEANO. This will involve investigation of operational capability and forecast skill of SLOSH, PCTides and ADCIRC, as well as several other storm surge models including CH3D-SSMS, Delft3D and FVCOM. The initial phase, presented in this poster, will entail a literature review to determine and summarize the recent and current state of storm-surge model comparisons in the scientific, industry, and government communities. Consideration will be given to the relative importance of improved inputs to the models (wind-fields and storm track/intensity and associated hurricane prediction models) as compared with model selection.

  18. Storm Evolution of Directional Seas in Shallow Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Technology, and Ms. Judy Roughton of College of the Albemarle, Elizabeth City, NC. Dr. R. T. Guza, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Mr. Lockhart...that used in the CERC Wave Information Studies (Resio, Vincent, and Corson 1982) to the storm events examined in this report. In conjunction with this...C. L., and Corson , W. D. (1982). "Objective specifi- cation of atlantic ocean wind fields from historical data," WIS Report 4, U.S. Army Engineer

  19. Hindcast storm events in the Bering Sea for the St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet Regions, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; McCall, Robert T.; van Rooijen, Arnold; Norris, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study provides viable estimates of historical storm-induced water levels in the coastal communities of Gambell and Savoonga situated on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, as well as Unalakleet located at the head of Norton Sound on the western coast of Alaska. Gambell, Savoonga, and Unalakleet are small Native Villages that are regularly impacted by coastal storms but where little quantitative information about these storms exists. The closest continuous water-level gauge is at Nome, located more than 200 kilometers from both St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet. In this study, storms are identified and quantified using historical atmospheric and sea-ice data and then used as boundary conditions for a suite of numerical models. The work includes storm-surge (temporary rise in water levels due to persistent strong winds and low atmospheric pressures) modeling in the Bering Strait region, as well as modeling of wave runup along specified sections of the coast in Gambell and Unalakleet. Modeled historical water levels are used to develop return periods of storm surge and storm surge plus wave runup at key locations in each community. It is anticipated that the results will fill some of the data void regarding coastal flood data in western Alaska and be used for production of coastal vulnerability maps and community planning efforts.

  20. Experimental investigation of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation are not fully understood. K...

  1. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  2. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  4. Variations of Morphologic Changes induced by Tropical Storm Debby along Three Barrier Island, West-Central Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Roberts, T.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical Storm Debby generated sustained high waves and elevated water levels for nearly three days from June 24th to 26th, 2012, inducing substantial changes in beach and nearshore morphology. In addition, the storm winds and high waves approached the coast from a highly oblique angle from the south, driving substantial northward longshore sand transport, opposite to the regional net annual southward transport. A total of 145 beach and nearshore profiles along 3 adjacent barrier islands were surveyed 2 weeks before and one week after the storm impact. Overall, dune, beach, intertidal, and immediate subtidal areas suffered erosion, while deposition was measured over the nearshore bar. Beach recovery in the form of ridge and runnel development occurred as the storm energy subsided. Substantial longshore variations of storm-induced beach changes were measured, including both severe dune/beach/berm erosion and storm berm accretion, and both onshore and offshore migration of nearshore bar. Factors controlling these longshore variations include: 1) the oblique approaching of the storm forcing, 2) pre-storm beach morphology and chronic erosional or accretional trends, 3) sediment supply, and 4) tidal inlet and beach interactions. Wide spreading dune scarping occurred along the 30-km studied coast. Based on the pre- and post-storm survey data, a balanced sediment budget is obtained accounting for sand volume loss from dune, beach, intertidal, and subtidal zones, and sand gains over the nearshore bar and along the northern sections of the beach.

  5. Arecibo observations of ionospheric perturbations associated with the passage of Tropical Storm Odette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. L.; Aponte, N.; Earle, G. D.; Sulzer, M.; Larsen, M. F.; Peng, G. S.

    2006-11-01

    A suite of instruments including incoherent scatter radar, ionosonde, and a satellite-bourne GPS receiver observed the ionosphere immediately following the passage of a tropical storm. Tropical Storm Odette formed on 4 December 2003 and proceeded northeasterly over the next 4 days, passing within 600 km of the Arecibo Observatory (AO). On the night of 7-8 December AO measured F region plasma densities and velocities nearly coincident with the storm. Large velocity variations, 10-80 m/s, are evident in the plasma drift components. The variations appear wave-like with an average period of 90 min at 367 km. Zonal drifts were observed with magnitudes significantly greater than commonly observed for similar geomagnetic conditions. The Ramey ionosonde observed intense midlatitude spread F on the night following the closest passage of the storm. GPS occultations within the storm path showed an increase in gravity wave activity and F region scintillation. Combining the local increase in gravity wave activity with the large drift variations and dominant meridional electric field observed immediately following the storm's traversal of the flux tube coincident with the AO observing volume provide insight into coupling between mesoscale weather systems and the ionosphere.

  6. Multi-station observation of ionospheric irregularities over South Africa during strong geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant Bertillas; Cilliers Pierre, J.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents results pertaining to the response of the mid-latitude ionosphere to strong geomagnetic storms that occurred from 31 March to 02 April 2001 and 07-09 September 2002. The results are based on (i) Global Positioning Systems (GPSs) derived total electron content (TEC) variations accompanying the storm, (ii) ionosonde measurements of the ionospheric electrodynamic response towards the storms and (iii) effect of storm induced travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) on GPS derived TEC. Ionospheric data comprising of ionospheric TEC obtained from GPS measurements, ionograms, solar wind data obtained from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and magnetic data from ground based magnetometers were used in this study. Storm induced features in vertical TEC (VTEC) have been obtained and compared with the mean VTEC of quiet days. The response of the mid-latitude ionosphere during the two storm periods examined may be characterised in terms of increased or decreased level of VTEC, wave-like structures in VTEC perturbation and sudden enhancement in hmF2 and h‧F. The study reveals both positive and negative ionospheric storm effects on the ionosphere over South Africa during the two strong storm conditions. These ionospheric features have been mainly attributed to the travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) as the driving mechanism for the irregularities causing the perturbations observed. TEC perturbations due to the irregularities encountered by the satellites were observed on satellites with pseudo random numbers (PRNs) 15, 17, 18 and 23 between 17:00 and 23:00 UT on 07 September 2002.

  7. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Springtime North Polar Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-321, 12 December 2002

    As on the Earth, many severe storms brew in the martian polar regions. Here, temperature contrasts between the cold carbon dioxide ('dry ice') seasonal frost cap and the warm ground adjacent to it--combined with a flow of cool polar air evaporating off the cap--sweeps up dust and funnels it into swirling dust storms along the cap edge. The dust storms shown here were observed during the recent northern spring by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in May 2002. The picture is a mosaic of daily global images from the MOC wide angle cameras. The north polar cap is the bright, frosty surface at the top.

  9. Agents to reduce cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term "cytokine storm" in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock.

  10. Hindcast of extreme sea states in North Atlantic extratropical storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, Sonia; Guedes Soares, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the variability of freak wave parameters around the eye of northern hemisphere extratropical cyclones. The data was obtained from a hindcast performed with the WAve Model (WAM) model forced by the wind fields of the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). The hindcast results were validated against the wave buoys and satellite altimetry data showing a good correlation. The variability of different wave parameters was assessed by applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) technique on the hindcast data. From the EOF analysis, it can be concluded that the first empirical orthogonal function (V1) accounts for greater share of variability of significant wave height (Hs), peak period (Tp), directional spreading (SPR) and Benjamin-Feir index (BFI). The share of variance in V1 varies for cyclone and variable: for the 2nd storm and Hs V1 contains 96 % of variance while for the 3rd storm and BFI V1 accounts only for 26 % of variance. The spatial patterns of V1 show that the variables are distributed around the cyclones centres mainly in a lobular fashion.

  11. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  12. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  13. National Severe Storms Forecast Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The principal mission of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is to maintain a continuous watch of weather developments that are capable of producing severe local storms, including tornadoes, and to prepare and issue messages designated as either Weather Outlooks or Tornado or Severe Thunderstorm Watches for dissemination to the public and aviation services. In addition to its assigned responsibility at the national level, the NSSFC is involved in a number of programs at the regional and local levels. Subsequent subsections and paragraphs describe the NSSFC, its users, inputs, outputs, interfaces, capabilities, workload, problem areas, and future plans in more detail.

  14. Research on Historical Records of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Alex, S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    In recent times, there has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs and concomitant magnetic storms. Magnetic storms are the most dramatic and perhaps important component of space weather effects on Earth. Super-intense magnetic storms (defined here as those with Dst < -500 nT, where Dst stands for the disturbance storm time index that measures the strength of the magnetic storm) although relatively rare, have the largest societal and technological relevance. Such storms can cause life-threatening power outages, satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. However, the data for such magnetic storms is rather scarce. For example, only one super-intense magnetic storm has been recorded (Dst=-640 nT, March 13, 1989) during the space-age (since 1958), although such storms may have occurred many times in the last 160 years or so when the regular observatory network came into existence. Thus, research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a good data base for intense and super-intense magnetic storms. From the application of knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of storms gained from the spaceage observations applied to the super-intense storm of September 1-2, 1859, it has been possible to deduce that an exceptionally fast (and intense) magnetic cloud was the interplanetary cause of this geomagnetic storm with a Dst -1760 nT, nearly 3 times as large as that of March 13, 1989 super-intense storm. The talk will focus on super-intense storms of September 1-2, 1859, and also discuss the results in the context of some recent intense storms.

  15. GPM Sees Powerful Storms in Tropical Storm Hermine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a 3-D animated flyby of Tropical Storm Hermine created using radar data from the GPM core satellite. On Aug. 31 at 4 p.m. EDT GPM found rainfall occurring at a rate of over 9.9 inches (251 ...

  16. Intensification of Pacific storm track linked to Asian pollution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Fan, Jiwen; Wu, Dong L.; Molina, Mario J.

    2007-01-01

    Indirect radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols by modification of cloud processes poses the largest uncertainty in climate prediction. We show here a trend of increasing deep convective clouds over the Pacific Ocean in winter from long-term satellite cloud measurements (1984–2005). Simulations with a cloud-resolving weather research and forecast model reveal that the increased deep convective clouds are reproduced when accounting for the aerosol effect from the Asian pollution outflow, which leads to large-scale enhanced convection and precipitation and hence an intensifed storm track over the Pacific. We suggest that the wintertime Pacific is highly vulnerable to the aerosol–cloud interaction because of favorable cloud dynamical and microphysical conditions from the coupling between the Pacific storm track and Asian pollution outflow. The intensified Pacific storm track is climatically significant and represents possibly the first detected climate signal of the aerosol–cloud interaction associated with anthropogenic pollution. In addition to radiative forcing on climate, intensification of the Pacific storm track likely impacts the global general circulation due to its fundamental role in meridional heat transport and forcing of stationary waves. PMID:17374719

  17. Attribution of storm surge events in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klehmet, Katharina; Burkhardt, Rockel

    2016-04-01

    In November 1995 and 2006 severe storm surges occurred along the German Baltic Sea coast. Water level heights of 1.8 m above sea level were observed at tide gauges in German coastal cities as e.g. Wismar and Flensburg. Within the attribution science an interesting aspect to consider is whether individual extreme events of e.g. heat waves, droughts or storm surges can be related to human-induced climate change or natural climate variability. The question arises whether these individual storm surges of 1995 and 2006 in the Baltic Sea have changed due to human influence on climate or whether the knowledge is still too vague to obtain robust information of attribution. We explore this question using two 15-member ensembles of Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 3-A (HadGEM3-A) as atmospheric forcing data for the regional ocean model TRIM-NP to downscale with 12.8 km spatial resolution and to calculate water level in the Baltic Sea. The ensemble of HadGEM3-A consists of two multi-decadal experiments from 1960-2013 - one with and one without anthropogenic forcings representing the actual and the natural climate respectively. This study, which is part of the EUCLEIA project (EUropean CLimate and weather Events: Interpretation and Attribution), will describe assessments of the human influence on the probability of occurrence of storm surge events in the German Baltic Sea.

  18. Templates of Change: Storms and Shoreline Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Robert; Hayden, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Presents results of research designed to assess and predict the storm-related hazards of living on the coast. Findings suggest that certain sections of coastline are more vulnerable than others to storm damage. (WB)

  19. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  20. Satellite View of 2 Trop. Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    System 98L exploded into Tropical Storm Irene on Saturday, August 20. This GOES-13 Video shows Tropical Storm Harvey making landfall in Belize (just beneath the Yucatan Peninsula) and moving into t...

  1. ENSO and winter storms in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cayan, D.R.; Bromirski, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of North Pacific winter storms that penetrate the California coast drives the winds, sea level, precipitation and streamflow that are crucial influences on coastal processes. There is considerable variability of these storm characteristics, in large part owing to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO} phenomenon. There is a great contrast of the storm characteristics during the El Nino phase vs. the La Nina phase, with the largest scale, southerly extensive winter storms generated during El Nino.

  2. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  3. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Regulations that require the retention and/or treatment of frequent, small storms that dominate runoff volumes and pollutant loads are becoming more common. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  4. Numerical simulations to account for boulder movements on Lanyu Island, Taiwan: tsunami or storm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mamoru; Arashiro, Yasuhisa; Shiga, Shota

    2014-12-01

    Boulders that originated from the Holocene coral terrace and coral reef are distributed on the coral terrace or talus on the shore of Lanyu Island, Taiwan. We employed numerical simulation of storm waves and estimated whether the boulders could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years, by larger storm waves with return periods of hundreds of years, or by tsunamis. The coral boulders are distributed between 36 and 128 m from the shoreline at elevations of 2.7 to 9.3 m. The sizes of the boulders are in the range 0.3 to 6.4 m. The boulder volume and a-axis length versus distance from the shore show weak and moderate correlation ( r = 0.21 and 0.48), respectively. We reproduced the runup of waves using the equation of continuity for a two-dimensional non-compressive fluid and the Navier-Stokes formula. In order to handle the free surface of the fluid, the volume of fluid method was applied. For the flow velocity to move the boulder, we employed the theoretical formula for the transport of boulders. We used the wave height for a return period of 50 years and set the height of the input wave to 13.1 m. The results show that all the large boulders on Lanyu Island could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years. Moreover, the computations show that most of the boulders could not have been transported by tsunamis generated by the Mw8.7 earthquakes. The ages of two boulders indicate that they were transported after 340 and 6,330 years ago. If these boulders were moved by tsunamis several hundred years ago, they would have been relocated subsequently by storm waves.

  5. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  6. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  7. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  8. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  9. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  10. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  11. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  12. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  13. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  14. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  15. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  16. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  17. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  18. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  19. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  20. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  1. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  2. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  3. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  4. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  5. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  6. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  7. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  8. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  9. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  10. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  11. The geological effects of hurricanes on coral reefs and the interpretation of storm deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoffin, T. P.

    1993-11-01

    Hurricanes occur in belts 7° to 25° north and south of the equator. Reefs growing in these belts suffer periodic damage from hurricane-generated waves and storm surge. Corals down to 20m depth may be broken and removed, branching colonies being much more susceptible to breakage than upright massive forms. Sand cays may be washed away and former storm ridges may migrate to leeward across reef flats to link with islands. Reef crest and reef front coral debris accumulate as talus at the foot of the fore-reef slope, on submarine terraces and grooves, on the intertidal reef flat as storm ridges of shingle or boulders and isolated blocks of reef framework, as accreting beach ridges of leeward migrating shingle, as lobes and wedges of debris in back-reef lagoons, as drapes of carbonate sand and mud in deep off-reef locations in the fore-reef and lagoonal areas. In addition to the coarse debris deposited, other features may aid the recognition of former hurricane events, including the assemblage of reef biota, its species composition and the structure of the skeletons; graded internal sediments in framework cavities; characteristic sequences of encrusting organisms; characteristic shapes of reef flat microatoll corals; and submarine cement crusts over truncated reef surfaces. The abundance of reef flat storm deposits whose ages cluster around 3000 4000 y BP in certain parts of the world most likely relate to a slight fall in relative sea level rather than an increase in storminess during that period. A higher frequency of storms need not result in more reef flat storm deposits. The violence of the storm relative to normal fair-weather conditions influences the extent of damage; the length of time since the previous major storm influences the amount of coral debris created; the length of time after the hurricane, and before a subsequent storm influences the degree of stabilization of reef-top storm deposits and hence their chances of preservation.

  12. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  13. Energization of outer radiation belt electrons during storm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Asif; Waters, C. L.; Sciffer, M. D.; Menk, F. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use test particle simulations incorporating an MHD model of ULF wave propagation in the magnetosphere with realistic ionosphere boundary conditions to study electron energization in the dayside outer Van Allen radiation belt, referenced to in situ particle and wave observations. On 7 January 2011 the THEMIS spacecraft detected 3 and 4-5 mHz waves simultaneous with flux enhancement of >10 keV electrons during the early recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm. We find that internal energization of equatorially mirroring electrons via nonresonant ULF wave-particle interactions can explain these observations. The wave poloidal components cause radial drift of electrons, increasing (decreasing) their kinetic energy as they move inward (outward). Electrons with initial kinetic energies of a few keV can be energized to double these values within an hour by interaction with the 3 mHz waves. The energization rate is somewhat less for the 4-5 mHz waves. An increase in the ionospheric conductance decreases the power of the fast mode wave, reducing radial drift velocities and hence decreasing the rate of energization. The fast mode poloidal field varies with radial distance and longitude, and this also affects energization. Electrons which drift outward encounter a region where the toroidal field due to the field line resonance becomes dominant and produces strong azimuthal drift. These electrons become trapped in an L-shell range just outward of the resonance region and are not energized.

  14. Enhancement of wind stress evaluation method under storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjian; Yu, Xiping

    2016-12-01

    Wind stress is an important driving force for many meteorological and oceanographical processes. However, most of the existing methods for evaluation of the wind stress, including various bulk formulas in terms of the wind speed at a given height and formulas relating the roughness height of the sea surface with wind conditions, predict an ever-increasing tendency of the wind stress coefficient as the wind speed increases, which is inconsistent with the field observations under storm conditions. The wave boundary layer model, which is based on the momentum and energy conservation, has the advantage to take into account the physical details of the air-sea interaction process, but is still invalid under storm conditions without a modification. By including the energy dissipation due to the presence of sea spray, which is speculated to be an important aspect of the air-sea interaction under storm conditions, the wave boundary layer model is improved in this study. The improved model is employed to estimate the wind stress caused by an idealized tropical cyclone motion. The computational results show that the wind stress coefficient reaches its maximal value at a wind speed of about 40 m/s and decreases as the wind speed further increases. This is in fairly good agreement with the field data.

  15. Wave Dissipation and Balance - NOPP Wave Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    with a common structure , and now estimating the “cumulative term” with the breaking probabilities used for the main dissipation term. This has led to a...captured by the new parameterizations, but that will require the analysis of more detailed measurement campaigns Ardhuin et al. (2011b). These result have...much more flat bias as a function of wave height (figure 1). A detailed case study of the February 2011 storm Quirin, in the North Atlantic, has shown

  16. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  17. Dust storms - Great Plains, Africa, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woiceshyn, P. M.; Krauss, R.; Minzner, R.; Shenk, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dust storms in the Great Plains of North America and in the Sahara Desert are analyzed on the basis of imagery from the geostationary Synchronous Meteorological Satellite. The onset time, location and areal extent of the dust storms are studied. Over land surfaces, contrast enhancement techniques are needed to obtain an adequate picture of dust storm development. In addition, infrared imagery may provide a means of monitoring the strong horizontal temperature gradients characteristic of dust cloud boundaries. Analogies between terrestrial dust storms and the airborne rivers of dust created by major Martian dust storms are also drawn.

  18. Storm Impacts on Potential Pathogens in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J. Stephen; Noble, Rachel T.; Kelly, Ginger M.; Hsieh, Jennifer L.

    2007-02-01

    Estuarine and coastal environments are susceptible to a variety of changes driven by tropical storms and hurricanes. The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season impressed upon the public the devastating impacts of storms on coastal populations and the possible social and public health costs. Storm surges and subsequent flooding have the potential to redistribute water and associated contaminants, including a wide range of chemicals and microorganisms. While this impact is difficult to observe through monitoring during larger storms, smaller storms provide opportunities to observe the mechanisms responsible for contaminant and microbial transport.

  19. Seasonal variations of planetary waves simulated by MarsWRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Toigo, A. D.; Richardson, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Observations indicate that traveling waves in the Martian atmosphere have distinct seasonality and are greatly influenced by major dust storms. In the northern hemisphere, traveling waves in the first few scale heights appear weakest around the winter solstice period and suppressed following the onset of a major dust storm, and those at higher levels exhibit different behavior. These waves are very important for flushing dust storm development, especially two to three days zonal wave number three waves. We have performed a series numerical simulations using the MarsWRF model to examine the general seasonality and variability of various planetary waves and the effects of major dust storms. The first set of simulations use prescribed dust distributions to represent both the background annual cycle and major dust storms occurring at different time. The model reproduce the seasonal variations of planetary waves well, but the simulated zonal wave number three waves are weaker than the observation. We plan to perform additional simulations with fully interactive dust to test the effect of dust distribution - dynamics feedback on the modeled waves and the development of flushing dust storms.

  20. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  1. Analysis of the global ionospheric disturbances of the March 2015 great storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Kong, Jian; Zhai, Changzhi

    2016-12-01

    The global ionospheric storm in March 2015 was investigated by using data from over 3000 GPS stations worldwide. In this study, total electron content (TEC), rate of TEC (ROT), and ROT's standard deviation rate of the TEC index, as well as the second-order difference operator TECT, were considered as main characteristic methods to distinguish ionosphereic disturbances. The results show that (1) based on the multiple methods above, we all observed that for the first time, there were three equatorward traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the main phase of this storm. In North America, the disturbance zone expanded to 40°N; the disturbance periods and AE peak stages were roughly synchronous. We suggest that these three TIDs were induced by the propagation of atmospheric gravity waves to low latitudes under the action of AE. (2) The most intense positive storm occurred over South America and the South Atlantic (over 300% enhancement; 00:00-05:00 UT on 18 March), whereas a negative storm was observed in the corresponding region of the Northern Hemisphere. Such inverse hemispheric asymmetry in intensity and structure can be explained by the variations of the thermospheric composition, the IMF By component, and the geomagnetic intensity. (3) On 18 March, a negative storm dominated globally (except at certain low latitudes), and tended to propagate equatorward and decay with time, which could be largely attributed to the storm circulation theory. And the evolution of the negative storm was further characterized by the foF2 variations of ionosondes.

  2. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively.

  3. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  4. [Diagnosis and treatment of thyroid storm].

    PubMed

    Akamizu, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Thyrotoxic storm is a life-threatening condition requiring emergency treatment. Neither its epidemiological data nor diagnostic criteria have been fully established. We clarified the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of thyroid storm using nationwide surveys and then formulate diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm. To perform the nationwide survey on thyroid storm, we first developed tentative diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm, mainly based upon the literature (the first edition). We analyzed the relationship of the major features of thyroid storm to mortality and to certain other features. Finally, based upon the findings of these surveys, we revised the diagnostic criteria. Thyrotoxic storm is still a life-threatening disorder with over 10% mortality in Japan.

  5. Thermospheric storms and related ionospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study of thermospheric storms for equinox and winter conditions is presented based on neutral-composition measurements from the Aeros-A neutral-atmosphere temperature experiment. The main features of the two storms as inferred from changes in N2, Ar, He, and O are described, and their implications for current theories of thermospheric storms are discussed. On the basis of the study of the F-region critical frequency measured from a chain of ground-based ionospheric stations during the two storm periods, the general characteristics of the ionospheric storms and the traveling ionospheric disturbances are described. It is suggested that the positive and negative phases of ionospheric storms are different manifestations of thermospheric storms.

  6. The responses of the thermosphere due to a geomagnetic storm: A MHD model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chang, S.

    1972-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamics theory was used to study the dynamic response of the neutral atmosphere to a geomagnetic storm. A full set of magnetohydrodynamic equations appropriate for the present problem is derived and their various orders of approximation are discussed in some detail. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of this theoretical model, the May 1967 geomagnetic storm data were used in the resulting set of nonlinear, time dependent, partial differential magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate variations of the thermosphere due to the storm. The numerical results are presented for wind speeds, electric field strength, and amount of joule heating at a constant altitude for the data recorded. Data show that the strongest thermospheric responses are at the polar region becoming weaker in the equatorial region. This may lead to the speculation that a thermospheric wave is generated in the polar region due to the geomagnetic storm which propagates towards the equator.

  7. Assessing storm events for energy meteorology: using media and scientific reports to track a North Sea autumn storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Important issues for energy meteorology are to assess meteorological conditions for normal operating conditions and extreme events for the ultimate limit state of engineering structures. For the offshore environment in northwest Europe, energy meteorology encompasses weather conditions relevant for petroleum production infrastructure and also the new field of offshore wind energy production. Autumn and winter storms are an important issue for offshore operations in the North Sea. The weather in this region is considered as challenging for extreme meteorological events as the Gulf of Mexico with its attendant hurricane risk. The rise of the Internet and proliferation of digital recording devices has placed a much greater amount of information in the public domain than was available to national meteorological agencies even 20 years ago. This contribution looks at reports of meteorology and infrastructure damage from a storm in the autumn of 2006 to trace the spatial and temporal record of meteorological events. Media reports give key information to assess the events of the storm. The storm passed over northern Europe between Oct.31-Nov. 2, 2006, and press reports from the time indicate that its most important feature was a high surge that inundated coastal areas. Sections of the Dutch and German North Sea coast were affected, and there was record flooding in Denmark and East Germany in the southern Baltic Sea. Extreme wind gusts were also reported that were strong enough to damage roofs and trees, and there was even tornado recorded near the Dutch-German border. Offshore, there were a series of damage reports from ship and platforms that were linked with sea state, and reports of rogue waves were explicitly mentioned. Many regional government authorities published summaries of geophysical information related to the storm, and these form part of a regular series of online winter storm reports that started as a public service about 15 years ago. Depending on the

  8. Regional characteristics of dust storms in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Tang, Xu; Quan, Linsheng

    2004-09-01

    Regional characteristics of dust storms in northern China are analyzed using a rotated empirical orthogonal function (REOF), based on the annual days of dust storms from 1954 to 1998. The relationships between regional dust storms corresponding to other factors such as precipitation and temperature are explored. The results show that five leading modes of dust storms exist in the following areas: the Taklamakan Desert (Tarim Basin) over the Xinjiang region (far northwestern China), the eastern part of Inner Mongolia (North China), the Tsaidam Basin, the Tibetan Plateau, and the upper reaches of the Yellow River (Gobi Desert). These areas are associated with an arid climate and frequent winds. For the first mode in the Tarim Basin, most dust storms appear in the 1980s, while dust storms become less frequent in the 1990s. The second mode (North China) shows the highest frequency of dust storms in the mid-1960s but the frequency decreases afterward. The third mode indicates a decreasing trend of annual dust storms after the mid-1960s but with a high interannual variability. The fourth mode also shows a decreasing trend but with a low interannual variability. The fifth mode displays a high frequency of dust storms in the 1970s followed by a decreasing trend. For the five modes of dust storm distribution, four of the centers are located in desert regions. The annual dust storms of a selected station in each mode region are shown to compare the coefficient time series of these modes. The negative correlation between the prior winter temperature and dust storm frequency is identified for most stations. There is no consistency in the correlation between the dust storm frequency and the annual rainfall as well as the prior winter rainfall at these stations. The activity of dust storms in northern China are directly linked to the cyclone activity, especially for the interdecadal variability.

  9. Agents to reduce cytokine storm

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term “cytokine storm” in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock. PMID:28105327

  10. Storm Warnings on Lake Balaton,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-06

    Vorhergesagt1 _ ___ !, ( SSZ . LI). (331, K _. )___ : 2 !daenkmmuflg 3 ja 4__ ’%ein %ZtLron S-0 6 j. a 3 10 24 126 B 88% A N in 4 13 173 186 B, 60% SZu...15 24 15 14 13 14 13 12 16 7 7 4 5 5 % 12 12 7 It 7 7 S 7 6 6 7 3 3 2 2 2 Key: 1-duration 2-number of storms 3-hours and one-third of storms last only...16-18 August 1959 and on 11- 13 June 1958, with a duration of 49.9 hours. Table 4 provides information about the frequency distribution of the maximum

  11. Dust storm off Western Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of Saharan dust storms reach far beyond Africa. Wind-swept deserts spill airborne dust particles out over the Atlantic Ocean where they can enter trade winds bound for Central and North America and the Caribbean. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows a dust storm casting an opaque cloud of cloud across the Canary Islands and the Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on June 30, 2002. In general it takes between 5 and 7 days for such an event to cross the Atlantic. The dust has been shown to introduce foreign bacteria and fungi that have damaged reef ecosystems and have even been hypothesized as a cause of increasing occurrences of respiratory complaints in places like Florida, where the amount of Saharan dust reaching the state has been increasing over the past 25 years.

  12. Impacts of Hurricane Rita on the beaches of western Louisiana: Chapter 5D in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Fauver, Laura A.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Rita made landfall as a category 3 storm in western Louisiana in late September 2005, 1 month following Hurricane Katrina's devastating landfall in the eastern part of the State. Large waves and storm surge inundated the lowelevation coastline, destroying many communities and causing extensive coastal change including beach, dune, and marsh erosion.

  13. Severe storms observing satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Stern, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Payload distribution and the attitude control system for the multi-mission modular spacecraft/StormSat configuration are discussed. The design of the advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer (AASIR) gimbal drive and its servomechanism is described. Onboard data handling, data downlink communications, and ground data handling systems are developed. Additional topics covered include: magnetic unloading at synchronous altitude, north-south stationkeeping, and the feasibility and impact of flying the microwave atmospheric sounding radiometer (MASR) as an additional payload.

  14. Magnetosphere-associated storms and the autonomous storms in the ionosphere-plasmasphere environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Stanislawska, I.

    2010-01-01

    Global GPS-derived ionosphere maps (GIM) of total electron content (TEC) were transformed into magnetic latitude (MLAT) versus magnetic local time (MLT) frame. TEC enhancement or depletion marked by W index show dominant electron content depressions and the ionosphere-plasmasphere storms increasing by nighttime, at high magnetic latitudes and over the crests of equatorial anomaly. Based on W maps, the planetary Wp index was produced and used for derivation of a catalogue of more than 140 TEC storms during 1999-2009. In total 33 space weather intense storms and 35 moderate storms are revealed with four series of indices (AE, Ap, Dst and Wp) but more than half Wp storms were either partially overlapping in time with magnetic storm or observed autonomously under non-storm magnetosphere conditions. Relation between an annual number of intense Dst storms and Wp storms has been used for their prediction towards the peak of the forthcoming 24th solar cycle.

  15. Dust Storm in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Along historic Route 66, just southeast of the little town of Amboy, California, lies a dried-up lake. Dry lakebeds are good sources of two things: salt and dust. In this image, the now-parched Bristol Lake offers up both. On April 12, 2007, dust storms menaced the area around Amboy. To the northwest, near Newberry Springs, California, dust hampered visibility and led to a multi-car collision on Interstate 40, killing two people and injuring several others. The same day, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a dust storm in the dry remains of Bristol Lake. Many small dust clouds boil up from the ground surface, casting their shadows to the northwest. A bright white cloud floating over the dust also throws its shadow onto the ground below. East of the dust storm are salt works that stand out from the surrounding landscape thanks to their straight lines and sharp angles. Dark ground surfaces alternate with mined white salt in a network of stripes. When lakes evaporate, chemicals that had been dissolved in the water stay behind, making dry lake beds an ideal place to find heavy concentrations of minerals, including salt. Besides the salt works, something else appears in stark contrast to this arid place. Lush green fields of irrigated crops appear in the east. Besides their color, their orderly arrangement reveals their human-made origin.

  16. Storms, shoreface morphodynamics, sand supply, and the accretion and erosion of coastal dune barriers in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Edward J.

    2013-10-01

    The coast of the southern North Sea is bound by dune barriers that have developed adjacent to a shallow storm- and tide-dominated shoreface comprising numerous shore-parallel to sub-shore-parallel tidal sand banks. The banks evolve under the joint control of tide-, wave- and wind-induced shore-parallel currents, which tend to ‘stretch' them, eventually leading to bank division, and to shoaling and breaking storm waves, which tend to drive them ashore. The banks, thus, modulate the delivery of storm wave energy to the coast, redirect currents alongshore and are the sand sources for the accretion of coastal dunes. Foredune accretion occurs where major sand banks have migrated shoreward over the last centuries to be finally driven ashore and weld under the impact of storm waves. Morphological changes in the bank field can impact on shoreline stability through dissipation or enhanced shoreward transmission of storm wave energy and effects on radiation stress, particularly when waves are breaking over the banks. Where banks are close to the shore, mitigation of offshore sediment transport, especially during storms, can occur because of gradients in radiation stress generated by the complex 3D bank structure. These macro-scale mechanisms involve embedded meso-scale interactions that revolve around the mobility of sand waves, mobility of beach bars and troughs and foredune mobility, and micro-scale processes of bedform mobility in the subaqueous and intertidal domains, and of swash and aeolian beach-dune sand transport. These embedded interactions and the morphodynamic feedback loops illustrate the importance of synchroneity of sand transport from shoreface to dune on this coast. Large stretches of the foredunes show either signs of stability, or mild but chronic erosion. Furthermore, a demonstrated lack of a clear relationship occurs between storminess and coastal response over the second half of the 20th century. The present situation may be indicative of conditions

  17. The Sources of Bz Fluctuations within CIRs: Magnetic Storms During the Descending Phase of the Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, R. K.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Smith, E. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation examines the magnetic field fluctuations within Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) detected by Ulysses at mid- and low-latitudes. CIRs are formed by the interaction of high-speed streams flowing from the polar coronal hole with slow-speed streams. Several wave modes are identified, and the effectiveness of these waves causing magnetic storms at Earth will be discussed.

  18. Coastal morphodynamic impacts induced by main storm phenomena on the Central East Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, Marco; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Bonamano, Simone; Scanu, Sergio; Martellucci, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The coastal area is a major dynamic systems of the Earth and in particular the sandy beaches are very sensitive to waves energy variation which mainly force morphological changes. Waves drive beaches morphological changes particularly when they exceed a determined threshold. In a short term (from hours to days) of storm conditions, intense erosion phenomena occur. They generate overwash, dunal erosion, loss of lands, damage to engineering structures and coastal ownerships. Several hazardous weather events take place every year in the Mediterranean region and cause relevant economic losses. The western Mediterranean Sea is an area subjected to cyclonic activity. In winter and during the negative phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), cyclonic activity generates extreme events as intense precipitation, the highest waves, landslides and surges. The study area is the Latium coast, eastern side of Central Tyrrhenian Sea.Wave data were measured by three wave buoys. In order to obtain a better spatial coverage useful to take into account the waves variability over the study area, wave data also has been calculated by WAM model. On the basis of storms events selected by a threshold criteria of events greater than 2 m for a period more than 6 hour, the Mean Sea Level Pressure (MSLP) field was analysed through Empirical Orthogonal Function and cluster analysis obtaining 3 classes of barometric events. The storms are always induced by the lows of Gulf of Genoa to be formed in the Mediterranean region triggered from the middle latitude storms which center is located in the northern atlantic and scandinavian region. The different classes, with a probability of 28%, 23% and 49%, generate different circulation driving waves from different directions. The classes of storms show spatial differences in terms of main directions but show similar behavior in terms of distribution of wave direction. In this study the wave and wind field induced by the different barometric condition

  19. Shallow-water seismoacoustic noise generated by tropical storms Ernesto and Florence.

    PubMed

    Traer, James; Gerstoft, Peter; Bromirski, Peter D; Hodgkiss, William S; Brooks, Laura A

    2008-09-01

    Land-based seismic observations of double frequency (DF) microseisms generated during tropical storms Ernesto and Florence are dominated by signals in the 0.15-0.5 Hz band. In contrast, data from sea floor hydrophones in shallow water (70 m depth, 130 km off the New Jersey coast) show dominant signals in the ocean gravity-wave frequency band, 0.02-0.18 Hz, and low amplitudes from 0.18 to 0.3 Hz, suggesting significant opposing wave components necessary for DF microseism generation were negligible at the site. Florence produced large waves over deep water while Ernesto only generated waves in coastal regions, yet both storms produced similar spectra. This suggests near-coastal shallow water as the dominant region for observed microseism generation.

  20. Boulder Dislodgement by Tsunamis and Storms: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In the past, boulder dislodgement by tsunami and storm waves has been approached with a simple threshold approach in which a boulder was moved if the sum of the acting forces on the boulder is larger than zero. The impulse theory taught us, however, that this criterion is not enough to explain particle dislodgement. We employ an adapted version of the Newton's Second Law of Motion (NSLM) in order to consider the essence of the impulse theory which is that the sum of the forces has to exceed a certain threshold for a certain period of time. Furthermore, a classical assumption is to consider linear waves. However, when waves travel toward the shore, they alter due to non-linear processes. We employ the TRIADS model to quantify that change and how it impacts boulder dislodgement. We present our results of the coupled model (adapted NSLM and TRIADS model). The results project a more complex picture of boulder transport by storms and tsunami. The following question arises: What information do we actually invert, and what does it tell us about the causative event?

  1. Boulder Dislodgement by Tsunamis and Storms: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R.; Diplas, P.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Sheremet, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, boulder dislodgement by tsunami and storm waves has been approached with a simple threshold approach in which a boulder was moved if the sum of the acting forces on the boulder is larger than zero. The impulse theory taught us, however, that this criterion is not enough to explain particle dislodgement. We employ an adapted version of the Newton's Second Law of Motion (NSLM) in order to consider the essence of the impulse theory which is that the sum of the forces has to exceed a certain threshold for a certain period of time. Furthermore, a classical assumption is to consider linear waves. However, when waves travel toward the shore, they alter due to non-linear processes. We employ the TRIADS model to quantify that change and how it impacts boulder dislodgement. We present our results of the coupled model (adapted NSLM and TRIADS model). The results project a more complex picture of boulder transport by storms and tsunami. The following question arises: What information do we actually invert, and what does it tell us about the causative event?

  2. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  3. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  4. The balance of dynamic vorticity for the Presidents' Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapotocny, Tom Harmon

    1990-06-01

    The maintenance of isentropic dynamic vorticity, defined as the vertical component of the curl of momentum, is examined for the life cycle of the Presidents'Day storm. Dynamic vorticity and its tendency are also compared to the more commonly used kinematic vorticity and its tendency. Diagnostics are first performed on an inviscid numerical simulation of an amplifying baroclinic disturbance by a hybrid isentropic-sigma coordinate channel model. The main purpose for studying a simulation with the channel model is to examine the first-order balance of dynamic vorticity during development under simplified conditions. A more in-depth evaluation of dynamic vorticity is presented for an excellent numerical simulation of the Presidents' Day storm of 18 to 20 February 1979. Dynamic vorticity diagnostics for the Presidents' Day storm reveal the importance of mass asymmetries within an isentropic layer and also document the effect of weak static stability. Prior to cyclogenesis, a strong cyclonic circulation tendency exists from both the vertical advection of vorticity and tilting terms. Another important feature is the merging of two synoptic scale short waves; one propagating southeast from the Great Lakes states, the other moving northeast from the Gulf of Mexico. Cyclogenesis is initiated by the latter of these two short waves, while rapid development occurs when the Great Lakes short waves reaches the Middle Atlantic states. During rapid development, an assessment of the ageostrophic component on spin-up is obtained from a balance of the divergence term and pressure stresses. Spin-up from the ageostrophic component is largest ahead of the lower tropospheric warm front. The impact of an 80 m/s subtropical jet streak, which enhances upper tropospheric processes during development, is also examined.

  5. Understanding impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes on submerged bank reefs and coral communities in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Fernández, A.; Gravois, M.

    2010-06-01

    A 100-year climatology of tropical storms and hurricanes within a 200-km buffer was developed to study their impacts on coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks (FGB) and neighboring banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The FGB are most commonly affected by tropical storms from May through November, peaking in August-September. Storms approach from all directions; however, the majority of them approach from the southeast and southwest, which suggests a correlation with storm origin in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. A storm activity cycle lasting 30-40 years was identified similar to that known in the Atlantic basin, and is similar to the recovery time for impacted reefs. On average there is 52% chance of a storm approaching within 200 km of the FGB every year, but only 17% chance of a direct hit every year. Storm-generated waves 5-25 m in height and periods of 11-15 s induce particle speeds of 1-4 m s -1 near these reefs. The wave-current flow is capable of transporting large (˜3 cm) sediment particles, uplifting the near-bottom nepheloid layer to the banks tops, but not enough to break coral skeletons. The resulting storm-driven turbulence induces cooling by heat extraction, mixing, and upwelling, which reduces coral bleaching potential and deepens the mixed layer by about 20 m. Tropical storms also aid larvae dispersal from and onto the FGB. Low storm activity in 1994-2004 contributed to an 18% coral cover increase, but Hurricane Rita in 2005 reduced it by 11% and brought coral cover to nearly pre-1994 levels. These results suggest that the FGB reefs and neighboring reef banks act as coral refugia because of their offshore location and deep position in the water column, which shields them from deleterious effects of all but the strongest hurricanes.

  6. Jets and storm tracks in ?-plane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Harvey, Ben

    2013-04-01

    We will present new results from linear calculations and non-linear simulations of a two-layer baroclinic ?-plane model. The model consists of two interacting levels with dynamical temperature anomalies (as in the Eady model), but by its nature provides a consistent description of the continuous 3-dimensional velocity field inside the domain. Our set-up has realistic jet-profiles, yet has a very low-dimensional parameter space. The model is shown to exhibit realistic linear baroclinic instability properties. In addition, it is shown that the introduction of a ?-plane term induces a jet and a storm-track that is highly non-linear: it exhibits a realistic spiral jet structure and jet-exit region, as is the case for the observed N. Hemisphere jet on Earth. This seems to imply that the variability of the N. Atlantic jet stream is not the result of complex topographic and orographic boundary conditions in the N. Hemisphere, as recent simulations appear to suggest, but rather the result of the spherical geometry of the Earth, setting the right conditions for relevant non-linear interactions between Rossby waves and the jet.

  7. The danger to satellites from meteor storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.; Brown, P.; Jones, J.; Webster, A. R.

    During past meteor storms impact probabilities of between 1 and 0.01 percent have be realized per 50m^2 of exposed surface area at altitudes corresponding to both GEO and LEO. The most likely meteoroid stream to yield a storm in the near future is that of the Leonids. Numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of hypothetical Leonid stream meteoroids suggest that storms may occur in the years 1999 and 2000.

  8. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  9. An observational study of the carrying capacity of suspended sediment during a storm event.

    PubMed

    Bian, Shuhua; Hu, Zejian; Xue, Zuo; Lv, Jingfu

    2012-10-01

    We measured the in situ suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and hydrodynamics (waves, currents, and sea level) concurrently during a storm event using self-recording instruments at offshore of the Shandong Peninsula in the Yellow Sea. We analyzed the temporal variation in suspended sediment carrying capacity and its correlation with wave, current, and water-level conditions. There was about 40% increase in SSC during the storm event. A 3-4-h lag was observed between the peak of wave height and SSC. The SSC increased in a fluctuating pattern up to the peak then decreased rapidly. This process was positively correlated with wave height and duration. The maximum SSC was 524.3 mg/l, which is about 10 times of that under normal weather conditions. This peak was observed after of a series of 1.8 m waves. The increased suspended sediments were the fine particles resuspended by the storm waves from seabed near the observation spot and transported by northward ebb currents from Shidao Bay.

  10. On the watch for geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Arthur W.; Brown, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms, induced by solar activity, pose significant hazards to satellites, electrical power distribution systems, radio communications, navigation, and geophysical surveys. Strong storms can expose astronauts and crews of high-flying aircraft to dangerous levels of radiation. Economic losses from recent geomagnetic storms have run into hundreds of millions of dollars. With the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as the lead agency, an international network of geomagnetic observatories monitors the onset of solar-induced storms and gives warnings that help diminish losses to military and commercial operations and facilities.

  11. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  12. A Personal Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Although lightning detection systems operated by government agencies, utilities and other businesses provide storm warnings, this information often does not reach the public until some time after the observations have been made. A low-cost personal lightning detector offers a significant safety advantage to private flyers, boaters, golfers and others. Developed by Airborne Research Associates, the detectors originated in Space Shuttle tests of an optical lightning detection technique. The commercial device is pointed toward a cloud to detect invisible intracloud lightning by sensing subtle changes in light presence. The majority of the sales have been to golf courses. Additional products and more advanced applications are in progress.

  13. The Framework of a Coastal Hazards Model - A Tool for Predicting the Impact of Severe Storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; O'Reilly, Bill; van Ormondt, Maarten; Elias, Edwin; Ruggiero, Peter; Erikson, Li H.; Hapke, Cheryl; Collins, Brian D.; Guza, Robert T.; Adams, Peter N.; Thomas, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California (Jones and others, 2007) is a five-year project (FY2007-FY2011) integrating multiple USGS research activities with the needs of external partners, such as emergency managers and land-use planners, to produce products and information that can be used to create more disaster-resilient communities. The hazards being evaluated include earthquakes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, wildfires, and coastal hazards. For the Coastal Hazards Task of the Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California, the USGS is leading the development of a modeling system for forecasting the impact of winter storms threatening the entire Southern California shoreline from Pt. Conception to the Mexican border. The modeling system, run in real-time or with prescribed scenarios, will incorporate atmospheric information (that is, wind and pressure fields) with a suite of state-of-the-art physical process models (that is, tide, surge, and wave) to enable detailed prediction of currents, wave height, wave runup, and total water levels. Additional research-grade predictions of coastal flooding, inundation, erosion, and cliff failure will also be performed. Initial model testing, performance evaluation, and product development will be focused on a severe winter-storm scenario developed in collaboration with the Winter Storm Working Group of the USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project in Southern California. Additional offline model runs and products will include coastal-hazard hindcasts of selected historical winter storms, as well as additional severe winter-storm simulations based on statistical analyses of historical wave and water-level data. The coastal-hazards model design will also be appropriate for simulating the impact of storms under various sea level rise and climate-change scenarios. The operational capabilities of this modeling system are designed to provide emergency planners with

  14. Optimal index related to the shoreline dynamics during a storm: the case of Jesolo beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archetti, Renata; Paci, Agnese; Carniel, Sandro; Bonaldo, Davide

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents an application of shoreline monitoring aimed at understanding the response of a beach to single storms and at identifying its typical behaviour, in order to be able to predict shoreline changes and to properly plan the defence of the shore zone. On the study area, in Jesolo beach (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy), a video monitoring station and an acoustic wave and current profiler were installed in spring 2013, recording, respectively, images and hydrodynamic data. The site lacks previous detailed hydrodynamic and morphodynamic data. Variations in the shoreline were quantified in combination with available near-shore wave conditions, making it possible to analyse the relationship between the shoreline displacement and the wave features. Results denote characteristic patterns of beach response to storm events, and highlight the importance of improving beach protection in this zone, notwithstanding the many interventions experimented in the last decades. A total of 31 independent storm events were selected during the period October 2013-October 2014, and for each of them synthetic indexes based on storm duration, energy and maximum wave height were developed and estimated. It was found that the net shoreline displacements during a storm are well correlated with the total wave energy associated to the considered storm by an empirical power law equation. A sub-selection of storms in the presence of an artificial dune protecting the beach (in the winter season) was examined in detail, allowing to conclude that the adoption of this coastal defence strategy in the study area can reduce shoreline retreat during a storm. This type of intervention can sometimes contribute to prolonging overall stability not only in the replenished zone but also in downdrift areas. The implemented methodology, which confirms to be economically attractive if compared to more traditional monitoring systems, proves to be a valuable system to monitor beach erosive

  15. Best index related to the shoreline dynamics during a storm: the case of Jesolo beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archetti, R.; Paci, A.; Carniel, S.; Bonaldo, D.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents an application of shoreline monitoring aimed to understand the response of a beach to single storms and to identify its typical behaviour, in order to be able to predict shoreline changes and to properly plan the defence of the shore zone. On the study area, in Jesolo beach (Nothern Adriatic sea, Italy), a video monitoring station and an acoustic wave and current profiler were installed in spring 2013, recording respectively images and hydrodynamic data. The site lacks of previous detailed hydrodynamic and morphodynamics data. Variations in the shoreline were quantified in combination with available nearshore wave conditions, making it possible to analyse a relationship between the shoreline displacement and the wave features. Results denote characteristic patterns of beach response to storm events, and highlight the importance of improving beach protection in this zone, notwithstanding the many interventions experimented in the last decades. A total of 31 independent storm events were selected during the period October 2013-October 2014, and for each of them synthetic indexes based on storm duration, energy and maximum wave height were developed and estimated. It was found that the mean shoreline displacements during a storm are well correlated with the total wave energy during the considered storm by an empirical power law equation. A sub-selection of storms on beach protected by artificial dunes (in winter season) was examined in detail; we can conclude that the extensive adoption of artificial dunes in the study area was useful in the past also to reduce shoreline retreat during the storm. This type of interventions can sometimes contribute to prolonged overall stability not only in the replenished zone but also in down drift areas. The implemented methodology, which confirms to be economically attractive if compared to more traditional monitoring systems, proves to be a valuable system to monitor beach erosive processes and provide detailed

  16. Storm-induced hazards and vulnerability along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The recently signed Protocol on ICZM in the Mediterranean by the EU and the Mediterranean countries includes a chapter on Natural Hazards where the Parties are advised to undertake vulnerability and hazard assessments of coastal zones. Within this context, the main aim of this work is to present a comprehensive framework developed within the Spain-funded VuCoMA research project to analyze coastal storm-induced hazards and vulnerability. The framework consists of three steps: definition of local storm characteristics, estimation of hazard intensities and vulnerability assessment. Storms recorded in different locations along the 500 km long Catalan coast have been analyzed to characterize the regional climate. First, a 5-class intensity scale was developed for the NW Mediterranean conditions using the wave power as classification variable. Each storm class was defined in terms of class-averaged values of Hs, Tp and duration. In addition to this, the storm climate was probabilistically defined by obtaining the wave height extreme probability function for different locations along the coast. The linkage of Hs to the other storm parameters (Tp and duration) was done through empirical relationships between each variable with Hs obtained for each location along the coast. To analyze storm-induced hazards, three main processes have been considered: sediment transport potential, beach erosion and inundation. Each process was formulated in terms of a simple indicator and they were quantified in two ways: (i) by just retaining the contribution of storm properties (wave and surge) to the considered hazard and, (ii) by including the local modulation due to coastal geomorphology (sediment and slope). This step follows the above presented two approaches. To define the hazard intensity of each storm class, we calculate the magnitude of induced processes for each individual storm within a class and, final representative figures are given in terms of class-averaged values plus the

  17. High Resolution Hurricane Storm Surge and Inundation Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettich, R.; Westerink, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal counties are home to nearly 60% of the U.S. population and industry that accounts for over 16 million jobs and 10% of the U.S. annual gross domestic product. However, these areas are susceptible to some of the most destructive forces in nature, including tsunamis, floods, and severe storm-related hazards. Since 1900, tropical cyclones making landfall on the US Gulf of Mexico Coast have caused more than 9,000 deaths; nearly 2,000 deaths have occurred during the past half century. Tropical cyclone-related adjusted, annualized losses in the US have risen from 1.3 billion from 1949-1989, to 10.1 billion from 1990-1995, and $35.8 billion per year for the period 2001-2005. The risk associated with living and doing business in the coastal areas that are most susceptible to tropical cyclones is exacerbated by rising sea level and changes in the characteristics of severe storms associated with global climate change. In the five years since hurricane Katrina devastated the northern Gulf of Mexico Coast, considerable progress has been made in the development and utilization of high resolution coupled storm surge and wave models. Recent progress will be presented with the ADCIRC + SWAN storm surge and wave models. These tightly coupled models use a common unstructured grid in the horizontal that is capable of covering large areas while also providing high resolution (i.e., base resolution down to 20m plus smaller subgrid scale features such as sea walls and levees) in areas that are subject to surge and inundation. Hydrodynamic friction and overland winds are adjusted to account for local land cover. The models scale extremely well on modern high performance computers allowing rapid turnaround on large numbers of compute cores. The models have been adopted for FEMA National Flood Insurance Program studies, hurricane protection system design and risk analysis, and quasi-operational forecast systems for several regions of the country. They are also being evaluated as

  18. Alfvénic field-aligned currents, ion upflow and electron precipitation during large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Spencer; LaBelle, James; Chaston, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present four years of FAST observations of Alfvénic field-aligned currents (FACs) in the Northern Hemisphere coincident with 40 moderate (Dst < -50 nT) to very large geomagnetic storms. Superposed epoch analysis of Alfvénic activity of storm periods demonstrate a sharp increase in the probability of AlfvÉn wave occurrence just after storm commencement, and analysis based on storm phase shows that the probability of Alfvén wave occurrence increases by more than a factor of 5 on both dayside and nightside. Additionally, recently reported Van Allen Probes measurements in the magnetosphere imply a region (˜60-68 degrees invariant latitude) in the nightside ionosphere where Alfvén waves are statistically likely to be observed during storm main phase; we report statistical observations during main phase showing that this region instead corresponds to both intense electron precipitation (>10 mW m-2) and strong upflowing ion number flux (> 108 cm^{-2 s-1), while observed Alfvénic FAC occurrence rates are diminished relative to Van Allen Probes measurements. FAST observations also indicate that the most intense electron precipitation associated with Alfvénic FACs occurs pre-midnight during storm recovery phase.

  19. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  20. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  1. In the Eye of the Storm: A Participatory Course on Coastal Storms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Storm disasters are amplified in the coastal environment due to population pressures and the power of the sea. The upper-division/graduate university course "Coastal Storms" was designed to equip future practitioners with the skills necessary to understand, respond to, and mitigate for these natural disasters. To accomplish this, "Coastal Storms"…

  2. Understanding Variability in Beach Slope to Improve Forecasts of Storm-induced Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, K. S.; Stockdon, H. F.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards combines measurements of beach morphology with storm hydrodynamics to produce forecasts of coastal change during storms for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Wave-induced water levels are estimated using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon et al. (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. Seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of a meter in wave runup elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. Spatial variation in beach slope is accounted for through alongshore averaging, but temporal variability in beach slope is not included in the final computation of the likelihood of coastal change. Additionally, input morphology may be years old and potentially very different than the conditions present during forecast storm. In order to improve our forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards, the temporal variability of beach slope must be included in the final uncertainty of modeled wave-induced water levels. Frequently collected field measurements of lidar-based beach morphology are examined for study sites in Duck, North Carolina, Treasure Island, Florida, Assateague Island, Virginia, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, with some records extending over a period of 15 years. Understanding the variability of slopes at these sites will help provide estimates of associated water level uncertainty which can then be applied to other areas where lidar observations are infrequent, and improve the overall skill of future forecasts of storm-induced coastal change. Stockdon, H. F., Holman, R. A., Howd, P. A., and Sallenger Jr, A. H. (2006). Empirical parameterization of setup

  3. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th) of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  4. Impacts on the Deep-Sea Ecosystem by a Severe Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M.; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B.; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26th of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem. PMID:22295084

  5. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  6. Phase I Report for SERRI Project No. 80037: Investigation of surge and wave reduction by vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and other severe storms can cause devastating damage of property and loss of life in coastal areas. Vegetation in wetlands, coastal fringes and stream floodplains can reduce storm surge and waves while providing ecological benefits and complementing traditiona...

  7. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  8. Comparison Of TES FFSM Eddies And MOC Storms MY 24-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, John; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Wilson, R. J.; Barnes, J. R.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Cantor, B. A.

    2012-10-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. Although PDSs occur on an irregular basis, all well-documented storms have begun within ± 75° of Ls from perihelion (Ls=251°) when insolation is greatest near the SH summer solstice (Ls=270°) and the south polar cap is receding. PDS seasonal occurrence suggests the presence of climatic/environmental precursors and components, yet interannual variability suggests that initiation and expansion mechanisms are not solely seasonal in character. We have integrated and examined all available MGS data in order to better understand and characterize the dynamical processes responsible for MY 25 PDS initiation and expansion. Here we present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward-traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. An examination of the spatial and temporal relationship of FFSM eddies and MOC storms suggests an interesting association between eastward eddy propagation and eastward storm evolution. Determining the factors responsible for PDS genesis in MY 25 and not 24 and 26 is difficult. The most notable difference is the amplitude of E1-E7 eddies in Hellas, with all seven MY 25 eddies colder than -3.5 K, compared with three in MY 24 and two in MY 26. It is possible that the sustained series of high-amplitude eddies in MY 25 was a factor in PDS interannual variability.

  9. Influence of resonance on tide and storm surge in the Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkratoke, Saifhon; Sirisup, Sirod; Udomchoke, Veerasak; Kanasut, Jirawat

    2015-10-01

    A numerical simulation is used to determine the effective resonance period, quality factor Q and linear friction coefficient and mechanism of tide and storm surge in the Gulf of Thailand. The results indicated that the resonance response is triggered by the forced wave with the period of 20.25 hours. The Q factor and linear friction coefficient are approximately 3.15 and 2.76×10-5 ms-1, respectively. The gulf is regarded as a moderately dissipative system, which may yield small amplification for the oscillating forced wave. The resonance structure of the basin can play an important role in spatial distribution and amplification of tidal waves in the Gulf of Thailand and nearby area. Distance from the effective resonance period and the corresponding Q factor can be employed in characterizing of tidal amplification in the gulf. The study found that phase difference in the incoming tidal waves can induce the distortion of a nodal band to the normal mode analysis results. The resonance in the north-south direction is the principal mechanism to control tidal waves, specifically for the upper part of the gulf (the Gulf of Thailand). However, significant effect of resonance in the west-east direction on the amplification of tidal waves near the southern part of the gulf (Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore coast) may be pronounced. From the reproduced historic storm surge and hypothetical results, the spatial distribution of storm surge elevation and the response ratio are in good agreement with the resonance mode and Q factor of the basin. Individually, the contribution of resonance factor to induce severe storm surge (positive surge) tends to be insignificant. Conversely, the interaction process between the disturbance system and the propagating surge wave in the gulf can induce large positive surge near the landfall location significantly.

  10. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  11. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  12. Typhoon Haiyan-Induced Storm Surge Simulation in Metro Manila Using High-Resolution LiDAR Topographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Storm surge is the abnormal rise in sea water over and above astronomical tides due to a forthcoming storm. Developing an early warning system for storm surges is vital due to the high level of hazard they might cause. On 08 November 2013, Typhoon Haiyan generated storm surges that killed over 6,000 people in the central part of the Philippines. The Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards under the Department of Science and Technology was tasked to create storm surge hazard maps for the country's coastal areas. The research project aims to generate storm surge hazard maps that can be used for disaster mitigation and planning. As part of the research, the team explored a scenario wherein a tropical cyclone hits the Metro Manila with strength as strong as Typhoon Haiyan. The area was chosen primarily for its political, economic and cultural significance as the country's capital. Using Japan Meteorological Agency Storm Surge model, FLO2D flooding software, LiDAR topographic data, and GIS technology, the effects of a Haiyan-induced tropical cyclone passing through Metro Manila was examined. The population affected, number of affected critical facilities, and potential evacuation sites were identified. The outputs of this study can be used by the authorities as basis for policies that involve disaster risk reduction and management.

  13. Tropical Storm Ernesto over Cuba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Microwave Image

    These infrared, microwave, and visible images were created with data retrieved by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite.

    Infrared Image Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Image In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue. Therefore deep blue areas in storms show where the most

  14. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  15. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  16. Storm surge modeling of Superstorm Sandy in the New York City Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimoff, A. I.; Blanton, B. O.; Dzedzits, E.; Fritz, W. J.; Kress, M.; Muzio, P.; Sela, L.

    2013-12-01

    Even though the New York/New Jersey area does not lie within the typical 'hurricane belt', recent events and the historical record indicate that large infrequent tropical storms have had direct hits on the region, with impacts being amplified due to the nearly right angle bend in the coastline. The recent plan unveiled by New York City's Mayor Bloomberg lays out mitigation strategies to protect the region's communities, infrastructure, and assets from future storms, and numerical simulation of storm surge and wave hazards driven by potential hurricanes plays a central role in developing and evaluating these strategies. To assist in local planning, recovery, and decision-making, we have used the tide, storm surge, and wind wave model ADCIRC+SWAN to simulate storm surge in one of the most populated areas of the United States: the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. We have generated a new high-resolution triangular finite-element model grid for the region from recent USGS data as well as recent city topographic maps at 2-foot (0.6m) contour intervals, nautical charts, and details of shipping channels. Our hindcast simulations are compared against Superstorm Sandy. We used the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center's Cray XE6tm at the College of Staten Island for these simulations. Hindcasting and analysis of the Superstorm Sandy storm surge and waves indicates that our simulations produce a reasonable representation of actual events. The grid will be used in an ADCIRC-based forecasting system implementation for the region.

  17. Long-term increase in New York Harbor storm tides, 1844-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, S. A.; Orton, P. M.; Jay, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Eight of the largest twenty recorded water levels in the New York Harbor region recorded since 1821 occurred after 1990, and three of the 10 largest have occurred since 2010 (March 2010, August 2011, and October 2012). Archival research and numerical modeling indicates, however, that the storm surge during an 1821 hurricane exceeded that from hurricane Sandy (~3.5m vs. 2.8m). To investigate flood risk we recover archival tide gauge data back to 1844 and evaluate whether the recent cluster of extreme water levels is random, driven solely by sea-level rise, or is caused by changes to storm tides (the sum of storm surge and tidal effects). Results indicate both long term trends and decadal variability in the annual maximum storm tide (AMST). Approximately half of long-term AMST variability is explained by a long term increase in storm tides, while the remainder is explained by the North Atlantic Oscillation. The magnitude of the 10 year return period storm tide has increased by 0.28m. Combined with a 0.44m increase in local sea level since 1856, the 10 year flood level has increased by approximately 0.72 ± 0.25m, and magnified the annual probability of overtopping the nominal Manhattan seawall from less than 1% to about 20-25%. Further, including the 1821 event in extreme value analysis suggests that the return period of hurricane Sandy storm tides is much smaller than other estimates. Though the cause of the long-term AMST trend is unclear, analysis of tidal properties indicates that long-wave propagation in New York harbor has shifted since the 1850s. Because storm surge is also a long-wave with a component in the tidal band, at least a portion of changed storm-tide hazard is likely driven by local anthropogenic alterations of the region's waterways. Along with sea-level rise, local development and climate-induced shifts to the North Atlantic Oscillation may continue to affect the New York harbor storm tide hazard in the future.

  18. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  19. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  20. Severe storms and local weather research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Developments in the use of space related techniques to understand storms and local weather are summarized. The observation of lightning, storm development, cloud development, mesoscale phenomena, and ageostrophic circulation are discussed. Data acquisition, analysis, and the development of improved sensor and computer systems capability are described. Signal processing and analysis and application of Doppler lidar data are discussed. Progress in numerous experiments is summarized.

  1. The evaluation and management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Eifling, Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Massumi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrical storm is an increasingly common and life-threatening syndrome that is defined by 3 or more sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator within 24 hours. The clinical presentation can be dramatic. Electrical storm can manifest itself during acute myocardial infarction and in patients who have structural heart disease, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or an inherited arrhythmic syndrome. The presence or absence of structural heart disease and the electrocardiographic morphology of the presenting arrhythmia can provide important diagnostic clues into the mechanism of electrical storm. Electrical storm typically has a poor outcome.The effective management of electrical storm requires an understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms, therapeutic options, device programming, and indications for radiofrequency catheter ablation. Initial management involves determining and correcting the underlying ischemia, electrolyte imbalances, or other causative factors. Amiodarone and β-blockers, especially propranolol, effectively resolve arrhythmias in most patients. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including radiofrequency ablation, can control electrical storm in drug-refractory patients. Patients who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can present with multiple shocks and may require drug therapy and device reprogramming. After the acute phase of electrical storm, the treatment focus should shift toward maximizing heart-failure therapy, performing revascularization, and preventing subsequent ventricular arrhythmias. Herein, we present an organized approach for effectively evaluating and managing electrical storm.

  2. A numerical study on the effects of wave-current-surge interactions on the height and propagation of sea surface waves in Charleston Harbor during Hurricane Hugo 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqing; Xie, Lian

    2009-06-01

    The effects of wave-current interactions on ocean surface waves induced by Hurricane Hugo in and around the Charleston Harbor and its adjacent coastal waters are examined by using a three-dimensional (3D) wave-current coupled modeling system. The 3D storm surge modeling component of the coupled system is based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), the wave modeling component is based on the third generation wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the inundation model is adopted from [Xie, L., Pietrafesa, L. J., Peng, M., 2004. Incorporation of a mass-conserving inundation scheme into a three-dimensional storm surge model. J. Coastal Res., 20, 1209-1223]. The results indicate that the change of water level associated with the storm surge is the primary cause for wave height changes due to wave-surge interaction. Meanwhile, waves propagating on top of surge cause a feedback effect on the surge height by modulating the surface wind stress and bottom stress. This effect is significant in shallow coastal waters, but relatively small in offshore deep waters. The influence of wave-current interaction on wave propagation is relatively insignificant, since waves generally propagate in the direction of the surface currents driven by winds. Wave-current interactions also affect the surface waves as a result of inundation and drying induced by the storm. Waves break as waters retreat in regions of drying, whereas waves are generated in flooded regions where no waves would have occurred without the flood water.

  3. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-12-11

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia.

  4. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-01-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia. PMID:26657163

  5. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-12-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia.

  6. Particle Energization During Magnetic Storms with Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, J.; Kepko, L.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, W.; McPherron, R. L.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electrons pose a space weather hazard to satellites in the radiation belts. Although about half of all geomagnetic storms result in relativistic electron flux enhancements, other storms decrease relativistic electron flux, even under similar solar wind drivers. Radiation belt fluxes depend on a complex balance between transport, loss, and acceleration. A critically important aspect of radiation belt enhancements is the role of the 'seed' population--plasma sheet particles heated and transported Earthward by magnetotail processes--which can become accelerated by wave-particle interactions with chorus waves. While the effect of substorms on seed electron injections has received considerable focus, in this study we explore how quasi-steady convection during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events affects the transport and energization of electrons. SMC events are long-duration intervals of enhanced convection without any substorm expansions, and are an important mechanism in coupling magnetotail plasma populations to the inner magnetosphere. We detail the behavior of the seed electron population for stormtime SMC events using the Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt and THEMIS in the plasma sheet and inner magnetosphere. Together, the two missions provide the ability to track particle transport and energization from the plasma sheet into the radiation belts. We present SMC events with Van Allen Probes/THEMIS conjunctions and compare plasma sheet fast flows/enhanced transport to radiation belt seed electron enhancements. Finally we utilize statistical analyses to quantify the relative importance of SMC events on radiation belt electron acceleration in comparison to isolated substorms.

  7. Interactions Between Convective Storms and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Hoxit, L. R.; Chappell, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which intense convective storms interact with their environment are considered for a number of specific severe storm situations. A physical model of subcloud wind fields and vertical wind profiles was developed to explain the often observed intensification of convective storms that move along or across thermal boundaries. A number of special, unusually dense, data sets were used to substantiate features of the model. GOES imagery was used in conjunction with objectively analyzed surface wind data to develop a nowcast technique that might be used to identify specific storm cells likely to become tornadic. It was shown that circulations associated with organized meso-alpha and meso-beta scale storm complexes may, on occasion, strongly modify tropospheric thermodynamic patterns and flow fields.

  8. A rare case of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brock; Dhillon, Manvinder Shelley; Yong-Yow, Sabrina

    2016-04-18

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening state of thyroid hormone excess. Rapid recognition of thyroid storm is key to decreasing the morbidity and mortality of this condition. Clinical manifestations of thyroid storm include unexplained weight loss, hyperactivity and irritability. The most common causes of thyrotoxicosis are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goitre and toxic adenoma. We present a rare case of thyroid storm induced by dual nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy in a patient receiving treatment for advanced melanoma. In this case, our patient was admitted for thyroid storm 1 month after initiating treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy. The patient was treated with β-blockers, antithyroid medications and systemic steroids resulting in an improvement in thyroid function testing and symptoms.

  9. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  10. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Liquefaction and fluidization structures in Messinian storm deposits (Bajo Segura Basin, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, P.; Delgado, J.; Estévez, A.; Molina, J. M.; Moretti, M.; Soria, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Synsedimentary deformation structures are recognized in Upper Miocene deposits of the eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain). A singular stratigraphic section in these deposits shows several levels with soft-sediment deformation structures (load casts, ball-and-pillows and pipes) induced by liquidization (liquefaction and/or fluidization) of sandy sediments. The morphologic analysis of these structures reveals a liquidized sediment thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 m. Although they have been previously interpreted as a result of seismic shocks, their origin was most likely related to the action of storm waves as the structures are always associated with tempestites. Facies analysis, geometrical features of the deformed beds and appraisal of geotechnical properties for shelf and coastal sediments allow the soft-sediment deformation structures to be interpreted as a result of the cyclic effect of storm waves on unconsolidated sediments, and excludes other processes such as overloading, tsunamis or the impact of breaking waves.

  12. Determining the Return Period of Storm Surge Events in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth; Lapidez, John Phillip; Mendoza, Jerico; Caro, Carl Vincent; Tablazon, Judd; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The devastating damages generated by the Tropical Cyclone Haiyan storm surges in Eastern Samar, Philippines prompted the Department of Science and Technology-Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) to calculate the return period and storm surge exceedance probability of these events. The recurrence interval or the period of return of a storm surge event is the estimated likelihood that that event would occur again. Return periods are measured through historical data denoting the interval of recurrence in average over a period of time. The exceedance probability however, is a graphical representation that describes the probability that some various levels of loss will be exceeded over a future time period or will be surpassed over a given time. DOST-Project NOAH simulates storm surge height time series using JMA storm surge model which is a numerical model based on shallow water equations. To determine the period of recurrence of storm surges with this type of intensity, the agency intends to compute the estimation of storm surge heights generated by tropical cyclones for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, 50-year and 100-year return periods for the Philippine coast. The storm surge time series generated from JMA combined with WXTide simulation, a software containing archives/catalogues of world-wide astronomical tides, and 5-meter resolution DEM were used as input parameters for the inundation model, which shows probable extent of flooding at a specific storm surge return period. Flo-2D two-dimensional flood routing model, a GIS integrated software tool that facilitates the creation of the flood model grid system, was used for flood hazard model. It is a simple volume conservation model composed of processor program that facilitate graphical editing and mapping of flooding details which uses continuity equation and the dynamic wave momentum equations. The measurements of storm surge return period and probable extent of coastal flooding in the

  13. Extreme Waves at Filyos, Southern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyay, Engin; Oztunali Ozbahceci, Berguzar; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet

    2010-05-01

    The Ministry of Transport, General Directorate of Railways, Ports and Airports Construction which is responsible for the design and construction of ports and harbors in Turkey, carried out a wave measurement project for a new planned port in Filyos, Western Black Sea region of Turkey. The wave measurement project at Filyos lasted for a period of two years. A self-recording pressure type instrument was used to conduct the wave measurements. Directional information of both waves and current was determined according to an electromagnetic system. The instrument was installed at a depth of 12.5m. Wave data were sampled every two hours with a sample length of 20 minutes and a sampling interval of 0.5 sec (i.e. a sampling frequency of 2 Hz). Before any further wave data analysis, the recorded subsurface pressure data was converted into the corresponding surface profile data. Then individual waves were obtained by zero-up crossing method. The characteristic waves like maximum, Hmax, significant, Hs, one-tenth, H1-10, mean wave height Hmean and the corresponding wave periods were calculated by using individual waves of each record. The analysis results show that the maximum significant wave height during the measurement period is 5.0 m. The maximum wave height is 7.5m in this record which makes the ratio of Hmax/Hs =1.5. The relation between the Hmax and Hs was investigated through a linear regression and the ratios for chosen 14 storms among the whole record were found to change between 1.38 and 1.88. It is stated that the ratio of Hmax / Hs is between 1.6 and 2 in the deep water but it decreases to 1.3 through to shallower zones (Goda, 2000). Since the measurement depth in Filyos is 12.5 m which is an intermediate depth, the result can be expected. However; it was noticed during the analysis that there are records in which Hmax /Hs ratio is higher than 2.0. These higher waves in a record are called as extreme waves using the abnormality index (AI) of Kharif et al. (2009

  14. Storm Surge Modelling of Super Typhoon Haiyan Event in Tacloban City, Leyte using MIKE 21 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelligera, Flor Angel; Caro, Carl Vincent; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Lapidez, John Phillip; Malano, Vicente; Agaton, Rojelee; Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines on 08 November 2013 causing massive destruction to the central part of the country. Arguably the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history, Haiyan caused 6,201 deaths and damages amounting to PhP 36,690,882,497.27 (USD 824,390,091.77). The typhoon also brought about destructive storm surges reaching up to 7 meters in height. A better understanding of storm surge is essential to the development of mechanisms to mitigate the effects of similar events. Thus, a computer simulation of Haiyan with the resulting wave heights and storm surge levels was made using MIKE 21 model -- a software used for many different coastal and marine engineering projects worldwide. Simulations were made using the Hydrodynamic Flexible Mesh (HD FM) model coupled with the Spectral Wave (SW) model of the software. This coupled approach allows accurate calculations of both surge water levels and wave crest heights for overtopping of coastal structures. The maximum mesh flexibility of MIKE 21 allows mesh refinement for the coastal areas of Tacloban City within coarser mesh elements resulting to higher grid accuracy. Input parameters for the simulations of the coastline of Tacloban City, a densely populated coastal community heaviest hit by the storm surges of Haiyan, were obtained from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Atmospheric conditions such as wind and pressure values were input to a set of regional and local hydrodynamic and spectral wave models. Simulation results were compared with available tidal gauge records and the comparison showed good correlation. Coastal regional inundation maps were then created from the results of the storm surge simulations. These maps or its equivalent should be used to develop and further improve disaster risk management plans for future surge events. These plans include, but are not limited to

  15. Atmospheric Dynamics of Sub-Tropical Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, Ashok Kumar

    Meso-alpha/beta scale observational and meso-beta/gamma scale numerical model analyses were performed to study the atmospheric dynamics responsible for generating Harmattan, Saudi Arabian, and Bodele Depression dust storms. For each dust storm case study, MERRA reanalysis datasets, WRF simulated very high resolution datasets, MODIS/Aqua and Terra images, EUMETSAT images, NAAPS aerosol modelling plots, CALIPSO images, surface observations, and rawinsonde soundings were analyzed. The analysis of each dust storm carried out separately and an in-depth comparison of the events shows some similarities among the three case studies: (1) the presence of a well-organized baroclinic synoptic scale system, (2) small scale dust emission events which occurred prior to the formation of the primary large-scale dust storms, (3) cross mountain flows which produced a strong leeside inversion layer prior to the large scale dust storm, (4) the presence of thermal wind imbalance in the exit region of the mid-tropospheric jet streak in the lee of the mountains shortly after the time of the inversion formation, (5) major dust storm formation was accompanied by large magnitude ageostrophic isallobaric low-level winds as part of the meso-beta scale adjustment process, (6) substantial low-level turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), (7) formation in the lee of nearby mountains, and (8) the emission of the dust occurred initially in narrow meso-beta scale zones parallel to the mountains, and later reached the meso-alpha scale when suspended dust was transported away from the mountains. In addition to this there were additional meso-beta scale and meso-gamma scale adjustment processes resulting in Kelvin waves in the Harmattan and the Bodele Depression cases and the thermally-forced MPS circulation in all of these three cases. The Kelvin wave preceded a cold pool accompanying the air behind the large scale cold front instrumental in the major dust storm. The Kelvin wave organized the major dust

  16. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  17. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  18. VHF radar observations of mesospheric density distrubance caused by Typhoon Susan and tropical storms in the western Pacific area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Johnson, D. L.; Chen, A. J.; Lin, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric parameters from the toposphere to the middle atmosphere during Typhoon Susan and tropical storms in May and June 1988 were observed by VHF radar in Taiwan. Time-dependent wind velocities with three-dimensional profiles are plotted by processing the backscattered echo power data and the Doppler spectral width of the signal returns from the VHF radar. The propagation characteristics of the gravity waves excited by the enhanced convection motions of the storms and the density perturbations caused by this gravity wave progagation are determined.

  19. Tropical cyclone waves detected with infrasound sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    The strong winds of a tropical cyclone whip up the sea surface, driving ocean waves a dozen meters high. When one such ocean wave runs into another wave that has an equal period but is traveling in the opposite direction, the interaction produces low-frequency sound waves that can be detected thousands of kilometers away. The infrasound signals produced by interacting ocean surface waves—known as microbarom—have typical frequencies around 0.2 hertz. Researchers previously determined that as a hurricane travels along its track, early waves generated by the storm will interact with those generated later on, producing a strong microbarom signal in the storm's wake. Researchers also found, however, that microbarom signals are produced by regular surface ocean behavior, including swell, surface waves, and nontropical cyclone storms.

  20. Probability of occurrence of planetary ionosphere storms associated with the magnetosphere disturbance storm time events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Arikan, F.; Stanislawska, I.

    2014-11-01

    The ionospheric W index allows to distinguish state of the ionosphere and plasmasphere from quiet conditions (W = 0 or ±1) to intense storm (W = ±4) ranging the plasma density enhancements (positive phase) or plasma density depletions (negative phase) regarding the quiet ionosphere. The global W index maps are produced for a period 1999-2014 from Global Ionospheric Maps of Total Electron Content, GIM-TEC, designed by Jet Propulson Laboratory, converted from geographic frame (-87.5:2.5:87.5° in latitude, -180:5:180° in longitude) to geomagnetic frame (-85:5:85° in magnetic latitude, -180:5:180° in magnetic longitude). The probability of occurrence of planetary ionosphere storm during the magnetic disturbance storm time, Dst, event is evaluated with the superposed epoch analysis for 77 intense storms (Dst ≤ -100 nT) and 230 moderate storms (-100 < Dst ≤ -50 nT) with start time, t0, defined at Dst storm main phase onset. It is found that the intensity of negative storm, iW-, exceeds the intensity of positive storm, iW+, by 1.5-2 times. An empirical formula of iW+ and iW- in terms of peak Dst is deduced exhibiting an opposite trends of relation of intensity of ionosphere-plasmasphere storm with regard to intensity of Dst storm.

  1. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  2. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  3. In Brief: Cassini images Saturn storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-11-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has spotted an 8000-kilometer-wide, hurricane-like storm around Saturn's South Pole, NASA announced on 9 November. The storm has a dark `eye' at the South Pole along with eye-wall clouds and spiral arms, but it is not known if moist convection-the driver of hurricanes on Earth-drives the Saturn storm. A movie taken by Cassini's camera indicates that the winds are blowing clockwise at about 560 kilometers per hour. Although large storms have been observed on other planets in the past-most notably, Jupiter's Great Red Spot-this is the first storm found to have eye-wall clouds and a relatively calm center. Andrew Ingersoll, a member of Cassini's imaging team at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, said the storm looks like a hurricane but is not behaving like one. ``Whatever it is, we are going to focus on the eye of this storm and find out why it is there.''

  4. Stability of subsea pipelines during large storms

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Scott; An, Hongwei; Cheng, Liang; White, David J.; Griffiths, Terry

    2015-01-01

    On-bottom stability design of subsea pipelines transporting hydrocarbons is important to ensure safety and reliability but is challenging to achieve in the onerous metocean (meteorological and oceanographic) conditions typical of large storms (such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes or typhoons). This challenge is increased by the fact that industry design guidelines presently give no guidance on how to incorporate the potential benefits of seabed mobility, which can lead to lowering and self-burial of the pipeline on a sandy seabed. In this paper, we demonstrate recent advances in experimental modelling of pipeline scour and present results investigating how pipeline stability can change in a large storm. An emphasis is placed on the initial development of the storm, where scour is inevitable on an erodible bed as the storm velocities build up to peak conditions. During this initial development, we compare the rate at which peak near-bed velocities increase in a large storm (typically less than 10−3 m s−2) to the rate at which a pipeline scours and subsequently lowers (which is dependent not only on the storm velocities, but also on the mechanism of lowering and the pipeline properties). We show that the relative magnitude of these rates influences pipeline embedment during a storm and the stability of the pipeline. PMID:25512592

  5. Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    morning dives. Then the boat heads towards Scripps Pier (Figure 13). Tom Lorensen joins the team there, swimming out to the boat for the afternoon...Oceanside Pier to south of Agua Hedionda Lagoon VI Batiquitos Lagoon VII San Elijo Lagoon VIII San Dieguito River IX South of Solidad Valley, near Torrey

  6. Wetland shoreline recession in the Mississippi River Delta from petroleum oiling and cyclonic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Ramsey, Elijah

    2016-11-01

    We evaluate the relative impact of petroleum spill and storm surge on near-shore wetland loss by quantifying the lateral movement of coastal shores in upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana (USA), between June 2009 and October 2012, a study period that extends from the year prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill to 2.5 years following the spill. We document a distinctly different pattern of shoreline loss in the 2 years following the spill, both from that observed in the year prior to the spill, during which there was no major cyclonic storm, and from change related to Hurricane Isaac, which made landfall in August 2012. Shoreline erosion following oiling was far more spatially extensive and included loss in areas protected from wave-induced erosion. We conclude that petroleum exposure can substantially increase shoreline recession particularly in areas protected from storm-induced degradation and disproportionally alters small oil-exposed barrier islands relative to natural erosion.

  7. Wetland shoreline recession in the Mississippi River Delta from petroleum oiling and cyclonic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Ramsey III, Elijah W.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the relative impact of petroleum spill and storm surge on near-shore wetland loss by quantifying the lateral movement of coastal shores in upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana (USA), between June 2009 and October 2012, a study period that extends from the year prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill to 2.5 years following the spill. We document a distinctly different pattern of shoreline loss in the 2 years following the spill, both from that observed in the year prior to the spill, during which there was no major cyclonic storm, and from change related to Hurricane Isaac, which made landfall in August 2012. Shoreline erosion following oiling was far more spatially extensive and included loss in areas protected from wave-induced erosion. We conclude that petroleum exposure can substantially increase shoreline recession particularly in areas protected from storm-induced degradation and disproportionally alters small oil-exposed barrier islands relative to natural erosion.

  8. A comparative study of wave-current interactions over the eastern Canadian shelf under severe weather conditions using a coupled wave-circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Sheng, Jinyu

    2016-07-01

    A coupled wave-circulation model is used to examine interactions between surface gravity waves and ocean currents over the eastern Canadian shelf and adjacent deep waters during three severe weather events. The simulated significant wave heights (SWHs) and peak wave periods reveal the importance of wave-current interactions (WCI) during and after the storm. In two fast-moving hurricane cases, the maximum SWHs are reduced by more than 11% on the right-hand side of the storm track and increased by about 5% on the left-hand side due to different WCI mechanisms on waves on two sides of the track. The dominate mechanisms of the WCI on waves include the current-induced modification of wind energy input to the wave generation, and current-induced wave advection and refraction. In the slow-moving winter storm case, the effect of WCI decreases the maximum SWHs on both sides of the storm track due to different results of the current-induced wave advection, which is affected greatly by the storm translation speed. The simulated sea surface temperature (SST) cooling induced by hurricanes and SST warming induced by the winter storm are also enhanced (up to 1.2°C) by the WCI mechanisms on circulation and hydrography. The 3D wave forces can affect water columns up to 200 m in all three storm cases. By comparison, the effect of breaking wave-induced mixing in the ocean upper layer is more important under strong stratification conditions in two hurricane cases than under weak stratification conditions in the winter storm case.

  9. Inverse modeling of storm intensity based on grain-size analysis of hurricane-induced event beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagno, K. A.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    As the coastal population continues to grow in size and wealth, increased hurricane frequency and intensity present a growing threat of property damage and loss of life. Recent reconstructions of past intense-hurricane landfalls from sediment cores in southeastern New England identify a series of active intervals over the past 2,000 years, with the last few centuries among the most quiescent intervals. The frequency of intense-hurricane landfalls in southeastern New England is well constrained, but the intensity of these storms, particularly prehistoric events, is not. This study analyzes the grain sizes of major storm event beds along a transect of sediment cores in Salt Pond, Falmouth, MA. Several prehistoric events contain more coarse material than any of the deposits from the historical interval, suggesting that landfalling hurricanes in the northeastern United States may have been more intense than the historically encountered category 2 and 3 storms. The intensity of major storm events is estimated using grain-size analysis with a digital image processing, size, and shape analyzer. Since event deposits in Salt Pond result from a combination of coastal inundation and wave action, a large population of both historical and synthetic storms is used to assess the storm characteristics that could result in the wave heights inversely modeled from grain size trends. Intense-hurricane activity may be closely tied to warming in sea surface temperature. As such, the prehistoric intervals of increased frequency and intensity provide potential analogs for current and future hurricane risk in the northeastern United States.

  10. Role of intertidal wetlands for tidal and storm tide attenuation along a confined estuary: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolders, S.; Plancke, Y.; Ides, S.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2015-07-01

    Coastal lowlands and estuaries are subjected to increasing flood risks during storm surges due to global and regional changes. Tidal wetlands are increasingly valued as effective natural buffers for storm surges by dissipating wave energy and providing flood water storage. While previous studies focused on flood wave attenuation within and behind wetlands, this study focuses on the effects of estuarine wetland properties on the attenuation of a storm tide that propagates along the length of an estuary. Wetland properties including elevation, surface area, and location within the estuary were investigated using a numerical model of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium, SW Netherlands). For a spring tide lower wetland elevations result in more attenuation of high water levels along the estuary, while for a higher storm tide higher elevations provide more attenuation compared to lower wetland elevations. For spring and storm tide a larger wetland surface area results in a better attenuation along the estuary up to a threshold wetland size for which larger wetlands do not further contribute to more attenuation. Finally a wetland of the same size and elevation, but located more upstream in the estuary, can store a larger proportion of the local flood volume and therefore has a larger attenuating effect on upstream high water levels. With this paper we aim to contribute towards a better understanding and wider implementation of ecosystem-based adaptation to increasing estuarine flood risks associated with storms.

  11. Role of intertidal wetlands for tidal and storm tide attenuation along a confined estuary: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolders, S.; Plancke, Y.; Ides, S.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2015-05-01

    Coastal lowlands and estuaries are subjected to increasing flood risks during storm surges due to global and regional changes. Tidal wetlands are increasingly valued as effective natural buffers for storm surges by dissipating wave energy and providing flood water storage. While previous studies focused on flood wave attenuation within and behind wetlands, this study focuses on the effects of estuarine wetland properties on the attenuation of a storm tide that propagates along the length of an estuary. Wetland properties including elevation, surface area, and location within the estuary were investigated using a numerical model of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium, SW Netherlands). For a spring tide lower wetland elevations result in more attenuation of high water levels along the estuary, while for a higher storm tide higher elevations provide more attenuation compared to lower wetland elevations. For spring and storm tide a arger wetland surface area results in a better attenuation along the estuary up to a threshold wetland size for which larger wetlands do not further contribute to more attenuation. Finally a wetland of the same size and elevation, but located more upstream in the estuary, can store a larger proportion of the local flood volume and therefore has a larger attenuating effect on upstream high water levels. With this paper we aim to contribute towards a better understanding and wider implementation of ecosystem-based adaptation to increasing estuarine flood risks associated with storms.

  12. Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, A. L.; Williams, M. J. M.; Dean, S. M.; Meylan, M. H.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of large, storm-generated waves through sea ice has so far not been measured, limiting our understanding of how ocean waves break sea ice. Without improved knowledge of ice breakup, we are unable to understand recent changes, or predict future changes, in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that storm-generated ocean waves propagating through Antarctic sea ice are able to transport enough energy to break sea ice hundreds of kilometres from the ice edge. Our results, which are based on concurrent observations at multiple locations, establish that large waves break sea ice much farther from the ice edge than would be predicted by the commonly assumed exponential decay. We observed the wave height decay to be almost linear for large waves--those with a significant wave height greater than three metres--and to be exponential only for small waves. This implies a more prominent role for large ocean waves in sea-ice breakup and retreat than previously thought. We examine the wider relevance of this by comparing observed Antarctic sea-ice edge positions with changes in modelled significant wave heights for the Southern Ocean between 1997 and 2009, and find that the retreat and expansion of the sea-ice edge correlate with mean significant wave height increases and decreases, respectively. This includes capturing the spatial variability in sea-ice trends found in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. Climate models fail to capture recent changes in sea ice in both polar regions. Our results suggest that the incorporation of explicit or parameterized interactions between ocean waves and sea ice may resolve this problem.

  13. Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent.

    PubMed

    Kohout, A L; Williams, M J M; Dean, S M; Meylan, M H

    2014-05-29

    The propagation of large, storm-generated waves through sea ice has so far not been measured, limiting our understanding of how ocean waves break sea ice. Without improved knowledge of ice breakup, we are unable to understand recent changes, or predict future changes, in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that storm-generated ocean waves propagating through Antarctic sea ice are able to transport enough energy to break sea ice hundreds of kilometres from the ice edge. Our results, which are based on concurrent observations at multiple locations, establish that large waves break sea ice much farther from the ice edge than would be predicted by the commonly assumed exponential decay. We observed the wave height decay to be almost linear for large waves--those with a significant wave height greater than three metres--and to be exponential only for small waves. This implies a more prominent role for large ocean waves in sea-ice breakup and retreat than previously thought. We examine the wider relevance of this by comparing observed Antarctic sea-ice edge positions with changes in modelled significant wave heights for the Southern Ocean between 1997 and 2009, and find that the retreat and expansion of the sea-ice edge correlate with mean significant wave height increases and decreases, respectively. This includes capturing the spatial variability in sea-ice trends found in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. Climate models fail to capture recent changes in sea ice in both polar regions. Our results suggest that the incorporation of explicit or parameterized interactions between ocean waves and sea ice may resolve this problem.

  14. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  15. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  16. Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (≳0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where its magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the depletions: fully adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering by plasma waves (e.g., EMIC and whistler waves), and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the magnetopause losses to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of March 17, 2013 storm. The intensities of > 1 MeV electrons were depleted by more that an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 hours after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test-particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with the inductive electric field. The comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the MagEIS experiment shows that the magnetopause losses in the model accounts for most of the observed depletion. The individual electron motion the process is non-adiabatic; the third invariant is violated by global variations of the inner magnetospheric fields caused by the magnetopause compressions and the buildup of ring current, while the second invariant is violated at drift orbit bifurcations. The analysis shows that the observed deep depletion of radiation belt intensities is enabled by the change in the global configuration of magnetic

  17. Desert Shield and Desert Storm Emerging Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-07

    becomes much more apparent over relatively flat terrain. d. Recommended or Ongoing Action. The M577 CPV is scheduled to yo through a system conversion to...STORM Vehicle exchange policy at maintenanfce points. 9? 40115 4f996 (0017?) DESERT STORM Fretracide, peor ommunication. poor flank ceerdihutien. 24...02413 fll% yo (00M) DEIil SIONM Distribut ion of Wcom arM Iaf amon units 4??44 INAI8 (002 n) TILSll STORM Pro-combat trainfig V4 14145 U’,411 (00276

  18. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  19. J-wave syndromes. from cell to bedside.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Yan, Gan-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The J wave, a deflection that follows the QRS complex of the surface electrocardiogram, is usually partially buried in the R wave in humans, appearing as a J-point elevation. An early repolarization (ER) pattern characterized by J-point elevation, slurring of the terminal part of the QRS, and ST-segment elevation has long been recognized and considered to be totally benign. Recent studies have presented evidence demonstrating that an ER pattern in inferior leads or inferolateral leads is associated with increased risk for life-threatening arrhythmias, named early repolarization syndrome. Early repolarization syndrome and Brugada syndrome share similar electrocardiographic characteristics, clinical outcomes, risk factors, as well as a common arrhythmic platform related to amplification of I(to)-mediated J waves. Although Brugada syndrome and early repolarization syndrome differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J wave manifestation, they can be considered to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression, termed J-wave syndromes. Early repolarization syndrome has been proposed to be divided into 3 subtypes: type 1, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in the lateral precordial leads, is prevalent among healthy male athletes and rarely seen in ventricular fibrillation survivors; type 2, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in the inferior or inferolateral leads, is associated with a higher level of risk; whereas type 3, displaying an ER pattern globally in the inferior, lateral, and right precordial leads, is associated with the highest level of risk for development of malignant arrhythmias and is often associated with ventricular fibrillation storms.

  20. Analysis of large boulders along the coast of south-eastern Sicily to discriminate between storm and tsunami deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrotta, Claudia; Serafina Barbano, Maria; Gerardi, Flavia

    2010-05-01

    We present a study to discriminate the kind of anomalous waves, storms or tsunamis, that were responsible for the large boulder accumulation in the Vendicari Reserve along the south-eastern Sicilian coast. These depositional and erosional indicators of the large wave impact have been already observed in some rocky coasts of the Mediterranean basin and associated to strong waves of tsunamigenic or meteorological origin. Distinguishing boulders deposited by tsunamis from that deposited by storms and determining the age of their deposition can help to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of tsunamis and the hazard along the coast also regarding extraordinarily violent storms. The Sicilian Ionian coast has been affected in historical time by large destructive earthquake-related tsunamis (e.g. the 1169, 1693 and 1908) and it is exposed to an intense wave motion coming from a NNE- SSE span direction . In the rocky coastal area of Vendicari Reserve, three different GPS surveys (from September 2006 until April 2009) have been performed with the aim to observe the distance of each boulders with respect to the shoreline and if storms removed boulders or deposited new ones. A morphological analysis aiming to identify boulder shapes, measuring their volumes, elongation axis azimuth, pre-transport setting and the probable transport mechanism on the platform, was also carried out. The calcarenitic boulders (specific weight about 2,3 g/cm3), reaching about 20 tons and a distance up to 60m from the shoreline, are generally carved out from the supratidal or mid-sublittoral zone, showing widespread biogenic encrustations sometimes so fresh that suggest a recent deposition. The GPS surveys allowed us to observed that, after a strong storm during January 2009, several boulders were removed while new have been deposited on the platform by the storm waves. Hydrodynamic equations jointly to statistical analysis of sea storms have been used to determine the extreme event, geological or

  1. Storm flood impacts along the shores of micro-tidal inland seas: A morphological and sedimentological study of the Vesterlyng beach, the Belt Sea, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Kroon, Aart

    2016-01-01

    The morphological and sedimentological impacts of an extreme storm event ('Bodil' in December 2013) were investigated at a mixed sand and gravel beach (Vesterlyng) in a micro-tidal environment along the Belt Sea, Denmark. The storm response was characteristic for mixed sand and gravel beaches: gravelly storm berms with sandy to gravelly washover fans were formed at the upper beach where swash processes dominated during extreme water levels in combination with overtopping and overwash. In addition, storm scarps and gravel flats were formed. The elevation of the storm berm crest was identical to a summation of the still-water level (1.60 m) in the Belt Sea during the storm flood and the wave run-up (0.75 m) at the shore. The crest of 2.35 m is therefore a precise measure of the storm flood level. This storm flood was classified as a large-scale extreme event. In a Holocene perspective it is suggested that storm berm (beach ridge) heights above contemporaneous sea level can be used as a proxy of past flood events along micro-tidal shores.

  2. Impact of Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies on the Atlantic Tropical Storm Activity and West African Rainfall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Bell, Gerald D.; Thiaw, Wassila M.

    2001-11-01

    The association between rainfall over the Sahel and Sudan region and tropical storm activity in the Atlantic is examined using the NCEP NCAR reanalysis and sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) from 1949 to 1998. Evidence indicates that both are influenced by global SSTAs. The SSTA modes generating favorable atmospheric conditions for tropical storms to develop are also in favor of a wet rainfall season in the Sahel and Sudan region. The easterly waves over West Africa become tropical storms only if the atmospheric conditions over the Atlantic are favorable. These conditions are responses to SSTAs.In addition to ENSO, a multidecadal trend mode also plays a role. The positive phase of the trend mode features positive loadings in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic, and negative loadings over the three southern oceans. The positive (negative) phases of both modes are associated with increased (reduced) Atlantic tropical storm activity, and with wet (dry) West African monsoon seasons. The SSTAs over the tropical South Atlantic (S-ATL) are related to the rainfall dipole over West Africa, but the influence on tropical storms is not large. Warm (cold) SSTAs over the tropical North Atlantic enhance (suppress) the occurrence of tropical storms, but have little influence on rainfall over West Africa.The most prominent circulation features associated with the positive phases of SSTA modes are enhanced upper-level 200-hPa easterly winds and reduced vertical wind shear in the main development region of the tropical Atlantic, which are well-known features of active Atlantic tropical storm seasons. The associated low-level flow shows enhanced anomalous westerly winds across the Atlantic to Africa. That allows more moisture transport into Africa and, therefore, more rainfall.


  3. Ionospheric effects at low latitudes during the March 22, 1979, geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G. ); Crowley, G.; Roble, R.G. )

    1989-05-01

    This paper investigates the response of the equatorial ionosphere to the neutral atmosphere perturbations produced by the magnetic storm of March 22, 1979. A numerical model of the equatorial ionosphere is used to calculate the maximum electron densities and F layer heights associated with a storm-perturbed neutral atmosphere and circulation model. Possible electric field perturbations due to the storm are ignored. The neutral atmosphere and dynamics are simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model (TGCM) for the storm day of March 22, 1979, and the preceding quiet day. The most striking feature of the TGCM storm day simulations is the presence of waves in the neutral composition, wind, and temperature fields which propagate from high latitudes to the equator. The TGCM-calculated fields for the two days are input into a low-latitude ionosphere model which calculates n{sub max} and h{sub max} between {plus minus}20{degree}dip latitude. The calculated nighttime 6300-{angstrom} airglow emission and the altitude profiles of electron concentration are also highly perturbed by the storm. Examination of ionosonde data for March 22, 1979, shows remarkable agreement between the measured and predicted changes in f{sub 0}F{sub 2} and h{sub max} near 140{degree}W. Poorer agreement near 70{degree}W may be due to the neglect of electric field perturbations and the approximations inherent in the modeling. The results of these simulations indicate that the major factor influencing the storm time ionospheric behavior in this case is the neutral wind.

  4. Probabilistic hurricane-induced storm surge hazard assessment in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krien, Y.; Dudon, B.; Roger, J.; Zahibo, N.

    2015-01-01

    Current storm surge hazard maps in the French West Indies are essentially based on simple statistical methods using limited historical data and early low-resolution models which do not take the effect of waves into account. In this paper, we infer new 100 and 1000 year surge levels in Guadeloupe from the numerical modelling of storm surges induced by a large set of synthetic events that are in statistical agreement with features of historical hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin between 1980 and 2011. Computations are performed using the wave-current coupled model ADCIRC-SWAN with high grid resolutions (up to 40-60 m) in the coastal and wave dissipation areas. This model is validated against observations during past events such as hurricane HUGO (1989). Results are generally found to be in reasonable agreement with past studies in areas where surge is essentially wind-driven, but to differ significantly in coastal regions where the transfer of momentum from waves to the water column constitutes a non-negligible part of the total surge. The methodology, which can be applied to other islands in the Lesser Antilles, allows to obtain storm surge level maps that can be of major interest for coastal planners and decision makers in terms of risk management.

  5. Probabilistic hurricane-induced storm surge hazard assessment in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krien, Y.; Dudon, B.; Roger, J.; Zahibo, N.

    2015-08-01

    Current storm surge hazard maps in the French West Indies are essentially based on simple statistical methods using limited historical data and early low-resolution models which do not take the effect of waves into account. In this paper, we infer new 100-year and 1000-year surge levels in Guadeloupe from the numerical modelling of storm surges induced by a large set of synthetic events that are in statistical agreement with features of historical hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin between 1980 and 2011. Computations are performed using the wave-current coupled model ADCIRC-SWAN with high grid resolutions (up to 40-60 m) in the coastal and wave dissipation areas. This model is validated against observations during past events such as hurricane HUGO (1989). Results are generally found to be in reasonable agreement with past studies in areas where surge is essentially wind-driven, but found to differ significantly in coastal regions where the transfer of momentum from waves to the water column constitutes a non-negligible part of the total surge. The methodology, which can be applied to other islands in the Lesser Antilles, allows storm surge level maps to be obtained that can be of major interest for coastal planners and decision makers in terms of risk management.

  6. Hurricane Sandy storm surges observed by HY-2A satellite altimetry and tide gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan; Han, Guoqi; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Dake

    2014-07-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall to the northeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey at 23:30 UTC on 29 October 2012 and caused large storm surges and devastating flooding along the New Jersey and New York coasts. Here we combine sea surface height measurements from the HaiYang-2A (HY-2A) satellite altimeter with coastal tide-gauge data to study the features of the Hurricane Sandy storm surges. The HY-2A altimeter captured the cross-shelf profile of surge at the time of Sandy's peak surge, with a surge magnitude of about 1.83 m at the coast and a cross-shelf decaying scale of 68 km. The altimetric surge magnitude agrees approximately with tide-gauge estimate of 1.73 m at nearby Montauk. Further analysis suggests that continental shelf waves were generated during the passage of Sandy. The continental shelf wave observed by altimetry has a propagating speed of 6.5 m/s. The post landfall free shelf wave at Atlantic City observed by tide gauges has a propagating phase speed of 6.8 m/s and cross-shelf e-folding scale of 75 km. In contrast, the post landfall sea level oscillation at Montauk is not associated with a continental shelf wave. The study indicates that satellite altimetry is capable of observing and useful for understanding features of storm surges, complementing existing coastal tide gauges.

  7. Unraveling Local Dust Storm Structure on Mars: The Case of Northern Amazonis During Mars Year 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    On an average Martian afternoon, two or three local dust storms are taking place somewhere on the planet. By definition, these storms range in area from a few square kilometers to hundreds of thousands, rarely surviving from sol to the next. After more than 40 years of observation, a great deal is known about where and when they occur, but very little is known about the structure and dynamics of individual storms. This contrast in our knowledge about local dust storms results from how they are observed. Daily global mapping of Mars in the visible has enabled an accurate census of storms as well as observation of their morphological diversity. However, even under ideal conditions, an individual storm is only observed by sounder-type instrumentation once or twice (if it is a large enough), providing an incomplete picture of structure of an individual storm. Early studies of cyclogenesis on Earth had a similar problem. Cyclones were many, but observations of individual cyclones, especially over the ocean, were sparse. The structure and dynamics of cyclones was unraveled by noting similarities in properties between certain classes of cyclones and using observational data to generate composite cyclones that could be analyzed and modeled. Variability within the composite also could be studied. Here I establish the existence of a well-defined class of Martian local dust storms defined by: (1) occurrence along the axis of the dark albedo feature in northern Amazonis Planitia (36 N, 155 W); (2) not being associated with lifting or cloudiness due to a baroclinic wave/frontal boundary at higher latitude; (3) being textured, that is, having dust clouds with sharp, well-defined features that are thought to indicate their clouds are supplied by the active lifting of dust; (4) having dust clouds organized in well-defined streets indicative of convective rolls. In Mars Year 24, such storms developed on thirteen occasions in northern fall and autumn. Using data from the Mars

  8. Criteria of interplanetary parameters causing intense magnetic storms (Dst less than -100nT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    Ten intense storms occurred during the 500 days of August 16, 1978 to December 28, 1979. From the analysis of ISEE-3 field and plasma data, it is found that the interplanetary cause of these storms are long-duration, large and negative IMF B sub Z events, associated with interplanetary duskward-electric fields greater than 5 mV/m. Because a one-to-one relationship was found between these interplanetary events and intense storms, it is suggested that these criteria can, in the future, be used as predictors of intense storms by an interplanetary monitor such as ISEE-3. These B sub Z events are found to occur in association with large amplitudes of the IMF magnitude within two days after the onset of either high-speed solar wind streams or of solar wind density enhancement events, giving important clues to their interplanetary origin. Some obvious possibilities will be discussed. The close proximity of B sub Z events and magnetic storms to the onset of high speed streams or density enhancement events is in sharp contrast to interplanetary Alfven waves and HILDCAA events previously reported, and thus the two interplanetary features corresponding geomagnetic responses can be thought of as being complementary in nature. An examination of opposite polarity B sub Z events with the same criteria show that their occurrence is similar both in number as well as in their relationship to interplanetary disturbances, and that they lead to low levels of geomagnetic activity.

  9. The results of the flight test of the small satellite "Compass-2" aimed at searching for abnormal phenomena in the ionosphere associated with earthquakes and other natural and man-caused events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, Vladimir

    The experimental small satellite "COMPASS - 2" was designed for the monitoring of the ionosphere and near-Earth space with the purpose of detection, registration and study of abnormal phenomena in the ionosphere associated with earthquakes and other natural and man-caused phenomena and to investigate the probability of detecting precursors of strong earthquakes. The scientific payload of the "Compass- 2" satellite comprises five devices: -low/ultra low frequencies wave analyzer; -high radio frequencies wave analyzer; -two frequencies GPS receiver; - two frequencies UHF transmitter; -energetic particles and ultraviolet detectors. The small satellite "COMPASS - 2" was launched to the orbit on 26 May 2006 and have worked up to the end of May 2007. Despite the malfunction of the platform, the measurements of the plasma parameters of the ionosphere and the registration of some interesting phenomena were made during this test flight. Two-frequency GPS receiver successfully has operated for measurements of key parameter of the ionosphere - the integrated contents of electrons . The same GPS receiver was used for positioning of satellite and time binding of onboard measurements with high accuracy. The radio-frequency dynamic spectrums of plasma emissions in the ionosphere were obtained by the Radio Frequency Analyzer (RFA). That spectrum provides information on the ionospheric parameters and processes. The detector of energetic particles DRF has registered the phenomena of powerful storm activity in the top atmosphere; streams of the accelerated protons and electrons were registered in the near Earth space during a large geomagnetic storm on December, 15, 2006. Registered protons have been accelerated and have got in a vicinity of the Earth as a result of solar flashes of 13-th and on December, 14-th, 2006. Low-Frequency Wave analyzer VLF/ULF have registered the whistlers modes propagating in the ionosphere. Abnormal signals associated, probably, with the earthquake

  10. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  11. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  12. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  13. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  14. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  15. The 1973 dust storm on Mars: Maps from hourly photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The hourly progress of the 1973 major Martian storm was mapped using photographic images from the International Planetary Patrol. Two series of 20 daily maps show the semi-hourly positions of the storm brightenings in red light and blue light. The maps indicate that the 1973 storm had many similarities to the 1971 storm.

  16. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  17. Rainfall Totals Over Storm Life of Matthew

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the amount of rainfall dropped by Hurricane Matthew over the life and track of the storm/ IMERG real time data covering the period from Sept. 28 through Oct. 10, 2016 show rain...

  18. Satellite Movie Sees Southern California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Jan. 5 through Jan 7 shows the progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that hit southern California and generated flooding a...

  19. Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Gordon

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 13-16, 2012, shows the birth of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression that strengthens into Tropical Storm Gordon. This...

  20. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  1. Quantifying Power Grid Risk from Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N.; Wei, L. H.; Gannon, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We are creating a statistical model of the geophysical environment that can be used to quantify the geomagnetic storm hazard to power grid infrastructure. Our model is developed using a database of surface electric fields for the continental United States during a set of historical geomagnetic storms. These electric fields are derived from the SUPERMAG compilation of worldwide magnetometer data and surface impedances from the United States Geological Survey. This electric field data can be combined with a power grid model to determine GICs per node and reactive MVARs at each minute during a storm. Using publicly available substation locations, we derive relative risk maps by location by combining magnetic latitude and ground conductivity. We also estimate the surface electric fields during the August 1972 geomagnetic storm that caused a telephone cable outage across the middle of the United States. This event produced the largest surface electric fields in the continental U.S. in at least the past 40 years.

  2. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  3. GPM Flyby of Tropical Storm Dineo

    NASA Video Gallery

    This flyby animation of rainfall data within Tropical Cyclone Dineo was taken from NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite on Feb.16. Storms over Swaziland were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 86 mm (3....

  4. Tropical Storm Wali Seen by GOESWest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 15 to 18 shows the birth of Tropical Storm Wali southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii on July 17. Credit: NA...

  5. Tropical Storm Gil - July 31, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain...

  6. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  7. TRMM Sees California Storm Move East

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from Feb. 28 to Mar. 3 shows the movement of the rain associated with the storm system that soaked California. On March 3, precipitation (yellow) and snow cover (white/yellow) spread...

  8. GOES Movie of Tropical Storm Danielle

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from June 18 to 20 shows the development and movement Tropical Storm Danielle from the western Caribbean Sea into the Bay of Campeche/Gulf of Mexic...

  9. The Surprising Power of Solar Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-funded researchers say a flurry of solar storms from March 8-10, 2012 dumped enough energy in Earth's upper atmosphere (our thermosphere absorbed 26 billion kWh of energy) to power every resid...

  10. GOES video of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the development of System 91L into Tropical Storm Andrea over the course of 3 days from June 4 to June 6, just after Andrea was officially designated a...

  11. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  12. Storm sudden commencements and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Ivan; Sobisevich, Aleksey; Guglielmi, Anatol

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated statistically the problem of possible impact of the geomagnetic storm sudden com-mencement (SSC) on the global seismic activity. SSC are used as reference points for comparative analysis of seismicity by the method of superposed epoch. We selected 405 earthquakes from 1973 to 2010 with M˜5 magnitudes from a representative part of USGS Catalog. The comparative analysis of seismicity was carried out at the intervals of ˜60 min relative to the reference point. With a high degree of reliability, it was found that before the reference point the number of earthquakes is noticeably greater than after it. In other words, the global seismicity is suppressed by SSC. We refer to some studies in which the chemical, thermal and force mechanisms of the electromagnetic field action on rocks are discussed. We emphasize the incompleteness of the study concerning the correlation between SSC and earthquakes because we still do not succeed in understanding and interpreting the relationship in terms of physics and mathematics. The study need to be continued to solve this problem of interest and importance.

  13. Tropical Storm Alberto, Seen Through New 'Eyes'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    NASA's new CloudSat satellite captured its first tropical storm, Alberto, as it spun over the Gulf of Mexico the morning of June 12, 2006. This image comparison shows how CloudSat 'sees' such storms differently than conventional weather satellites. The CloudSat image (top of this page and bottom of figure 1) is compared with images obtained at nearly the same time from two National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service tools that are mainstays for monitoring the development and movement of tropical cyclones: the NEXRAD storm detection radar, which maps out precipitation patterns for that portion of the storm that comes into its range, and the GOES-12 (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) infrared imager, which is presented here to indicate the scale of the storm and the location where CloudSat overflies it. CloudSat sees the storm outside the range of NEXRAD and provides significantly greater vertical detail compared to the GOES satellite. NEXRAD, for example, can only see out to about 402 kilometers (250 nautical miles), and so could not see the portion of the storm that CloudSat was flying over at the time. GOES-12 only sees the very top of the clouds, and cannot provide any detail about what is being seen beneath the cloud tops.

    The CloudSat data show a storm that reaches about 16 kilometers (10 miles) in height and extends perhaps 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) in scale. The green line at the bottom of the CloudSat image is the radar echo of the Earth's surface. Where this line starts to disappear (change color) under the storm is where the rainfall is heaviest. Very heavy rainfall can be seen over about 400 kilometers (249 miles) of the satellite track. Cirrus clouds can also been seen out ahead of the storm (near letter A) -- this is also evident in the GOES-12 image. A smaller thunderstorm is visible in the CloudSat image under that cirrus cloud

  14. Variability in storm climate along the Gulf of Cadiz: the role of large scale atmospheric forcing and implications to coastal hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Benavente, Javier; Laiz, Irene; Del Río, Laura

    2015-11-01

    In the context of increased coastal hazards due to variability in storminess patterns, the danger of coastal damages and/or morphological changes is related to the sum of sea level conditions, storm surge, maximum wave height and run up values. In order to better understand the physical processes that cause the variability of the above parameters a 44 years reanalysis record (HIPOCAS) was used. The HIPOCAS time-series was validated with real wave and sea-level data using linear and vector correlation methods. In the present work changes in the magnitude, duration, frequency and approach direction of the Atlantic storms over the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula) were identified by computing various storm characteristics such as maximum wave height, total energy per storm wave direction and storm duration. The obtained time-series were compared with large-scale atmospheric indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the East Atlantic pattern. The results show a good correlation between negative NAO values and increased storminess over the entire Gulf of Cadiz. Furthermore, negative NAO values were correlated with high residual sea level values. Finally, a joint probability analysis of storm and sea level analysis resulted in increased probabilities of the two events happening at the same time indicating higher vulnerability of the coast and increased coastal risks. The above results were compared with coastal inundation events that took place over the last winter seasons in the province of Cadiz.

  15. Semiannual variations of great geomagnetic storms: Solar sources of great storms. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E.W.; Crooker, N.U.; Cane, H.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report preliminary results of an investigation of the solar sources of 25 great geomagnetic storms with D sub st < or = {minus}250 nT occurring from 1957-1990. These storms exhibit a clear semiannual variation with 14 events occurring within {+-} 30 days of the equinoxes vs. 5 storms within {+-} 30 days of the solstices. This seasonal variation appears to result from a variable threshold for the size of a solar event required to produce a great geomagnetic storm, in the sense that weaker solar events, such as disappearing solar filaments, are more likely to produce great storms at the equinoxes than near the solstices. The great problem storms of the last four solar cycles, i.e., those storms lacking commensurate preceding solar activity, are all found to occur relatively near the equinoxes. Conversely, four of the five great storms that occurred near the solstices were preceded by truly outstanding solar flares. About half (11/25) of the great storms had obvious precursor geomagnetic activity, i.e., periods of approximately > 1 day with D sub st approximately < {minus}30 nT. The precursors can enable some weaker solar events to be more geoeffective than would otherwise be the case in two ways: (1) compression and amplification of pre-existing southward (precursor) fields by the transient shock, and (2) establishment of a lower D sub st baseline , making it easier for transient events to drive D sub st to values < or = {minus}250 nT.

  16. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR COMET STORMS IN METEORITE AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S.; Muller, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Clustering of cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondritic meteorites occurs at 7 {+-} 3 and 30 {+-} 6 Myr ago. There is independent evidence that comet storms have occurred at the same times, based on the fossil record of family and genus extinctions, impact craters and glass, and geomagnetic reversals. We suggest that H chondrites were formed by the impact of shower comets on asteroids. The duration of the most recent comet shower was {le} 4 Myr, in agreement with storm theory.

  18. Ionospheric F-Region Storms: Unsolved Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    the largest solar - terrestrial storms ever observed, with an X17/4B flare on October 28, a solar wind velocity of nearly 2000 km/s and a minimum Dst...disturbance dynamo effects over low and equatorial lat- itude F-region, in Recurrent Magnetic Storms: Corotating Solar Wind Streams (B.T. Tsurutani, R.L...some of the more prominent anomalies observed in this region, including the heating effect below the magne- tospheric cusp, the subauroral electron

  19. Dust Storm, Red Sea and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Outlined against the dark blue water of the Red Sea, a prominent dust storm is making its way across the Red Sea into Saudi Arabia (22.0N, 39.0E) between the Islamic holy cities of Medinah and Mecca. Funneled through a gap in the coastal ranges of southern Sudan near the Ethiopian border, dust storms frequently will blow counter to the prevailing tropical easterly winds of the region.

  20. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proelss, G. W.; Brace, L. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Carignan, G. R.; Killeen, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  1. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. ); Brace, L.H.; Mayr, H.G. ); Carignan, G.R.; Killeen, T.L. ); Klobuchar, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  2. Investigation of the relationship between hurricane waves and extreme runup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. M.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2006-12-01

    In addition to storm surge, the elevation of wave-induced runup plays a significant role in forcing geomorphic change during extreme storms. Empirical formulations for extreme runup, defined as the 2% exceedence level, are dependent on some measure of significant offshore wave height. Accurate prediction of extreme runup, particularly during hurricanes when wave heights are large, depends on selecting the most appropriate measure of wave height that provides energy to the nearshore system. Using measurements from deep-water wave buoys results in an overprediction of runup elevation. Under storm forcing these large waves dissipate across the shelf through friction, whitecapping and depth-limited breaking before reaching the beach and forcing swash processes. The use of a local, shallow water wave height has been shown to provide a more accurate estimate of extreme runup elevation (Stockdon, et. al. 2006); however, a specific definition of this local wave height has yet to be defined. Using observations of nearshore waves from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck, NC during Hurricane Isabel, the most relevant measure of wave height for use in empirical runup parameterizations was examined. Spatial and temporal variability of the hurricane wave field, which made landfall on September 18, 2003, were modeled using SWAN. Comparisons with wave data from FRF gages and deep-water buoys operated by NOAA's National Data Buoy Center were used for model calibration. Various measures of local wave height (breaking, dissipation-based, etc.) were extracted from the model domain and used as input to the runup parameterizations. Video based observations of runup collected at the FRF during the storm were used to ground truth modeled values. Assessment of the most appropriate measure of wave height can be extended over a large area through comparisons to observations of storm- induced geomorphic change.

  3. Numerical Experiments for Storm Surge Inundation in Korean Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shim, J.; Jun, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rising due to climate change following the global warming and the increased intensity of typhoon are magnifying inundation hazards up to the unpredictable level, resulting from the typhoon surge in Korea and other coastal states around the world. Typhoon is the most serious natural disaster in Korean coastal area. Many people died by storm surge inundation every year. And typhoon caused a lot of damage to property. Climate changes due to global warming are producing a stronger natural disaster. Coastal zones have been damaged by typhoons and accompanying storm surge. Especially, the most serious loss of life and terrible property damage caused by typhoon Maemi in 2003. The typhoon Maemi invaded Korean Peninsula leaving property loss of $ 4 Billion and killing 131 people. After then, there has been an increased interest in these coastal zone problems. If storm surges coincide with high tides, the loss of life and property damage due to high waters arc even worse. Therefore it is desirable to accurately forecast the amount water level increase. In this study, using a numerical model FVCOM(finite volume coastal circulation model, Chen et al.,2004), storm surge was simulated to examine its fluctuation characteristics for the coastal area behind Masan, Yeosu and Busan city in Korea. In the numerical model, a moving boundary condition(wet-dry treatment) was incorporated to explain wave inundation. To simulate the inundation scenario, the model grids were extended up to the area inside the lowland in application of the digital elevation data(DEM) made by precisely combining the aero-LiDAR survey data and bathymetry data for the 3 demonstration regions of Busan, Masan and Yeosu. Minimum grid of 300 m unstructured triangular mesh applied to calculate the storm surge was adopted as a grid system. And the minimum grid size of 30 m was built near Busan, Masan and Yeosu area which are the fine coastal regions and where the inundation is simulated. Numerically

  4. Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian; Minen, Stefanie

    2007-07-11

    A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e storm windows.

  5. Mapping Hurricane Rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.

  6. Scientists Track 'Perfect Storm' on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Two dramatically different faces of our Red Planet neighbor appear in these comparison images showing how a global dust storm engulfed Mars with the onset of Martian spring in the Southern Hemisphere. When NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged Mars in June, the seeds of the storm were caught brewing in the giant Hellas Basin (oval at 4 o'clock position on disk) and in another storm at the northern polar cap.

    When Hubble photographed Mars in early September, the storm had already been raging across the planet for nearly two months obscuring all surface features. The fine airborne dust blocks a significant amount of sunlight from reaching the Martian surface. Because the airborne dust is absorbing this sunlight, it heats the upper atmosphere. Seasonal global Mars dust storms have been observed from telescopes for over a century, but this is the biggest storm ever seen in the past several decades.

    Mars looks gibbous in the right photograph because it is 26 million miles farther from Earth than in the left photo (though the pictures have been scaled to the same angular size), and our viewing angle has changed. The left picture was taken when Mars was near its closest approach to Earth for 2001 (an event called opposition); at that point the disk of Mars was fully illuminated as seen from Earth because Mars was exactly opposite the Sun.

    Both images are in natural color, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  7. Mapping hurricane rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, C.; Mason, R.R.; Blanchard, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of affected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-h intervals from midnight (00:00 hours) through noon (12:00 hours) on 24 September 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared with the extent of flood inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Solar storm effects on the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, David; Lillis, Robert; Peticolas, Laura; Luhmann, Janet G.

    Solar storms, including solar flares, solar energetic particles (SEPs), and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), may have a profound influence on planetary atmospheres left unprotected by global magnetic fields, such as Mars and Venus. Energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by photons and charged particles during storms should contribute to ionization and heating, driving chemistry and dynamics over periods of hours or days. There is observational evidence that the escape rate of planetary ions from the Venus atmosphere can increase by an order of magnitude during a storm. The planetary plasma environment may also change considerably during a storm (for example compressing during a passing CME and leading to a strongly magnetized ionosphere). We will present observations and model calculations of the influence of solar energetic particle events and CMEs on the atmosphere of Mars, focusing on three areas. First, we will present a correlation between the energy of auroral-like electron distributions observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft and the presence of solar energetic particles. We will use an electron transport model to calculate the influence of these electron distributions on the nightside atmosphere. Second, we will present an analysis of electron pitch angle distributions recorded by MGS during solar storms, showing a substantial increase in ionization resulting from SEP impact. Third, we will present model calculations of the atmospheric energy deposition by solar energetic particles during a storm.

  9. Non-storm water discharges technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S.

    1994-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge storm water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity Storm Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-storm water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-storm water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and storm water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-storm water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.

  10. Equatorial noise emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, O.

    2016-10-01

    Equatorial noise emissions are electromagnetic waves routinely observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency. Their observations are, however, typically limited to radial distances larger than about 2RE. We use the data measured by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft (altitude of about 700 km) to confirm that during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity, these emissions penetrate down to low radial distances and eventually become a dominant wave emission close to the proton cyclotron frequency in the equatorial region. Wave data obtained during six intense geomagnetic storms (Dst <- 100 nT) are analyzed. It is shown that during the analyzed time intervals, the daytime wave activity within about 20° from the geomagnetic equator is significantly enhanced, while the nightside wave activity shows a weaker increase at lower frequencies. Multicomponent wave data allow us to determine dayside wave propagation parameters. It is shown that the waves are nearly linearly polarized and their wave vector directions are almost perpendicular to the ambient Earth's magnetic field, as it has been previously observed for equatorial noise emissions. Finally, we analyze the dependence of the equatorial wave intensity at the proton cyclotron frequency on Dst and AE geomagnetic indices, and we demonstrate that the dayside wave intensity increases by as much as 3 orders of magnitude during severely disturbed periods.

  11. Development of the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting the impact of storms on high-energy, active-margin coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Maarten van Ormondt,; Erikson, Li H.; Jodi Eshleman,; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Peter Ruggiero,; Peter Adams,; Foxgrover, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) applies a predominantly deterministic framework to make detailed predictions (meter scale) of storm-induced coastal flooding, erosion, and cliff failures over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers). CoSMoS was developed for hindcast studies, operational applications (i.e., nowcasts and multiday forecasts), and future climate scenarios (i.e., sea-level rise + storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm hazards information that may be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. The prototype system, developed for the California coast, uses the global WAVEWATCH III wave model, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry-based global tide model, and atmospheric-forcing data from either the US National Weather Service (operational mode) or Global Climate Models (future climate mode), to determine regional wave and water-level boundary conditions. These physical processes are dynamically downscaled using a series of nested Delft3D-WAVE (SWAN) and Delft3D-FLOW (FLOW) models and linked at the coast to tightly spaced XBeach (eXtreme Beach) cross-shore profile models and a Bayesian probabilistic cliff failure model. Hindcast testing demonstrates that, despite uncertainties in preexisting beach morphology over the ~500 km alongshore extent of the pilot study area, CoSMoS effectively identifies discrete sections of the coast (100s of meters) that are vulnerable to coastal hazards under a range of current and future oceanographic forcing conditions, and is therefore an effective tool for operational and future climate scenario planning.

  12. Infragravity waves over a natural barred profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Holman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of cross-shore flow were made across the surf zone during a storm as a nearshore bar became better developed and migrated offshore. Measured infragravity band spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated numerically over the natural barred profile assuming a white run-up spectrum of leaky mode or high-mode edge waves. The dominant wave observed early in the storm was consistent with Symond and Bowen's (1984) theoretical prediction of resonant amplification of discrete frequencies over a barred profile. -from Authors

  13. Topographic Rossby Waves Generated by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Morey, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    Analytical and numerical studies suggest that given appropriate slope, the ocean responds to a tropical storm with low-frequency motions trapped over a continental slope, the Coastal Trapped Waves. The presented study is focused on Topographic Rossby Waves (TRW), sub-inertial oscillations propagating over a sloping bottom. Generation and propagation of TRW under barotropic (Continental Shelf Waves or Shelf Waves) and baroclinic (Bottom Trapped Waves) approximations are discussed. A real-case model study of a storm surge in Apalachee Bay, northeastern Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Dennis (July, 2005) is presented to demonstrate the role of the shelf waves in coastal inundation. The presentation also discusses excitation of baroclinic bottom-intensified wave motions on the continental slope by a tropical cyclone. An idealized model experiment demonstrates that a continental shelf that (1) responds to a storm as a baroclinic ocean and (2) has a slope steep enough to dominate the planetary β-effect (but small enough to prevent internal Kelvin-type modes) can support baroclinic topographic waves.

  14. Some observations of currents in shallow water during a storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathershaw, A. D.

    1982-06-01

    Observations of currents in a shallow coastal embayment, Swansea Bay in the Bristol Channel, U.K., have indicated that during a storm surge residual flows may be five times higher than during quiescent flow periods. In particular near-bed residuals of the order of 10 cm s -1 were observed during the storm surge of 11 November 1977. While the effect of waves on these measurements cannot be eliminated entirely, correlation analyses and comparisons of wave and current records suggest that the effect is likely, in this case, to have been minimal. The observed flow regime suggests that while the residual circulation in Swansea Bay may be influenced by strong SW. winds blowing onshore, offshore winds from a NW. direction have a more significant effect, possibly as a result of wind induced set down in the Bay head. Calculations show that the observed bottom currents can be predicted by a simple constant eddy viscosity model in which tidal mixing is dominant.

  15. Paleo-tsunami and storm records inferred from coastal boulders along the Ryukyu Islands, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, K.; Miyagi, K.; Imamura, F.

    2012-12-01

    After the 11 March 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami (Mw=9.0) at off the coast of Tohoku district of Japan, re-evaluation of the occurrence of large earthquake and tsunami along the subduction zone is one of the major issues in Japan. Along the Ryukyu trench, there are no known thrust type earthquakes of magnitude greater than 8.0 in the last 300 years [Ando et al., 2009, 2012], although there is one possible exception: the AD1771 event at the southern Ryukyu Islands which is characterized by the ~30 m run-up heights. Hence, the occurrence of tsunamigenic large earthquake along the Ryukyu trench in the past and future is controversial. The lack of thousands of years geological record of past earthquake and tsunami such as the sandy tsunami deposits along the Ryukyu trench has made the discussion more difficult, because there are very few suitable places to study such deposits. On the other hand, numerous coastal boulders are reported on the fringing reefs of each island [e.g. Goto et al., 2010]. They are mostly composed of the coralline and reef rocks and are regarded as useful markers of the past large tsunamis and storm events. In fact, some of them are fossil Porites sp. and hence 14C dating is possible for determining the depositional age [e.g. Araoka et al., 2010]. Moreover, boulders of tsunami and storm wave origins at Ryukyu Islands can be differentiated because difference of the wave lengths of tsunami and storm wave are affected the clast size and spatial distributions of boulders on the wide fringing reef (~1500 m) [e.g. Goto et al., 2010]. Therefore, presence or absence of tsunami boulders at each island may provide useful information of occurrence of past large tsunamis and the causative earthquakes along the Ryukyu Trench. In this study, we show the clast size and spatial distributions of more than 2,500 boulders at 11 islands along the Ryukyu trench. Based on the geological study and hydrodynamic analyses, boulders on the reefs at the Sakishima

  16. Burial preservation of trace fossils as indicator of storm deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.J.

    1986-05-01

    Positive semirelief epichnia (ridgelike trace fossils on the top surface of a bed) commonly represent burrow structures, perhaps originally supported by a mucoidal matrix, that have been infilled by sediment. The preservation of these structures, in addition to other trace fossils on a bed superface, suggests an instantaneous burial event and a minimum of concomitant erosion. This supposition can be verified by an absence of paucity of biogenic sedimentary structures accompanied by certain physical sedimentary structures (laminated shell hashes, graded bedding, fissile shales) in strata directly overlying bioturbated surfaces. The main process involved in this burial preservation (the rapid burial of biogenic sedimentary structures with minimum erosion) are probably storm-generated in most instances. Sediments would be deposited primarily in the suspension mode, and mean storm wave base would be slightly above the sediment-water interface. This burial preservation model is most applicable to relatively small stratigraphic intervals (several centimeters or decimeters) representing deposition on an open-marine shelf. Positive semirelief epichnia, interpreted as burrow system infilling, from the Cincinnatian Series (Upper Ordovician) of Ohio and Indiana are used to illustrate these concepts.

  17. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  18. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2-4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6-16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May-July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  19. Sea-cliff erosion at Pacifica, California caused by 1997/98 El Nino storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snell, Charles B.; Lajoie, K.R.; Medley, Edward W.

    2000-01-01

    Twelve homes were constructed in 1949 at the top of a sea cliff along Esplanade Drive in the City of Pacifica, located on the northern coast of San Mateo County, California. During the heavy storms of the 1997/98 El Nino winter, a severe episode of cliff retreat undermined seven homes and threatened three others. The geologic, tide, wave, rainfall and wind data were analyzed to determine the causes of this erosion events.

  20. Storm Damage Reduction Project Design for Wallops Island, Virginia, Version 1.01

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    nor’easter caused extensive damage along the eastern seaboard from New York to North Carolina and is considered one of the ten worst storms in the United...ADCIRC (ADvanced CIRCulation model) as described in Melby et al. (2005). The ADCIRC grid covered the eastern seaboard from North Carolina to New Jersey...attributed to the construction will be less than the variability in the change rate caused by yearly changes in the wave climate . That is, stormy years