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Sample records for abnormal tau accumulation

  1. Time-weighted accumulations ap(. tau. ) and Kp(. tau. )

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.L. )

    1987-09-01

    The planetary geomagnetic indices Kp and ap are widely used in space geophysics. They provide an estimate of maximum magnetic perturbation within a 3-hour period. Many geophysical properties are clearly related to the indices, through energy transfer from a common disturbance source, but direct correlation is often lacking because of poor matching between the frequency of sampling and the physical response functions. The index ap({tau}) is a simple accumulation of the linear ap calculated with an attenuation factor {tau} included to take account of natural temporal relaxation. The case for ap({tau}) and the related Kp({tau}) is made using applications to the variability of the plasma environment in the ionosphere and inner magnetosphere. These examples of improved correlation suggest that time-weighted integration might profitably be applied to other indices.

  2. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  3. Sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human Tau fragment in an inducible cell model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Ji-Ying; Hu, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of misfolded hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau within neurons, forming neurofibrillary tangles and leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here we study sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human fragment Tau244-372 in an inducible cell model. As evidenced by confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by Congo red: when its two fibril-forming segments PHF6 and PHF6* are deleted, Tau244-372 does lose its ability to form fibrils in SH-SY5Y cells, and the replacement of PHF6 and PHF6* with an unrelated amyloidogenic sequence IFQINS from human lysozyme does rescue the fibril-forming ability of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, insertion of a non-fibril forming peptide GGGGGG does not drive the disabled Tau244-372 to misfold in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, as revealed by quantum dots based probes combined with annexin V staining, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay, and immunofluorescence, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for early apoptosis of living SH-SY5Y cells induced by abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs could be the determinants of Tau protein tending to misfold in living cells, thereby inducing neuronal apoptosis and causing the initiation and development of AD.

  4. Tau pathology induces intraneuronal cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Frauke; Ohm, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, but not of frontotemporal dementias. In these 3 neurodegenerative diseases, however, protein tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles are observed. To elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and tau, we compared sterol levels of neurons burdened with neurofibrillary tangles with those of their unaffected neighbors using semiquantitative filipin fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing P301L mutant human tau (a well-described model of FTDP-17) and in P301L transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (the major cholesterol transporter in the brain). Cellular unesterified cholesterol was higher in neurons affected by tau pathology irrespective of apolipoprotein E deficiency. This argues for an impact of tau pathology on cellular cholesterol homeostasis. We suggest that there is a bidirectional mode of action: Disturbances in cellular cholesterol metabolism may promote tau pathology, but tau pathology may also alter neuronal cholesterol homeostasis; once it is established, a vicious cycle may promote neurofibrillary tangle formation.

  5. Discoveries of tau, abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau and others of neurofibrillary degeneration: a personal historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease was described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907, but it was not until approximately 60-70 years later that any new significant developments were reported on the pathology of this disease. The discoveries that laid down the foundation for the exciting research that has been carried out during the last approximately 20 years and that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease are the ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic (senile) plaques, the clinical-pathological correlation of these lesions to the presence of dementia, and the bulk isolation and protein composition of paired helical filaments and plaque amyloid. We discovered tau as the major protein subunit of paired helical filaments/neurofibrillary tangles, the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of this protein in this lesion and in Alzheimer brain cytosol and the gain of toxic function by the cytosolic abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in Alzheimer brain. Here we present a personal historical account of the work in our laboratories that led, in 1986, to the discoveries of tau and its abnormal hyperphosphorylation in paired helical filaments and Alzheimer brain cytosol. This article also describes several major findings which subsequently resulted from the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and in a large part account for the current understanding of the role of this lesion in Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  6. LRRK2 Promotes Tau Accumulation, Aggregation and Release.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Patrícia Silva; Gerhardt, Ellen; Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Bähr, Mathias; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Eckermann, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are known as the most frequent cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD), but are also present in sporadic cases. The G2019S-LRRK2 mutation is located in the kinase domain of the protein, and has consistently been reported to promote a gain of kinase function. Several proteins have been reported as LRRK2 substrates and/or interactors, suggesting possible pathways involved in neurodegeneration in PD. Hyperphosphorylated Tau protein accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles, a typical pathological hallmark in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. In addition, it is also frequently found in the brains of PD patients. Although LRRK2 is a kinase, it appears that a putative interaction with Tau is phosphorylation-independent. However, the underlying mechanisms and the cellular consequences of this interaction are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate an interaction between LRRK2 and Tau and that LRRK2 promotes the accumulation of non-monomeric and high-molecular weight (HMW) Tau species independent of its kinase activity. Interestingly, we found that LRRK2 increases Tau secretion, possibly as a consequence of an impairment of Tau proteasomal degradation. Our data highlight a mechanism through which LRRK2 regulates intracellular Tau levels, contributing to the progression of the pathology caused by the LRRK2-mediated proteasome impairment. In total, our findings suggest that the interplay between LRRK2 and proteasome activity might constitute a valid target for therapeutic intervention in PD.

  7. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506352

  8. Learning and Memory Deficits upon TAU Accumulation in "Drosophila" Mushroom Body Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershin, Andreas; Pavlopoulos, Elias; Fitch, Olivia; Braden, Brittany C.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the neuronal-specific microtubule-binding protein TAU are associated with several dementias and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of elevated TAU accumulation on behavioral plasticity are unknown. We report that directed expression of wild-type vertebrate and "Drosophila" TAU in adult mushroom body neurons, centers for…

  9. Tau kinase inhibitors protect hippocampal synapses despite of insoluble tau accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hinners, Ina; Hill, Anika; Otto, Ulrike; Michalsky, Anke; Mack, Till G A; Striggow, Frank

    2008-03-01

    A better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathomechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prerequisite for the development of efficient treatments. We have used a novel assay system based on virus-transduced organotypic hippocampal slice cultures that mimics important aspects of tau-driven AD pathology in a short time frame. Human tau P301L, when expressed in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures, was increasingly phosphorylated at several disease-relevant epitopes, leading to progressive neuronal dystrophy and formation of RIPA-insoluble tau. AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation was reduced by the tau kinase inhibitors lithium and SRN-003-556, but RIPA-insoluble tau remained unaffected after treatment with any of these substances. Only SRN-003-556 was able to protect hippocampal neurons from synaptic damage that was presumably caused by a toxic soluble tau fraction. These data provide first mechanistic insights towards the functional benefits of SRN-003-556 that have been observed in vivo.

  10. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  11. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S. Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D.; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  12. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  13. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  14. A Dextral Primary Progressive Aphasia Patient with Right Dominant Hypometabolism and Tau Accumulation and Left Dominant Amyloid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Young Kyoung; Park, Seongbeom; Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Hanna; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a degenerative disease that presents as progressive decline of language ability with preservation of other cognitive functions in the early stages. Three subtypes of PPA are known: progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic aphasia (LPA). Patients and Methods We report the case of a 77-year-old patient with PPA whose clinical findings did not correspond to the three subtypes but mainly fit LPA. Unlike other LPA patients, however, this patient showed a right hemisphere predominant glucose hypometabolism and tau accumulation and a left hemisphere predominant amyloid deposition. The right-handed patient presented with comprehension difficulty followed by problems naming familiar objects. This isolated language problem had deteriorated rapidly for 2 years, followed by memory difficulties and impairment of daily activities. Using a Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery, aphasia was consistent with a severe form of Wernicke's aphasia. According to the brain magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results, right hemisphere atrophy and hypometabolism, more predominant on the right hemisphere than the left, were apparent despite the fact that Edinburgh Handedness Questionnaire scores indicated strong right-handedness. On Pittsburgh compound B-PET, amyloid accumulation was asymmetrical with the left hemisphere being more predominant than the right, whereas 18F-T807-PET showed a right dominant tau accumulation. Conclusions This is the first report of atypical PPA, in which the patient exhibited crossed aphasia and asymmetrical amyloid accumulation. PMID:27194988

  15. Imaging the accumulation and suppression of tau pathology using multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Holly E.; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Ma, Da; Powell, Nick M.; O'Callaghan, James M.; Harrison, Ian F.; Johnson, Ross A.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morton; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Ourselin, Sebastien; O'Neill, Michael J.; Wells, Jack A.; Collins, Emily C.; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease have served as valuable tools for investigating pathogenic mechanisms relating to neurodegeneration, including tau-mediated and neurofibrillary tangle pathology—a major hallmark of the disease. In this work, we have used multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a longitudinal study of neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, a subset of which were treated with doxycycline at different time points to suppress the tau transgene. Using this paradigm, we investigated the sensitivity of multiparametric MRI to both the accumulation and suppression of pathologic tau. Tau-related atrophy was discernible from 5.5 months within the cortex and hippocampus. We observed markedly less atrophy in the treated rTg4510 mice, which was enhanced after doxycycline intervention from 3.5 months. We also observed differences in amide proton transfer, cerebral blood flow, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the rTg4510 mice, which were significantly less altered after doxycycline treatment. We propose that these non-invasive MRI techniques offer insight into pathologic mechanisms underpinning Alzheimer's disease that may be important when evaluating emerging therapeutics targeting one of more of these processes. PMID:26923415

  16. Imaging the accumulation and suppression of tau pathology using multiparametric MRI.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Holly E; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Ma, Da; Powell, Nick M; O'Callaghan, James M; Harrison, Ian F; Johnson, Ross A; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morton; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M J; Modat, Marc; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Ourselin, Sebastien; O'Neill, Michael J; Wells, Jack A; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2016-03-01

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease have served as valuable tools for investigating pathogenic mechanisms relating to neurodegeneration, including tau-mediated and neurofibrillary tangle pathology-a major hallmark of the disease. In this work, we have used multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a longitudinal study of neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, a subset of which were treated with doxycycline at different time points to suppress the tau transgene. Using this paradigm, we investigated the sensitivity of multiparametric MRI to both the accumulation and suppression of pathologic tau. Tau-related atrophy was discernible from 5.5 months within the cortex and hippocampus. We observed markedly less atrophy in the treated rTg4510 mice, which was enhanced after doxycycline intervention from 3.5 months. We also observed differences in amide proton transfer, cerebral blood flow, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the rTg4510 mice, which were significantly less altered after doxycycline treatment. We propose that these non-invasive MRI techniques offer insight into pathologic mechanisms underpinning Alzheimer's disease that may be important when evaluating emerging therapeutics targeting one of more of these processes. PMID:26923415

  17. Tau accumulation induces synaptic impairment and memory deficit by calcineurin-mediated inactivation of nuclear CaMKIV/CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yaling; Gao, Di; Wang, Yali; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Wang, Xin; Ye, Jinwang; Wu, Dongqin; Fang, Lin; Pi, Guilin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Lu, Chengbiao; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-06-28

    Intracellular accumulation of wild-type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular mechanisms underlying tau-induced synapse impairment and memory deficit are poorly understood. Here we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced memory deficits with impairments of synaptic plasticity. Both in vivo and in vitro data demonstrated that hTau accumulation caused remarkable dephosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the nuclear fraction. Simultaneously, the calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) was up-regulated, whereas the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) was suppressed. Further studies revealed that CaN activation could dephosphorylate CREB and CaMKIV, and the effect of CaN on CREB dephosphorylation was independent of CaMKIV inhibition. Finally, inhibition of CaN attenuated the hTau-induced CREB dephosphorylation with improved synapse and memory functions. Together, these data indicate that the hTau accumulation impairs synapse and memory by CaN-mediated suppression of nuclear CaMKIV/CREB signaling. Our findings not only reveal new mechanisms underlying the hTau-induced synaptic toxicity, but also provide potential targets for rescuing tauopathies. PMID:27298345

  18. In Silico Modelling of Novel Drug Ligands Associated with Abnormal Tau Phosphorylation: Implications for Concussion Associated Tauopathy Intervention†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Yemul, Shrishailam; Ward, Libby; Freire, Daniel; Mazzola, Paolo; Brathwaite, Justin; Mezei, Mihaly; Sanchez, Roberto; Elder, Gregory A.; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in silico screening model for characterization of potential novel ligands from commercial drug libraries able to functionally activate certain olfactory receptors (ORs), which are members of the class A rhodopsin-like family of G protein couple receptors (GPCRs), in the brain of murine models of concussion. We previously found that concussions may significantly influence expression of certain ORs, e.g. OR4M1 in subjects with a history of concussion/traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we built a 3-D OR4M1 model and used it in in silico screening of potential novel ligands from commercial drug libraries. We report that in vitro activation of OR4M1 with the commercially available ZINC library compound 10915775 led to a significant attenuation of abnormal tau phosphorylation in embryonic cortico-hippocampal neuronal cultures derived from NSE-OR4M1 transgenic mice, possibly through modulation of the JNK signaling pathway. The attenuation of abnormal tau phosphorylation was rather selective since ZINC10915775 significantly decreased tau phosphorylation on tau Ser202/T205 (AT8 epitope) and tau Thr212/Ser214 (AT100 epitope), but not on tau Ser396/404 (PHF-1 epitope). Moreover, no response of ZINC10915775 was found in control hippocampal neuronal cultures derived from wild type littermates. Our in silico model provides novel means to pharmacologically modulate select ubiquitously expressed ORs in the brain through high affinity ligand activation to prevent and eventually to treat concussion induced down regulation of ORs and subsequent cascade of tau pathology. PMID:26910498

  19. Abnormal tau induces cognitive impairment through two different mechanisms: synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Di, J.; Cohen, L. S.; Corbo, C. P.; Phillips, G. R.; El Idrissi, A.; Alonso, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    The hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau is present in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the causal relationship remains elusive. Few mouse models used to study Alzheimer-like dementia target tau phosphorylation. We created an inducible pseudophosphorylated tau (Pathological Human Tau, PH-Tau) mouse model to study the effect of conformationally modified tau in vivo. Leaky expression resulted in two levels of PH-Tau: low basal level and higher upon induction (4% and 14% of the endogenous tau, respectively). Unexpectedly, low PH-Tau resulted in significant cognitive deficits, decrease in the number of synapses (seen by EM in the CA1 region), reduction of synaptic proteins, and localization to the nucleus. Induction of PH-Tau triggered neuronal death (60% in CA3), astrocytosis, and loss of the processes in CA1. These findings suggest, that phosphorylated tau is sufficient to induce neurodegeneration and that two different mechanisms can induce cognitive impairment depending on the levels of PH-Tau expression. PMID:26888634

  20. Abnormal Phosphorylation of the Microtubule-Associated Protein τ (Tau) in Alzheimer Cytoskeletal Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Tung, Yunn-Chyn; Quinlan, Maureen; Wisniewski, Henryk M.; Binder, Lester I.

    1986-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody to the microtubule-associated protein τ (tau) labeled some neurofibrillary tangles and plaque neurites, the two major locations of paired-helical filaments (PHF), in Alzheimer disease brain. The antibody also labeled isolated PHF that had been repeatedly washed with NaDodSO4. Dephosphorylation of the tissue sections with alkaline phosphatase prior to immunolabeling dramatically increased the number of tangles and plaques recognized by the antibody. The plaque core amyloid was not stained in either dephosphorylated or nondephosphorylated tissue sections. On immunoblots PHF polypeptides were labeled readily only when dephosphorylated. In contrast, a commercially available monoclonal antibody to a phosphorylated epitope of neurofilaments that labeled the tangles and the plaque neurites in tissue did not label any PHF polypeptides on immunoblots. The PHF polypeptides, labeled with the monoclonal antibody to τ , electrophoresed with those polypeptides recognized by antibodies to isolated PHF. The antibody to τ -labeled microtubules from normal human brains assembled in vitro but identically treated Alzheimer brain preparations had to be dephosphorylated to be completely recognized by this antibody. These findings suggest that τ in Alzheimer brain is an abnormally phosphorylated protein component of PHF.

  1. Curcumin improves tau-induced neuronal dysfunction of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Xie, Ce; Yoshimura, Satomi; Shinzaki, Yuki; Yoshina, Sawako; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Mitani, Shohei; Ihara, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Tau is a key protein in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, which are categorized as tauopathies. Because the extent of tau pathologies is closely linked to that of neuronal loss and the clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease, anti-tau therapeutics, if any, could be beneficial to a broad spectrum of tauopathies. To learn more about tauopathy, we developed a novel transgenic nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) model that expresses either wild-type or R406W tau in all the neurons. The wild-type tau-expressing worms exhibited uncoordinated movement (Unc) and neuritic abnormalities. Tau accumulated in abnormal neurites that lost microtubules. Similar abnormalities were found in the worms that expressed low levels of R406W-tau but were not in those expressing comparative levels of wild-type tau. Biochemical studies revealed that tau is aberrantly phosphorylated but forms no detergent-insoluble aggregates. Drug screening performed in these worms identified curcumin, a major phytochemical compound in turmeric, as a compound that reduces not only Unc but also the neuritic abnormalities in both wild-type and R406W tau-expressing worms. Our observations suggest that microtubule stabilization mediates the antitoxicity effect of curcumin. Curcumin is also effective in the worms expressing tau fragment, although it does not prevent the formation of tau-fragment dimers. These data indicate that curcumin improves the tau-induced neuronal dysfunction that is independent of insoluble aggregates of tau. PMID:26923403

  2. Complex proteinopathy with accumulations of prion protein, hyperphosphorylated tau, α-synuclein and ubiquitin in experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Pedro; Cervenak, Juraj; Bu, Ming; Miller, Lindsay; Asher, David M

    2014-07-01

    Proteins aggregate in several slowly progressive neurodegenerative diseases called 'proteinopathies'. Studies with cell cultures and transgenic mice overexpressing mutated proteins suggested that aggregates of one protein induced misfolding and aggregation of other proteins as well - a possible common mechanism for some neurodegenerative diseases. However, most proteinopathies are 'sporadic', without gene mutation or overexpression. Thus, proteinopathies in WT animals genetically close to humans might be informative. Squirrel monkeys infected with the classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent developed an encephalopathy resembling variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with accumulations not only of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)), but also three other proteins: hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), α-synuclein and ubiquitin; β-amyloid protein (Aβ) did not accumulate. Severity of brain lesions correlated with spongiform degeneration. No amyloid was detected. These results suggested that PrP(TSE) enhanced formation of p-tau and aggregation of α-synuclein and ubiquitin, but not Aβ, providing a new experimental model for neurodegenerative diseases associated with complex proteinopathies.

  3. Inducible Expression of a Truncated Form of Tau in Oligodendrocytes Elicits Gait Abnormalities and a Decrease in Myelin: Implications for Selective CNS Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton protein Tau present in oligodendrocytes (OLGs) promotes cellular process outgrowth and myelination; whereas abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau has been shown to be present in the most debilitating form of multiple sclerosis and in selective dementias. This research examined the functional consequences of expressing a truncated form of Tau in OLGs during the second postnatal life. In particular, this truncated form of Tau (∆Tau) retains the Fyn-binding domain but lacks the microtubule-binding domain. Similar to hyperphosphorylated Tau, ∆Tau cannot bind the cytoskeleton and is missorted. The Cre/loxP recombination system was used to generate transgenic (TG) founder lines, which contain a Floxed LacZ-STOP cassette to prevent expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-∆Tau. The founder lines were then crossed with a Tamoxifen (TM)-inducible proteolipid protein (PLP)-dependent Cre driver line. Myelin PLP is the major myelin protein in the central nervous system (CNS). TM was given at postnatal day (p) 12 for 3 days, and CNS tissues were collected at p22. Only TG mice with both EGFP-∆Tau and Cre manifested an overt phenotype of loss of balance and stumbles starting around p18. CNS tissues obtained from TM-treated EGFP-∆Tau/Cre double transgenic mice had recombined PCR products, GFP, and diminished brain myelin. GFP was expressed in OLGs, but not in neurons or astrocytes. On the contrary, TM-treated TG mice with only one of the two transgenes, i.e., Cre or Tau, did not have recombinant PCR products, GFP, diminished myelin, or abnormal phenotype. Thus, this inducible model shows for the first time that a non-microtubule-associated Tau protein in OLGs elicits both myelin decrease and gait abnormalities, similar to the occurrence in selective demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. The Neurotoxic Tau45-230 Fragment Accumulates in Upper and Lower Motor Neurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vintilescu, Claudia R; Afreen, Sana; Rubino, Ashlee E; Ferreira, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and lethal neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons leading to muscle paralysis in affected individuals. Numerous mechanisms have been implicated in the death of these neurons. However, the pathobiology of this disease has not been completely elucidated. In the present study, we investigated to what extent tau cleavage and generation of the neurotoxic tau45-230 fragment is associated with ALS. Quantitative western blot analysis indicated that high levels of tau45-230 accumulated in lumbar and cervical spinal cord specimens obtained from ALS subjects. This neurotoxic tau fragment was also detected in ALS upper motor neurons located in the precentral gyrus. Our results also showed that tau45-230 aggregates were present in the spinal cord of ALS patients. On the other hand, this neurotoxic fragment was not generated in a mouse model of a familial form of this disease. Together, these results suggest a potential role for this neurotoxic tau fragment in the mechanisms leading to the degeneration of motor neurons in the context of sporadic ALS. PMID:27496042

  5. Activation of mTOR signaling leads to orthopedic surgery-induced cognitive decline in mice through β-amyloid accumulation and tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhen; Lu, Keliang; Wang, Jiawan; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious complication following surgery, however, the mechanism of POCD remains to be elucidated. Previous evidence has revealed that POCD may be associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative processes. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been reported to be crucial in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the implications of mTOR in POCD remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, western blotting and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the expression of mTOR and any associated downstream targets; contextual fear conditioning was used to estimate the learning and memory ability of mice. Using an animal model of orthopedic surgery, it was found that surgical injury impaired hippocampal‑dependent memory and enhanced the levels of phosphorylated mTOR at Serine‑2448, phosphorylated 70‑kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) at Threonine‑389 with accumulation of β‑amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau at Serine-396, compared with the control group. Pretreatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, restored the abnormal mTOR/p70S6K signaling induced by surgery, attenuated the accumulation of Aβ and reduced the phosphorylation of tau protein. Rapamycin also reversed the surgery‑induced cognitive dysfunction. The results of the present study suggested that the surgical stimulus activated mTOR/p70S6K signaling excessively, and that the inhibition of mTOR signaling with rapamycin may prevent postoperative cognitive deficits, partly through attenuating the accumulation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. PMID:27599409

  6. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains.

  7. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  8. Reduced CSF p-Tau181 to Tau ratio is a biomarker for FTLD-TDP

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Kelly; Grossman, Murray; Glass, Jonathan; Lah, James J.; Hales, Chadwick; Shelnutt, Matthew; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Levey, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To validate the ability of candidate CSF biomarkers to distinguish between the 2 main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). Methods: Antemortem CSF samples were collected from 30 patients with FTLD in a single-center validation cohort, and CSF levels of 5 putative FTLD-TDP biomarkers as well as levels of total Tau (t-Tau) and Tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-Tau181) were measured using independent assays. Biomarkers most associated with FTLD-TDP were then tested in a separate 2-center validation cohort composed of subjects with FTLD-TDP, FTLD-Tau, Alzheimer disease (AD), and cognitively normal subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of FTLD-TDP biomarkers were determined. Results: In the first validation cohort, FTLD-TDP cases had decreased levels of p-Tau181 and interleukin-23, and increased Fas. Reduced ratio of p-Tau181 to t-Tau (p/t-Tau) was the strongest predictor of FTLD-TDP pathology. Analysis in the second validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio <0.37 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau, AD, and healthy seniors with 82% sensitivity and 82% specificity. Conclusion: A reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a reproducible, validated biomarker for FTLD-TDP with performance approaching well-established CSF AD biomarkers. Introducing this biomarker into research and the clinical arena can significantly increase the power of clinical trials targeting abnormal accumulations of TDP-43 or Tau, and select the appropriate patients for target-specific therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that the CSF p/t-Tau ratio distinguishes FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau. PMID:24174584

  9. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  10. Rapid Accumulation of Endogenous Tau Oligomers in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Bridget E.; Krishnamurthy, Shashirekha; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L.; Sengupta, Urmi; Prough, Donald S.; Jackson, George R.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Kayed, Rakez

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious problem that affects millions of people in the United States alone. Multiple concussions or even a single moderate to severe TBI can also predispose individuals to develop a pathologically distinct form of tauopathy-related dementia at an early age. No effective treatments are currently available for TBI or TBI-related dementia; moreover, only recently has insight been gained regarding the mechanisms behind their connection. Here, we used antibodies to detect oligomeric and phosphorylated Tau proteins in a non-transgenic rodent model of parasagittal fluid percussion injury. Oligomeric and phosphorylated Tau proteins were detected 4 and 24 h and 2 weeks post-TBI in injured, but not sham control rats. These findings suggest that diagnostic tools and therapeutics that target only toxic forms of Tau may provide earlier detection and safe, more effective treatments for tauopathies associated with repetitive neurotrauma. PMID:23632019

  11. SUMOylation at K340 inhibits tau degradation through deregulating its phosphorylation and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong-Bin; Xia, Yi-Yuan; Shu, Xi-Ji; Liu, Zan-Chao; Feng, Ye; Liu, Xing-Hua; Yu, Guang; Yin, Gang; Xiong, Yan-Si; Zeng, Kuan; Jiang, Jun; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of the abnormally modified tau is hallmark pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the mechanism leading to tau aggregation is not fully characterized. Here, we studied the effects of tau SUMOylation on its phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation. We show that tau SUMOylation induces tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-associated sites, whereas site-specific mutagenesis of tau at K340R (the SUMOylation site) or simultaneous inhibition of tau SUMOylation by ginkgolic acid abolishes the effect of small ubiquitin-like modifier protein 1 (SUMO-1). Conversely, tau hyperphosphorylation promotes its SUMOylation; the latter in turn inhibits tau degradation with reduction of solubility and ubiquitination of tau proteins. Furthermore, the enhanced SUMO-immunoreactivity, costained with the hyperphosphorylated tau, is detected in cerebral cortex of the AD brains, and β-amyloid exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons induces a dose-dependent SUMOylation of the hyperphosphorylated tau. Our findings suggest that tau SUMOylation reciprocally stimulates its phosphorylation and inhibits the ubiquitination-mediated tau degradation, which provides a new insight into the AD-like tau accumulation. PMID:25378699

  12. Axonal Transport Rates In Vivo Are Unaffected by Tau Deletion or Overexpression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Aidong; Kumar, Asok; Peterhoff, Corrinne; Duff, Karen; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated tau expression has been proposed as a possible basis for impaired axonal transport in Alzheimer’s disease. To address this hypothesis, we analyzed the movement of pulse radiolabeled proteins in vivo along retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of mice that lack tau or overexpress human tau isoforms. Here, we show that the global axonal transport rates of slow and fast transport cargoes in axons are not significantly impaired when tau expression is eliminated or increased. In addition, markers of slow transport (neurofilament light subunit) and fast transport (snap25) do not accumulate in retinas and are distributed normally along optic axons in mice that lack or overexpress tau. Finally, ultrastructural analyses revealed no abnormal accumulations of vesicular organelles or neurofilaments in RGC perikarya or axons in mice overexpressing or lacking tau. These results suggest that tau is not essential for axonal transport and that transport rates in vivo are not significantly affected by substantial fluctuations in tau expression. PMID:18272688

  13. PHF-Tau from Alzheimer Brain is Rapidly Dephosphorylated and Degraded When Injected into Neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Hall, Garth F.

    1999-12-01

    Accumulation of abnormally modified tau protein (PHF-tau) is the principal intracellular lesion in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but the cellular mechanisms underlying this accumulation are unknown. In this study, the cellular metabolism of PHF-tau purified from AD brain was investigated by microinjecting it into identified central neurons of the lamprey, a lower vertebrate. Dephosphorylation of 2 critical epitopes (the PHF-1 and TAU-1 sites), occurred within a few hours of PHF-tau microinjection, while proteolysis was complete by 2 days. These results constitute the first demonstration of the intracellular degradation of PHF-tau in an experimental in vivo system and suggest that the degradation of PHF-tau in situ is preceded by dephosphorylation. They also suggest that intracellular PHF-tau accumulation is primarily due to the failure of normal dephosphorylation and/or proteolytic mechanisms during neurofibrillary degenerative disease.

  14. Accumulation of aspartic acid421- and glutamic acid391-cleaved tau in neurofibrillary tangles correlates with progression in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L; Binder, Lester I; Mena, Raul; García-Sierra, Francisco

    2008-05-01

    Truncations of tau protein at aspartic acid421 (D421) and glutamic acid391 (E391) residues are associated with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to D421- and E391-truncated tau (Tau-C3 and MN423, respectively), we correlated the presence of NFTs composed of these truncated tau proteins with clinical and neuropathologic parameters in 17 AD and 23 non-AD control brains. The densities of NFTs composed of D421- or E391-truncated tau correlated with clinical dementia index and Braak staging in AD. Glutamic acid391 tau truncation was prominent in the entorhinal cortex, whereas D421 truncation was prominent in the subiculum, suggesting that NFTs composed of either D421- or E391-truncated tau may be formed mutually exclusively in these areas. Both truncations were associated with the prevalence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele. By double labeling, intact tau in NFTs was commonly associated with D421-cleaved tau but not with E391-truncated tau; D421-cleaved tau was never associated with E391-truncated tau. These results indicate that tau is not randomly proteolyzed at different domains, and that proteolysis occurs sequentially from the C-terminus to inner regions of tau in AD progression. Identification of NFTs composed of tau at different stages of truncation may facilitate assessment of neurofibrillary pathology in AD.

  15. Aging analysis reveals slowed tau turnover and enhanced stress response in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Chad; Kraft, Clara; Jinwal, Umesh; Koren, John; Johnson, Amelia; Anderson, Laura; Lebson, Lori; Lee, Daniel; Dickson, Dennis; de Silva, Rohan; Binder, Lester I; Morgan, David; Lewis, Jada

    2009-01-01

    We have extensively analyzed the biochemical and histochemical profiles of the tau protein from the rTg4510 transgenic mouse model in which the animals uniquely develop forebrain tau pathologies similar to those found in human tauopathies. Levels of several soluble phosphorylated tau species were highest at 1 month relative to later time points, suggesting that certain tau hyperphosphorylation events were insufficient to drive tangle formation in young mice. Despite a robust, pre-tangle-like accumulation of phospho-tau in 1-month-old mice, this material was cleared by 3 months, indicating that the young mouse brain either fails to facilitate tau insolubility or possesses an enhanced ability to clear tau relative to the adult. We also found that while heat shock protein expression increased with normal aging, this process was accelerated in rTg4510 mice. Moreover, by exploiting an exon 10 (-) specific antibody, we demonstrated that endogenous mouse tau turnover was slowed in response to human tau over-expression, and that this endogenous tau adopted disease-related properties. These data suggest that a younger brain fails to develop lasting tau pathology despite elevated levels of phosphorylated tau, perhaps because of reduced expression of stress-related proteins. Moreover, we show that the active production of small amounts of abnormal tau protein facilitates dysfunction and accumulation of otherwise normal tau, a significant implication for the pathogenesis of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  17. Expression of A152T human tau causes age-dependent neuronal dysfunction and loss in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sumihiro; Djukic, Biljana; Taneja, Praveen; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Lo, Iris; Davis, Allyson; Craft, Ryan; Guo, Weikun; Wang, Xin; Kim, Daniel; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Gill, T Michael; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    A152T-variant human tau (hTau-A152T) increases risk for tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Comparing mice with regulatable expression of hTau-A152T or wild-type hTau (hTau-WT), we find age-dependent neuronal loss, cognitive impairments, and spontaneous nonconvulsive epileptiform activity primarily in hTau-A152T mice. However, overexpression of either hTau species enhances neuronal responses to electrical stimulation of synaptic inputs and to an epileptogenic chemical. hTau-A152T mice have higher hTau protein/mRNA ratios in brain, suggesting that A152T increases production or decreases clearance of hTau protein. Despite their functional abnormalities, aging hTau-A152T mice show no evidence for accumulation of insoluble tau aggregates, suggesting that their dysfunctions are caused by soluble tau. In human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, co-expression of hTau-A152T enhances risk of early death and epileptic activity, suggesting copathogenic interactions between hTau-A152T and amyloid-β peptides or other hAPP metabolites. Thus, the A152T substitution may augment risk for neurodegenerative diseases by increasing hTau protein levels, promoting network hyperexcitability, and synergizing with the adverse effects of other pathogenic factors. PMID:26931567

  18. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the N-terminal projection domain of tau or mouse IgG as a control by intraperitoneal injection once a week for 4 weeks, and the effects of the passive immunization on reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ accumulation and cognitive performance in these animals. We found that treatment with tau antibodies 43D and 77E9 reduced total tau level, decreased tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser199, Ser202/Thr205 (AT8), Thr205, Ser262/356 (12E8), and Ser396/404 (PHF-1) sites, and a trend to reduce Aβ pathology. Most importantly, targeting N-terminal tau especially by 43D (tau 6-18) improved reference memory in the Morris water maze task in 3xTg-AD mice. We did not observe any abnormality in general physical characteristics of the treated animals with either of the two antibodies during the course of this study. Taken together, our studies demonstrate for the first time (1) that passive immunization targeting normal tau can effectively clear the hyperphosphorylated protein and possibly reduce Aβ pathology from the brain and (2) that targeting N-terminal projection domain of tau containing amino acid 6-18 is especially beneficial. Thus, targeting selective epitopes of N-terminal domain of tau may present a novel effective therapeutic opportunity for Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  19. Ameliorative Effects of Antioxidants on the Hippocampal Accumulation of Pathologic Tau in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; West, Matthew B.; Cheng, Weihua; Ewert, Donald L.; Li, Wei; Saunders, Debra; Towner, Rheal A.; Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to early onset dementia and other related neurodegenerative diseases. We previously demonstrated that damage to the central auditory pathway resulting from blast-induced TBI (bTBI) could be significantly attenuated by a combinatorial antioxidant treatment regimen. In the current study, we examined the localization patterns of normal Tau and the potential blast-induced accumulation of neurotoxic variants of this microtubule-associated protein that are believed to potentiate the neurodegenerative effects associated with synaptic dysfunction in the hippocampus following three successive blast overpressure exposures in nontransgenic rats. We observed a marked increase in the number of both hyperphosphorylated and oligomeric Tau-positive hilar mossy cells and somatic accumulation of endogenous Tau in oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus. Remarkably, a combinatorial regimen of 2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) resulted in striking reductions in the numbers of both mossy cells and oligodendrocytes positively labeled for these pathological Tau immunoreactivity patterns in response to bTBI. This treatment strategy represents a promising therapeutic approach for simultaneously reducing or eliminating both primary auditory injury and nonauditory changes associated with bTBI-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration. PMID:27034735

  20. Accumulation of abnormal adult-generated hippocampal granule cells predicts seizure frequency and severity

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Michael S.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of abnormally integrated, adult-born, hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGC) is hypothesized to contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). DGCs have long been implicated in TLE, as they regulate excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit neuroplastic changes during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, DGCs are unusual in that they are continually generated throughout life, with aberrant integration of new cells underlying the majority of restructuring in the dentate during epileptogenesis. While it is known that these abnormal networks promote abnormal neuronal firing and hyperexcitability, it has yet to be established whether they directly contribute to seizure generation. If abnormal DGCs do contribute, a reasonable prediction would be that the severity of epilepsy will be correlated with the number or load of abnormal DGCs. To test this prediction, we utilized a conditional, inducible transgenic mouse model to fate-map adult-generated DGCs. Mossy cell loss, also implicated in epileptogenesis, was assessed as well. Transgenic mice rendered epileptic using the pilocarpine-status epilepticus model of epilepsy were monitored 24/7 by video/EEG for four weeks to determine seizure frequency and severity. Positive correlations were found between seizure frequency and: 1) the percentage of hilar ectopic DGCs, 2) the amount of mossy fiber sprouting and 3) the extent of mossy cell death. In addition, mossy fiber sprouting and mossy cell death were correlated with seizure severity. These studies provide correlative evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal DGCs contribute to the development of TLE, and also support a role for mossy cell loss. PMID:23699504

  1. Propagation of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease: identification of novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Pooler, Amy M; Polydoro, Manuela; Wegmann, Susanne; Nicholls, Samantha B; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Hyman, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau are a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD, tau becomes abnormally phosphorylated and forms inclusions throughout the brain, starting in the entorhinal cortex and progressively affecting additional brain regions as the disease progresses. Formation of these inclusions is thought to lead to synapse loss and cell death. Tau is also found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and elevated levels are a biomarker for AD. Until recently, it was thought that the presence of tau in the CSF was due to the passive release of aggregated tau from dead or dying tangle-bearing neurons. However, accumulating evidence from different AD model systems suggests that tau is actively secreted and transferred between synaptically connected neurons. Transgenic mouse lines with localized expression of aggregating human tau in the entorhinal cortex have demonstrated that, as these animals age, tau becomes mislocalized from axons to cell bodies and dendrites and that human tau-positive aggregates form first in the entorhinal cortex and later in downstream projection targets. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have provided insight into the mechanisms by which tau may be released and internalized by neurons and have started to provide insight into how tau pathology may spread in AD. In this review, we discuss the evidence for regulated tau release and its specific uptake by neurons. Furthermore, we identify possible therapeutic targets for preventing the propagation of tau pathology, as inhibition of tau transfer may restrict development of tau tangles in a small subset of neurons affected in early stages of AD and therefore prevent widespread neuron loss and cognitive dysfunction associated with later stages of the disease.

  2. Dynamic PET Measures of Tau Accumulation in Cognitively Normal Older Adults and Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Measured Using [18F] THK-5351

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Suzanne L.; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Ishiki, Aiko; Furumoto, Shozo; Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Harada, Ryuichi; Tomita, Naoki; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Watanuki, Shoichi; Jagust, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background [18F]THK5351, a recently-developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for measuring tau neurofibrillary tangle accumulation, may help researchers examine aging, disease, and tau pathology in living human brains. We examined THK5351 tracer pharmacokinetics to define an optimal acquisition time for static late images. Methods Primary measurements were calculation of regional values of distribution volume ratios (DVR) and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) in 6 healthy older control and 10 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) participants. We examined associations between DVR and SUVR, searching for a 20 min SUVR time window that was stable and comparable to DVR. We additionally examined diagnostic group differences in this 20 min SUVR. Results In healthy controls, [18F]THK5351 uptake was low, with increased temporal relative to frontal binding. In AD, regional uptake was substantially higher than in healthy controls, with temporal exceeding frontal binding. Retention in cerebellar gray matter, which was used as the reference region, was low compared to other regions. Both DVR and SUVR values showed minimal change over time after 40 min. SUVR 20–40, 30–50, and 40–60 min were most consistently correlated with DVR; SUVR 40–60 min, the most stable time window, was used in further analyses. Significant (AD > healthy control) group differences existed in temporoparietal regions, with marginal medial temporal differences. We found high basal ganglia SUVR 40–60 min signal, with no group differences. Conclusions We examined THK5351, a new PET tracer for measuring tau accumulation, and compared multiple analysis methods for quantifying regional tracer uptake. SUVR 40–60 min performed optimally when examining 20 min SUVR windows, and appears to be a practical method for quantifying relative regional tracer retention. The results of this study offer clinical potential, given the usefulness of THK5351-PET as a biomarker of tau pathology in aging and

  3. c-jun N-terminal kinase hyperphosphorylates R406W tau at the PHF-1 site during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Planel, Emmanuel; Chui, De-Hua; Sato, Shinji; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Sahara, Naruhiko; Murayama, Miyuki; Kikuchi, Naomi; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Rivka, Ravid; Takashima, Akihiko

    2006-04-01

    Tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease (AD) probably involve a type of phosphorylation imbalance causing the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons and/or glias. Investigation of R406W tau mutation may provide insight into such abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation, since this mutation causes AD-like dementia and tauopathy in humans and because it has the unique ability to reduce tau phosphorylation in vitro and in cultured cells. Here we show that R406W mutation primarily disrupts tau phosphorylation at Ser404, a priming phosphorylation site of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), thereby reducing subsequent GSK-3beta-mediated phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site (mostly Ser396). In contrast, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as activated in the mitotic phase directly hyperphosphorylates R406W tau at the PHF-1 site. This was confirmed by PHF-1 hyperphosphorylation of R406W tau in mitotic cells, its association with cytoplasmic JNK activation, and its inhibition by a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. These data unveil the unknown mechanisms of physiological tau phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site and suggest that cytoplasmic JNK activation may play an important role in the abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation associated with R406W tau mutation and in AD.

  4. Widespread Lewy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Li, Abi; Schneider, Susanne A.; Holton, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert; Kidd, Desmond; Chataway, Jeremy; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Lees, Andrew J.; Hardy, John; Revesz, Tamas; Houlden, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The 2 major types of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) are the pantothenate kinase type 2 (PANK2)-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) and NBIA2 or infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) due to mutations in the phospholipase A2, group VI (PLA2G6) gene. We have recently demonstrated clinical heterogeneity in patients with mutations in the PLA2G6 gene by identifying a poorly defined subgroup of patients who present late with dystonia and parkinsonism. We report the clinical and genetic features of 7 cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Brain was available in 5 cases with an age of death ranging from 8 to 36 years and showed widespread alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy pathology, which was particularly severe in the neocortex, indicating that the Lewy pathology spread corresponded to Braak stage 6 and was that of the “diffuse neocortical type”. In 3 cases there was hyperphosphorylated tau accumulation in both cellular processes as threads and neuronal perikarya as pretangles and neurofibrillary tangles. Later onset cases tended to have less tau involvement but still severe alpha-synuclein pathology. The clinical and neuropathological features clearly represent a link between PLA2G6 and parkinsonian disorders. PMID:20619503

  5. Therapeutic strategies for tau mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Lee, Virginia M Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Based on the amyloid hypothesis, controlling β-amyloid protein (Aβ) accumulation is supposed to suppress downstream pathological events, tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. However, in recent clinical trials, Aβ removal or reducing Aβ production has shown limited efficacy. Moreover, while active immunisation with Aβ resulted in the clearance of Aβ, it did not prevent tau pathology or neurodegeneration. This prompts the concern that it might be too late to employ Aβ targeting therapies once tau mediated neurodegeneration has occurred. Therefore, it is timely and very important to develop tau directed therapies. The pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration are unclear but hyperphosphorylation, oligomerisation, fibrillisation and propagation of tau pathology have been proposed as the likely pathological processes that induce loss of function or gain of toxic function of tau, causing neurodegeneration. Here we review the strategies for tau directed treatments based on recent progress in research on tau and our understanding of the pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23085937

  6. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  7. Tau Oligomers: The Toxic Player at Synapses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J.; Gerson, Julia; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive disorder in which the most noticeable symptoms are cognitive impairment and memory loss. However, the precise mechanism by which those symptoms develop remains unknown. Of note, neuronal loss occurs at sites where synaptic dysfunction is observed earlier, suggesting that altered synaptic connections precede neuronal loss. The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau protein is the main histopathological feature of the disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that the small oligomeric forms of Aβ and tau may act synergistically to promote synaptic dysfunction in AD. Remarkably, tau pathology correlates better with the progression of the disease than Aβ. Recently, a growing number of studies have begun to suggest that missorting of tau protein from the axon to the dendrites is required to mediate the detrimental effects of Aβ. In this review we discuss the novel findings regarding the potential mechanisms by which tau oligomers contribute to synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:26696824

  8. [Accumulation of abnormal psychosocial circumstances in juvenile delinquents with modified legal culpability].

    PubMed

    Brettel, Hauke; Poustka, Fritz

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate specific influence on the exclupation according the medical-legal certificate approved by the courts decision. 34 culpable young offenders have been compared with 40 young delinquents who have disorders of penal responsibility according to socio-demographic, anamnestic and diagnostic variables. A significant difference between the two compared groups was found in the associated, abnormal psychosocial situations. Those delinquents who were exculpated displayed more than three times higher scores in the abnormal psychosocial axis five of ICD-10 than among the non-exculpated group. The influence of actual abnormal psychosocial situations on a substantial general psychic vulnerability is discussed.

  9. Characteristics of TBS-extractable hyperphosphorylated tau species: aggregation intermediates in rTg4510 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Naruhiko; DeTure, Michael; Ren, Yan; Ebrahim, Abdul-Shukkur; Kang, Dongcheul; Knight, Joshua; Volbracht, Christiane; Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Dickson, Dennis W; Yen, Shu-Hui; Lewis, Jada

    2013-01-01

    Conditional overexpression of four-repeat human tau containing the P301L missense mutation in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy leads to progressive accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and hyperphosphorylated, sarkosyl-insoluble tau species, which are biochemically comparable to abnormal tau characteristic of hereditary tauopathies termed FTDP-17. To fully understand the impact of tau species at different stages of self-assembly on neurodegeneration, we fractionated rTg4510 brain representing several stages of tauopathy to obtain TBS-extractable (S1), high salt/sarkosyl-extractable (S3), and sarkosyl-insoluble (P3) fractions. Under reducing condition, the S1 fraction was demonstrated by western blotting to contain both 50-60 kDa normally-sized and 64 kDa tau. Both are thermo-stable, but the 64 kDa tau showed a higher degree of phosphorylation. Under non-reducing condition, nearly all TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau were detected as ∼130 kDa species consistent with the size of dimer. Quantitative analysis showed ∼80 times more 64 kDa tau in S1 than P3 fraction. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed tau-positive granules/short filaments in S1 fraction. These structures displayed MC1 immunoreactivities indicative of conformational/pathological change of tau. MC1 immunoreactivity was detected by dot blotting in samples from 2.5 month-old mice, whereas Ab39 immunoreactivity indicative of late stages of tau assembly was detected only in P3 fraction. Quantitative analysis also demonstrated a significant inverse correlation between brain weight and 64 kDa tau, but the level of TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau reflects neurodegeneration better than that of sarkosyl-insoluble 64 kDa tau. Together, the findings suggest that TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau production is a potential target for therapeutic intervention of tauopathies.

  10. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  11. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide.

  12. Inhibition of tau aggregation by a rosamine derivative that blocks tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mamunul; Kim, Dohee; Yu, Young Hyun; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Dong Jin; Chang, Young-Tae; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal tau aggregates are presumed to be neurotoxic and are an important therapeutic target for multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Growing evidence has shown that tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking is critical in generating tau oligomers that serve as a building block for higher-order aggregates. Here we report that a small molecule inhibitor prevents tau aggregation by blocking the generation of disulfide cross-linked tau oligomers. Among the compounds tested, a rosamine derivative bearing mild thiol reactivity selectively labeled tau and effectively inhibited oligomerization and fibrillization processes in vitro. Our data suggest that controlling tau oxidation status could be a new therapeutic strategy for prevention of abnormal tau aggregation. PMID:24919397

  13. Tau binds ATP and induces its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mina; Corbo, Christopher P; Alonso, Alejandra Del C

    2014-02-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein mainly found in neurons. The protein is associated with process of microtubule assembly, which plays an important role in intracellular transport and cell structure of the neuron. Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases specifically associated with tau abnormalities. While a well-defined mechanism remains unknown, most facts point to tau as a prominent culprit in neurodegeneration. In most cases of Tauopathies, aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau have been found. Two proposals are present when discussing tau toxicity, one being the aggregation of tau proteins and the other points toward a conformational change within the protein. Previous work we carried out showed tau hyperphosphorylation promotes tau to behave abnormally resulting in microtubule assembly disruption as well as a breakdown in tau self-assembly. We found that tau's N-terminal region has a putative site for ATP/GTP binding. In this paper we demonstrate that tau is able to bind ATP and not GTP, that this binding induces tau self-assembly into filaments. At 1 mM ATP the filaments are 4-7 nm in width, whereas at 10 mM ATP the filaments appeared to establish lateral interaction, bundling and twisting, forming filaments that resembled the Paired Helical Filaments (PHF) isolated from Alzheimer disease brain. ATP-induced self-assembly is not energy dependent because the nonhydrolysable analogue of the ATP induces the same assembly. PMID:24258797

  14. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results.

  15. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results. PMID:22685439

  16. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results. PMID:22685439

  17. Hyperphosphorylation and Cleavage at D421 Enhance Tau Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rivest-McGraw, Jessica; Bertrand, Johanne; Lauzon, Michel; Leclerc, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that tau pathology propagates in a predictable manner in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, tau accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD’s patients. The mechanisms underlying the propagation of tau pathology and its accumulation in the CSF remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have reported that human tau was secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells when it was overexpressed indicating that tau secretion could contribute to the spreading of tau pathology in the brain and could lead to its accumulation in the CSF. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of human tau resulted in its secretion by Hela cells. The main form of tau secreted by these cells was cleaved at the C-terminal. Surprisingly, secreted tau was dephosphorylated at several sites in comparison to intracellular tau which presented a strong immunoreactivity to all phospho-dependent antibodies tested. Our data also revealed that phosphorylation and cleavage of tau favored its secretion by Hela cells. Indeed, the mimicking of phosphorylation at 12 sites known to be phosphorylated in AD enhanced tau secretion. A mutant form of tau truncated at D421, the preferential cleavage site of caspase-3, was also significantly more secreted than wild-type tau. Taken together, our results indicate that hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of tau by favoring its secretion could contribute to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain and its accumulation in the CSF. PMID:22615831

  18. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  19. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  20. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation; Lighting-Up Tau-Tau Interaction in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tak, HyeJin; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Joo Hyun; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Kim, YoungSoo; Kim, Dong Jin; Grailhe, Regis; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tau aggregation is a pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders and it is becoming apparent that soluble tau aggregates play a key role in neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Despite this pathological importance, there is currently no single method that allows monitoring soluble tau species in living cells. In this regard, we developed a cell-based sensor that visualizes tau self-assembly. By introducing bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique to tau, we were able to achieve spatial and temporal resolution of tau-tau interactions in a range of states, from soluble dimers to large aggregates. Under basal conditions, tau-BiFC cells exhibited little fluorescence intensity, implying that the majority of tau molecules exist as monomers. Upon chemically induced tau hyperphosphorylation, BiFC fluorescence greatly increased, indicating an increased level of tau-tau interactions. As an indicator of tau assembly, our BiFC sensor would be a useful tool for investigating tau pathology. PMID:24312574

  1. The Hsp90 cochaperone, FKBP51, increases Tau stability and polymerizes microtubules.

    PubMed

    Jinwal, Umesh K; Koren, John; Borysov, Sergiy I; Schmid, Andreas B; Abisambra, Jose F; Blair, Laura J; Johnson, Amelia G; Jones, Jeffrey R; Shults, Cody L; O'Leary, John C; Jin, Ying; Buchner, Johannes; Cox, Marc B; Dickey, Chad A

    2010-01-13

    Imbalanced protein load within cells is a critical aspect for most diseases of aging. In particular, the accumulation of proteins into neurotoxic aggregates is a common thread for a host of neurodegenerative diseases. Our previous work demonstrated that age-related changes to the cellular chaperone repertoire contributes to abnormal buildup of the microtubule-associated protein tau that accumulates in a group of diseases termed tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Hsp90 cochaperone, FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51), which possesses both an Hsp90-interacting tetratricopeptide domain and a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) domain, prevents tau clearance and regulates its phosphorylation status. Regulation of the latter is dependent on the PPIase activity of FKBP51. FKB51 enhances the association of tau with Hsp90, but the FKBP51/tau interaction is not dependent on Hsp90. In vitro FKBP51 stabilizes microtubules with tau in a reaction depending on the PPIase activity of FKBP51. Based on these new findings, we propose that FKBP51 can use the Hsp90 complex to isomerize tau, altering its phosphorylation pattern and stabilizing microtubules.

  2. Rapamycin ester analog CCI-779/Temsirolimus alleviates tau pathology and improves motor deficit in mutant tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Christelle; Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Suain, Valérie; Buée, Luc; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are intracellular inclusions made of tau protein that accumulates in neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in other tauopathies. We have investigated the ability of the rapamycin ester CCI-779/Temsilorimus, a mTOR inhibitor with better stability and pharmacological properties compared to rapamycin, to interfere with the development of a motor phenotype and tau pathology in a mutant tau mouse model developing neurofibrillary tangles, by stimulation of mTOR dependent macroautophagy. Mutant tau mice (Tg30) were treated with CCI-779 before onset of motor signs for 7 months (from 5 to 12 months of age) or after the onset of motor signs for 2 months (from 10 to 12 months of age). End-point motor deficits were 50% lower in the group of Tg30 mice treated for 7 months. Inhibition of mTOR signaling and stimulation of macroautophagy in the brain of CCI-779 treated Tg30 mice was suggested by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR downstream signaling molecules p70S6 kinase and Akt and increased level of the autophagy markers Rab7 and LC3-II. CCI-779 treatment decreased the brain levels of Sarkosyl-insoluble tau and phosphotau inTg30 mice both after 2 months or 7 months of treatment. The density of neurofibrillary tangles was significantly decreased when treatment was started prior onset of motor signs. These results indicate that stimulation of mTOR dependent autophagy by CCI-779 compound is efficient to counteract the accumulation of abnormal tau when administered early or late in a tauopathy model and to improve a motor deficit when started before onset of motor signs.

  3. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-06

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies.

  4. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies. PMID:26751494

  5. Reduced miR-512 and the Elevated Expression of Its Targets cFLIP and MCL1 Localize to Neurons With Hyperphosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Mezache, Louisa; Mikhail, Madison; Garofalo, Michela; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    The cause for the neurofibrillary tangles and plaques in Alzheimer disease likely relates to an abnormal accumulation of their key components, which include β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. We segregated Alzheimer brain sections from people with end-stage disease into those with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau protein and those without and compared each to normal brains for global microRNA patterns. A significant reduced expression of several microRNAs, including miR-512, was evident in the Alzheimer brain sections with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau. Immunohistochemistry documented that 2 known targets of microRNA-512, cFLIP and MCL1, were significantly over expressed and each colocalized to neurons with the abnormal tau protein. Analysis for apoptosis including activated caspase-3, increased caspase-4 and caspase-8, apoptosis initiating factor, APAF-1 activity, and the TUNEL assay was negative in the areas where neurons showed hyperphosphorylated tau. MCM2 expression, a marker of neuroprogenitor cells, was significantly reduced in the Alzheimer sections that contained the hyperphosphorylated tau. These results suggest that a basic defect in Alzheimer disease may be the reduced microRNA-driven increased expression of proteins that may alter the apoptotic/antiapoptotic balance of neurons. This, in turn, could lead to the accumulation of key Alzheimer proteins such as hyperphosphorylated tau that ultimately prevent normal neuronal function and lead to disease symptomatology.

  6. Iron accumulation in deep cortical layers accounts for MRI signal abnormalities in ALS: correlating 7 tesla MRI and pathology.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Justin Y; Jeong, Suh Young; Van Gelderen, Peter; Deng, Han-Xiang; Quezado, Martha M; Danielian, Laura E; Butman, John A; Chen, Lingye; Bayat, Elham; Russell, James; Siddique, Teepu; Duyn, Jeff H; Rouault, Tracey A; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cortical and spinal motor neuron dysfunction. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have previously shown hypointense signal in the motor cortex on T(2)-weighted images in some ALS patients, however, the cause of this finding is unknown. To investigate the utility of this MR signal change as a marker of cortical motor neuron degeneration, signal abnormalities on 3T and 7T MR images of the brain were compared, and pathology was obtained in two ALS patients to determine the origin of the motor cortex hypointensity. Nineteen patients with clinically probable or definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 19 healthy controls underwent 3T MRI. A 7T MRI scan was carried out on five ALS patients who had motor cortex hypointensity on the 3T FLAIR sequence and on three healthy controls. Postmortem 7T MRI of the brain was performed in one ALS patient and histological studies of the brains and spinal cords were obtained post-mortem in two patients. The motor cortex hypointensity on 3T FLAIR images was present in greater frequency in ALS patients. Increased hypointensity correlated with greater severity of upper motor neuron impairment. Analysis of 7T T(2)(*)-weighted gradient echo imaging localized the signal alteration to the deeper layers of the motor cortex in both ALS patients. Pathological studies showed increased iron accumulation in microglial cells in areas corresponding to the location of the signal changes on the 3T and 7T MRI of the motor cortex. These findings indicate that the motor cortex hypointensity on 3T MRI FLAIR images in ALS is due to increased iron accumulation by microglia.

  7. Advances in tau-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Wendy; Pooler, Amy M.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and some frontotemporal dementias, are neurodegenerative diseases characterised by pathological lesions comprised of tau protein. There is currently a significant and urgent unmet need for disease-modifying therapies for these conditions and recently attention has turned to tau as a potential target for intervention. Areas covered Increasing evidence has highlighted pathways associated with tau-mediated neurodegeneration as important targets for drug development. Here, the authors review recently published papers in this area and summarise the genetic and pharmacological approaches that have shown efficacy in reducing tau-associated neurodegeneration. These include the use of agents to prevent abnormal tau processing and increase tau clearance, therapies targeting the immune system, and the manipulation of tau pre-mRNA to modify tau isoform expression. Expert opinion Several small molecule tau-based treatments are currently being assessed in clinical trials, the outcomes of which are eagerly awaited. Current evidence suggests that therapies targeting tau are likely, at least in part, to form the basis of an effective and safe treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders in which tau deposition is evident. PMID:22003359

  8. Rimmed vacuoles with beta-amyloid and tau protein deposits in the muscle of children with hereditary myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fidziańska, Anna; Glinka, Zofia

    2006-08-01

    We investigated whether beta-amyloid and tau protein are involved in the formation of inclusion body myositis (IBM)-like inclusions found in children with rimmed vacuoles and congenitally affected muscles. We immunostained muscle biopsy specimens from four children and one 18-year-old boy with congenital myopathy containing rimmed vacuoles and IBM-like inclusions with antibodies against beta-amyloid, tau protein and ubiquitin. Focal accumulations of both beta-amyloid and phosphorylated tau coexisted with tubulofilamentous structures in all cases. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that the full morphological phenotype of IBM including beta-amyloid and tau protein deposits may also develop in children, and that congenital, probably genetic, muscle defects may lead to abnormal protein aggregation in IBM-like inclusions.

  9. Effects of CX3CR1 and Fractalkine Chemokines in Amyloid Beta Clearance and p-Tau Accumulation in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) Rodent Models: Is Fractalkine a Systemic Biomarker for AD?

    PubMed

    Merino, José Joaquín; Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma; Alvárez, María-Isabel; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    mice with the P301L mutation (frontotemporal dementia) had caspase-3 activation (8-fold) and higher proinflammatory TNF alpha levels and p-Tau deposits at 4 weeks postinfusion. Thus, the CX3CR1/Fractalkine axis regulates microglial activation, the clearance of amyloid plaque and plays a role in p-Tau intraneuronal accumulation in rodent models of AD.

  10. Pathways by which Abeta facilitates tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Laferla, Frank M

    2006-12-01

    Since the initial description one hundred years ago by Dr. Alois Alzheimer, the disorder that bears his name has been characterized by the occurrence of two brain lesions: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Yet the precise relationship between beta-amyloid (Abeta) and tau, the two proteins that accumulate within these lesions, has proven elusive. Today, a growing body of work supports the notion that Abeta may directly or indirectly interact with tau to accelerate NFT formation. Here we review recent evidence that Abeta can adversely affect distinct molecular and cellular pathways, thereby facilitating tau phosphorylation, aggregation, mis-localization, and accumulation. Studies are presented that support four putative mechanisms by which Abeta may facilitate the development of tau pathology. A great deal of work suggests that Abeta may drive tau pathology by activating specific kinases, providing a straightforward mechanism by which Abeta may enhance tau hyperphosphorylation and NFT formation. In the AD brain, Abeta also triggers a massive inflammatory response and pro-inflammatory cytokines can in turn indirectly modulate tau phosphorylation. Mounting evidence also suggests that Abeta may inhibit tau degradation via the proteasome. Lastly, Abeta and tau may indirectly interact at the level of axonal transport and evidence is presented for two possible scenarios by which axonal transport deficits may play a role. We propose that the four putative mechanisms described in this review likely mediate the interactions between Abeta and tau, thereby leading to the development of AD neurodegeneration.

  11. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE. PMID:26556772

  12. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  14. P301S Mutant Human Tau Transgenic Mice Manifest Early Symptoms of Human Tauopathies with Dementia and Altered Sensorimotor Gating

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Haruhisa; Higuchi, Makoto; Takao, Keizo; Tsukita, Kayoko; Karatsu, Yoshiko; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M. -Y.; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2011-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of abnormal tau protein leading to cognitive and/or motor dysfunction. To understand the relationship between tau pathology and behavioral impairments, we comprehensively assessed behavioral abnormalities in a mouse tauopathy model expressing the human P301S mutant tau protein in the early stage of disease to detect its initial neurological manifestations. Behavioral abnormalities, shown by open field test, elevated plus-maze test, hot plate test, Y-maze test, Barnes maze test, Morris water maze test, and/or contextual fear conditioning test, recapitulated the neurological deficits of human tauopathies with dementia. Furthermore, we discovered that prepulse inhibition (PPI), a marker of sensorimotor gating, was enhanced in these animals concomitantly with initial neuropathological changes in associated brain regions. This finding provides evidence that our tauopathy mouse model displays neurofunctional abnormalities in prodromal stages of disease, since enhancement of PPI is characteristic of amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a transitional stage between normal aging and dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), in contrast with attenuated PPI in AD patients. Therefore, assessment of sensorimotor gating could be used to detect the earliest manifestations of tauopathies exemplified by prodromal AD, in which abnormal tau protein may play critical roles in the onset of neuronal dysfunctions. PMID:21698260

  15. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  16. Critical residues involved in tau binding to fyn: implications for tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Dawn H W; Hogseth, Marte; Phillips, Emma C; O'Neill, Michael J; Pooler, Amy M; Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by neuropathological deposits of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles comprised of β-amyloid and tau protein, respectively. In AD, tau becomes abnormally phosphorylated and aggregates to form intracellular deposits. However, the mechanisms by which tau exerts neurotoxicity in disease remain unclear. Recent studies have suggested that the presence of tau at synapses may indicate a role in neuronal signalling, which could be disrupted in pathological conditions. The non-receptor-associated tyrosine kinase fyn is located at the dendrite in neurons, where it was recently shown to interact with tau to stabilise receptor complexes at the post-synaptic density. Fyn also co-localises with tau in a proportion of neurons containing tau tangles in AD and fyn is also a tau kinase. Hence, tau-fyn interactions could play a pathogenic role in AD. Here we report the identification of critical proline residues, Pro213, Pro216, and Pro219, located within the fifth and sixth Pro-X-X-Pro motifs in the proline-rich region of tau, that are important for its binding to fyn. These residues in tau are flanked by numerous phosphorylation sites and therefore we investigated the relationship between fyn and the degree of tau phosphorylation in human post-mortem brain tissue. We found no difference in the amount of fyn present in control and AD brain. Notably, however, there was a significant correlation between fyn and phosphorylated tau at specific phospho-epitopes in control, but not in AD brain. Our results suggest that the pathological mechanisms underlying AD, that result in increased tau phosphorylation, may disrupt the physiological relationship between tau phosphorylation and fyn. PMID:27193083

  17. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Constance, Brian H.; Hwang, Andrew W.; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27383765

  18. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions.

  19. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  20. A combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant effectively diminishes the dendritic loss, tau-hyperphosphorylation, amyloids-β accumulation and brain mitochondrial dynamic disruption in rats with chronic iron-overload.

    PubMed

    Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Krintratun, Warunsorn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-09-22

    Iron-overload can cause cognitive impairment due to blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Although deferiprone (DFP) has been shown to exert neuroprotection, the head-to-head comparison among iron chelators used clinically on brain iron-overload has not been investigated. Moreover, since antioxidant has been shown to be beneficial in iron-overload condition, its combined effect with iron chelator has not been tested. Therefore, the hypothesis is that all chelators provide neuroprotection under iron-overload condition, and that a combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant has greater efficacy than monotherapy. Male Wistar rats (n=42) were assigned to receive a normal diet (ND) or a high-iron diet (HFe) for 4months. At the 2nd month, HFe-fed rats were treated with a vehicle, deferoxamine (DFO), DFP, deferasirox (DFX), n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or a combination of DFP with NAC, while ND-fed rats received vehicle. At the end of the experiment, rats were decapitated and brains were removed to determine brain iron level and deposition, brain mitochondrial function, BBB protein expression, brain mitochondrial dynamic, brain apoptosis, tau-hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and dendritic spine density. The results showed that iron-overload induced BBB breakdown, brain iron accumulation, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired brain mitochondrial dynamics, tau-hyperphosphorylation, Aβ accumulation and dendritic spine reduction. All treatments, except DFX, attenuated these impairments. Moreover, combined therapy provided a greater efficacy than monotherapy. These findings suggested that iron-overload induced brain iron toxicity and a combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant provided a greatest efficacy for neuroprotection than monotherapy.

  1. A combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant effectively diminishes the dendritic loss, tau-hyperphosphorylation, amyloids-β accumulation and brain mitochondrial dynamic disruption in rats with chronic iron-overload.

    PubMed

    Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Krintratun, Warunsorn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-09-22

    Iron-overload can cause cognitive impairment due to blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Although deferiprone (DFP) has been shown to exert neuroprotection, the head-to-head comparison among iron chelators used clinically on brain iron-overload has not been investigated. Moreover, since antioxidant has been shown to be beneficial in iron-overload condition, its combined effect with iron chelator has not been tested. Therefore, the hypothesis is that all chelators provide neuroprotection under iron-overload condition, and that a combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant has greater efficacy than monotherapy. Male Wistar rats (n=42) were assigned to receive a normal diet (ND) or a high-iron diet (HFe) for 4months. At the 2nd month, HFe-fed rats were treated with a vehicle, deferoxamine (DFO), DFP, deferasirox (DFX), n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or a combination of DFP with NAC, while ND-fed rats received vehicle. At the end of the experiment, rats were decapitated and brains were removed to determine brain iron level and deposition, brain mitochondrial function, BBB protein expression, brain mitochondrial dynamic, brain apoptosis, tau-hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and dendritic spine density. The results showed that iron-overload induced BBB breakdown, brain iron accumulation, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired brain mitochondrial dynamics, tau-hyperphosphorylation, Aβ accumulation and dendritic spine reduction. All treatments, except DFX, attenuated these impairments. Moreover, combined therapy provided a greater efficacy than monotherapy. These findings suggested that iron-overload induced brain iron toxicity and a combination of an iron chelator with an antioxidant provided a greatest efficacy for neuroprotection than monotherapy. PMID:27403880

  2. Tau neutrino propagation and tau energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sharada Iyer; Huang Yiwen; Reno, Mary Hall

    2005-07-01

    Electromagnetic energy loss of tau leptons is an important ingredient for eventual tau neutrino detection from high energy astrophysical sources. Proposals have been made to use mountains as neutrino converters, in which the emerging tau decays in an air shower. We use a stochastic evaluation of both tau neutrino conversion to taus and of tau electromagnetic energy loss. We examine the effects of the propagation for monoenergetic incident tau neutrinos as well as for several neutrino power-law spectra. Our main result is a parameterization of the tau electromagnetic energy loss parameter {beta}. We compare the results from the analytic expression for the tau flux using this {beta} with other parameterizations of {beta}.

  3. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  5. Passive Immunization with Phospho-Tau Antibodies Reduces Tau Pathology and Functional Deficits in Two Distinct Mouse Tauopathy Models

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M.; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S.; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F.; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Brunden, Kurt R.; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:25933020

  6. Passive immunization with phospho-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology and functional deficits in two distinct mouse tauopathy models.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Brunden, Kurt R; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies.

  7. Inhibition of Both Hsp70 Activity and Tau Aggregation in Vitro Best Predicts Tau Lowering Activity of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mackenzie D; Baker, Jeremy D; Suntharalingam, Amirthaa; Nordhues, Bryce A; Shelton, Lindsey B; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Haystead, Timothy A J; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    Three scaffolds with inhibitory activity against the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of chaperones have been found to enhance the degradation of the microtubule associated protein tau in cells, neurons, and brain tissue. This is important because tau accumulation is linked to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Here, we expanded upon this study to investigate the anti-tau efficacy of additional scaffolds with Hsp70 inhibitory activity. Five of the nine scaffolds tested lowered tau levels, with the rhodacyanine and phenothiazine scaffolds exhibiting the highest potency as previously described. Because phenothiazines also inhibit tau aggregation in vitro, we suspected that this activity might be a more accurate predictor of tau lowering. Interestingly, the rhodacyanines did inhibit in vitro tau aggregation to a similar degree as phenothiazines, correlating well with tau-lowering efficacy in cells and ex vivo slices. Moreover, other Hsp70 inhibitor scaffolds with weaker tau-lowering activity in cells inhibited tau aggregation in vitro, albeit at lower potencies. When we tested six well-characterized tau aggregation inhibitors, we determined that this mechanism of action was not a better predictor of tau-lowering than Hsp70 inhibition. Instead, we found that compounds possessing both activities were the most effective at promoting tau clearance. Moreover, cytotoxicity and PAINS activity are critical factors that can lead to false-positive lead identification. Strategies designed around these principles will likely yield more efficacious tau-lowering compounds. PMID:27177119

  8. Role of Hypertension in Aggravating Aβ Neuropathology of AD Type and Tau-Mediated Motor Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Ruiz, C.; Wang, J.; Ksiezak-Reding, H.; Ho, L.; Qian, X.; Humala, N.; Thomas, S.; Martínez-Martín, P.; Pasinetti, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that hypertension may accelerate the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we explored the role of hypertension in the neurodegenerative changes associated with Aβ and tau aggregation. We induced hypertension in APPswe Tg2576 and P301L-tauTg mouse models. In Tg2576 mice, experimental hypertension was associated with a significant increase of the accumulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in brain tissue and a significant reduction of Aβ peptides in serum (P < .05). These results indicate that hypertension may promote AD-type Aβ neuropathology in Tg2576. In P301L-tauTg mice we found that the presence of hypertension was significantly associated with aggravated motor function assessed by hindlimb extension test (P = .01). These results suggest that hypertension may play a role in accelerating the progression of motor dysfunction associated with tau-related alterations. Our studies suggest that the management of blood pressure (BP) may alleviate AD-type Aβ neuropathology and neurological disorders associated with abnormal tau metabolism. PMID:19936102

  9. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  10. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

    PubMed

    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  11. From tangles to tau protein.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer couldn't have chosen a name more appropriate than neurofibrillary tangles when one hundred years ago (Alzheimer, 1906) he presented this histopathological hallmark of the progressive dementing disorder, which got named after him as Alzheimer disease. Both, the structure and as well as the molecular composition of neurofibrillary tangles have baffled neuroscientists for many years. It was not till 1963 when with the help of the electron microscope the tangles were found to be made up of paired helical filaments (PHF). It took another 23 years before microtubule associated protein tau was immunohistochemically identified as the part of neurofibrillary tangles (Grundke-lqbal, 1986 a). The same year it was shown that tau protein in Alzheimer disease brain was abnormally hyperphosphorylated (Grundke-Iqbal, 1986 b). In 1988 Michal Novak, Cesar Milstein and Claude Wischik produced monoclonal antibody that was able to recognize then unknown protein in PHF. The antibody (MN423) allowed its isolation and let to full molecular characterization as protein tau. These studies provided molecular proof that tau protein was the major and an integral component of the PHF (Wischik et al, 1988 a, b, Goedert et al, 1988, Novak et al, 1989, 1991). Over the years the significance of tau pathology for the neurodegenerative diseases was discussed and often questioned. However, detailed studies of the maturation and distribution of NFTs, showing correlation with degree of cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (Braak and Braak, 1991), together with discovery of tau gene mutations causing fronto-temporal dementia in many families (Hutton et al, 1998) promoted tau as the major pathogenic force in neurodegenerative cascade. Further studies focused on tau dysfunctions revealed truncation and phosphorylation as two major posttranslational modifications responsible for toxic gain of function as an underlying cause of tauopathies including Alzheimer

  12. From tangles to tau protein.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer couldn't have chosen a name more appropriate than neurofibrillary tangles when one hundred years ago (Alzheimer, 1906) he presented this histopathological hallmark of the progressive dementing disorder, which got named after him as Alzheimer disease. Both, the structure and as well as the molecular composition of neurofibrillary tangles have baffled neuroscientists for many years. It was not till 1963 when with the help of the electron microscope the tangles were found to be made up of paired helical filaments (PHF). It took another 23 years before microtubule associated protein tau was immunohistochemically identified as the part of neurofibrillary tangles (Grundke-lqbal, 1986 a). The same year it was shown that tau protein in Alzheimer disease brain was abnormally hyperphosphorylated (Grundke-Iqbal, 1986 b). In 1988 Michal Novak, Cesar Milstein and Claude Wischik produced monoclonal antibody that was able to recognize then unknown protein in PHF. The antibody (MN423) allowed its isolation and let to full molecular characterization as protein tau. These studies provided molecular proof that tau protein was the major and an integral component of the PHF (Wischik et al, 1988 a, b, Goedert et al, 1988, Novak et al, 1989, 1991). Over the years the significance of tau pathology for the neurodegenerative diseases was discussed and often questioned. However, detailed studies of the maturation and distribution of NFTs, showing correlation with degree of cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (Braak and Braak, 1991), together with discovery of tau gene mutations causing fronto-temporal dementia in many families (Hutton et al, 1998) promoted tau as the major pathogenic force in neurodegenerative cascade. Further studies focused on tau dysfunctions revealed truncation and phosphorylation as two major posttranslational modifications responsible for toxic gain of function as an underlying cause of tauopathies including Alzheimer

  13. Inhibitory effect of corcin on aggregation of 1N/4R human tau protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karakani, Ali Mohammadi; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Mahmood Ghaffari, Seyed; Ahmadian, Shahin; Mokhtari, Farzad; Jalili Firuzi, Mahshad; Zahra Bathaie, Seyedeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. One of the hallmarks of AD is an abnormal accumulation of fibril forms of tau protein which is known as a microtubule associated protein. In this regard, inhibition of tau aggregation has been documented to be a potent therapeutic approach in AD and tauopathies. Unfortunately, the available synthetic drugs have modest beneficial efficacy with several side effects. Therefore, pipeline drugs from natural sources with anti-aggregation properties can be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. Among medicinal plants, saffron (Crocus sativus, L.), as a traditional herbal medicine has different pharmacological properties and can be used as treatment for several nervous system impairment including depression and dementia. Crocin as a major constituent of saffron is the glycosylated form of crocetin. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of crocin on aggregation of recombinant human tau protein 1N/4R isoform using biochemical methods and cell culture. Results: Results revealed that tau protein under the fibrillation condition and in the presence of crocin had enough stability with low tendency for aggregation. Crocin inhibited tau aggregation with IC50 of 100 µg/ml. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that crocin could suppress the formation of tau protein filaments. Conclusion: Inhibitory effect of crocin could be related to its interference with nucleation phase that led to increases in monomer species of tau protein. Based on our results, crocin is recommended as a proper candidate to be used in AD treatment. PMID:26124935

  14. Aminothienopyridazines and Methylene Blue Affect Tau Fibrillization via Cysteine Oxidation*

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Smith, Amos B.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:23443659

  15. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein.

  16. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein. PMID:27497324

  17. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  18. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  19. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  20. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  1. APP Metabolism Regulates Tau Proteostasis in Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Steven; Evans, Lewis D.B.; Andersson, Therese; Portelius, Erik; Smith, James; Dias, Tatyana B.; Saurat, Nathalie; McGlade, Amelia; Kirwan, Peter; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons. PMID:25921538

  2. T-Tau and P-Tau in Brain and Blood from Natural and Experimental Prion Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Richard; Chang, Binggong; Petersen, Robert; Chiu, Allen; Davies, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic abnormalities are prominent in prion disease pathogenesis and are responsible for functional deficits. The microtubule associated protein, Tau, binds to and stabilizes microtubules in axons ensuring axonal transport of synaptic components. Tau phosphorylation reduces its affinity for microtubules leading to their instability and resulting in disrupted axonal transport and synaptic dysfunction. We report on the levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau), measured by highly sensitive laser-based immunoassays, in the central nervous system and biofluids from experimentally transmitted prion disease in mice and natural cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) in humans. We found that, in contrast to sCJD where only the levels of T-Tau in brain are increased, both T-Tau and P-Tau are increased in the brains of symptomatic mice experimentally infected with the ME7, 139A and 22L mouse-adapted scrapie strains. The increased levels of T-Tau in sCJD brain, compared to control samples, were also observed in patient plasma. In contrast, there was no detectable increase in T-Tau and P-Tau in plasma from symptomatic experimentally infected mice. Furthermore, our data suggests that in mice showing clinical signs of prion disease the levels and/or ratios of T-Tau and P-Tau are only a useful parameter for differentiating the mouse-adapted scrapie strains that differ in the extent of disease. We conclude that the neuropathogenesis associated with P-Tau and synaptic dysfunction is similar for at least two of the mouse-adapted scrapie strains tested but may differ between sporadic and experimentally transmitted prion diseases. PMID:26630676

  3. T-Tau and P-Tau in Brain and Blood from Natural and Experimental Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Richard; Chang, Binggong; Petersen, Robert; Chiu, Allen; Davies, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic abnormalities are prominent in prion disease pathogenesis and are responsible for functional deficits. The microtubule associated protein, Tau, binds to and stabilizes microtubules in axons ensuring axonal transport of synaptic components. Tau phosphorylation reduces its affinity for microtubules leading to their instability and resulting in disrupted axonal transport and synaptic dysfunction. We report on the levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau), measured by highly sensitive laser-based immunoassays, in the central nervous system and biofluids from experimentally transmitted prion disease in mice and natural cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) in humans. We found that, in contrast to sCJD where only the levels of T-Tau in brain are increased, both T-Tau and P-Tau are increased in the brains of symptomatic mice experimentally infected with the ME7, 139A and 22L mouse-adapted scrapie strains. The increased levels of T-Tau in sCJD brain, compared to control samples, were also observed in patient plasma. In contrast, there was no detectable increase in T-Tau and P-Tau in plasma from symptomatic experimentally infected mice. Furthermore, our data suggests that in mice showing clinical signs of prion disease the levels and/or ratios of T-Tau and P-Tau are only a useful parameter for differentiating the mouse-adapted scrapie strains that differ in the extent of disease. We conclude that the neuropathogenesis associated with P-Tau and synaptic dysfunction is similar for at least two of the mouse-adapted scrapie strains tested but may differ between sporadic and experimentally transmitted prion diseases. PMID:26630676

  4. Lipofuscin accumulation, abnormal electrophysiology, and photoreceptor degeneration in mutant ELOVL4 transgenic mice: a model for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Karan, G; Lillo, C; Yang, Z; Cameron, D J; Locke, K G; Zhao, Y; Thirumalaichary, S; Li, C; Birch, D G; Vollmer-Snarr, H R; Williams, D S; Zhang, K

    2005-03-15

    Macular degeneration is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the central retina. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt macular degeneration (STGD) is caused by mutations in ELOVL4, which is predicted to encode an enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain fatty acids. We generated transgenic mice expressing a mutant form of human ELOVL4 that causes STGD. In these mice, we show that accumulation by the RPE of undigested phagosomes and lipofuscin, including the fluorophore, 2-[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetraenyl]-1-(2-hyydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6-(2,6,6,-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium (A2E) is followed by RPE atrophy. Subsequently, photoreceptor degeneration occurs in the central retina in a pattern closely resembling that of human STGD and age-related macular degeneration. The ELOVL4 transgenic mice thus provide a good model for both STGD and dry age-related macular degeneration, and represent a valuable tool for studies on therapeutic intervention in these forms of blindness. PMID:15749821

  5. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  6. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  7. Caspase-cleaved Tau-D(421) is colocalized with the immunophilin FKBP52 in the autophagy-endolysosomal system of Alzheimer's disease neurons.

    PubMed

    Meduri, Geri; Guillemeau, Kevin; Dounane, Omar; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Duyckaerts, Charles; Chambraud, Béatrice; Baulieu, Etienne Emile; Giustiniani, Julien

    2016-10-01

    Pathologic modifications of the Tau protein leading to neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation are a common feature of a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, which include Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously showed that the immunophilin FKBP52 physically and functionally interacts with Tau, and we recently reported that FKBP52 levels are abnormally low in AD patients' brains. To decipher the mechanism of FKBP52 decrease in AD brains, we performed multiple labeling immunohistofluorescence and lysosomal purification using postmortem brain samples of healthy controls (n = 8) and AD (n = 20) patients. Confocal analysis revealed that FKBP52 localizes to the endolysosomal system. We also report FKBP52 colocalization with the truncated Tau-D(421) in the autophagy-endolysosomal system in some AD neurons and that the decrease of FKBP52 correlates with NFT formation. Additional experiments of autophagy inhibition in Tau-inducible SH-SY5Y cells allowed demonstrating FKBP52 release in the extracellular milieu. Our findings point out the possibility that FKBP52 could be abnormally released from NFTs negative neurons in AD brains in correlation with the early pathologic Tau-D(421) neuronal accumulation.

  8. The Role of Tau in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Potential as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal deposition of proteins in and around neurons is a common pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Among these pathological proteins, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intraneuronal filaments in a spectrum of neurological disorders. The discovery that dominant mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau are associated with familial frontotemporal dementia strongly supports abnormal tau protein as directly involved in disease pathogenesis. This and other evidence suggest that tau is a worthwhile target for the prevention or treatment of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. However, it is critical to understand the normal biological roles of tau, the specific molecular events that induce tau to become neurotoxic, the biochemical nature of pathogenic tau, the means by which pathogenic tau exerts neurotoxicity, and how tau pathology propagates. Based on known differences between normal and abnormal tau, a number of approaches have been taken toward the discovery of potential therapeutics. Key questions still remain open, such as the nature of the connection between the amyloid-β protein of Alzheimer's disease and tau pathology. Answers to these questions should help better understand the nature of tauopathies and may also reveal new therapeutic targets and strategies. PMID:24278740

  9. Untangling tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Victor L; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Rowe, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging of tau deposits is providing a better understanding of the temporal and spatial tau deposition in the brain, allowing a more comprehensive insight into the causes, diagnoses, and potentially treatment of tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and some variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The assessment of tau deposition in the brain over time will allow a deeper understanding of the relationship between tau and other variables such as cognition, genotype, and neurodegeneration, as well as assessing the role tau plays in ageing. Preliminary human studies suggest that tau imaging could also be used as a diagnostic, prognostic, and theranostic biomarker, as well as a surrogate marker for target engagement, patient recruitment, and efficacy monitoring for disease-specific therapeutic trials. PMID:27489878

  10. Tau immunotherapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2014-01-01

    Disappointing findings from recent phase III trials on amyloid-β (Aβ) immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have shifted the focus of such treatments to the tau protein. As tau pathology correlates better with the degree of dementia than Aβ plaque burden, it is a more attractive target once cognitive impairments are evident, while Aβ therapies may be better suited for the presymptomatic phase of the disease. Over 12 years ago, we initiated a tau immunotherapy program, seeking to alleviate the functional impairments associated with tau lesions in tauopathies. We have reported that various active and passive tau immunizations diminish tau pathology and improve function, including cognition, in different mouse models. Both extra- and intracellular pathways are likely involved. The antibodies may block the spread of tau pathology via microglial phagocytosis of the antibody-tau complex and facilitate lysosomal tau clearance in neurons after endosomal uptake. We have observed such antibody internalization following intracarotid injection in mice and in various culture models. These include brain slices and primary neurons from tangle mice as well as human neuroblastoma cell lines. Antibody targeting of different intracellular protein aggregates, including α-synuclein, Aβ and superoxide dismutase has been reported by others. Now, several laboratories have confirmed and extended our findings using various active and passive tau immunizations in different models, thereby clearly establishing the feasibility of this approach for clinical trials. We are also working on imaging approaches to monitor tau pathology, its consequences and the efficacy of treatments. Dire need exists for such diagnostic methods for tauopathies. Overall, therapies and diagnostic tools targeting tau pathology have a great potential for AD and other tauopathies.

  11. Pioglitazone prevents tau oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tadanori; Shirafuji, Norimichi; Makino, Chiemi; Yen, Shu-Hui; Kanaan, Nicholas M; Ueno, Asako; Suzuki, Jinya; Ikawa, Masamichi; Matsunaga, Akiko; Yamamura, Osamu; Kuriyama, Masaru; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-09-23

    Tau aggregation and amyloid β protein (Aβ) deposition are the main causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation modulates Aβ production. To test whether the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) is also effective in preventing tau aggregation in AD, we used a cellular model in which wild-type tau protein (4R0N) is overexpressed (M1C cells) (Hamano et al., 2012) as well as primary neuronal cultures. PIO reduced both phosphorylated and total tau levels, and inactivated glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a major tau kinase, associated with activation of Akt. In addition, PIO decreased cleaved caspase3 and C-terminal truncated tau species by caspase, which is expected to decrease tau aggregation. A fractionation study showed that PIO reduced high molecular-weight (120 kDa), oligomeric tau species in Tris Insoluble, sarkosyl-soluble fractions. Tau decrease was reversed by adding GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Together, our current results support the idea that PPARγ agonists may be useful therapeutic agents for AD.

  12. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  13. Microtubule-associated protein tau in bovine retinal photoreceptor rod outer segments: comparison with brain tau

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Akio; Nishizawa, Yuji; Matsuura, Isao; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Bondarenko, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a possible involvement of abnormal tau in some retinal degenerative diseases. The common view in these studies is that these retinal diseases share the mechanism of tau-mediated degenerative diseases in brain and that information about these brain diseases may be directly applied to explain these retinal diseases. Here we collectively examine this view by revealing three basic characteristics of tau in the rod outer segment (ROS) of bovine retinal photoreceptors, i.e., its isoforms, its phosphorylation mode and its interaction with microtubules, and by comparing them with those of brain tau. We find that ROS contains at least four isoforms: three are identical to those in brain and one is unique in ROS. All ROS isoforms, like brain isoforms, are modified with multiple phosphate molecules; however, ROS isoforms show their own specific phosphorylation pattern, and these phosphorylation patterns appear not to be identical to those of brain tau. Interestingly, some ROS isoforms, under the normal conditions, are phosphorylated at the sites identical to those in Alzheimer’s patient isoforms. Surprisingly, a large portion of ROS isoforms tightly associates with a membranous component(s) other than microtubules, and this association is independent of their phosphorylation states. These observations strongly suggest that tau plays various roles in ROS and that some of these functions may not be comparable to those of brain tau. We believe that knowledge about tau in the entire retinal network and/or its individual cells are also essential for elucidation of tau-mediated retinal diseases, if any. PMID:23712071

  14. Lysosomal Dysfunction Promotes Cleavage and Neurotoxicity of Tau In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Katherine A.; Loewen, Carin A.; Mulkearns, Erin; Tyynelä, Jaana; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Feany, Mel B.

    2010-01-01

    Expansion of the lysosomal system, including cathepsin D upregulation, is an early and prominent finding in Alzheimer's disease brain. Cell culture studies, however, have provided differing perspectives on the lysosomal connection to Alzheimer's disease, including both protective and detrimental influences. We sought to clarify and molecularly define the connection in vivo in a genetically tractable model organism. Cathepsin D is upregulated with age in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Genetic analysis reveals that cathepsin D plays a neuroprotective role because genetic ablation of cathepsin D markedly potentiates tau-induced neurotoxicity. Further, generation of a C-terminally truncated form of tau found in Alzheimer's disease patients is significantly increased in the absence of cathepsin D. We show that truncated tau has markedly increased neurotoxicity, while solubility of truncated tau is decreased. Importantly, the toxicity of truncated tau is not affected by removal of cathepsin D, providing genetic evidence that modulation of neurotoxicity by cathepsin D is mediated through C-terminal cleavage of tau. We demonstrate that removing cathepsin D in adult postmitotic neurons leads to aberrant lysosomal expansion and caspase activation in vivo, suggesting a mechanism for C-terminal truncation of tau. We also demonstrate that both cathepsin D knockout mice and cathepsin D–deficient sheep show abnormal C-terminal truncation of tau and accompanying caspase activation. Thus, caspase cleavage of tau may be a molecular mechanism through which lysosomal dysfunction and neurodegeneration are causally linked in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20664788

  15. Tau protein in normal and Alzheimer's disease brain: an update.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G V; Hartigan, J A

    1999-11-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that, in a hyperphosphorylated form, comprises the main component of the paired helical filaments and neurofibrillary tangles found in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) brain. It is therefore important to understand the normal functioning and processing of tau protein, and the abnormal posttranslational processing of tau in AD pathology. In 1996, Johnson and Jenkins reviewed the literature on the biochemistry, function, and phosphorylation of tau in normal and AD brain. Since that time, numerous publications have come out further elucidating the properties of tau. The present review updates the topics originally covered in the 1996 review, as well as presents a number of new topics. For example, mutations in the tau gene have been found in several non-AD, autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders that exhibit extensive neurofibrillary pathology. In addition, there is increasing evidence that tau may be involved in signal transduction, organelle transport, and cell growth, independent of its microtubule-binding functions. Taken together, the research reviewed here demonstrates that tau is a very complex protein with various functions that are intricately regulated. It is clear that more research is required to completely understand the functions and regulation of tau in normal and AD brain.

  16. Stress-Induced Tau Phosphorylation: Functional Neuroplasticity or Neuronal Vulnerability?

    PubMed Central

    Rissman, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein is a key component of the pathology seen in neurodegenerative tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite its association with disease, tau phosphorylation (tau-P) also plays an important role in neuroplasticity, such as dendritic/synaptic remodeling seen in the hippocampus in response to environmental challenges, such as stress. To define the boundaries between neuroplasticity and neuropathology, studies have attempted to characterize the paradigms, stimuli, and signaling intermediates involved in stress-induced tau-P. Supporting an involvement of stress in AD are data demonstrating alterations in stress pathways and peptides in the AD brain and epidemiological data implicating stress exposure as a risk factor for AD. In this review, the question of whether stress-induced tau-P can be used as a model for examining the relationship between functional neuroplasticity and neuronal vulnerability will be discussed. PMID:19584431

  17. Tau physiology and pathomechanisms in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Eckert, Anne; Ittner, Lars Matthias; Piguet, Olivier; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has been associated with toxic intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau (FTLD-tau). Moreover, genetic studies identified mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau in familial cases of the disease. In this review, we cover a range of aspects of tau function, both in the healthy and diseased brain, discussing several in vitro and in vivo models. Tau structure and function in the healthy brain is presented, accentuating its distinct compartmentalization in neurons and its role in microtubule stabilization and axonal transport. Furthermore, tau-driven pathology is discussed, introducing current concepts and the underlying experimental evidence. Different aspects of pathological tau phosphorylation, the protein's genomic and domain organization as well as its spreading in disease, together with MAPT-associated mutations and their respective models are presented. Dysfunction related to other post-transcriptional modifications and their effect on normal neuronal functions such as cell cycle, epigenetics and synapse dynamics are also discussed, providing a mechanistic explanation for the observations made in FTLD-tau cases, with the possibility for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we cover aspects of tau function, both in the healthy and diseased brain, referring to different in vitro and in vivo models. In healthy neurons, tau is compartmentalized, with higher concentrations found in the distal part of the axon. Cargo molecules are sensitive to this gradient. A disturbed tau distribution, as found in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-tau), has severe consequences for cellular physiology: tau accumulates in the neuronal soma and dendrites, leading among others to microtubule depolymerization and impaired axonal transport. Tau forms insoluble aggregates that sequester additional molecules stalling cellular physiology. Neuronal communication is gradually lost as toxic tau accumulates in dendritic spines

  18. Monitoring of Intracellular Tau Aggregation Regulated by OGA/OGT Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Nam, Ghilsoo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation of tau has been considered as a key pathogenic mechanism inducing tau aggregation in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, collectively called tauopathies. Recent evidence showed that tau phosphorylation sites are protected with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in normal brain. In pathological condition, tau is de-glycosylated and becomes a substrate for kinases. Despite the importance of O-GlcNAcylation in tau pathology, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), and an enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAc to tau, has not been carefully investigated in the context of tau aggregation. Here, we investigated intracellular tau aggregation regulated by BZX2, an inhibitor of OGT. Upon the inhibition of OGT, tau phosphorylation increased 2.0-fold at Ser199 and 1.5-fold at Ser396, resulting in increased tau aggregation. Moreover, the BZX2 induced tau aggregation was efficiently reduced by the treatment of Thiamet G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Our results demonstrated the protective role of OGT in tau aggregation and also suggest the counter-regulatory mechanism of OGA and OGT in tau pathology. PMID:26343633

  19. An immunochemical study on tau glycation in paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    Ko, L W; Ko, E C; Nacharaju, P; Liu, W K; Chang, E; Kenessey, A; Yen, S H

    1999-06-01

    Glycation is a non-enzymatic posttranslational modification that involves a covalent linkage between a sugar and an amino group of protein molecule forming ketoamine. Subsequent oxidation, fragmentation and/or crosslinking of ketoamine leads to the production of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Formation of AGEs causes detrimental effects on the structure and function of affected proteins. Accumulation of AGEs has been implicated in normal aging and in the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated complications and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of all AGEs, Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) is a major glycoxidation product known to be stable and accumulate progressively in vivo. In order to determine if tau is glycated in AD, we raised a rabbit antibody to CML that demonstrated its usefulness in detecting glycation of different proteins in vitro, including BSA, ribonuclease, lysozyme and recombinant tau. Immunochemical analyses indicated that ribose and glucose-6-phosphate are more effective than glucose in generating CML formation in these proteins. We used this antibody to probe for glycation in the following human tau preparations: tau of normal brains and preparations of soluble PHF-tau as well as insoluble PHF from AD brains. All three principal tau components resolved from PHF-tau on Western blots showed CML immunoreactivity indicating that tau is glycated in PHF-tau; and insoluble PHF exhibited prominent CML immunoreactivity on top of the stacking gel. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopic analyses indicate that the anti-CML antibody labels predominantly PHF in aggregates. Taken together, these results suggest that tau becomes glycated in PHF-tau and glycation may play a role in stabilizing PHF aggregation leading to tangle formation in AD.

  20. Tau Mislocation in Glucocorticoid-Triggered Hippocampal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sara; Silva, Joana; Mota, Cristina; Vaz-Silva, João; Veloso, Ana; Pinto, Vítor; Sousa, Nuno; Cerqueira, João; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    The exposure to high glucocorticoids (GC) triggers neuronal atrophy and cognitive deficits, but the exact cellular mechanisms underlying the GC-associated dendritic remodeling and spine loss are still poorly understood. Previous studies have implicated sustained GC elevations in neurodegenerative mechanisms through GC-evoked hyperphosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein Tau while Tau mislocation has recently been proposed as relevant in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In light of the dual cytoplasmic and synaptic role of Tau, this study monitored the impact of prolonged GC treatment on Tau intracellular localization and its phosphorylation status in different cellular compartments. We demonstrate, both by biochemical and ultrastructural analysis, that GC administration led to cytosolic and dendritic Tau accumulation in rat hippocampus, and triggered Tau hyperphosphorylation in epitopes related to its malfunction (Ser396/404) and cytoskeletal pathology (e.g., Thr231 and Ser262). In addition, we show, for the first time, that chronic GC administration also increased Tau levels in synaptic compartment; however, at the synapse, there was an increase in phosphorylation of Ser396/404, but a decrease of Thr231. These GC-triggered Tau changes were paralleled by reduced levels of synaptic scaffolding proteins such as PSD-95 and Shank proteins as well as reduced dendritic branching and spine loss. These in vivo findings add to our limited knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of GC-evoked synaptic atrophy and neuronal disconnection implicating Tau missorting in mechanism(s) of synaptic damage, beyond AD pathology.

  1. Aluminum induces tau aggregation in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke; Maeda, Sumihiro; Murayama, Miyuki; Sahara, Naruhiko; Takashima, Akihiko

    2007-07-01

    Etiological studies suggest that aluminum (Al) intake might increase an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Biochemical analysis data on the effects of Al, however, are inconsistent. Hence, the pathological involvement of Al in AD remains unclear. If Al is involved in AD, then it is reasonable to hypothesize that Al might be involved in the formation of either amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Here, we investigated whether Al might be involved in NFT formation by using an in vitro tau aggregation paradigm, a tau-overexpressing neuronal cell line (N2a), and a tau-overexpressing mouse model. Although Al induced tau aggregation in a heparin-induced tau assembly assay, these aggregates were neither thioflavin T positive nor did they resemble tau fibrils seen in human AD brains. With cell lysates from stable cell lines overexpressing tau, the accumulation of SDS-insoluble tau increased when the lysates were treated with at least 100 muM Al-maltolate. Yet Al-maltolate caused illness or death in transgenic mice overexpressing human tau and in non-transgenic littermates well before the Al concentration in the brain reached 100 muM. These results indicate that Al has no direct link to AD pathology.

  2. Hyperphosphorylated Tau is Elevated in Alzheimer's Disease with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick S.; Kirkwood, Caitlin M.; Gray, Megan C.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Kofler, Julia K.; Klunk, William E.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis occurs in 40–60% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects, is heritable, and indicates amore rapidly progressive disease phenotype. Neuroimaging and postmortem evidence support an exaggerated prefrontal cortical synaptic deficit in AD with psychosis. Microtubule-associated protein tau is a key mediator of amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity in AD, and differential mechanisms of progressive intraneuronal phospho-tau accumulation and interneuronal spread of tau aggregates have recently been described. We hypothesized that psychosis in AD would be associated with greater intraneuronal concentration of phospho-tau and greater spread of tau aggregates in prefrontal cortex. We therefore evaluated prefrontal cortex phospho-tau in a cohort of 45 AD cases with and without psychosis. Intraneuronal phospho-tau concentration was higher in subjects with psychosis, while a measure of phospho-tau spread, volume fraction, was not. Across groups both measures were associated with lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination and Digit Span Backwards test. These novel findings indicate that tau phosphorylation may be accelerated in AD with psychosis, indicating a more dynamic, exaggerated pathology in AD with psychosis. PMID:24270207

  3. The Many Faces of Tau

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meaghan; Maeda, Sumihiro; Vossel, Keith; Mucke, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Summary While the microtubule-binding capacity of the protein tau has been known for many years, new functions of tau in signaling and cytoskeletal organization have recently emerged. In this review, we highlight these functions and the potential roles of tau in neurodegenerative disease. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting various aspects of tau biology. PMID:21555069

  4. Microtubule-associated protein tau (tau) is a major antigenic component of paired helical filaments in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, K S; Joachim, C L; Selkoe, D J

    1986-01-01

    The detailed protein composition of the paired helical filaments (PHF) that accumulate in human neurons in aging and Alzheimer disease is unknown. However, the identity of certain components has been surmised by using immunocytochemical techniques. Whereas PHF share epitopes with neurofilament proteins and microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 2, we report evidence that the MAP tau (tau) appears to be their major antigenic component. Immunization of rabbits with NaDodSO4-extracted, partially purified PHF (free of normal cytoskeletal elements, including tau) consistently produces antibodies to tau but not, for example, to neurofilaments. Such PHF antibodies label all of the heterogeneous fetal and mature forms of tau from rat and human brain. Absorption of PHF antisera with heat-stable MAPs (rich in tau) results in almost complete loss of staining of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in human brain sections. An affinity-purified antibody to tau specifically labels NFT and the neurites of senile plaques in human brain sections as well as NaDodSO4-extracted NFT. tau-Immunoreactive NFT frequently extend into the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons, suggesting an aberrant intracellular locus for this axonal protein. tau and PHF antibodies label tau proteins identically on electrophoretic transfer blots and stain the gel-excluded protein representing NaDodSO4-insoluble PHF in homogenates of human brain. The progressive accumulation of altered tau protein in neurons in Alzheimer disease may result in instability of microtubules, consequent loss of effective transport of molecules and organelles, and, ultimately, neuronal death. Images PMID:2424016

  5. Phosphorylation of Tau at Thr212, Thr231, and Ser262 Combined Causes Neurodegeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Alejandra D.; Di Clerico, John; Li, Bin; Corbo, Christopher P.; Alaniz, Maria E.; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease and related diseases called tauopathies. As yet, the exact mechanism by which this pathology causes neurodegeneration is not understood. The present study provides direct evidence that Tau abnormal hyperphosphorylation causes its aggregation, breakdown of the microtubule network, and cell death and identifies phosphorylation sites involved in neurotoxicity. We generated pseudophosphorylated Tau proteins by mutating Ser/Thr to Glu and, as controls, to Ala. These mutations involved one, two, or three pathological phosphorylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis using as backbones the wild type or FTDP-17 mutant R406W Tau. Pseudophosphorylated and corresponding control Tau proteins were expressed transiently in PC12 and CHO cells. We found that a single phosphorylation site alone had little influence on the biological activity of Tau, except Thr212, which, upon mutation to Glu in the R406W background, induced Tau aggregation in cells, suggesting phosphorylation at this site along with a modification on the C-terminal of the protein facilitates self-assembly of Tau. The expression of R406W Tau pseudophosphorylated at Thr212, Thr231, and Ser262 triggered caspase-3 activation in as much as 85% of the transfected cells, whereas the corresponding value for wild type pseudophosphorylated Tau was 30%. Cells transfected with pseudophosphorylated Tau became TUNEL-positive. PMID:20663882

  6. Depletion of microglia and inhibition of exosome synthesis halt tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Medalla, Maria; Luebke, Jennifer; Haydar, Tarik; Wolozin, Benjamin; Butovsky, Oleg; Kügler, Sebastian; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of pathological tau protein is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Tau protein spreads from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal region early in the disease. Microglia, the primary phagocytes in the brain, are positively correlated with tau pathology, but their involvement in tau propagation is unknown. We developed an adeno-associated virus–based model exhibiting rapid tau propagation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus in 4 weeks. We found that depleting microglia dramatically suppressed the propagation of tau and reduced excitability in the dentate gyrus in this mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrate that microglia spread tau via exosome secretion, and inhibiting exosome synthesis significantly reduced tau propagation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that microglia and exosomes contribute to the progression of tauopathy and that the exosome secretion pathway may be a therapeutic target. PMID:26436904

  7. Tau and neurodegenerative disease: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, tau protein was isolated as a microtubule-associated factor from the porcine brain. In the previous year, a paired helical filament (PHF) protein had been identified in neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD), but it was not until 1986 that the PHF protein and tau were discovered to be one and the same. In the AD brain, tau was found to be abnormally hyperphosphorylated, and it inhibited rather than promoted in vitro microtubule assembly. Almost 80 disease-causing exonic missense and intronic silent mutations in the tau gene have been found in familial cases of frontotemporal dementia but, to date, no such mutation has been found in AD. The first phase I clinical trial of an active tau immunization vaccine in patients with AD was recently completed. Assays for tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma are now available, and tau radiotracers for PET are under development. In this article, we provide an overview of the pivotal discoveries in the tau research field over the past 40 years. We also review the current status of the field, including disease mechanisms and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26635213

  8. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  9. Tau antagonizes end-binding protein tracking at microtubule ends through a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Denarier, Eric; Prezel, Eléa; Vinit, Angélique; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Devred, François; Barbier, Pascale; Peyrot, Vincent; Sayas, Carmen Laura; Avila, Jesus; Peris, Leticia; Andrieux, Annie; Serre, Laurence; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Arnal, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Proper regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for cell functions and involves various microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). Among them, end-binding proteins (EBs) accumulate at microtubule plus ends, whereas structural MAPs bind along the microtubule lattice. Recent data indicate that the structural MAP tau modulates EB subcellular localization in neurons. However, the molecular determinants of EB/tau interaction remain unknown, as is the effect of this interplay on microtubule dynamics. Here we investigate the mechanisms governing EB/tau interaction in cell-free systems and cellular models. We find that tau inhibits EB tracking at microtubule ends. Tau and EBs form a complex via the C-terminal region of EBs and the microtubule-binding sites of tau. These two domains are required for the inhibitory activity of tau on EB localization to microtubule ends. Moreover, the phosphomimetic mutation S262E within tau microtubule-binding sites impairs EB/tau interaction and prevents the inhibitory effect of tau on EB comets. We further show that microtubule dynamic parameters vary, depending on the combined activities of EBs and tau proteins. Overall our results demonstrate that tau directly antagonizes EB function through a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism. This study highlights a novel role for tau in EB regulation, which might be impaired in neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.

    1986-02-01

    Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb/sup -1/ of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the ..gamma../sup +/..gamma../sup -/ pair produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -13/ s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  12. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  13. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bondulich, Marie K; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-08-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies.

  14. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Bondulich, Marie K.; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. PMID:27297240

  15. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bondulich, Marie K; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-08-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. PMID:27297240

  16. Tau protein role in sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Jose L; Hita-Yañez, Eva; Moreno-Lopez, Bernardo; Portillo, Federico; Rubio, Alicia; Avila, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the lack of tau produces subtle changes in neuronal structure and modest impairment in complex behaviors, suggesting compensatory mechanisms carried out by other neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. Here we show major abnormalities in sleep-wake cycle of tau-deficient animals including increased wakefulness duration and decreased non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, a higher number of state transitions between NREM and wake, and shortened sleep bouts. Altered sleep structure in tau-/- mice was accompanied by a significant decline in delta power together with an enhanced spectral density of sleep spindles during NREM sleep. No significant differences were observed in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep between the two mouse strains. Taken together, these results suggest that tau indirectly participates in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle modulating not only the control and maintenance of global brain states but also the cerebral oscillatory patterns underlying sleep-wake states.

  17. Tau as a Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Krishnamurthy, Pavan K.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are primarily composed of aggregates of hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein tau. It is likely that an imbalance of kinase and phosphatase activities leads to the abnormal phosphorylation of tau and subsequent aggregation. The wide ranging therapeutic approaches that are being developed include to inhibit tau kinases, to enhance phosphatase activity, to promote microtubule stability, and to reduce tau aggregate formation and/or enhance their clearance with small molecule drugs or by immunotherapeutic means. Most of these promising approaches are still in preclinical development whilst some have progressed to Phase II clinical trials. By pursuing these lines of study, a viable therapy for AD and related tauopathies may be obtained. PMID:21679154

  18. Naphthoquinone-Tryptophan Hybrid Inhibits Aggregation of the Tau-Derived Peptide PHF6 and Reduces Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Pinter, Moran; Tal, Sharon; Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Abu-Hussien, Malak; Alyagor, Idan; Eisenbaum, Tal; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), are a group of disorders characterized neuropathologically by intracellular toxic accumulations of abnormal protein aggregates formed by misfolding of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Since protein self-assembly appears to be an initial key step in the pathology of this group of diseases, intervening in this process can be both a prophylactic measure and a means for modifying the course of the disease for therapeutic purposes. We and others have shown that aromatic small molecules can be effective inhibitors of aggregation of various protein assemblies, by binding to the aromatic core in aggregation-prone motifs and preventing their self-assembly. Specifically, we have designed a series of small aromatic naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecules as candidate aggregation inhibitors of β -sheet based assembly and demonstrated their efficacy toward inhibiting aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide, another culprit of AD, as well as of various other aggregative proteins involved in other protein misfolding diseases. Here we tested whether a leading naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecule, namely NQTrp, can be repurposed as an inhibitor of the aggregation of the tau protein in vitro and in vivo. We show that the molecule inhibits the in vitro assembly of PHF6, the aggregation-prone fragment of tau protein, reduces hyperphosphorylated tau deposits and ameliorates tauopathy-related behavioral defect in an established transgenic Drosophila model expressing human tau. We suggest that NQTrp, or optimized versions of it, could act as novel disease modifying drugs for AD and other tauopathies.

  19. Disruption of neuronal function by soluble hyperphosphorylated tau in a Drosophila model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Catherine M; Chee, Francis; Shepherd, David; Mudher, Amritpal

    2010-04-01

    Axonal microtubules are essential for transport of materials to the synapse. Compromised microtubules and synaptic loss have been demonstrated in AD (Alzheimer's disease), which is believed to contribute to cognitive dysfunction before neuronal death in the early stages of the disease. The mechanism by which hyperphosphorylated tau, the building block of neurofibrillary tangles, one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, disrupts neuronal and synaptic function is unclear. There is a theory that hyperphosphorylated tau does not bind effectively to microtubules and is no longer able to function in stabilizing them, thus axonal transport can no longer proceed efficiently. This leads to synaptic dysfunction. We have tested this theory in a Drosophila model of tauopathies in which we expressed human tau (h-tau). Using this model, we have tested all aspects of this hypothesis and have demonstrated that axonal transport does become compromised in the presence of hyperphosphorylated h-tau and this leads to synaptic and behavioural defects. We are currently investigating the mechanism by which hyperphosphorylated h-tau mediates this effect and are preliminary data indicate that this entails phospho-tau-mediated effects that are predicted by the tau-microtubule hypothesis, as well as novel effects. These deleterious effects of h-tau occur in the absence of tau filaments and before neuronal death. This sequence of pathogenic events may constitute the mechanism by which abnormal tau disrupts neuronal and synaptic function and contributes to cognitive impairment before neuronal death in the early stages of tauopathies such as AD. PMID:20298222

  20. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Tau physics with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.

    1995-11-01

    We present the first results on tau physics using polarized beams. These include measurements of the {tau} Michel parameters {xi} and {xi}{delta} and the {tau} neutrino helicity h{sub {nu}}. The measurements were performed using the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC).

  2. Measurements of the decays tau/sup -/. -->. rho/sup -/. nu. /sub tau/, tau/sup -/. -->. pi. /sup -/. nu. /sub tau/ and tau/sup -/. -->. K*-(892). nu. /sub tau/ using the MARK II detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo favored decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and the Cabibbo suppressed decay mode tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/ (892)..nu../sub tau/ are presented. The energy dependence of the tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ production cross section is obtained for the decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and these spectra agree well with the classification of the tau/sup -/ as a spin-1/2 point particle. Fits to the production cross section yield a measurement of M/sub tau/ = (1787 +- 10) MeV/c/sup 2/ for the tau mass. Ninety-five percent confidence upper limits for the forbidden decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(1430)..nu../sub tau/ and the tau neutrino mass are presented.

  3. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes.

  4. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes. PMID:26834532

  5. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes. PMID:26834532

  6. Ferritin is associated with the aberrant tau filaments present in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, M.; Valpuesta, J. M.; de Garcini, E. M.; Quintana, C.; Arrasate, M.; López Carrascosa, J. L.; Rábano, A.; García de Yébenes, J.; Avila, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tau-containing filaments purified from the brain of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patients were isolated and characterized. These filaments co-purify with regular particles that biophysical and biochemical methods identified as ferritin shells. In vivo, brain tau accumulation in PSP co-localized with ferritin. These results suggest that ferritin/iron could modulate the formation of tau aggregates in PSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9626057

  7. Pattern of tau hyperphosphorylation and neurotransmitter markers in the brainstem of senescent tau filament forming transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Morcinek, Kerstin; Köhler, Christoph; Götz, Jürgen; Schröder, Hannsjörg

    2013-02-25

    The early occurrence of brainstem-related symptoms, e.g. gait and balance impairment, apathy and depression in Alzheimer's disease patients suggests brainstem involvement in the initial pathogenesis. To address the question whether tau filament forming mice expressing mutated human tau mirror histopathological changes observed in Alzheimer brainstem, the degree and distribution of neurofibrillary lesions as well as the pattern of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons were investigated. The expression of the human tau transgene was observed in multiple brainstem nuclei, particularly in the magnocellular reticular formation, vestibular nuclei, cranial nerve motor nuclei, sensory trigeminal nerve nuclei, inferior and superior colliculi, periaqueductal and pontine gray matter, and the red nucleus. Most of the human tau-immunoreactive cell groups also showed tau hyperphosphorylation at the epitopes Thr231/Ser235 and Ser202/Thr205, while abnormal tau phosphorylation at the epitope Ser422 or silver stained structures were almost totally lacking. We found no obvious differences in distribution and density of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons between tau-transgenic and wild type mice. Although numerous brainstem nuclei in our model expressed human tau protein, the development of neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads and ghost tangles was rare and likewise its distribution differed largely from Alzheimer's disease pattern. The number of monoaminergic neurons remained unchanged in the transgenic mice, while monoaminergic nuclei in Alzheimer brainstem showed a distinct neuronal loss. However, the distribution of pretangle-affected neurons in the tau-transgenic mice partly resembled those seen in progressive supranuclear palsy, presenting these animals as a model to examine brainstem pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:23261664

  8. Secondary atmospheric tau neutrino production

    SciTech Connect

    Bulmahn, Alexander; Hall Reno, Mary

    2010-09-01

    We evaluate the flux of tau neutrinos produced from the decay of pair produced taus from incident muons using a cascade equation analysis. To solve the cascade equations, our numerical result for the tau production Z moment is given. Our results for the flux of tau neutrinos produced from incident muons are compared to the flux of tau neutrinos produced via oscillations and the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux. Results are given for both downward and upward going neutrinos fluxes and higher zenith angles are discussed. We conclude that the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux dominates these other atmospheric sources of tau neutrinos for neutrino energies larger than a few TeV for upward fluxes, and over a wider range of energy for downward fluxes.

  9. Calpain-Mediated Tau Cleavage: A Mechanism Leading to Neurodegeneration Shared by Multiple Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana; Bigio, Eileen H

    2011-01-01

    Tau dysfunction has been associated with a host of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. These diseases share, as a common pathological hallmark, the presence of intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau in affected brain areas. Aside from tau hyperphosphorylation, little is known about the role of other posttranslational modifications in tauopathies. Recently, we obtained data suggesting that calpain-mediated tau cleavage leading to the generation of a neurotoxic tau fragment might play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease. In the current study, we assessed the presence of this tau fragment in several tauopathies. Our results show high levels of the 17-kDa tau fragment and enhanced calpain activity in the temporal cortex of AD patients and in brain samples obtained from patients with other tauopathies. In addition, our data suggest that this fragment could partially inhibit tau aggregation. Conversely, tau aggregation might prevent calpain-mediated cleavage, establishing a feedback circuit that might lead to the accumulation of this toxic tau fragment. Collectively, these data suggest that the mechanism underlying the generation of the 17-kDa neurotoxic tau fragment might be part of a conserved pathologic process shared by multiple tauopathies. PMID:21442128

  10. Direct Evidence of Internalization of Tau by Microglia In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bolós, Marta; Llorens-Martín, María; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Hernández, Félix; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Excess tau can be released into the extracellular medium in a physiological or pathological manner to be internalized by surrounding neurons-a process that contributes to the spread of this protein throughout the brain. Such spreading may correlate with the progression of the abovementioned diseases. In addition to neurons, tau can be internalized into other cells. Here we demonstrate that microglia take up tau in vitro and in vivo. In this regard, microglia from primary cultures internalized soluble (human recombinant tau42) and insoluble (homogenates derived from human AD brain) tau in vitro. Furthermore, using stereotaxic injection of tau in mice in vivo, we show that murine microglia internalize human tau. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time, that microglia colocalize with various forms of tau in postmortem brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease and non-demented control subjects. Our data reveal a potential role of microglia in the internalization of tau that might be relevant for the design of strategies to enhance the clearance of extracellular tau in neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation of this protein.

  11. Acetylation of the KXGS motifs in tau is a critical determinant in modulation of tau aggregation and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Casey; Carlomagno, Yari; Gendron, Tania F.; Dunmore, Judy; Scheffel, Kristyn; Stetler, Caroline; Davis, Mary; Dickson, Dennis; Jarpe, Matthew; DeTure, Michael; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a neuropathological hallmark of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, but effective therapies directly targeting the tau protein are currently lacking. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism in which the acetylation of tau on KXGS motifs inhibits phosphorylation on this same motif, and also prevents tau aggregation. Using a site-specific antibody to detect acetylation of KXGS motifs, we demonstrate that these sites are hypoacetylated in patients with AD, as well as a mouse model of tauopathy, suggesting that loss of acetylation on KXGS motifs renders tau vulnerable to pathogenic insults. Furthermore, we identify histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as the enzyme responsible for the deacetylation of these residues, and provide proof of concept that acute treatment with a selective and blood–brain barrier-permeable HDAC6 inhibitor enhances acetylation and decreases phosphorylation on tau's KXGS motifs in vivo. As such, we have uncovered a novel therapeutic pathway that can be manipulated to block the formation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:23962722

  12. Abnormal Intracellular Accumulation and Extracellular Aβ Deposition in Idiopathic and Dup15q11.2-q13 Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Cook, Edwin H.; Sigman, Marian; Brown, W. Ted; Kuchna, Izabela; Wegiel, Jarek; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Imaki, Humi; Ma, Shuang Yong; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Miller, David L.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Flory, Michael; Cohen, Ira L.; London, Eric; Reisberg, Barry; de Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been shown that amyloid ß (Aβ), a product of proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid β precursor protein (APP), accumulates in neuronal cytoplasm in non-affected individuals in a cell type–specific amount. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we found that the percentage of amyloid-positive neurons increases in subjects diagnosed with idiopathic autism and subjects diagnosed with duplication 15q11.2-q13 (dup15) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In spite of interindividual differences within each examined group, levels of intraneuronal Aβ load were significantly greater in the dup(15) autism group than in either the control or the idiopathic autism group in 11 of 12 examined regions (p<0.0001 for all comparisons; Kruskall-Wallis test). In eight regions, intraneuronal Aβ load differed significantly between idiopathic autism and control groups (p<0.0001). The intraneuronal Aβ was mainly N-terminally truncated. Increased intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ17–40/42 in children and adults suggests a life-long enhancement of APP processing with α-secretase in autistic subjects. Aβ accumulation in neuronal endosomes, autophagic vacuoles, Lamp1-positive lysosomes and lipofuscin, as revealed by confocal microscopy, indicates that products of enhanced α-secretase processing accumulate in organelles involved in proteolysis and storage of metabolic remnants. Diffuse plaques containing Aβ1–40/42 detected in three subjects with ASD, 39 to 52 years of age, suggest that there is an age-associated risk of alterations of APP processing with an intraneuronal accumulation of a short form of Aβ and an extracellular deposition of full-length Aβ in nonfibrillar plaques. Conclusions/Significance The higher prevalence of excessive Aβ accumulation in neurons in individuals with early onset of intractable seizures, and with a high risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in autistic subjects with dup(15) compared to subjects with idiopathic

  13. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: old knowledge and new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of tau mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a group of heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases which includes tauopathies. In the central nervous system (CNS) tau is the major microtubule-associated protein (MAP) of neurons, promoting assembly and stabilization of microtubules (MTs) required for morphogenesis and axonal transport. Primary tauopathies are characterized by deposition of abnormal fibrils of tau in neuronal and glial cells, leading to neuronal death, brain atrophy and eventually dementia. In genetic tauopathies mutations of tau gene impair the ability of tau to bind to MTs, alter the normal ratio among tau isoforms and favor fibril formation. Recently, additional functions have been ascribed to tau and different pathogenetic mechanisms are then emerging. In fact, a role of tau in DNA protection and genome stability has been reported and chromosome aberrations have been found associated with tau mutations. Furthermore, newly structurally and functionally characterized mutations have suggested novel pathological features, such as a tendency to form oligomeric rather than fibrillar aggregates. Tau mutations affecting axonal transport and plasma membrane interaction have also been described. In this article, we will review the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tau mutations, focusing in particular on the less common aspects, so far poorly investigated. PMID:26528178

  14. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P < 0.001) and in entorhinal/amygdaloidal areas (+15%; P < 0.001) of biGT mice when compared with WT, whereas aged WT mice did not show increased tracer uptake. Immunohistochemical tau loads correlated with small-animal PET SUVR for both P301S (R = 0.8; P < 0.001) and biGT (R = 0.7; P < 0.001) mice, and distribution patterns of AT8-positive neurons matched voxelwise statistical parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer

  15. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P < 0.001) and in entorhinal/amygdaloidal areas (+15%; P < 0.001) of biGT mice when compared with WT, whereas aged WT mice did not show increased tracer uptake. Immunohistochemical tau loads correlated with small-animal PET SUVR for both P301S (R = 0.8; P < 0.001) and biGT (R = 0.7; P < 0.001) mice, and distribution patterns of AT8-positive neurons matched voxelwise statistical parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer

  16. PROTEIN L-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE2 is differentially expressed in chickpea and enhances seed vigor and longevity by reducing abnormal isoaspartyl accumulation predominantly in seed nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pooja; Kaur, Harmeet; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Saxena, Saurabh C; Majee, Manoj

    2013-03-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a widely distributed protein-repairing enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal aspartyl residues. This enzyme is encoded by two divergent genes (PIMT1 and PIMT2) in plants, unlike many other organisms. While the biological role of PIMT1 has been elucidated, the role and significance of the PIMT2 gene in plants is not well defined. Here, we isolated the PIMT2 gene (CaPIMT2) from chickpea (Cicer arietinum), which exhibits a significant increase in isoaspartyl residues in seed proteins coupled with reduced germination vigor under artificial aging conditions. The CaPIMT2 gene is found to be highly divergent and encodes two possible isoforms (CaPIMT2 and CaPIMT2') differing by two amino acids in the region I catalytic domain through alternative splicing. Unlike CaPIMT1, both isoforms possess a unique 56-amino acid amino terminus and exhibit similar yet distinct enzymatic properties. Expression analysis revealed that CaPIMT2 is differentially regulated by stresses and abscisic acid. Confocal visualization of stably expressed green fluorescent protein-fused PIMT proteins and cell fractionation-immunoblot analysis revealed that apart from the plasma membrane, both CaPIMT2 isoforms localize predominantly in the nucleus, while CaPIMT1 localizes in the cytosol. Remarkably, CaPIMT2 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing abnormal isoaspartyl residues predominantly in nuclear proteins upon seed-specific expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), while CaPIMT1 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing such abnormal proteins mainly in the cytosolic fraction. Together, our data suggest that CaPIMT2 has most likely evolved through gene duplication, followed by subfunctionalization to specialize in repairing the nuclear proteome.

  17. B Decays with tau at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Koji

    2010-02-10

    B decays with {tau} are sensitive to a charged Higgs predicted by extensions of the Standard Model such as the Two Higgs Doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We report measurements of the decays B+->{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B->D*{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} and B->D{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} using a large data sample of BB-bar pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe a signal of B{sup 0}->D*{sup -}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with a significance of 5.2 {sigma} and find evidences of B{sup +}->{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and D-bar{sup 0}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays with significances more than 3 {sigma}.

  18. Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) enhances tau expression.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Jin, Nana; Shi, Jianhua; Yin, Xiaomin; Jin, Xiaoxia; Wang, Shibao; Cao, Maohong; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is found to be accumulated and aggregated in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is overexpressed in Down syndrome and may play a critical role in the early onset of tau pathology in this disease. To investigate the effect of Dyrk1A on tau expression, we co-expressed different isoforms of tau with Dyrk1A in HEK-293FT cells and measured the mRNA and protein levels of tau using RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. We further investigated the mechanism of regulation of tau expression by Dyrk1A. We found that Dyrk1A enhanced tau expression in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement did not require the kinase activity of Dyrk1A. Dyrk1A increased the expression of tau isoforms containing exon 10 to a larger extent than isoforms lacking exon 10. The expression of endogenous tau in neuronal cells was also regulated by Dyrk1A, and increased tau levels were found in the brains of Ts65Dn mice that overexpress Dyrk1A due to partial trisomy of chromosome 16. Dyrk1A did not enhance tau gene transcription, but increased tau mRNA stability. These results suggest that Dyrk1A enhances tau expression by stabilizing its mRNA and provides a novel insight into the regulation of tau expression and a molecular mechanism of tauopathies. PMID:23948904

  19. The physiological link between metabolic rate depression and tau phosphorylation in mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Stieler, Jens T; Bullmann, Torsten; Kohl, Franziska; Tøien, Øivind; Brückner, Martina K; Härtig, Wolfgang; Barnes, Brian M; Arendt, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein are hallmarks of a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased tau phosphorylation is assumed to represent an early event in pathogenesis and a pivotal aspect for aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. However, the regulation of tau phosphorylation in vivo and the causes for its increased stage of phosphorylation in AD are still not well understood, a fact that is primarily based on the lack of adequate animal models. Recently we described the reversible formation of highly phosphorylated tau protein in hibernating European ground squirrels. Hence, mammalian hibernation represents a model system very well suited to study molecular mechanisms of both tau phosphorylation and dephosphorylation under in vivo physiological conditions. Here, we analysed the extent and kinetics of hibernation-state dependent tau phosphorylation in various brain regions of three species of hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels, Syrian hamsters and black bears. Overall, tau protein was highly phosphorylated in torpor states and phosphorylation levels decreased after arousal in all species. Differences between brain regions, hibernation-states and phosphosites were observed with respect to degree and kinetics of tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, we tested the phosphate net turnover of tau protein to analyse potential alterations in kinase and/or phosphatase activities during hibernation. Our results demonstrate that the hibernation-state dependent phosphorylation of tau protein is specifically regulated but involves, in addition, passive, temperature driven regulatory mechanisms. By determining the activity-state profile for key enzymes of tau phosphorylation we could identify kinases potentially involved in the differentially regulated, reversible tau phosphorylation that occurs during hibernation. We show that in black bears hibernation is associated with conformational

  20. The Ambiguous Relationship of Oxidative Stress, Tau Hyperphosphorylation, and Autophagy Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Li, Tao; Li, Ping; Wei, Nannan; Zhao, Zhiquan; Liang, Huimin; Ji, Xinying; Chen, Wenwu; Xue, Mengzhou; Wei, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The pathological hallmarks of AD are amyloid plaques [aggregates of amyloid-beta (Aβ)] and neurofibrillary tangles (aggregates of tau). Growing evidence suggests that tau accumulation is pathologically more relevant to the development of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD patients than Aβ plaques. Oxidative stress is a prominent early event in the pathogenesis of AD and is therefore believed to contribute to tau hyperphosphorylation. Several studies have shown that the autophagic pathway in neurons is important under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, this pathway plays a crucial role for the degradation of endogenous soluble tau. However, the relationship between oxidative stress, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, autophagy dysregulation, and neuronal cell death in AD remains unclear. Here, we review the latest progress in AD, with a special emphasis on oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, and autophagy. We also discuss the relationship of these three factors in AD. PMID:26171115

  1. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates. PMID:25545358

  2. Tau overexpression in transgenic mice induces glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and beta-catenin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shim, S B; Lim, H J; Chae, K R; Kim, C K; Hwang, D Y; Jee, S W; Lee, S H; Sin, J S; Leem, Y H; Lee, S H; Cho, J S; Lee, H H; Choi, S Y; Kim, Y K

    2007-05-11

    The abnormal phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin have been shown to perform a crucial function in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the manner in which overexpressed htau23 interacts and regulates the behavior and phosphorylation characteristics of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin. In order to accomplish this, transgenic mice expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE/htau23) were created. Transgenic mice evidenced the following: (i) tendency toward memory impairments at later stages, (ii) dramatic overexpression of the tau transgene, coupled with increased tau phosphorylation and paired helical filaments (PHFs), (iii) high levels of GSK3beta phosphorylation with advanced age, resulting in increases in the phosphorylations of tau and beta-catenin, (iv) an inhibitory effect of lithium on the phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin, but not in the non-transgenic littermate group. Therefore, the overexpression of NSE/htau23 in the brains of transgenic mice induces abnormal phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin, which are ultimately linked to neuronal degeneration in cases of AD. These transgenic mice are expected to prove useful for the development of new drugs for the treatment of AD.

  3. Tau Lorentz Structure with Polarization at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K

    2004-01-29

    We present a measurement of the tau neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}) and the Michel parameters ({rho}, {zeta} and {delta}) by analyzing the {tau} decays {tau} {yields} {pi}(K){nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau} {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau} {yields} {mu}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}. The analysis uses the 1993-1995 SLD data sample of 4316 {tau}-pair events produced with highly polarized electrons. We obtain preliminary results of h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} = -0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03, {rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05 and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05.

  4. UCH-L1 Inhibition Decreases the Microtubule-Binding Function of Tau Protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Han, Yun; Yu, Quntao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Shaohui; Liao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is critical for protein degradation and free ubiquitin recycling. In Alzheimer's disease brains, UCH-L1 is negatively related to neurofibrillary tangles whose major component is hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the direct action of UCH-L1 on tau has not been reported. In the current study, mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were treated by the different concentrations of UCH-L1 inhibitor LDN (2.5, 5 and 10 μM) to inhibit the hydrolase activity of UCH-L1. In addition, we also used UCH-L1 siRNA to treat the HEK293/tau441 cells to decrease the expression of UCH-L1. After LDN and UCH-L1 siRNA treatment, we used immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and tau-microtubule binding assay to measure the microtubule-binding ability and post-translational modifications of tau protein. All the results presented that both inhibition of the activity and expression of UCH-L1 induced the decreased microtubule-binding ability and increased phosphorylation of tau protein. Abnormal aggregation and ubiquitination of tau protein was also observed after UCH-L1 inhibition. The above results suggested that aggregation of tau protein might be devoted to the abnormal post-translational modifications of tau protein. Our study first indicates that dysfunction of UCH-L1 most likely affected normal biological function of tau protein through decreasing degradation of ubiquitinated and hyperphosphorylated tau. PMID:26444754

  5. UX Tau A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, located approximately 450 light-years away. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

    Spitzer saw a gap in UX Tau A's disk that extends from 0.2 to 56 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The gap extends from the equivalent of Mercury to Pluto in our solar system, and is sandwiched between thick inner and outer disks on either side. Astronomers suspect that the gap was carved out by one or more forming planets.

    Such dusty disks are where planets are thought to be born. Dust grains clump together like snowballs to form larger rocks, and then the bigger rocks collide to form the cores of planets. When rocks revolve around their central star, they act like cosmic vacuum cleaners, picking up all the gas and dust in their path and creating gaps.

    Although gaps have been detected in disks swirling around young stars before, UX Tau A is special because the gap is sandwiched between two thick disks of dust. An inner thick dusty disk hugs the central star, then, moving outward, there is a gap, followed by another thick doughnut-shaped disk. Other systems with gaps contain very little to no dust near the central star. In other words, those gaps are more like big holes in the centers of disks.

    Some scientists suspect that these holes could have been carved out by a process called photoevaporation. Photoevaporation occurs when radiation from the central star heats up the gas and dust around it to the point where it evaporates away. The fact that there is thick disk swirling extremely close to UX Tau A's central star rules out the photoevaporation scenario. If photoevaporation from the star played a role, then large amounts of dust would not be floating so close to the star.

  6. Tau Based Therapeutic Approaches for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated, hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuropil threads (NT) are cardinal features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The other lesions found in AD include amyloid plaques and congophilic amyloid angiopathy, both associated with the extracellular accumulation of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. AD is the most common cause of dementia globally. Currently there are no effective means to treat AD or even to slow it down. The dominant theory for the causation of AD is the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which suggests that the aggregation of Aβ as oligomers and amyloid plaques is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Numerous therapies have been developed directed to Aβ relate pathology, in particular various immunotherapeutic approaches. So far all of these have failed in clinical trials. Recently there has been more focus on therapy directed to tau related pathology, which correlates better with the cognitive status of patients, compared to the amyloid burden. Immunotherapeutic targeting of tau pathology has showed great potential to treat tau pathologies in mouse models of AD. A number of studies have shown the efficacy of both passive and active immunization. This review summarizes recent advances on therapy targeting pathological tau protein, in particular focusing on immunotherapeutic approaches which are showing great promise. PMID:24732638

  7. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  8. Effects of interferon-tau on cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Junko; Nishikura, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Tajima, Motoshi; Onuma, Misao

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the antiviral effects of bovine interferon-tau (boIFN-tau) on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were examined in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro experiments, the replication of cytopathic and non-cytopathic BVDV was inhibited in the bovine cells treated with boIFN-tau. The replication of BVDV was completely suppressed by boIFN-tau at a concentration higher than 10(2) U/ml. In order to examine the effect of boIFN-tau on virus propagation in cattle persistently infected (PI) with non-cytopathic BVDV, boIFN-tau was subcutaneously administered to PI cattle at 10(5) U/kg or 10(6) U/kg body weight 5 times per week for 2 weeks. No physical abnormality such as depression was observed in the cattle during the experiment. The mean BVDV titers in the serum of the PI cattle decreased slightly during the boIFN-tau administration period with the dose of 10(6) U/kg. However, the BVDV titers in the serum returned to the pre-administration level after the final boIFN-tau administration. These results suggest that boIFN-tau demonstrates an anti-BVDV effect, reducing the BVDV level in serum transiently when injected into PI cattle.

  9. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  10. Extracellular Tau Paired Helical Filaments Differentially Affect Tau Pathogenic Mechanisms in Mitotic and Post-Mitotic Cells: Implications for Mechanisms of Tau Propagation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Merina; Santa-Maria, Ismael; Ho, Lap; Ward, Libby; Yemul, Shrishailam; Dubner, Lauren; Księżak-Reding, Hanna; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-09-01

    The release of paired helical filaments (PHFs) from neurons into the extracellular space may contribute to the propagation of tau pathology across brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. The majority of available mechanistic studies exploring the pathologic role of extracellular PHFs are conducted in proliferating cell lines. Here, we compare how extracellular PHFs induce tauopathy in mitotic cells and in post-mitotic brain neurons. In a mitotic cell line (HEK 293T), extracellular exposure to AD PHFs leads to an intracellular "aggresomal" type deposition of tau, coincidental with redistribution of dynein, a retrograde motor protein. We also observed that PHFs impaired proteasome degradation, but not autophagy. Exposure of cells to proteasome inhibitors was sufficient to induce intracellular tau aggregate formation as well as reorganization of dynein and the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Thus, in mitotic cells, extracellular PHFs promote cellular tau aggregation, in part, by interfering with cellular proteasome degradation processes. In contrast with our observations with proliferating cells, exposure of post-mitotic primary neuronal cultures to AD PHFs did not promote "aggresomal" tau deposition, but instead resulted in a widespread accumulation of phosphorylated tau-immunoreactive swellings in neuritic processes, characterized by disturbed cytoskeletal organization of dynein and vimentin. Collectively, our observations suggest that extracellular PHFs may contribute to the propagation of tau pathology by independent mechanisms in post-mitotic and mitotic brain cells. These outcomes indicate that in addition to post-mitotic brain neurons, mitotic brain cells should also be considered as targets for therapeutic interventions to attenuate propagation of tauopathy.

  11. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  12. Structure-activity relationship of cyanine tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Congdon, Erin E.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Duff, Karen E.; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship for symmetrical cyanine inhibitors of human tau aggregation was elaborated using a filter trap assay. Antagonist activity depended on cyanine heterocycle, polymethine bridge length, and the nature of meso- and N-substituents. One potent member of the series, 3,3’-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide (compound 11), retained submicromolar potency and had calculated physical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier and cell membrane penetration. Exposure of organotypic slices prepared from JNPL3 transgenic mice (which express human tau harboring the aggregation prone P301L tauopathy mutation) to compound 11 for one week revealed a biphasic dose response relationship. Low nanomolar concentrations decreased insoluble tau aggregates to half those observed in slices treated with vehicle alone. In contrast, high concentrations (≥300 nM) augmented tau aggregation and produced abnormalities in tissue tubulin levels. These data suggest that certain symmetrical carbocyanine dyes can modulate tau aggregation in the slice biological model at concentrations well below those associated with toxicity. PMID:19432420

  13. CP violation in hadronic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; Szynkman, Alejandro; O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the {delta}S=0 decays {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to {tau}{yields}{pi}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{yields}{rho}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}{yields}4{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (triple-product asymmetry)

  14. GSPE interferes with tau aggregation in vivo: implication for treating tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Diaz-Ruiz, Carmen; Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Chen, Alice; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathies are characterized by progressive neurodegeneration caused by intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein aggregates in the brain. The present study was designed to test whether a grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) previously shown to inhibit tau protein aggregation in vitro could benefit tau-mediated neuropathology and behavior deficits in JNPL3 transgenic mice expressing a human tau protein containing the P301L mutation. Nine months old JNPL3 mice were treated with GSPE delivered through their drinking water for six months. We found that GSPE treatment significantly reduced the number of motor neurons immunoreactive for hyperphosphorylated and conformationally-modified tau in the ventral horns of the spinal cord identified using AT100, PHF-1, AT8 and Alz50 tau antibodies. This coincided with a drastically reduced level of hyperphosphorylated and sarcosyl-insoluble tau in spinal cord fractions. Furthermore, the reduction of tau pathology was accompanied by an improvement in the motor function assessed by a wire hang test. Collectively, our results suggest that GSPE can interfere with tau-mediated neurodegenerative mechanisms and ameliorate neurodegenerative phenotype in an animal model of tauopathy. Our studies support further evaluation of GSPE for preventing and/or treating of tauopathies in humans. PMID:22054871

  15. Humanized Tau Mice with Regionalized Amyloid Exhibit Behavioral Deficits but No Pathological Interaction.

    PubMed

    Yetman, Michael J; Fowler, Stephanie W; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) researchers have struggled for decades to draw a causal link between extracellular Aβ aggregation and intraneuronal accumulation of microtubule-associated protein tau. The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that Aβ deposition promotes tau hyperphosphorylation, tangle formation, cell loss, vascular damage, and dementia. While the genetics of familial AD and the pathological staging of sporadic disease support this sequence of events, attempts to examine the molecular mechanism in transgenic animal models have largely relied on models of other inherited tauopathies as the basis for testing the interaction with Aβ. In an effort to more accurately model the relationship between Aβ and wild-type tau in AD, we intercrossed mice that overproduce human Aβ with a tau substitution model in which all 6 isoforms of the human protein are expressed in animals lacking murine tau. We selected an amyloid model in which pathology was biased towards the entorhinal region so that we could further examine whether the anticipated changes in tau phosphorylation occurred at the site of Aβ deposition or in synaptically connected regions. We found that Aβ and tau had independent effects on locomotion, learning, and memory, but found no behavioral evidence for an interaction between the two transgenes. Moreover, we saw no indication of amyloid-induced changes in the phosphorylation or aggregation of human tau either within the entorhinal area or elsewhere. These findings suggest that robust amyloid pathology within the medial temporal lobe has little effect on the metabolism of wild type human tau in this model. PMID:27070146

  16. Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Model of Tau-A152T Frontotemporal Dementia Reveals Tau-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Silva, M Catarina; Cheng, Chialin; Mair, Waltraud; Almeida, Sandra; Fong, Helen; Biswas, M Helal U; Zhang, Zhijun; Huang, Yadong; Temple, Sally; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L; Kosik, Kenneth S; Gao, Fen-Biao; Steen, Judith A; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2016-09-13

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and other tauopathies characterized by focal brain neurodegeneration and pathological accumulation of proteins are commonly associated with tau mutations. However, the mechanism of neuronal loss is not fully understood. To identify molecular events associated with tauopathy, we studied induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons from individuals carrying the tau-A152T variant. We highlight the potential of in-depth phenotyping of human neuronal cell models for pre-clinical studies and identification of modulators of endogenous tau toxicity. Through a panel of biochemical and cellular assays, A152T neurons showed accumulation, redistribution, and decreased solubility of tau. Upregulation of tau was coupled to enhanced stress-inducible markers and cell vulnerability to proteotoxic, excitotoxic, and mitochondrial stressors, which was rescued upon CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of tau or by pharmacological activation of autophagy. Our findings unmask tau-mediated perturbations of specific pathways associated with neuronal vulnerability, revealing potential early disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets for FTD and other tauopathies. PMID:27594585

  17. Measurements of the {tau} mass and the mass difference of the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -} at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.

    2009-11-01

    We present the result from a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, we determine the mass to be 1776.68{+-}0.12(stat){+-}0.41(syst) MeV. We also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}}-M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}}=(-3.4{+-}1.3(stat){+-}0.3(syst))x10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  18. Tau Reduction Prevents Disease in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gheyara, Ania L; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Djukic, Biljana; Craft, Ryan J; Ho, Kaitlyn; Guo, Weikun; Finucane, Mariel M; Sanchez, Pascal E; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing levels of the microtubule-associated protein tau has shown promise as a potential treatment strategy for diseases with secondary epileptic features such as Alzheimer disease. We wanted to determine whether tau reduction may also be of benefit in intractable genetic epilepsies. Methods We studied a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe childhood epilepsy caused by mutations in the human SCN1A gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.1. We genetically deleted 1 or 2 Tau alleles in mice carrying an Nav1.1 truncation mutation (R1407X) that causes Dravet syndrome in humans, and examined their survival, epileptic activity, related hippocampal alterations, and behavioral abnormalities using observation, electroencephalographic recordings, acute slice electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and behavioral assays. Results Tau ablation prevented the high mortality of Dravet mice and reduced the frequency of spontaneous and febrile seizures. It reduced interictal epileptic spikes in vivo and drug-induced epileptic activity in brain slices ex vivo. Tau ablation also prevented biochemical changes in the hippocampus indicative of epileptic activity and ameliorated abnormalities in learning and memory, nest building, and open field behaviors in Dravet mice. Deletion of only 1 Tau allele was sufficient to suppress epileptic activity and improve survival and nesting performance. Interpretation Tau reduction may be of therapeutic benefit in Dravet syndrome and other intractable genetic epilepsies. Ann Neurol 2014;76:443–456 PMID:25042160

  19. Direct cellular delivery of human proteasomes to delay tau aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Hoon; Na, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Won, Cheolhee; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kuret, Jeff; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, Min Jae

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the primary machinery that degrades ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, including many proteotoxic proteins implicated in neurodegeneraton. It has been suggested that the elevation of proteasomal activity is tolerable to cells and may be beneficial to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates. Here we show that purified proteasomes can be directly transported into cells through mesoporous silica nanoparticle-mediated endocytosis. Proteasomes that are loaded onto nanoparticles through non-covalent interactions between polyhistidine tags and nickel ions fully retain their proteolytic activity. Cells treated with exogenous proteasomes are more efficient in degrading overexpressed human tau than endogenous proteasomal substrates, resulting in decreased levels of tau aggregates. Moreover, exogenous proteasome delivery significantly promotes cell survival against proteotoxic stress caused by tau and reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that increasing cellular proteasome activity through the direct delivery of purified proteasomes may be an effective strategy for reducing cellular levels of proteotoxic proteins. PMID:25476420

  20. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies: Promoting Microglial Clearance Versus Blocking Neuronal Uptake.

    PubMed

    Funk, Kristen E; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2015-08-28

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥ ∼ 20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼ 10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo.

  1. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies: Promoting Microglial Clearance Versus Blocking Neuronal Uptake.

    PubMed

    Funk, Kristen E; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2015-08-28

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥ ∼ 20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼ 10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  2. Trans-Synaptic Spread of Tau Pathology In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Drouet, Valerie; Wu, Jessica W.; Witter, Menno P.; Small, Scott A.; Clelland, Catherine; Duff, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathy in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease starts in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and spreads anatomically in a defined pattern. To test whether pathology initiating in the EC spreads through the brain along synaptically connected circuits, we have generated a transgenic mouse model that differentially expresses pathological human tau in the EC and we have examined the distribution of tau pathology at different timepoints. In relatively young mice (10–11 months old), human tau was present in some cell bodies, but it was mostly observed in axons within the superficial layers of the medial and lateral EC, and at the terminal zones of the perforant pathway. In old mice (>22 months old), intense human tau immunoreactivity was readily detected not only in neurons in the superficial layers of the EC, but also in the subiculum, a substantial number of hippocampal pyramidal neurons especially in CA1, and in dentate gyrus granule cells. Scattered immunoreactive neurons were also seen in the deeper layers of the EC and in perirhinal and secondary somatosensory cortex. Immunoreactivity with the conformation-specific tau antibody MC1 correlated with the accumulation of argyrophilic material seen in old, but not young mice. In old mice, axonal human tau immunoreactivity, especially at the endzones of the perforant pathway, was greatly reduced. Relocalization of tau from axons to somatodendritic compartments and propagation of tauopathy to regions outside of the EC correlated with mature tangle formation in neurons in the EC as revealed by thioflavin-S staining. Our data demonstrate propagation of pathology from the EC and support a trans-synaptic mechanism of spread along anatomically connected networks, between connected and vulnerable neurons. In general, the mouse recapitulates the tauopathy that defines the early stages of AD and provides a model for testing mechanisms and functional outcomes associated with disease progression. PMID:22312444

  3. Glycosylation of microtubule-associated protein tau in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Tsujioka, Y; Yamada, T; Tsuboi, Y; Okada, H; Yamamoto, T; Liposits, Z

    1999-06-01

    In the neurofibrillary pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) contain paired helical filaments (PHFs) as their major fibrous component. Abnormally hyperphosphorylated, microtubule-associated protein tau is the major protein subunit of PHFs. A recent in vitro study showed that PHF tangles from AD brains are highly glycosylated, whereas no glycan is detected in normal tau. Deglycosylation of PHF tangles converts them into bundles of straight filaments and restores their accessibility to microtubules. We showed that PHF tangles from AD brain tissue were associated with specific glycan molecules by double immunostaining with peroxidase and alkaline phosphatase labeling. Intracellular tangles and dystrophic neurites in a neuritic plaque with abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau, detected with the monoclonal antibodies AT-8 and anti-tau-2, were also positive with lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) which recognizes both the N- and O-glycosidically linked saccharides. Colocalization was not seen in the extracellular tangles and amyloid deposition, suggesting that the glycosylation of tau might be associated with the early phase of insoluble NFT formation. Thus, although abnormal phosphorylation might promote aggregation of tau and inhibition of the assembly of microtubules, glycosylation mediated by a GNA-positive glycan appears to be responsible for the formation of the PHF structures in vivo.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. O-GlcNAcylation modulates the self-aggregation ability of the fourth microtubule-binding repeat of tau

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.-H.; Si Tong; Wu Weihui; Hu Jia; Du Jintang; Zhao Yufen; Li Yanmei

    2008-10-10

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), tau protein is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into paired helical filaments (PHFs). It was discovered recently that tau is also O-GlcNAcylated in human brains. And O-GlcNAcylation may regulate phosphorylation of tau in a site-specific manner. In this work, we focused on the fourth microtubule-binding repeat (R4) of tau, which has an O-GlcNAcylation site-Ser356. The aggregation behavior of this repeat and its O-GlcNAcylated form was investigated by turbidity, precipitation assay and electron microscopy. In addition, conformations of these two peptides were analyzed with circular dichroism (CD). Our results revealed that O-GlcNAcylation at Ser356 could greatly slow down the aggregation speed of R4 peptide. This modulation of O-GlcNAcylation on tau aggregation implies a new perspective of tau pathology.

  6. Rosiglitazone ameliorates diffuse axonal injury by reducing loss of tau and up-regulating caveolin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong-lin; Song, Jin-ning; Ma, Xu-dong; Zhang, Bin-fei; Li, Dan-dong; Pang, Hong-gang

    2016-01-01

    Rosiglitazone up-regulates caveolin-1 levels and has neuroprotective effects in both chronic and acute brain injury. Therefore, we postulated that rosiglitazone may ameliorate diffuse axonal injury via its ability to up-regulate caveolin-1, inhibit expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein, and reduce the loss and abnormal phosphorylation of tau. In the present study, intraperitoneal injection of rosiglitazone significantly reduced the levels of amyloid-beta precursor protein and hyperphosphorylated tau (phosphorylated at Ser404(p-tau (S404)), and it increased the expression of total tau and caveolin-1 in the rat cortex. Our results show that rosiglitazone inhibits the expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein and lowers p-tau (S404) levels, and it reduces the loss of total tau, possibly by up-regulating caveolin-1. These actions of rosiglitazone may underlie its neuroprotective effects in the treatment of diffuse axonal injury. PMID:27482223

  7. Hadronic Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-25

    Precision measurements of the exclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, where the h represent either a pion or a kaon, from the BABAR Experiment are presented. The branching fraction for {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the first resonant plus non-resonant measurement of this mode and the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also a first measurement. In addition we present the new measurement of the branching fraction of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}.

  8. Blocking Effects of Human Tau on Squid Giant Synapse Transmission and Its Prevention by T-817 MA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Herman; Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Brusco, Janaina; Avila, Jesus; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative tauopathies, but the molecular mechanisms involved in tau-mediated changes in neuronal function and their possible effects on synaptic transmission are unknown. We have evaluated the effects of human tau protein injected directly into the presynaptic terminal axon of the squid giant synapse, which affords functional, structural, and biochemical analysis of its action on the synaptic release process. Indeed, we have found that at physiological concentration recombinant human tau (h-tau42) becomes phosphorylated, produces a rapid synaptic transmission block, and induces the formation of clusters of aggregated synaptic vesicles in the vicinity of the active zone. Presynaptic voltage clamp recordings demonstrate that h-tau42 does not modify the presynaptic calcium current amplitude or kinetics. Analysis of synaptic noise at the post-synaptic axon following presynaptic h-tau42 microinjection revealed an initial phase of increase spontaneous transmitter release followed by a marked reduction in noise. Finally, systemic administration of T-817MA, a proposed neuro-protective agent, rescued tau-induced synaptic abnormalities. Our results show novel mechanisms of h-tau42 mediated synaptic transmission failure and identify a potential therapeutic agent to treat tau-related neurotoxicity. PMID:21629767

  9. Blocking Effects of Human Tau on Squid Giant Synapse Transmission and Its Prevention by T-817 MA.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Herman; Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Brusco, Janaina; Avila, Jesus; Moreira, Jorge E; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative tauopathies, but the molecular mechanisms involved in tau-mediated changes in neuronal function and their possible effects on synaptic transmission are unknown. We have evaluated the effects of human tau protein injected directly into the presynaptic terminal axon of the squid giant synapse, which affords functional, structural, and biochemical analysis of its action on the synaptic release process. Indeed, we have found that at physiological concentration recombinant human tau (h-tau42) becomes phosphorylated, produces a rapid synaptic transmission block, and induces the formation of clusters of aggregated synaptic vesicles in the vicinity of the active zone. Presynaptic voltage clamp recordings demonstrate that h-tau42 does not modify the presynaptic calcium current amplitude or kinetics. Analysis of synaptic noise at the post-synaptic axon following presynaptic h-tau42 microinjection revealed an initial phase of increase spontaneous transmitter release followed by a marked reduction in noise. Finally, systemic administration of T-817MA, a proposed neuro-protective agent, rescued tau-induced synaptic abnormalities. Our results show novel mechanisms of h-tau42 mediated synaptic transmission failure and identify a potential therapeutic agent to treat tau-related neurotoxicity.

  10. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A.; O’Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M.; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D.; Cosentino, Stephanie; O’Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D.; O’Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P.; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5’ splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the ‘missing’ +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the ‘stem’ when the

  11. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  12. TDP-43 is a component of ubiquitin-positive tau-negative inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tetsuaki . E-mail: arai@prit.go.jp; Hasegawa, Masato . E-mail: masato@prit.go.jp; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Ikeda, Kenji; Nonaka, Takashi; Mori, Hiroshi; Mann, David; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Oda, Tatsuro

    2006-12-22

    Ubiquitin-positive tau-negative neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites are common pathological features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with or without symptoms of motor neuron disease and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, we have identified a TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), a nuclear factor that functions in regulating transcription and alternative splicing, as a component of these structures in FTLD. Furthermore, skein-like inclusions, neuronal intranuclear inclusions, and glial inclusions in the spinal cord of ALS patients are also positive for TDP-43. Dephosphorylation treatment of the sarkosyl insoluble fraction has shown that abnormal phosphorylation takes place in accumulated TDP-43. The common occurrence of intracellular accumulations of TDP-43 supports the hypothesis that these disorders represent a clinicopathological entity of a single disease, and suggests that they can be newly classified as a proteinopathy of TDP-43.

  13. Diaminothiazoles Modify Tau Phosphorylation and Improve the Tauopathy in Mouse Models*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Hernandez, Israel; Rei, Damien; Mair, Waltraud; Laha, Joydev K.; Cornwell, Madison E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Tsai, Li-Huei; Steen, Judith A. J.; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Tau accumulation is a feature of several neurodegenerative conditions, treatment options for these conditions are nonexistent. Targeting Tau kinases represents a potential therapeutic approach. Small molecules in the diaminothiazole class are potent Tau kinase inhibitors that target CDK5 and GSK3β. Lead compounds from the series have IC50 values toward CDK5/p25 and GSK3β in the low nanomolar range and no observed toxicity in the therapeutic dose range. Neuronal protective effects and decreased PHF-1 immunoreactivity were observed in two animal models, 3×Tg-AD and CK-p25. Treatment nearly eliminated Sarkosyl-insoluble Tau with the most prominent effect on the phosphorylation at Ser-404. Treatment also induced the recovery of memory in a fear conditioning assay. Given the contribution of both CDK5/p25 and GSK3β to Tau phosphorylation, effective treatment of tauopathies may require dual kinase targeting. PMID:23737518

  14. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  15. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  16. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  17. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  18. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  19. The Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) Regulates Alzheimer Amyloid-β Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Bachmeier, Corbin; Laco, Gary; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Lin, Yong; Jin, Chao; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the L-type calcium channel (LCC) antagonist nilvadipine reduces brain amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation by affecting both Aβ production and Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Nilvadipine consists of a mixture of two enantiomers, (+)-nilvadipine and (−)-nilvadipine, in equal proportion. (+)-Nilvadipine is the active enantiomer responsible for the inhibition of LCC, whereas (−)-nilvadipine is considered inactive. Both nilvadipine enantiomers inhibit Aβ production and improve the clearance of Aβ across the BBB showing that these effects are not related to LCC inhibition. In addition, treatment of P301S mutant human Tau transgenic mice (transgenic Tau P301S) with (−)-nilvadipine reduces Tau hyperphosphorylation at several Alzheimer disease (AD) pertinent epitopes. A search for the mechanism of action of (−)-nilvadipine revealed that this compound inhibits the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). We further validated Syk as a target-regulating Aβ by showing that pharmacological inhibition of Syk or down-regulation of Syk expression reduces Aβ production and increases the clearance of Aβ across the BBB mimicking (−)-nilvadipine effects. Moreover, treatment of transgenic mice overexpressing Aβ and transgenic Tau P301S mice with a selective Syk inhibitor respectively decreased brain Aβ accumulation and Tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD relevant epitopes. We show that Syk inhibition induces an increased phosphorylation of the inhibitory Ser-9 residue of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, a primary Tau kinase involved in Tau phosphorylation, by activating protein kinase A, providing a mechanism explaining the reduction of Tau phosphorylation at GSK3β-dependent epitopes following Syk inhibition. Altogether our data highlight Syk as a promising target for preventing both Aβ accumulation and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD. PMID:25331948

  20. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport

    PubMed Central

    Le, Michelle H.; Weissmiller, April M.; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C.; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD. PMID:26790099

  1. Abnormal accumulation of trace metals by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, R.D.; Brooks, R.R.; Baker, A.J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The article describes the hyperaccumulation of metals by plants. Ranges for low, normal, high, and hyperaccumulating uptake are established. A partial list of hyperaccumulator species and their localities is included. Studies are reviewed and summarized for zinc, cadmium and lead, nickel, cobalt and copper, selenium, and cadmium and manganese hyperaccumulation.

  2. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  3. On-chip microtubule gliding assay for parallel measurement of tau protein species.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan Parimalam, Subhathirai; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Karsten, Stanislav L; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-04-26

    Tau protein is a well-established biomarker for a group of neurodegenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies. So far, clinically relevant detection of tau species in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cannot be achieved without immunological methods. Recently, it was shown that different tau isoforms including the ones carrying various types of mutations affect microtubule (MT)-kinesin binding and velocity in an isoform specific manner. Here, based on these observations, we developed a microfluidic device to analyze tau mutations, isoforms and their ratios. The assay device consists of three regions: a MT reservoir which captures MTs from a solution to a kinesin-coated surface, a microchannel which guides gliding MTs, and an arrowhead-shaped collector which concentrates MTs. Tau-bound fluorescently labeled MTs (tau-MTs) were assayed, and the increase in fluorescence intensity (FI) corresponding to the total number of MTs accumulated was measured at the collector. We show that our device is capable of differentiating 3R and 4R tau isoform ratios and effects of point mutations within 5 minutes. Furthermore, radially oriented collector regions enable simultaneous FI measurements for six independent assays. Performing parallel assays in the proposed device with minimal image processing provides a cost-efficient, easy-to-use and fast tau detection platform. PMID:27056640

  4. Reconstruction and selection of Z{yields}{tau}{tau}{yields}{mu}+{tau}-jet+{nu}'s decays at the CMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lusito, Letizia

    2010-12-22

    At the LHC, tau leptons are expected in final states of many important physics processes including Supersymmetry and the production of Higgs boson(s) and other exotic particles. An efficient and accurate {tau} reconstruction and identification are therefore an important part of the CMS physics programme. Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decays are often considered the ''standard candle'' of tau reconstruction as they validate tau lepton identification and provide a test bench for Higgs searches (for which they constitute the main irreducible background). We describe techniques for selecting and reconstructing the Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})+{tau}-jet{sup {-+}}{nu}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) events that were developed for the measurement of the Z production cross-section by the CMS experiment using 200 pb{sup -1} of the LHC collision data at the center-of-mass energy {radical}(s) 10 TeV. We validate these techniques using simulated events and present a data-driven method for estimating background contributions to this measurement.

  5. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Powers, Jenny G; Nichols, Tracy; Balachandran, Aru; Cummings, Bruce; Wild, Margaret A; VerCauteren, Kurt; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP(CWD)) and spongiform degeneration in a single section of brain stem in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease (CWD). A section of obex from 85 CWD-positive elk was scored using the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration in 10 nuclear regions and the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in 10 axonal tracts, the subependymal area of the fourth ventricle, and the thin subpial astrocytic layer (glial limitans). Data was placed in a formula to generate an overall obex score. Data suggests that PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration has a unique and relatively consistent pattern of progression throughout a section of obex. This scoring technique utilizing a single section of obex may prove useful in future work for estimating the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in peripheral tissues and the nervous system in elk with CWD. PMID:26185123

  6. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Powers, Jenny G; Nichols, Tracy; Balachandran, Aru; Cummings, Bruce; Wild, Margaret A; VerCauteren, Kurt; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP(CWD)) and spongiform degeneration in a single section of brain stem in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease (CWD). A section of obex from 85 CWD-positive elk was scored using the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration in 10 nuclear regions and the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in 10 axonal tracts, the subependymal area of the fourth ventricle, and the thin subpial astrocytic layer (glial limitans). Data was placed in a formula to generate an overall obex score. Data suggests that PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration has a unique and relatively consistent pattern of progression throughout a section of obex. This scoring technique utilizing a single section of obex may prove useful in future work for estimating the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in peripheral tissues and the nervous system in elk with CWD.

  7. [Seed, aggregation and propagation of abnormal proteins could explain neurodegeneration?].

    PubMed

    Murayama, Shigeo

    2011-11-01

    Braak proposed propagation staging paradigm of Lewy- related alpha-synucleinopathy, which starts from medulla oblongata and extends rostrally to neocortex. Since this propagation shares that of bovine spongiformic encephalopathy, alpha- synuclein- prionopathy hypothesis was presented and augumented by pathological reports of Lewy body pathology in fetal tansplants of midbrain to patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The prionopathy hypothesis expanded to include tau and TDP- 43, is now receiving considerable attention world wide. Laterality of clinical symptoms can be explained with this hypothesis in PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis- TDP43, frontotemoral lobar degeneration- semantic dementia- TDP43 and tauopathy including corticobasal degeneration and argyrophilic grain dementia. Major cons of prionopathy hypothesis is how to explain cell to cell transmission of intracellular amyloid- like proteins. Several clinical and experimental data are now accumulated to answer this question. The difference in speed of spread between prion disease and neurodegenerative disease could be explained by aggregation size of abnormal proteins. The hypothesis could also explain glinoneuronal interaction, which is receiving another hot topic of neurodeneration. We propose that seed, aggregation propagation of abnormal protein should form one factor of clinical progression of neurodegenerative diseases and can be a therapeutic targets in future research.

  8. Tau Protein Mediates APP Intracellular Domain (AICD)-Induced Alzheimer’s-Like Pathological Features in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Hana N.; Pimplikar, Sanjay W.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved by gamma-secretase to simultaneously generate amyloid beta (Aβ) and APP Intracellular Domain (AICD) peptides. Aβ plays a pivotal role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis but recent studies suggest that amyloid-independent mechanisms also contribute to the disease. We previously showed that AICD transgenic mice (AICD-Tg) exhibit AD-like features such as tau pathology, aberrant neuronal activity, memory deficits and neurodegeneration in an age-dependent manner. Since AD is a tauopathy and tau has been shown to mediate Aβ–induced toxicity, we examined the role of tau in AICD-induced pathological features. We report that ablating endogenous tau protects AICD-Tg mice from deficits in adult neurogenesis, seizure severity, short-term memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Deletion of tau restored abnormal phosphorylation of NMDA receptors, which is likely to underlie hyperexcitability and associated excitotoxicity in AICD-Tg mice. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type human tau aggravated receptor phosphorylation, impaired adult neurogenesis, memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Our findings show that tau is essential for mediating the deleterious effects of AICD. Since tau also mediates Aβ-induced toxic effects, our findings suggest that tau is a common downstream factor in both amyloid-dependent and–independent pathogenic mechanisms and therefore could be a more effective drug target for therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:27459671

  9. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS.

  10. Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Tauopathies, and Possible Neuroprotective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R

    2016-01-06

    Abnormal deposition of misprocessed and aggregated proteins is a common final pathway of most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by the extraneuronal deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) protein in the form of plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in the form of filaments. Based on the biochemically diverse range of pathological tau proteins, a number of approaches have been proposed to develop new potential therapeutics. Here we discuss some of the most promising ones: inhibition of tau phosphorylation, proteolysis and aggregation, promotion of intra- and extracellular tau clearance, and stabilization of microtubules. We also emphasize the need to achieve a full understanding of the biological roles and post-translational modifications of normal tau, as well as the molecular events responsible for selective neuronal vulnerability to tau pathology and its propagation. It is concluded that answering key questions on the relationship between Aβ and tau pathology should lead to a better understanding of the nature of secondary tauopathies, especially AD, and open new therapeutic targets and strategies.

  11. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  12. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:27030011

  13. miR-106b inhibits tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 by targeting Fyn in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Jingya; Lu, Guangxiu

    2016-09-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by β-amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Increasing evidence has revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the effect of miRNAs on abnormal tau phosphorylation remains largely unclear so far. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-106b in tau phosphorylation and identified a new molecular mechanism of the hyperphosphorylation of tau. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the expression level of miR-106b was decreased, but Fyn was increased in the temporal cortex of AD patients. Overexpression of miR-106b inhibited Aβ1-42-induced tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 in SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing tau (SH-SY5Y/tau), whereas no changes were observed in tau phosphorylation at Ser396/404. Dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated that Fyn was a direct target gene of miR-106b. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that Fyn protein expression was suppressed when SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with miR-106b mimics. Endogenous Fyn expression was knockdown by transfection with a small interfering RNA specific for Fyn (si-Fyn). The phosphorylation level of tau at Tyr 18 was decreased in the si-Fyn group compared with the negative control group, but the inhibitory effect of si-Fyn on tau phosphorylation was attenuated when miR-106b expression was inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-106b inhibits Aβ1-42-induced tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 by targeting Fyn. Our findings extend the knowledge about the regulation of tau phosphorylation and the regulatory mechanism of Fyn gene expression.

  14. miR-106b inhibits tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 by targeting Fyn in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Jingya; Lu, Guangxiu

    2016-09-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by β-amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Increasing evidence has revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the effect of miRNAs on abnormal tau phosphorylation remains largely unclear so far. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-106b in tau phosphorylation and identified a new molecular mechanism of the hyperphosphorylation of tau. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the expression level of miR-106b was decreased, but Fyn was increased in the temporal cortex of AD patients. Overexpression of miR-106b inhibited Aβ1-42-induced tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 in SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing tau (SH-SY5Y/tau), whereas no changes were observed in tau phosphorylation at Ser396/404. Dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated that Fyn was a direct target gene of miR-106b. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that Fyn protein expression was suppressed when SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with miR-106b mimics. Endogenous Fyn expression was knockdown by transfection with a small interfering RNA specific for Fyn (si-Fyn). The phosphorylation level of tau at Tyr 18 was decreased in the si-Fyn group compared with the negative control group, but the inhibitory effect of si-Fyn on tau phosphorylation was attenuated when miR-106b expression was inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-106b inhibits Aβ1-42-induced tau phosphorylation at Tyr18 by targeting Fyn. Our findings extend the knowledge about the regulation of tau phosphorylation and the regulatory mechanism of Fyn gene expression. PMID:27520374

  15. Isoelectric point differentiates PHF-tau from biopsy-derived human brain tau proteins.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, N; Bussière, T; Vermersch, P; Lejeune, J P; Delacourte, A

    1995-11-13

    In the present study, Tau proteins were detected by two monoclonal antibodies AD2 and Tau-1 raised against PHF-tau and normal Tau proteins respectively using single- and two-dimensional immunoblotting. We demonstrate here the presence of a Tau triplet in brain homogenates from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) processed human brain biopsies from controls. However PHF-tau proteins have a slight but significantly higher mol. wt and a much more acidic isoelectric point. Therefore, Tau proteins are more phosphorylated in AD.

  16. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  17. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src.

  18. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  19. Observation of the Semileptonic Decays B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and Evidence for B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.

    2008-01-18

    We present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -}{yields}D*{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which are potentially sensitive to non-standard model amplitudes. The data sample comprises 232x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB decays collected with the BABAR detector. From a combined fit to B{sup -} and B{sup 0} channels, we obtain the branching fractions B(B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(0.86{+-}0.24{+-}0.11{+-}0.06)% and B(B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.62{+-}0.31{+-}0.10{+-}0.05)% (normalized for the B{sup 0}), where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and normalization-mode-related.

  20. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  1. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  2. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  3. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  4. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  5. The natively unfolded character of tau and its aggregation to Alzheimer-like paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Sadasivam; von Bergen, Martin; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2008-10-01

    The abnormal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau into paired helical filaments (PHFs) is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). Tau in solution behaves as a natively unfolded or intrinsically disordered protein while its aggregation is based on the partial structural transition from random coil to beta-structure. Our aim is to understand in more detail the unfolded nature of Tau, to investigate the aggregation of Tau under different conditions and the molecular interactions of Tau in filaments. We show that soluble Tau remains natively unfolded even when its net charge is minimized, in contrast to other unfolded proteins. The CD signature of the random-coil character of Tau shows no major change over wide variations in charge (pH), ionic strength, solvent polarity, and denaturation. Thus there is no indication of a hydrophobicity-driven collapse, neither in the microtubule-binding repeat domain constructs nor in full-length Tau. This argues that the lack of hydrophobic residues but not the net charge accounts for unfolded nature of soluble Tau. The aggregation of the Tau repeat domain (that forms the core of PHFs) in the presence of nucleating polyanionic cofactors (heparin) is efficient in a range of buffers and pH values between approximately 5 and 10 but breaks down beyond that range, presumably because the pattern of charged interactions disappears. Similarly, elevated ionic strength attenuates aggregation, and the temperature dependence is bell-shaped with an optimum around 50 degrees C. Reporter dyes ThS and ANS record the aggregation process but sense different states (cross-beta-structure vs hydrophobic pockets) with different kinetics. Preformed PHFs are surprisingly labile and can be disrupted by denaturants at rather low concentration ( approximately 1.0 M GdnHCl), much less than required to denature globular proteins. Partial disaggregation of Tau filaments at extreme pH values monitored by CD and EM indicate the importance of

  6. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  7. Measurement of the semileptonic decays B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.

    2009-05-01

    We present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -}{yields}D*{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-standard model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton (l=e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. We perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B{yields}D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}({tau}{sup -}{yields}l{sup -}{nu}{sub l}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B{yields}D{sup (*)}l{sup -}{nu}{sub l}. We measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D){identical_to}B(B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/B(B{yields}Dl{sup -}{nu}{sub l}) and R(D{sup *}){identical_to}B(B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/B(B{yields}D*l{sup -}{nu}{sub l}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and B{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D)=(41.6{+-}11.7{+-}5.2)% and R(D*)=(29.7{+-}5.6{+-}1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -}{yields}D{sup (*)0}l{sup -}{nu}{sub l} branching fractions, we obtain B(B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(0.86{+-}0.24{+-}0.11{+-}0.06)% and B(B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.62{+-}0.31{+-}0.10{+-}0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. We also present, for the first time, distributions of the lepton momentum, |p{sub l}{sup *}|, and the squared momentum transfer, q{sup 2}.

  8. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  10. Epitope mapping and structural basis for the recognition of phosphorylated tau by the anti‐tau antibody AT8

    PubMed Central

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Ernst, Robin; Wu, Sheng‐Jiun; Lacy, Eilyn R.; Liu, Xuesong; Vandermeeren, Marc; Mercken, Marc; Luo, Jinquan; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microtubule‐associated protein tau becomes abnormally phosphorylated in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies and forms aggregates of paired helical filaments (PHF‐tau). AT8 is a PHF‐tau‐specific monoclonal antibody that is a commonly used marker of neuropathology because of its recognition of abnormally phosphorylated tau. Previous reports described the AT8 epitope to include pS202/pT205. Our studies support and extend previous findings by also identifying pS208 as part of the binding epitope. We characterized the phosphoepitope of AT8 through both peptide binding studies and costructures with phosphopeptides. From the cocrystal structure of AT8 Fab with the diphosphorylated (pS202/pT205) peptide, it appeared that an additional phosphorylation at S208 would also be accommodated by AT8. Phosphopeptide binding studies showed that AT8 bound to the triply phosphorylated tau peptide (pS202/pT205/pS208) 30‐fold stronger than to the pS202/pT205 peptide, supporting the role of pS208 in AT8 recognition. We also show that the binding kinetics of the triply phosphorylated peptide pS202/pT205/pS208 was remarkably similar to that of PHF‐tau. The costructure of AT8 Fab with a pS202/pT205/pS208 peptide shows that the interaction interface involves all six CDRs and tau residues 202–209. All three phosphorylation sites are recognized by AT8, with pT205 acting as the anchor. Crystallization of the Fab/peptide complex under acidic conditions shows that CDR‐L2 is prone to unfolding and precludes peptide binding, and may suggest a general instability in the antibody. Proteins 2016; 84:427–434. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800003

  11. Search for anomalous couplings in the decay of polarized Z bosons to tau lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.C.

    1997-06-01

    Using a sample of 4,500 polarized Z decays to {tau} lepton pairs accumulated with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in 1993-95, a search has been made for anomalous couplings in the neutral current reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}. A measurement of the CP violating Weak Electric Dipole Moment (WEDM) and the CP conserving Weak Magnetic Dipole Moment (WMDM) of the {tau} lepton has been performed by considering the transverse spin polarization of {tau} leptons produced at the Z pole. Using a maximum likelihood technique, the observed {tau} decay spectra in the e, {mu}, {pi}, and {rho} decay channels are used to infer the net transverse polarization of the underlying tau leptons, and a fit for the anomalous dipole moments is performed. No evidence for these dipole movements is observed, and limits are placed on both the real and imaginary parts of the WEDM and WMDM.

  12. Truncation and activation of GSK-3β by calpain I: a molecular mechanism links to tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Yu, Dian; Cao, Maohong; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau is pivotally involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is a primary tau kinase that is most implicated in tau pathology in AD. However, the exact molecular nature of GSK-3β involved in AD is unclear. In the present study, we found that GSK-3β was truncated at C-terminus and correlated with over-activation of calpain I in AD brain. Truncation of GSK-3β was positively correlated with tau hyperphosphorylation, tangles score and Braak stage in human brain. Calpain I proteolyzed GSK-3β in vitro at C-terminus, leading to an increase of its kinase activity, but keeping its characteristic to preferentially phosphorylate the protein kinase A-primed tau. Excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid (KA) caused GSK-3β truncation at C-terminus and hyperphosphorylation of tau in mouse brain. Inhibition of calpain prevented the KA-induced changes. These findings suggest that truncation of GSK-3β by Ca2+/calpain I markedly increases its activity and involvement of this mechanism probably is responsible for up-regulation of GSK-3β and consequent abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofibrillary degeneration in AD. PMID:25641096

  13. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  14. Hippocampal Aβ expression, but not phosphorylated tau, predicts cognitive deficits following repeated peripheral poly I:C administration.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Eimerbrink, M J; Hayes, H B; Hardy, A; Van Enkevort, E A; Peterman, J L; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2016-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease is marked by the accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, and increases in phosphorylation of the microtubule associated protein, tau. Changes in these proteins are considered responsible, in part, for the progressive neuronal degeneration and cognitive deficits seen in AD. We examined the effect of repeated consecutive peripheral poly I:C injections on cognitive deficits, central Aβ, and phosphorylated tau accumulation, following three treatment durations: 7, 14, and 21 days. Forty-eight hours after the final injection, animals were trained in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm, and tested 24h later. Immediately after testing, the hippocampus was collected to quantify Aβ and phosphorylated tau accumulation. Results showed that, although poly I:C-induced Aβ was significantly elevated at all time points examined, poly I:C only disrupted cognition after 14 and 21 days of administration. Moreover, elevations in phosphorylated tau were not seen until the 14-day time point. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau expression then declined at the 21-day time point. Finally, we demonstrated that Aβ levels are a stronger predictor of cognitive dysfunction, explaining 37% of the variance, whereas phosphorylated tau levels only accounted for 0.2%. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that inflammation-induced elevation in Aβ disrupts cognition, independently of phosphorylated tau, and suggest that long-term administration of poly I:C may provide a model to investigate the contribution of long-term inflammation toward the development of Alzheimer's-like pathology.

  15. Rescue from tau-induced neuronal dysfunction produces insoluble tau oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Quraishe, Shmma; Hands, Sarah; Sealey, Megan; Mahajan, Sumeet; Allan, Douglas W.; Mudher, Amritpal

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of highly phosphorylated tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. Nevertheless, animal models demonstrate that tau-mediated dysfunction/toxicity may not require large tau aggregates but instead may be caused by soluble hyper-phosphorylated tau or by small tau oligomers. Challenging this widely held view, we use multiple techniques to show that insoluble tau oligomers form in conditions where tau-mediated dysfunction is rescued in vivo. This shows that tau oligomers are not necessarily always toxic. Furthermore, their formation correlates with increased tau levels, caused intriguingly, by either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of tau kinase glycogen-synthase-kinase-3beta (GSK-3β). Moreover, contrary to common belief, these tau oligomers were neither highly phosphorylated, and nor did they contain beta-pleated sheet structure. This may explain their lack of toxicity. Our study makes the novel observation that tau also forms non-toxic insoluble oligomers in vivo in addition to toxic oligomers, which have been reported by others. Whether these are inert or actively protective remains to be established. Nevertheless, this has wide implications for emerging therapeutic strategies such as those that target dissolution of tau oligomers as they may be ineffective or even counterproductive unless they act on the relevant toxic oligomeric tau species. PMID:26608845

  16. Low micromolar zinc accelerates the fibrillization of human tau via bridging of Cys-291 and Cys-322.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Ying-Zhu; Zhu, Hai-Li; Fan, Jun-Bao; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2009-12-11

    A hallmark of a group of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, which are principally composed of bundles of filaments formed by microtubule-associated protein Tau. Clarifying how natively unstructured Tau protein forms abnormal aggregates is of central importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. There is considerable evidence showing that zinc, as an essential element that is highly concentrated in brain, is linked to the development or progression of these diseases. Herein, by using recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372) and its mutants, we have investigated the effect of zinc on the aggregation of Tau. Low micromolar concentrations of Zn(2+) dramatically accelerate fibril formation of wild-type Tau(244-372) under reducing conditions, compared with no Zn(2+). Higher concentrations of Zn(2+), however, induce wild-type Tau(244-372) to form granular aggregates in reducing conditions. Moreover, these non-fibrillar aggregates assemble into mature Tau filaments when Zn(2+) has been chelated by EDTA. Unlike wild-type Tau(244-372), low micromolar concentrations of Zn(2+) have no obvious effects on fibrillization kinetics of single mutants C291A and C322A and double mutant C291A/C322A under reducing conditions. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one Zn(2+) binds to one Tau molecule via tetrahedral coordination to Cys-291 and Cys-322 as well as two histidines, with moderate, micromolar affinity. Our data demonstrate that low micromolar zinc accelerates the fibrillization of human Tau protein via bridging Cys-291 and Cys-322 in physiological reducing conditions, providing clues to understanding the relationship between zinc dyshomeostasis and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. CSF α-synuclein improves diagnostic and prognostic performance of CSF tau and Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Korff, Ane; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zhang, Jing

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy body diseases (LBD), e.g., Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), are common causes of geriatric cognitive impairments. In addition, AD and LBD are often found in the same patients at autopsy; therefore, biomarkers that can detect the presence of both pathologies in living subjects are needed. In this investigation, we report the assessment of α-synuclein (α-syn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and its association with CSF total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181), and amyloid beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) in subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; n = 389), with longitudinal clinical assessments. A strong correlation was noted between α-syn and t-tau in controls, as well as in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the correlation is not specific to subjects in the ADNI cohort, as it was also seen in PD patients and controls enrolled in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI; n = 102). A bimodal distribution of CSF α-syn levels was observed in the ADNI cohort, with high levels of α-syn in the subjects with abnormally increased t-tau values. Although a correlation was also noted between α-syn and p-tau181, there was a mismatch (α-syn-p-tau181-Mis), i.e., higher p-tau181 levels accompanied by lower α-syn levels in a subset of ADNI patients. We hypothesize that this α-syn-p-tau181-Mis is a CSF signature of concomitant LBD pathology in AD patients. Hence, we suggest that inclusion of measures of CSF α-syn and calculation of α-syn-p-tau181-Mis improves the diagnostic sensitivity/specificity of classic CSF AD biomarkers and better predicts longitudinal cognitive changes.

  18. FOXP2 Expression in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration-Tau.

    PubMed

    López-González, Irene; Palmeira, Andre; Aso, Ester; Carmona, Margarita; Fernandez, Liana; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-09-01

    FOXP2 is altered in a variety of language disorders. We found reduced mRNA and protein expression of FOXP2 in frontal cortex area 8 in Pick's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau linked to P301L mutation presenting with language impairment in comparison with age-matched controls and cases with parkinsonian variant progressive supranuclear palsy. Foxp2 mRNA and protein are also reduced with disease progression in the somatosensory cortex in transgenic mice bearing the P301S mutation in MAPT when compared with wild-type littermates. Our findings support the presence of FOXP2 expression abnormalities in sporadic and familial frontotemporal degeneration tauopathies.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin Y Is a Promiscuous Cyclase That Increases Endothelial Tau Phosphorylation and Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Pastukh, Viktoriya; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Exotoxin Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in ∼ 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY causes inter-endothelial gaps and vascular leak, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Using both a bacteria-delivered and a codon-optimized conditionally expressed ExoY, we report that this toxin is a dual soluble adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase that results in intracellular cAMP and cGMP accumulation. The enzymatic activity of ExoY caused phosphorylation of endothelial Tau serine 214, accumulation of insoluble Tau, inter-endothelial cell gap formation, and increased macromolecular permeability. To discern whether the cAMP or cGMP signal was responsible for Tau phosphorylation and barrier disruption, pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were engineered for the conditional expression of either wild-type guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP, or a mutated guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cAMP. Sodium nitroprusside stimulation of the cGMP-generating cyclase resulted in transient Tau serine 214 phosphorylation and gap formation, whereas stimulation of the cAMP-generating cyclase induced a robust increase in Tau serine 214 phosphorylation, gap formation, and macromolecular permeability. These results indicate that the cAMP signal is the dominant stimulus for Tau phosphorylation. Hence, ExoY is a promiscuous cyclase and edema factor that uses cAMP and, to some extent, cGMP to induce the hyperphosphorylation and insolubility of endothelial Tau. Because hyperphosphorylated and insoluble Tau are hallmarks in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease, acute Pseudomonas infections cause a pathophysiological sequela in endothelium previously recognized only in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22637478

  20. Humanized Tau Mice with Regionalized Amyloid Exhibit Behavioral Deficits but No Pathological Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yetman, Michael J.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) researchers have struggled for decades to draw a causal link between extracellular Aβ aggregation and intraneuronal accumulation of microtubule-associated protein tau. The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that Aβ deposition promotes tau hyperphosphorylation, tangle formation, cell loss, vascular damage, and dementia. While the genetics of familial AD and the pathological staging of sporadic disease support this sequence of events, attempts to examine the molecular mechanism in transgenic animal models have largely relied on models of other inherited tauopathies as the basis for testing the interaction with Aβ. In an effort to more accurately model the relationship between Aβ and wild-type tau in AD, we intercrossed mice that overproduce human Aβ with a tau substitution model in which all 6 isoforms of the human protein are expressed in animals lacking murine tau. We selected an amyloid model in which pathology was biased towards the entorhinal region so that we could further examine whether the anticipated changes in tau phosphorylation occurred at the site of Aβ deposition or in synaptically connected regions. We found that Aβ and tau had independent effects on locomotion, learning, and memory, but found no behavioral evidence for an interaction between the two transgenes. Moreover, we saw no indication of amyloid-induced changes in the phosphorylation or aggregation of human tau either within the entorhinal area or elsewhere. These findings suggest that robust amyloid pathology within the medial temporal lobe has little effect on the metabolism of wild type human tau in this model. PMID:27070146

  1. AlphaScreen HTS and live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays for identification of Tau-Fyn SH3 interaction inhibitors for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J Nicholas; Diggs, Pauleatha V; Nebane, N Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Maddry, Joseph A; Suto, Mark J; Roberson, Erik D

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, and with Americans' increasing longevity, it is becoming an epidemic. There are currently no effective treatments for this disorder. Abnormalities of Tau track more closely with cognitive decline than the most studied therapeutic target in AD, amyloid-β, but the optimal strategy for targeting Tau has not yet been identified. On the basis of considerable preclinical data from AD models, we hypothesize that interactions between Tau and the Src-family tyrosine kinase, Fyn, are pathogenic in AD. Genetically reducing either Tau or Fyn is protective in AD mouse models, and a dominant negative fragment of Tau that alters Fyn localization is also protective. Here, we describe a new AlphaScreen assay and a live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using a novel BRET pair for quantifying the Tau-Fyn interaction. We used these assays to map the binding site on Tau for Fyn to the fifth and sixth PXXP motifs to show that AD-associated phosphorylation at microtubule affinity regulating kinase sites increases the affinity of the Tau-Fyn interaction and to identify Tau-Fyn interaction inhibitors by high-throughput screening. This screen has identified a variety of chemically tractable hits, suggesting that the Tau-Fyn interaction may represent a good drug target for AD. PMID:25156556

  2. The effect of cdk-5 overexpression on tau phosphorylation and spatial memory of rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Yipeng; Wang, Jianzhi

    2004-06-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hyperphosphorylation of tau may be the underlying mechanism for the cytoskeletal abnormalities and neuronal death. It was reported that cyclin-dependent kinase5 (cdk-5) could phosphorylate tau at most AD-related epitopes in vitro. In this study, we investigated the effect of cdk-5 overexpression on tau phosphorylation and spatial memory in rat. We demonstrated that 24 h after transfection into rat hippocampus, cdk-5 was overexpressed and induced a reduced staining with antibody tau-1 and an enhanced staining with antibodies 12e8 and PHF-1, suggesting hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser199/202, Ser262/356 and Ser396/404 sites. Additionally, the cdk-5 transfected rats showed long latency to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze compared to the control rat. 48 h after transfection, the level of cdk-5 was decreased significantly, and the latency of rats to find the hidden platform was prolonged. It implies that in vivo overexpression of cdk-5 leads to impairment of spatial memory in rat and tau hyperphosphorylation may be the underlying mechanism.

  3. B vitamin deficiency promotes tau phosphorylation through regulation of GSK3beta and PP2A.

    PubMed

    Nicolia, Vincenzina; Fuso, Andrea; Cavallaro, Rosaria A; Di Luzio, Andrea; Scarpa, Sigfrido

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of intracellular filamentous aggregates of hyperphosphorylated protein tau, are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau phosphorylation is regulated by the equilibrium between activities of its protein kinases and phosphatases; unbalance of these activities is proposed to be a reasonable causative factor to the disease process. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) is one of the most important protein kinase in regulating tau phosphorylation; overexpression of active GSK3beta causes ADlike hyperphosphorylation of tau. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the major phosphatase that dephosphorylates tau; it was demonstrated that highly conserved carboxyl-terminal sequence of PP2A C-subunit is a focal point for phosphatase regulation. This is the site of a reversible methyl esterification reaction that controls AB_{alpha}C heterotrimers formation. Here we demonstrate that GSK3beta and PP2A genes were upregulated by inhibiting methylation reactions through B vitamin deficiency. In this condition, methylated catalytic subunit PP2Ac was decreased, leading to reduced PP2A activity. By contrast, we observed GSK3beta protein increase and a modulation in phosphorylation sites that regulate GSK3beta activity. Therefore, one-carbon metabolism alteration seems to be a cause of deregulation of the equilibrium between GSK3beta and PP2A, leading to abnormal hyperphosphorylated tau.

  4. Tau interaction with microtubules in vivo.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, Andrey; Yu, Jiang-Zhou; Rasenick, Mark; Popov, Sergey V

    2004-12-01

    Tau is a major microtubule-associated protein which induces bundling and stabilization of axonal microtubules (MTs). To investigate the interaction of tau with MTs in living cells, we expressed GFP-tau fusion protein in cultured Xenopus embryo neurons and performed time-lapse imaging of tau-labeled MTs. Tau uniformly labeled individual MTs regardless of their assembly/disassembly status and location along the axon. Photobleaching experiments indicated that interaction of tau with MTs is very dynamic, with a half-time of fluorescence recovery of the order of 3 seconds. Treatment of cells with taxol, a drug that suppresses MT dynamics, rapidly induced detachment of tau from MTs. Although binding of tau to straight MTs was uniform, there was a heightened concentration of tau at the sites of high MT curvature. Our results suggest that dynamic interaction of tau with MTs may modify local mechanical properties of individual MTs and play a crucial role in the remodeling of the MT cytoskeleton during neuronal plasticity.

  5. Natural cannabinoids improve dopamine neurotransmission and tau and amyloid pathology in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Casarejos, Maria J; Perucho, Juan; Gomez, Ana; Muñoz, Maria P; Fernandez-Estevez, Marian; Sagredo, Onintza; Fernandez Ruiz, Javier; Guzman, Manuel; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Mena, Maria A

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids are neuroprotective in models of neurodegenerative dementias. Their effects are mostly mediated through CB1 and CB2 receptor-dependent modulation of excitotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, and other processes. We tested the effects of Sativex®, a mixture of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, acting on both CB1 and CB2 receptors, in parkin-null, human tau overexpressing (PK-/-/TauVLW) mice, a model of complex frontotemporal dementia, parkinsonism, and lower motor neuron disease. The animals received Sativex®, 4.63 mg/kg, ip, daily, for one month, at six months of age, at the onset of the clinical symptoms. We evaluated the effects of Sativex® on behavior, dopamine neurotransmission, glial activation, redox state, mitochondrial activity, and deposition of abnormal proteins. PK-/-/TauVLW mice developed the neurological deficits, but those treated with Sativex® showed less abnormal behaviors related to stress, less auto and hetero-aggression, and less stereotypy. Sativex® significantly reduced the intraneuronal, MAO-related free radicals produced during dopamine metabolism in the limbic system. Sativex® also decreased gliosis in cortex and hippocampus, increased the ratio reduced/oxidized glutathione in the limbic system, reduced the levels of iNOS, and increased those of complex IV in the cerebral cortex. With regard to tau and amyloid pathology, Sativex® reduced the deposition of both in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of PK-/-/TauVLW mice and increased autophagy. Sativex®, even after a short administration in animals with present behavioral and pathological abnormalities, improves the phenotype, the oxidative stress, and the deposition of proteins in PK-/-/TauVLW mice, a model of complex neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23478312

  6. Measurement of the {tau} Lepton Mass and an Upper Limit on the Mass Difference between {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Sokolov, A.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.

    2007-07-06

    The mass of the {tau} lepton has been measured in the decay mode {tau}{yields}3{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} using a pseudomass technique. The result obtained from 414 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the Belle detector is M{sub {tau}}=[1776.61{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.35(sys)] MeV/c{sup 2}. The upper limit on the relative mass difference between positive and negative {tau} leptons is vertical bar M{sub {tau}{sup +}}-M{sub {tau}{sup -}} vertical bar/M{sub {tau}}<2.8x10{sup -4} at 90% confidence level.

  7. Cytoplasmic SET induces tau hyperphosphorylation through a decrease of methylated phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuronal cytoplasmic localization of SET, an inhibitor of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A), results in tau hyperphosphorylation in the brains of Alzheimer patients through mechanisms that are still not well defined. Results We used primary neurons and mouse brain slices to show that SET is translocated to the cytoplasm in a manner independent of both its cleavage and over-expression. The localization of SET in the cytoplasm, either by the translocation of endogenous SET or by internalization of the recombinant full-length SET protein, induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Cytoplasmic recombinant full-length SET in mouse brain slices induced a decrease of PP2A activity through a decrease of methylated PP2A levels. The levels of methylated PP2A were negatively correlated with tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser-202 but not with the abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-422. Conclusions The presence of full-length SET in the neuronal cytoplasm is sufficient to impair PP2A methylation and activity, leading to tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, our data suggest that tau hyperphosphorylation is regulated by different mechanisms at distinct sites. The translocation of SET to the neuronal cytoplasm, the low activity of PP2A, and tau hyperphosphorylation are associated in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Our data show a link between the translocation of SET in the cytoplasm and the decrease of methylated PP2A levels leading to a decrease of PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation. This chain of events may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. PMID:24981783

  8. BAG2 expression dictates a functional intracellular switch between the p38-dependent effects of nicotine on tau phosphorylation levels via the α7 nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Adriele Silva Alves; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; Balioni, Laiz Furlan; Ferrari, Merari de Fatima Ramires; Almeida, Maria Camila; Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    The histopathological hallmarks present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain are plaques of Aβ peptide, neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and a reduction in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels. The role of nAChRs in AD is particularly controversial. Tau protein function is regulated by phosphorylation, and its hyperphosphorylated forms are significantly more abundant in AD brain. Little is known about the relationship between nAChR and phospho-tau degradation machinery. Activation of nAChRs has been reported to increase and decrease tau phosphorylation levels, and the mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy are not presently understood. The co-chaperone BAG2 is capable of regulating phospho-tau levels via protein degradation. In SH-SY5Y cell line and rat primary hippocampal cell culture low endogenous BAG2 levels constitute an intracellular environment conducive to nicotine-induced accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. Further, nicotine treatment inhibited endogenous expression of BAG2, resulting in increased levels of phosphorylated tau indistinguishable from those induced by BAG2 knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of BAG2 is conducive to a nicotine-induced reduction in cellular levels of phosphorylated tau protein. In both cases the effect of nicotine was p38MAPK-dependent, while the α7 antagonist MLA was synthetic to nicotine treatment, either increasing levels of phospho-Tau in the absence of BAG2, or further decreasing the levels of phospho-Tau in the presence of BAG2. Taken together, these findings reconcile the apparently contradictory effects of nicotine on tau phosphorylation by suggesting a role for BAG2 as an important regulator of p38-dependent tau kinase activity and phospho-tau degradation in response to nicotinic receptor stimulation. Thus, we report that BAG2 expression dictates a functional intracellular switch between the p38-dependent functions of nicotine on tau phosphorylation levels via the α7

  9. Evidence for a tau-neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, M.A.; Mendel, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    In a recent experiment, the measured lifetime of the tau lepton indicates that the e - ..mu.. universality may not hold in the case of the third-generation leptons. It is shown here that the universality of weak interactions can be restored if the tau-neutrino has a non-zero mass. This results is m/sub v/tau/sub / = (160 +- 70) MeV.

  10. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  11. B to tau Leptonic and Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.; /Brunel U.

    2011-11-17

    Decays of B mesons to states involving {tau} leptons can be used as a tool to search for the effects of new physics, such as those involving a charged Higgs boson. The experimental status of the decays B {yields} {tau}{nu} and B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu} is discussed, together with limits on new physics effects from current results. Leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons into states involving {tau} leptons remain experimentally challenging, but can prove a useful tool for constraining Standard Model parameters, and also offer to constrain the effects of any new physics that may exist including the presence of a charged Higgs boson.

  12. Tau Flavour Violation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.

    2009-04-17

    We study the relevance of neutrino oscillation data for sparticle decays that violate the {tau} lepton number at the LHC, in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and in SU(5) extensions of the theory. We study the conditions required for {chi}{sub 2}{yields}{chi}+{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}} decays to yield observable tau flavour violation, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density. We present detailed studies of the relevant supersymmetric parameter space and pay particular emphasis to signals from tau hadronisation, that are analysed using PYTHIA event simulation.

  13. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V W; Jo, Chulman

    2016-04-26

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD.

  14. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Jo, Chulman

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD. PMID:27112200

  15. Highly Selective Tau-SPECT Imaging Probes for Detection of Neurofibrillary Tangles in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kitada, Ayane; Matsumura, Kenji; Ihara, Masafumi; Saji, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins are one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in addition to the deposition of β-amyloid plaques. Since the deposition of tau aggregates is closely associated with the severity of AD, the in vivo detection of tau aggregates may be useful as a biomarker for the diagnosis and progression of AD. In this study, we designed and synthesized a new series of radioiodinated benzoimidazopyridine (BIP) derivatives, and evaluated their utility as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging agents targeting tau aggregates in AD brains. Five radioiodinated BIP derivatives were successfully prepared in high radiochemical yields and purities. In in vitro autoradiographic studies using postmortem AD brains, all BIP derivatives displayed high accumulation of radioactivity in the brain sections with abundant neurofibrillary tangles, while no marked radioactivity accumulation was observed in the brain sections with only β-amyloid aggregates, indicating that the BIP derivatives exhibited selective binding to tau aggregates. Biodistribution studies in normal mice showed high brain uptake at 2 min postinjection (3.5–4.7% ID/g) and rapid clearance at 60 min postinjection (0.04–0.23% ID/g), which is highly desirable for tau imaging agents. The results of the present study suggest that [123I]BIP derivatives may be useful SPECT agents for the in vivo imaging of tau aggregates in AD. PMID:27687137

  16. Tau protein degradation is catalyzed by the ATP/ubiquitin-independent 20S proteasome under normal cell conditions

    PubMed Central

    Grune, Tilman; Botzen, Diana; Engels, Martina; Voss, Peter; Kaiser, Barbara; Jung, Tobias; Grimm, Stefanie; Ermak, Gennady; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Tau is the major protein exhibiting intracellular accumulation in Alzheimer disease. The mechanisms leading to its accumulation are not fully understood. It has been proposed that the proteasome is responsible for degrading tau but, since proteasomal inhibitors block both the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome and the ubiqutin-independent 20S proteasome pathways, it is not clear which of these pathways is involved in tau degradation. Some involvement of the ubiquitin ligase, CHIP in tau degradation has also been postulated during stress. In the current studies, we utilized HT22 cells and tau-transfected E36 cells in order to test the relative importance or possible requirement of the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasomal system versus the ubiquitin-independent 20S proteasome, in tau degradation. By means of ATP-depletion, ubiquitinylation-deficient E36ts20 cells, a 19S proteasomal regulator subunit MSS1-siRNA approaches, and in vitro ubiquitinylation studies, we were able to demonstrate that ubiquitinylation is not required for normal tau degradation. PMID:20478262

  17. Caspase-cleaved tau exhibits rapid memory impairment associated with tau oligomers in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoungDoo; Choi, Hyunwoo; Lee, WonJae; Park, Hyejin; Kam, Tae-In; Hong, Se-Hoon; Nah, Jihoon; Jung, Sunmin; Shin, Bora; Lee, Huikyong; Choi, Tae-Yong; Choo, Hyosun; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Choi, Se-Young; Kayed, Rakez; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases like AD, tau forms neurofibrillary tangles, composed of tau protein. In the AD brain, activated caspases cleave tau at the 421th Asp, generating a caspase-cleaved form of tau, TauC3. Although TauC3 is known to assemble rapidly into filaments in vitro, a role of TauC3 in vivo remains unclear. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse expressing human TauC3 using a neuron-specific promoter. In this mouse, we found that human TauC3 was expressed in the hippocampus and cortex. Interestingly, TauC3 mice showed drastic learning and spatial memory deficits and reduced synaptic density at a young age (2-3months). Notably, tau oligomers as well as tau aggregates were found in TauC3 mice showing memory deficits. Further, i.p. or i.c.v. injection with methylene blue or Congo red, inhibitors of tau aggregation in vitro, and i.p. injection with rapamycin significantly reduced the amounts of tau oligomers in the hippocampus, rescued spine density, and attenuated memory impairment in TauC3 mice. Together, these results suggest that TauC3 facilitates early memory impairment in transgenic mice accompanied with tau oligomer formation, providing insight into the role of TauC3 in the AD pathogenesis associated with tau oligomers and a useful AD model to test drug candidates.

  18. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain.

  19. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N.; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1−/− mice. Second, CD45+ microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1−/− mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain. PMID:25833819

  20. Detecting tau in serum of transgenic animal models after tau immunotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    d'Abramo, Cristina; Acker, Christopher M; Schachter, Joel B; Terracina, Giuseppe; Wang, Xiaohai; Forest, Stefanie K; Davies, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the attempt to elucidate if the "peripheral sink hypothesis" could be a potential mechanism of action for tau removal in passive immunotherapy experiments, we have examined tau levels in serum of chronically injected JNPL3 and Tg4510 transgenic animals. Measurement of tau in serum of mice treated with tau antibodies is challenging because of the antibody interference in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To address this issue, we have developed a heat-treatment protocol at acidic pH to remove interfering molecules from serum, with excellent recovery of tau. The present data show that pan-tau and conformational antibodies do increase tau in mouse sera. However, these concentrations in serum do not consistently correlate with reductions of tau pathology in brain, suggesting that large elevations of tau species measured in serum are not predictive of efficacy. Here, we describe a reliable method to detect tau in serum of transgenic animals that have undergone tau immunotherapy. Levels of tau in human serum are less than the sensitivity of current assays, although artifactual signals are common. The method may be useful in similarly treated humans, a situation in which false positive signals are likely.

  1. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  2. The Microjet of AA Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. W.; Hilton, G. M.; Williger, G. M.; Grady, C. A.; Woodgate, B.

    2005-12-01

    The microjet of AA Tau A.W. Cox (Atholton High School, Columbia MD), G.M. Hilton (SSAI and GSFC), G.M. Williger (JHU and U. Louisville), C.A. Grady (Eureka Scientific and GSFC) B.Woodgate (NASA's GSFC) AA Tau is a classical T Tauri star with a spatially resolved disk viewed at approximately 70 degrees from pole-on. Photo-polarimetric variability of the star has been interpreted as being caused by the stellar magnetic field being inclined at 30 degrees with respect to the stellar rotation axis, producing a warp in the inner disk. Under these conditions, any jet should be less collimated than typical of T Tauri microjets, and should show signs of the jet axis precessing around the stellar rotation axis. When compared with the microjets imaged in the HST/STIS coronagraphic imaging survey, the AA Tau jet has an opening half-angle of approximately 10-15 degrees rather than the 3-5 degrees typical of the other T Tauri stars which have been coronagraphically imaged by HST/STIS. Using the HST data with ultra-narrowband imagery and long slit spectroscopy obtained with the Goddard Fabry-Perot and the Dual Imaging Spectrograph at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope, we derive the jet inclination, knot ejection epochs, and ejection frequency. We also compare the jet opening angle with model predictions. Apache Point Observatory observations with the Goddard Fabry-Perot were made through a grant of Director's Discretionary Time. Apache Point Observatory is operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. The GFP was supported under NASA RTOP 51-188-01-22 to GSFC. Grady is supported under NASA contract NNH05CD30C to Eureka Scientific.

  3. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  4. The Search for B+ to Tau+ Nu(Tau) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, L.A.; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} using 288 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup o}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = 0.88{sub -0.67}{sup +0.68}(stat.) {+-} 0.11(syst.) x 10{sup -4} and extract an upper limit on the branching fraction, at the 90% confidence level, of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -4}. We calculate the product of the B meson decay constant and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.0{sub -3.6}{sup +2.3}(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.4}(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  5. Csf p-tau181/tau ratio as biomarker for TDP pathology in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Benussi, Alberto; Archetti, Silvana; Galimberti, Daniela; Parnetti, Lucilla; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Scarpini, Elio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the CSF phospho-Tau181/total-Tau (p/t-Tau) ratio to distinguish between the two main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD): FTLD with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). CSF p/t-Tau ratio was examined in 79 FTLD patients with predictable neuropathology, i.e. Tau (affected by progressive supranuclear palsy or carriers of mutations within the MAPT gene) or TDP-43 (carriers of mutations within granulin, C9orf72, TARDBP genes or affected by FTD with motor neuron disease). FTLD patients were randomly grouped in a training cohort (n = 39) to assess the best CSF p/t-Tau cut-off score according to ROC analysis, and a validation cohort (n = 40) to evaluate accuracy values of the identified marker. Results showed that, in the training cohort, we found a significantly reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio in FTLD-TDP relative to FTLD-Tau. ROC analysis for p/t-Tau ratio was 0.873 and cut-off score of 0.136 allowed to differentiate FTLD-TDP and FTLD-Tau with 81.8% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity, respectively. Analysis in the validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio < 0.136 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau with 83.3% specificity and 63.6% sensitivity, respectively. The positive predictive value of detecting TDP neuropathology was 82.4%. In conclusion, a reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a viable biomarker to correctly identify TDP pathology in FTLD.

  6. Synthesis, stereochemical analysis, and derivatization of myricanol provide new probes that promote autophagic tau clearance.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mackenzie D; Calcul, Laurent; Smith, Courtney; Jinwal, Umesh K; Fontaine, Sarah N; Darling, April; Seeley, Kent; Wojtas, Lukasz; Narayan, Malathi; Gestwicki, Jason E; Smith, Garry R; Reitz, Allen B; Baker, Bill J; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-04-17

    We previously discovered that one specific scalemic preparation of myricanol (1), a constituent of Myrica cerifera (bayberry/southern wax myrtle) root bark, could lower the levels of the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). The significance is that tau accumulates in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, the most common being Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, a new synthetic route to prepare myricanol using a suitable boronic acid pinacol ester intermediate is reported. An X-ray crystal structure of the isolated myricanol (1) was obtained and showed a co-crystal consisting of (+)-aR,11S-myricanol (2) and (-)-aS,11R-myricanol (3) coformers. Surprisingly, 3, obtained from chiral separation from 1, reduced tau levels in both cultured cells and ex vivo brain slices from a mouse model of tauopathy at reasonable mid-to-low micromolar potency, whereas 2 did not. SILAC proteomics and cell assays revealed that 3 promoted tau degradation through an autophagic mechanism, which was in contrast to that of other tau-lowering compounds previously identified by our group. During the course of structure-activity relationship (SAR) development, we prepared compound 13 by acid-catalyzed dehydration of 1. 13 had undergone an unexpected structural rearrangement through the isomyricanol substitution pattern (e.g., 16), as verified by X-ray structural analysis. Compound 13 displayed robust tau-lowering activity, and, importantly, its enantiomers reduced tau levels similarly. Therefore, the semisynthetic analogue 13 provides a foundation for further development as a tau-lowering agent without its SAR being based on chirality.

  7. A peculiar constellation of tau pathology defines a subset of dementia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Molnár, Kinga; László, Lajos; Ströbel, Thomas; Botond, Gergö; Hönigschnabl, Selma; Reiner-Concin, Angelika; Palkovits, Miklós; Fischer, Peter; Budka, Herbert

    2011-08-01

    Sporadic tauopathies are characterized by differential cellular and topographical predominance of phospho-tau immunoreactivity and biochemical distinction of the tau protein. Established entities include progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Pick's disease, and argyrophilic grain disease. During a community-based longitudinal study on aging, we detected tau pathologies not compatible with these categories. We immunostained for different phospho-tau epitopes, 4R and 3R tau isoforms, α-synuclein, amyloid-β, and phospho-TDP-43, analyzed the MAPT and ApoE genes, and performed western blotting for the tau protein. The mean age of patients (4 women, 3 men) was 83.8 years. Clinical presentations combined dementia with psychiatric symptoms and/or parkinsonism. In addition to neurofibrillary tangles and diffuse neuronal cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity, the neuropathology was characterized by peculiar cytopathologies (diffuse granular immunopositivity of astrocytic processes and patchy accumulation of thin threads) in a distinctive distribution (frontal and temporal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, basal ganglia, locus coeruleus, and substantia nigra). Argyrophilic grains were detected in four patients. Few to moderate densities of neuritic plaques but widespread phospho-TDP-43 pathology was observed in five patients. There was variability in the H1/H2 and ApoE alleles and biochemical features of tau protein. We propose these cases as complex tauopathy with a characteristic constellation: some features of primary tauopathies and Alzheimer's disease mixed with additional cytopathologies including a distinctive astrogliopathy, in a characteristic distribution of lesions. These complex tauopathies in the elderly deserve specific diagnostic and eventually therapeutic considerations.

  8. Geniposide ameliorates learning memory deficits, reduces tau phosphorylation and decreases apoptosis via GSK3β pathway in streptozotocin-induced alzheimer rat model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chong; Liu, Yueze; Jiang, Yuanhong; Ding, Jianming; Li, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Intracerebral-ventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) induces an insulin-resistant brain state that may underlie the neural pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Our previous work showed that prior ICV treatment of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) could prevent STZ-induced learning memory impairment and tau hyperphosphorylation in the rat brain. The Chinese herbal medicine geniposide is known to relieve symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Because geniposide is thought to act as a GLP-1 receptor agonist, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of geniposide on STZ-induced AD model in rats. Our result showed that a single injection of geniposide (50 μM, 10 μL) to the lateral ventricle prevented STZ-induced spatial learning deficit by about 40% and reduced tau phosphorylation by about 30% with Morris water maze test and quantitative immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. It has been known that tau protein can be phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and STZ can increase the activity of GSK3β. Our result with Western blot analysis showed that central administration of geniposide resulted in an elevated expression of GSK3β(pS-9) but suppressed GSK3β(pY-216) indicating that geniposide reduced STZ-induced GSK3β hyperactivity. In addition, ultrastructure analysis showed that geniposide averted STZ-induced neural pathology, including paired helical filament (PHF)-like structures, accumulation of vesicles in synaptic terminal, abnormalities of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and early stage of apoptosis. In summary, our study suggests that the water soluble and orally active monomer of Chinese herbal medicine geniposide may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of sporadic AD. PMID:24329968

  9. Measurement of the Semileptonic Decays B->D tau nu and B->D* tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. They select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton ({ell} = e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. They perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} ({tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. They measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and R(D*) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D* {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D) = (41.6 {+-} 11.7 {+-} 5.2)% and R(D*) = (29.7 {+-} 5.6 {+-} 1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fractions, they obtain {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.06)% and {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1.62 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. They also present, for the first time, distributions of

  10. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  11. Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Tauopathies, and Possible Neuroprotective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal deposition of misprocessed and aggregated proteins is a common final pathway of most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is characterized by the extraneuronal deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) protein in the form of plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in the form of filaments. Based on the biochemically diverse range of pathological tau proteins, a number of approaches have been proposed to develop new potential therapeutics. Here we discuss some of the most promising ones: inhibition of tau phosphorylation, proteolysis and aggregation, promotion of intra- and extracellular tau clearance, and stabilization of microtubules. We also emphasize the need to achieve a full understanding of the biological roles and post-translational modifications of normal tau, as well as the molecular events responsible for selective neuronal vulnerability to tau pathology and its propagation. It is concluded that answering key questions on the relationship between Aβ and tau pathology should lead to a better understanding of the nature of secondary tauopathies, especially AD, and open new therapeutic targets and strategies. PMID:26751493

  12. A novel tau transcript in cultured human neuroblastoma cells expressing nuclear tau

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of the microtubule-associated protein, tau in the nuclei of primate cells in culture. The present study confirms the existence of nuclear tau in two human neuroblastoma cells lines by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot using mAbs to tau. Northern blot analysis of poly A+ mRNA detects a novel 2-kb tau transcript coexpressed with the 6-kb message in cultured human cells and human frontal cortex. PCR and cDNA sequencing demonstrate that the 2-kb message contains the entire tau coding region. Furthermore, actinomycin D transcription inhibition experiments indicate that the 2- kb message is not derived from the 6-kb message, but instead arises from the original tau transcript. One of the human neuroblastoma cell lines examined contains both nuclear and cytoplasmic tau as assayed by both Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence. Northern blot analysis of this cell line indicates that copious amounts of the 2-kb message are present while little of the 6-kb transcript is obvious. Immunofluorescence analysis of this cell line demonstrates that the cytoplasmic tau is not localized to microtubules. Together, these results indicate that the 2-kb tau message in humans may specify tau for non-microtubule functions in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We hypothesize that this is accomplished via a message targeting mechanism mediated by the untranslated regions of the tau messages. PMID:8468346

  13. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  14. Status of the tau one prong problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, K.G.

    1989-08-01

    The present status of the tau one prong problem is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on recent published branching fraction measurements, the status and implications of tau lifetime measurements, and measurements which constrain the sum of branching fractions to be unity. 29 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  16. Measurement of tau lepton branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, N.A.

    1993-09-30

    We present {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of{tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} events, we examine the resonance structure of the K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1270) and {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, {mu}, {pi}, and K.

  17. Crystal Ball results on tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews measurements and upper limit determinations for a number of exclusive 1-prong tau decay modes using the Crystal Ball detector. These results are important input to the apparent discrepancy between the topological and sum-of-exclusive branching fractions in 1-prong tau decays.

  18. Large tau and tau neutrino electric dipole moments in models with vectorlike multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2010-02-01

    It is shown that the electric dipole moment of the {tau} lepton several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the standard model can be generated from mixings in models with vectorlike mutiplets. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of the {tau} lepton arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the neutralinos, the sleptons, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. The EDM of the Dirac {tau} neutrino is also computed from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. A numerical analysis is presented, and it is shown that the EDMs of the {tau} lepton and the {tau} neutrino which lie just a couple of orders of magnitude below the sensitivity of the current experiment can be achieved. Thus the predictions of the model are testable in an improved experiment on the EDM of the {tau} and the {tau} neutrino.

  19. Microglial internalization and degradation of pathological tau is enhanced by an anti-tau monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenjie; Liu, Wencheng; Hu, Xiaoyan; Hanna, Mary; Caravaca, April; Paul, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia have been shown to contribute to the clearance of brain amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the major component of amyloid plaques, in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it is not known whether microglia play a similar role in the clearance of tau, the major component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). We now report that murine microglia rapidly internalize and degrade hyperphosphorylated pathological tau isolated from AD brain tissue in a time-dependent manner in vitro. We further demonstrate that microglia readily degrade human tau species released from AD brain sections and eliminate NFTs from brain sections of P301S tauopathy mice. The anti-tau monoclonal antibody MC1 enhances microglia-mediated tau degradation in an Fc-dependent manner. Our data identify a potential role for microglia in the degradation and clearance of pathological tau species in brain and provide a mechanism explaining the potential therapeutic actions of passively administered anti-tau monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057852

  20. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies.

  1. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, has been reported in captive and free-ranging cervids. An abnormal isoform of a prion protein (PrP-CWD) has been associated with CWD in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and this prion protein can be detected with i...

  2. Role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Jia, Hengchuan; She, Xiaojun; Cui, Bo; Zhang, Na; Chen, Xuewei; Xu, Chuanxiang; An, Gaihong; Ma, Qiang

    2014-05-15

    Chronic noise exposure has been associated with abnormalities in glutamate (Glu)-NMDAR signaling and tau hyperphosphorylation. However, further studies are necessary to clarify potential causal relationships. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups in the present study: control with isotonic saline instillation (n=10); noise exposure (100 dB SPL white noise, 4h/d × 14d) and treated with saline (n=10); and noise exposure and treated with MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally; n=10). The levels of tau phosphorylated at Ser202 and Ser396, and proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after the last noise exposure. We showed that phosphorylated tau levels were enhanced in noise-exposed-rat hippocampus and PFC. MK-801 decreased the hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser202 and Ser396 sites in the hippocampus and PFC. Furthermore, MK-801 reversed noise-induced GSK3β overexpression but had no significant effect on PP2A levels. This suggests that MK-801 protects against chronic-noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC. These findings demonstrate that Glu-NMDAR signaling may be involved in triggering aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC after chronic noise exposure.

  3. Low Serum Level α-Synuclein and Tau Protein in Autism Spectrum Disorder Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Cetin, Ihsan; Tarakçıoğlu, Mahmut Cem; Özer, Ömer Faruk; Kaçar, Selma; Çimen, Behzat

    2015-12-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) and tau proteins are thought to be related with the synaptic loss and cell death underlying several important neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of our study was to investigate serum α-syn and tau levels in autism. Serum levels of α-syn and tau were measured, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) severity was assessed at admission using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) total score. The mean CARS score of the autism group on admission was 47.91 points (SD: 5.97). The results indicated that the mean serum α-syn and serum tau levels were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in children with ASD as compared with normal cases (33.01 ± 20.78 and 55.19 ± 15.34 ng/mL and 241.23 ± 290.5 and 509.78 ± 269.25 ng/mL, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between serum α-syn levels and serum levels of tau identified by Pearson correlation analysis (r = 0.922, n = 28, p < 0.001). Synaptic abnormality in autism may result from microglial activity. Furthermore, α-syn and tau aggregation may lead to synaptic dysfunction, and this may contribute to either neuronal or synaptic dysfunction or neurodegeneration. Our preliminary study suggests that low levels of serum α-syn and tau may be implicated in the relationship between synaptic activity and autism.

  4. Neuroinflammation is not a Prerequisite for Diabetes-induced Tau Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van der Harg, Judith M.; Eggels, Leslie; Ruigrok, Silvie R.; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Scheper, Wiep

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau is a key hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder for which Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a risk factor. In animal models for DM, the phosphorylation and aggregation of tau is induced or exacerbated, however the underlying mechanism is unknown. In addition to the metabolic dysfunction, DM is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. This was reported to be associated with a neuroinflammatory response in the hypothalamus of DM animal models. Neuroinflammation is also implicated in the development and progression of AD. It is unknown whether DM also induces neuroinflammation in brain areas affected in AD, the cortex and hippocampus. Here we investigated whether neuroinflammation could be the mechanistic trigger to induce tau phosphorylation in the brain of DM animals. Two distinct diabetic animal models were used; rats on free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet that are insulin resistant and streptozotocin-treated rats that are insulin deficient. The streptozotocin-treated animals demonstrated increased tau phosphorylation in the brain as expected, whereas the fcHFHS diet fed animals did not. Remarkably, neither of the diabetic animal models showed reactive microglia or increased GFAP and COX-2 levels in the cortex or hippocampus. From this, we conclude: 1. DM does not induce neuroinflammation in brain regions affected in AD, and 2. Neuroinflammation is not a prerequisite for tau phosphorylation. Neuroinflammation is therefore not the mechanism that explains the close connection between DM and AD. PMID:26617484

  5. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  6. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  7. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  8. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O’Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development. PMID:26220942

  9. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  10. Imaging pathological tau in atypical parkinsonian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coakeley, Sarah; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines the current literature on tau imaging in atypical parkinsonian disorders and other tauopathies. Recent findings There are a number of tau PET radiotracers that have demonstrated promising preliminary results in atypical parkinsonian disorders, such as progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. These radiotracers were capable of selectively labeling tau in vitro and in vivo, with high affinity. Other radiotracers tested more extensively in patients with Alzheimer’s disease have also been able to successfully image tau deposition. Summary The development of tau radioligands for PET has led to the current testing of these tracers in clinical studies, many of which concentrate on patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration are now being investigated as well. These disorders can be very difficult to diagnose, because of their clinical overlap with other parkinsonian disorders. Imaging tau using PET could serve as a diagnostic biomarker for these tauopathies and provide a means of assessing treatment that targets tau burden. PMID:26110795

  11. Global hairpin folding of tau in solution.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Sadasivam; von Bergen, Martin; Brutlach, Henrik; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2006-02-21

    The microtubule-associated protein tau stabilizes microtubules in its physiological role, whereas it forms insoluble aggregates (paired helical filaments) in Alzheimer's disease. Soluble tau is considered a natively unfolded protein whose residual folding and intramolecular interactions are largely undetermined. In this study, we have applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the proximity and flexibility of tau domains and the global folding. FRET pairs spanning the tau molecule were created by inserting tryptophans (donor) and cysteines (labeled with IAEDANS as an acceptor) by site-directed mutagenesis. The observed FRET distances were significantly different from those expected for a random coil. Notably, the C-terminal end of tau folds over into the vicinity of the microtubule-binding repeat domain, the N-terminus remains outside the FRET distance of the repeat domain, yet both ends of the molecule approach one another. The interactions between the domains were obliterated by denaturation in GdnHCl. Paramagnetic spin-labels attached in various domains of tau were analyzed by EPR and exhibited a high mobility throughout. The data indicate that tau retains some global folding even in its "natively unfolded" state, combined with the high flexibility of the chain.

  12. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A.; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. PMID:25220759

  13. Cis phosphorylated tau as the earliest detectable pathogenic conformation in Alzheimer disease, offering novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Zhen Zhou, Xiao; Ping Lu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    After protein phosphorylation on certain serine or threonine residues preceding a proline (pSer/Thr-Pro), the function of certain phosphorylated protein is further regulated by cis-trans conformational change. Due to the lack of any tool to detect such two conformations in cells, however, it is not even known whether any cis or trans conformation exists in vivo, not to mention their conformation-specific functions or regulation. We developed a novel peptide chemistry technology to generate the first pair of antibodies that can distinguish cis from trans pThr231-Pro tau. Cis, but not trans, pThr231-tau appears early in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) neurons and further accumulates in only degenerating neurons as Alzheimer disease (AD) progresses, localizing to dystrophic neurites, which are known to correlate well with memory loss. Unlike trans p-tau, the cis cannot promote microtubule assembly, and is more resistant to dephosphorylation and degradation and more prone to aggregation. Pin1 accelerates cis to trans isomerization to prevent tau pathology in AD. Thus, during MCI and AD development, cis pThr231-Pro tau is the earliest detectable pathogenic tau conformation and antibodies and vaccines against the pathogenic cis p-tau may be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of AD. These findings offer in vivo approach to study conformational regulation of Pro-directed phosphorylation signaling.

  14. The emerging role of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase chaperones in tau oligomerization, amyloid processing and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Laura J.; Baker, Jeremy D.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases), a unique family of molecular chaperones, regulate protein folding at proline residues. These residues are abundant within intrinsically disordered proteins, like the microtubule-associated protein tau. Tau has been shown to become hyperphosphorylated and accumulate as one of the two main pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the other being amyloid beta (Aβ). PPIases, including Pin1, FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 52, FKBP51, and FKBP12, have been shown to interact with and regulate tau biology. This interaction is particularly important given the numerous proline-directed phosphorylation sites found on tau and the role phosphorylation has been found to play in pathogenesis. This regulation then affects downstream aggregation and oligomerization of tau. However, many PPIases have yet to be explored for their effects on tau biology, despite the high likelihood of interaction based on proline content. Moreover, Pin1, FKBP12, FKBP52, cyclophilin (Cyp) A, CypB, and CypD have been shown to also regulate Aβ production or the toxicity associated with Aβ pathology. Therefore, PPIases directly and indirectly regulate pathogenic protein multimerization in AD and represent a family rich in targets for modulating the accumulation and toxicity. PMID:25628064

  15. Tau and Amyloid-β Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers have Differential Relationships with Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by two primary pathologies: tau-related neurofibrillary tangles and the extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ). The development of these pathologies is topologically distinct early in the disease, with Aβ beginning to accumulate as a diffuse, neocortical pathology, while tau-related pathology begins to form in mesial temporal regions. This study investigated the hypothesis that, by virtue of this distinction, there exist preferential associations between the primary pathologies and aspects of the cognitive phenotype. We investigated the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for tau and Aβ pathologies with neurocognitive measures in 191 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants completed cognitive tests of new learning, information processing speed, and working memory. Separate regression models were computed and then followed up with mediation analyses to examine the predictive status of CSF biomarkers. The effect of Aβ on learning was mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.008). In contrast, Aβ had a direct effect on information processing speed that was not mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.59). No predictors were significant for working memory. This study provided evidence for a differential relationship of Aβ and phospho-tau pathologies on the neurocognitive phenotype of MCI. This supports the proposition that these primary AD pathologies maximally affect different aspects of cognition, and has potential implications for cognitive assessments and the use of biomarkers in disease-modifyingtherapeutic trials.

  16. Tau and Amyloid-β Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers have Differential Relationships with Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by two primary pathologies: tau-related neurofibrillary tangles and the extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ). The development of these pathologies is topologically distinct early in the disease, with Aβ beginning to accumulate as a diffuse, neocortical pathology, while tau-related pathology begins to form in mesial temporal regions. This study investigated the hypothesis that, by virtue of this distinction, there exist preferential associations between the primary pathologies and aspects of the cognitive phenotype. We investigated the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for tau and Aβ pathologies with neurocognitive measures in 191 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants completed cognitive tests of new learning, information processing speed, and working memory. Separate regression models were computed and then followed up with mediation analyses to examine the predictive status of CSF biomarkers. The effect of Aβ on learning was mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.008). In contrast, Aβ had a direct effect on information processing speed that was not mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.59). No predictors were significant for working memory. This study provided evidence for a differential relationship of Aβ and phospho-tau pathologies on the neurocognitive phenotype of MCI. This supports the proposition that these primary AD pathologies maximally affect different aspects of cognition, and has potential implications for cognitive assessments and the use of biomarkers in disease-modifyingtherapeutic trials. PMID:26401775

  17. Tau Lepton Flavor Violation Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, A.; /INFN, Pisa

    2012-04-03

    We report the recent results obtained by BABAR collaboration in lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches in the tau lepton sector, presenting 16 new results from {tau}{sub LLL} (L = e, {mu}), {tau} {yields} LV{sup 0} V{sup 0} = {rho}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0}, K*{sup -0}, {Phi} and {tau} {yields} lK{sub S}.

  18. Precision measurements of tau lepton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Ian M.

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a centre-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions B (tau-- → pi--pi --pi+nutau) = (8.83 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.13)%, B (tau-- → K--pi --pi+nutau) = (0.273 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.009)%, B (tau-- → K--pi --K+nutau) = (0.1346 +/- 0.0010 +/- 0.0036)%, and B (tau-- → K-- K--K +nutau) = (1.58 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.12) x 10--5 are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the tau -- → pi--pi--pi +nutau, tau-- → K--pi--pi+nu tau, tau-- → K --pi--K+nu tau and tau-- → K --K--K +nutau decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of B (tau-- → φpi--nu tau) = (3.42 +/- 0.55 +/- 0.25) x 10--5 , a measurement of B (tau-- → φK --nutau) = (3.39 +/- 0.20 +/- 0.28) x 10--5 and an upper limit on B (tau-- → K-- K--K +nutau [ex.φ]) ≤ 2.5 x 10--6 90%CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the tau-- → K-- pi--K+nu tau and tau-- → K --K--K +nutau K+K -- invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio Bt-→K -nt Bt-→p -nt is measured to be (6.531 +/- 0.056 +/- 0.093) x 10 --2 from which |Vus| is determined to be 0.2255 +/- 0.0023. The branching ratio Bt-→m -ntn¯ mB t-→e-nt n¯e = (9.796 +/- 0.016 +/- 0.035) x 10--1 is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of charged current lepton universality, gmge = 1.0036 +/- 0.0020. The branching ratios Bt-→K -nt Bt-→e- ntn¯ e = (3.882 +/- 0.032 +/- 0.056) x 10--2 , and Bt-→p -nt Bt-→e- ntn¯ e = (5.945 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.061) x 10--1 are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, gtgm p = 0.9856 +/- 0.0057 and gtgm K = 0.9827 +/- 0.0086 which can be combined to give gtgm p/K = 0.9850 +/- 0.0054. Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  19. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  20. Quantitative characterization of heparin binding to Tau protein: implication for inducer-mediated Tau filament formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Li; Fernández, Cristina; Fan, Jun-Bao; Shewmaker, Frank; Chen, Jie; Minton, Allen P; Liang, Yi

    2010-02-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, principally composed of bundles of filaments formed by the microtubule-associated protein Tau, are a hallmark of a group of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin can induce Tau filament formation in vitro. Here we quantitatively characterize the interaction between recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372) and heparin (average molecular mass = 7 kDa) as well as heparin-induced fibril formation by using static light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, turbidity assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Our data clearly show that at physiological pH, heparin 7K, and human Tau(244-372) form a tight 1:1 complex with an equilibrium association constant exceeding 10(6) m(-1) under reducing conditions, triggering Tau fibrillization. In the absence of dithiothreitol, heparin shows a moderate binding affinity (10(5) m(-1)) to Tau(244-372), similarly triggering Tau fibrillization. Further fibrillization kinetics analyses show that the lag time appears to be approximately invariant up to a molar ratio of 2:1 and then increases at larger ratios of heparin/Tau. The maximum slope representing the apparent rate constant for fibril growth increases sharply with substoichiometric ratios of heparin/Tau and then decreases to some extent with ratios of >1:1. The retarding effect of heparin in excess is attributed to the large increase in ionic strength of the medium arising from free heparin. Together, these results suggest that the formation of the 1:1 complex of Tau monomer and heparin plays an important role in the inducer-mediated Tau filament formation, providing clues to understanding the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Search for second-class currents in tau;{-} --> omegapi;{-}nu_{tau}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-07-24

    We report an analysis of tau;{-} decaying into omegapi;{-}nu_{tau} with omega --> pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 x 10;{6}tau pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents, and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode. PMID:19659341

  2. Tau-Centric Targets and Drugs in Clinical Development for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Imbimbo, Bruno P.; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Zecca, Chiara; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Pilotto, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio; Greco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The failure of several Phase II/III clinical trials in Alzheimer's disease (AD) with drugs targeting β-amyloid accumulation in the brain fuelled an increasing interest in alternative treatments against tau pathology, including approaches targeting tau phosphatases/kinases, active and passive immunization, and anti-tau aggregation. The most advanced tau aggregation inhibitor (TAI) is methylthioninium (MT), a drug existing in equilibrium between a reduced (leuco-methylthioninium) and oxidized form (MT+). MT chloride (methylene blue) was investigated in a 24-week Phase II clinical trial in 321 patients with mild to moderate AD that failed to show significant positive effects in mild AD patients, although long-term observations (50 weeks) and biomarker studies suggested possible benefit. The dose of 138 mg/day showed potential benefits on cognitive performance of moderately affected AD patients and cerebral blood flow in mildly affected patients. Further clinical evidence will come from the large ongoing Phase III trials for the treatment of AD and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia on a new form of this TAI, more bioavailable and less toxic at higher doses, called TRx0237. More recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued based on impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, a clinically used derivative of salicylic acid. PMID:27429978

  3. Tau-Centric Targets and Drugs in Clinical Development for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Zecca, Chiara; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Pilotto, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The failure of several Phase II/III clinical trials in Alzheimer's disease (AD) with drugs targeting β-amyloid accumulation in the brain fuelled an increasing interest in alternative treatments against tau pathology, including approaches targeting tau phosphatases/kinases, active and passive immunization, and anti-tau aggregation. The most advanced tau aggregation inhibitor (TAI) is methylthioninium (MT), a drug existing in equilibrium between a reduced (leuco-methylthioninium) and oxidized form (MT(+)). MT chloride (methylene blue) was investigated in a 24-week Phase II clinical trial in 321 patients with mild to moderate AD that failed to show significant positive effects in mild AD patients, although long-term observations (50 weeks) and biomarker studies suggested possible benefit. The dose of 138 mg/day showed potential benefits on cognitive performance of moderately affected AD patients and cerebral blood flow in mildly affected patients. Further clinical evidence will come from the large ongoing Phase III trials for the treatment of AD and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia on a new form of this TAI, more bioavailable and less toxic at higher doses, called TRx0237. More recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued based on impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, a clinically used derivative of salicylic acid. PMID:27429978

  4. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissiere, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganit, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; Schott, G

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  6. Tau-Driven Neuronal and Neurotrophic Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Early Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaro, Nadia; Barini, Erica; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Goedert, Michel; Medini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by intraneuronal inclusions of hyperphosphorylated tau protein and abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key modulator of neuronal survival and function. The severity of both these pathological hallmarks correlate with the degree of cognitive impairment in patients. However, how tau pathology specifically modifies BDNF signaling and affects neuronal function during early prodromal stages of tauopathy remains unclear. Here, we report that the mild tauopathy developing in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of the P301S tau transgenic (P301S) mouse induces functional retinal changes by disrupting BDNF signaling via the TrkB receptor. In adult P301S mice, the physiological visual response of RGCs to pattern light stimuli and retinal acuity decline significantly. As a consequence, the activity-dependent secretion of BDNF in the vitreous is impaired in P301S mice. Further, in P301S retinas, TrkB receptors are selectively upregulated, but uncoupled from downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling. We also show that the impairment of TrkB signaling is triggered by tau pathology and mediates the tau-induced dysfunction of visual response. Overall our results identify a neurotrophin-mediated mechanism by which tau induces neuronal dysfunction during prodromal stages of tauopathy and define tau-driven pathophysiological changes of potential value to support early diagnosis and informed therapeutic decisions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This work highlights the potential molecular mechanisms by which initial tauopathy induces neuronal dysfunction. Combining clinically used electrophysiological techniques (i.e., electroretinography) and molecular analyses, this work shows that in a relevant model of early tauopathy, the retina of the P301S mutant human tau transgenic mouse, mild tau pathology results in functional changes of neuronal activity, likely due to selective impairment

  7. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  8. Constitutive secretion of tau protein by an unconventional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiyun; Dage, Jeffrey L; Citron, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and several related disorders. In the disease tau aggregates into paired helical and straight filaments, which can form higher order neurofibrillary tangles in neurons and this pathology is associated with progressive neuronal loss and cognitive decline. Tau is a cytoplasmic protein and is thought to be released only from degenerating cells. In contrast, here we provide evidence that tau is constitutively secreted at a low level. We directly show tau release in cell culture model systems. In inducible transfected cell lines we observe that a small proportion of full-length tau is released from intact cells in a time dependent manner. We show that this tau is released by an unconventional secretion process, as the release is temperature dependent but not blocked by inhibitors of the conventional secretory pathway. We characterize the released tau as full length, not vesicle associated and containing Phospho-Tau (181P) proportional to its intracellular concentration. We demonstrate that tau secretion and its suppression by low temperature also occurs in human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. The constitutive tau secretion that we propose provides the most parsimonious explanation for the observed presence of tau in the CSF of healthy animals and human beings. If previously postulated pathogenic extracellular tau intermediates are released by this route, low level constitutive tau secretion could play a role in the spread of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other human tauopathies. PMID:22668776

  9. No Overt Deficits in Aged Tau-Deficient C57Bl/6.Mapttm1(EGFP)Kit GFP Knockin Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Hummel, Annika; Bi, Mian; Ippati, Stefania; van der Hoven, Julia; Volkerling, Alexander; Lee, Wei S.; Tan, Daniel C. S.; Bongers, Andre; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D.; Ittner, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Several mouse lines with knockout of the tau-encoding MAPT gene have been reported in the past; they received recent attention due to reports that tau reduction prevented Aβ-induced deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the effects of long-term depletion of tau in vivo remained controversial. Here, we used the tau-deficient GFP knockin line Mapttm1(EGFP)kit on a pure C57Bl/6 background and subjected a large cohort of males and females to a range of motor, memory and behavior tests and imaging analysis, at the advanced age of over 16 months. Neither heterozygous nor homozygous Mapttm1(EGFP)kit mice presented with deficits or abnormalities compared to wild-type littermates. Differences to reports using other tau knockout models may be due to different genetic backgrounds, respective gene targeting strategies or other confounding factors, such as nutrition. To this end, we report no functional or morphological deficits upon tau reduction or depletion in aged mice. PMID:27736877

  10. Tau hyperphosphorylation in synaptosomes and neuroinflammation are associated with canine cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Smolek, Tomas; Madari, Aladar; Farbakova, Jana; Kandrac, Ondrej; Jadhav, Santosh; Cente, Martin; Brezovakova, Veronika; Novak, Michal; Zilka, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Canine cognitive impairment syndrome (CDS) represents a group of symptoms related to the aging of the canine brain. These changes ultimately lead to a decline of memory function and learning abilities, alteration of social interaction, impairment of normal housetraining, and changes in sleep-wake cycle and general activity. We have clinically examined 215 dogs, 28 of which underwent autopsy. With canine brains, we performed extensive analysis of pathological abnormalities characteristic of human Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, including β-amyloid senile plaques, tau neurofibrillary tangles, and fused in sarcoma (FUS) and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43) inclusions. Most demented dogs displayed senile plaques, mainly in the frontal and temporal cortex. Tau neurofibrillary inclusions were found in only one dog. They were identified with antibodies used to detect tau neurofibrillary lesions in the human brain. The inclusions were also positive for Gallyas silver staining. As in humans, they were distributed mainly in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and temporal cortex. On the other hand, FUS and TDP43 aggregates were not present in any of the examined brain samples. We also found that CDS was characterized by the presence of reactive and senescent microglial cells in the frontal cortex. Our transcriptomic study revealed a significant dysregulation of genes involved in neuroinflammation. Finally, we analyzed tau phosphoproteome in the synaptosomes. Proteomic studies revealed a significant increase of hyperphosphorylated tau in synaptosomes of demented dogs compared with nondemented dogs. This study suggests that cognitive decline in dogs is related to the tau synaptic impairment and neuroinflammation. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:874-895, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The winds from HL Tau

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (∼1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1−0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s−1. PMID:27559304

  12. The winds from HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-07-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (˜1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1-0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s-1.

  13. A novel triple repeat mutant tau transgenic model that mimics aspects of pick's disease and fronto-temporal tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Overk, Cassia R; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Bisquert, Alejandro; Trejo-Morales, Margarita; Spencer, Brian; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are a group of disorders leading to cognitive and behavioral impairment in the aging population. While four-repeat (4R) Tau is more abundant in corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Alzheimer's disease, three-repeat (3R) Tau is the most abundant splice, in Pick's disease. A number of transgenic models expressing wild-type and mutant forms of the 4R Tau have been developed. However, few models of three-repeat Tau are available. A transgenic mouse model expressing three-repeat Tau was developed bearing the mutations associated with familial forms of Pick's disease (L266V and G272V mutations). Two lines expressing high (Line 13) and low (Line 2) levels of the three-repeat mutant Tau were analyzed. By Western blot, using antibodies specific to three-repeat Tau, Line 13 expressed 5-times more Tau than Line 2. The Tau expressed by these mice was most abundant in the frontal-temporal cortex and limbic system and was phosphorylated at residues detected by the PHF-1, AT8, CP9 and CP13 antibodies. The higher-expressing mice displayed hyperactivity, memory deficits in the water maze and alterations in the round beam. The behavioral deficits started at 6-8 months of age and were associated with a progressive increase in the accumulation of 3R Tau. By immunocytochemistry, mice from Line 13 displayed extensive accumulation of 3R Tau in neuronal cells bodies in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex, CA1-3 regions, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Aggregates in the granular cells had a globus appearance and mimic Pick's-like inclusions. There were abundant dystrophic neurites, astrogliosis and synapto-dendritic damage in the neocortex and hippocampus of the higher expresser line. The hippocampal lesions were moderately argyrophilic and Thioflavin-S negative. By electron microscopy, discrete straight filament aggregates were detected in some neurons in the hippocampus. This model holds promise for better understanding the natural history

  14. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  15. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  16. Ultrahigh energy tau neutrino flux regeneration while skimming the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Bigas, Oscar Blanch

    2008-09-15

    The detection of Earth-skimming tau neutrinos has turned into a very promising strategy for the observation of ultra-high-energy cosmic neutrinos. The sensitivity of this channel crucially depends on the parameters of the propagation of the tau neutrinos through the terrestrial crust, which governs the flux of emerging tau leptons that can be detected. One of the characteristics of this propagation is the possibility of regeneration through multiple {nu}{sub {tau}}{r_reversible}{tau} conversions, which are often neglected in the standard picture. In this paper, we solve the transport equations governing the {nu}{sub {tau}} propagation and compare the flux of emerging tau leptons obtained allowing regeneration or not. We discuss the validity of the approximation of neglecting the {nu}{sub {tau}} regeneration using different scenarios for the neutrino-nucleon cross sections and the tau energy losses.

  17. Overexpression of 14-3-3z promotes tau phosphorylation at Ser262 and accelerates proteosomal degradation of synaptophysin in rat primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Hamid Y; Han, Dong; MacDonald, Ryen; Paudel, Hemant K

    2013-01-01

    b-Amyloid peptide accumulation, tau hyperphosphorylation, and synapse loss are characteristic neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau hyperphosphorylation is suggested to inhibit the association of tau with microtubules, making microtubules unstable and causing neurodegeneration. The mechanism of tau phosphorylation in AD brain, therefore, is of considerable significance. Although PHF-tau is phosphorylated at over 40 Ser/Thr sites, Ser(262) phosphorylation was shown to mediate b-amyloid neurotoxicity and formation of toxic tau lesions in the brain. In vitro, PKA is one of the kinases that phosphorylates tau at Ser(262), but the mechanism by which it phosphorylates tau in AD brain is not very clear. 14-3-3z is associated with neurofibrillary tangles and is upregulated in AD brain. In this study, we show that 14-3-3z promotes tau phosphorylation at Ser(262) by PKA in differentiating neurons. When overexpressed in rat hippocampal primary neurons, 14-3-3z causes an increase in Ser(262) phosphorylation, a decrease in the amount of microtubule-bound tau, a reduction in the amount of polymerized microtubules, as well as microtubule instability. More importantly, the level of pre-synaptic protein synaptophysin was significantly reduced. Downregulation of synaptophysin in 14-3-3z overexpressing neurons was mitigated by inhibiting the proteosome, indicating that 14-3-3z promotes proteosomal degradation of synaptophysin. When 14-3-3z overexpressing neurons were treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug taxol, tau Ser(262) phosphorylation decreased and synaptophysin level was restored. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of 14-3-3z accelerates proteosomal turnover of synaptophysin by promoting the destabilization of microtubules. Synaptophysin is involved in synapse formation and neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that 14-3-3z may cause synaptic pathology by reducing synaptophysin levels in the brains of patients suffering from AD. PMID

  18. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  19. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sendek, Austin; Fuller, Henry R.; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Cox, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06–0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse. PMID:25162587

  20. Horizontal Tau air showers from mountains in deep vally :Traces of Ultrahigh neutrino tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    1999-08-01

    Ultra High Energy (UHE) Tau neutrino may lead to a very peculiar imprint in future underground K m3 detectors in water and ice as well as in air: rarest secondary tau tracks and decay which may exceed the muon ones. Indeed Bremsstrahlung at high energy lead to longer tracks for heavier leptons. Radiation lenght grows nearly with the square of the lepton mass. Indeed electrons are too light and their trace in matter is negligible (decimeters) muon are much better observed, while tau are too short life time and short range to be found. However, because relativistic time expansion, UHE tau traces in matter, above 1017 eV , are relativistically boosted overcoming the corresponding muon tracks, already bounded by bremsstrahlung logaritmic regime. The tau crossing for Kms in water or ice may be confused with common muon tracks; their tau decay may be missunderstood as muonic catastrophic brehmstrallung interactions. To economize UHE tau dicovery, we suggest to look the tau decay in air into the deep valleys montains, like Canyons or deep in escavation mines where horizontal air showers induce fluoresce or Cerenkov lights. The mountain valley width screens from horizontal secondary muons. The valley height increases the solid angle view. The horizontal air Kms-size gap offer a strong discriminator to filter UHE muons against tau. Tens event a year at PeV ( W resonance peak) energies in K m3 excavation gap should be observable . Hunting air shower in the night toward high mountains in Canyons or in a deep excavation may be the best and cheapest way to discover UHE neutrinos , either born by electron antineutrino scattering on electrons at PeV energies, or by direct tau neutrino possibly relic of muonic flavour oscillation even at EeV energies.

  1. Study of {tau}{sup -}{yields}VP{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} in the framework of resonance chiral theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zhihui

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we study two kinds of {tau} decays: (a) {tau}{sup -}{yields}({rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -},{omega}{pi}{sup -},{phi}{pi}{sup -},K*{sup 0}K{sup -}){nu}{sub {tau}}, which belong to {delta}S=0 processes and (b) {delta}S=1 processes, such as {tau}{sup -}{yields}({rho}{sup 0}K{sup -},{omega}K{sup -},{phi}K{sup -},K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}){nu}{sub {tau}}, in the framework of resonance chiral theory (R{chi}T). We fit the {tau}{sup -}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} spectral function and the invariant mass distribution of {omega}K in the process of {tau}{sup -}{yields}{omega}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} to get the values of unknown resonance couplings. Then we make a prediction for branching ratios of all channels.

  2. Disentangling the role of the tau gene locus in sporadic tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Vandrovcova, J; Anaya, F; Kay, V; Lees, A; Hardy, J; de Silva, R

    2010-12-01

    Fibrillar aggregates of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein are the major component of the pathological entities, including intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles that define the broad class of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders called the tauopathies. Mutations in the tau gene (MAPT) causing familial frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) confirm that tau protein dysfunction could be a primary cause of neuronal loss. However, in the sporadic tauopathies such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) where MAPT mutation is absent, common variation in MAPT that defines the H1 and H2 haplotype clades strongly influences disease risk. Surprisingly, this influence on risk extends to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), traditionally not defined as a tauopathy. This review will focus on recent work aimed at elucidating the mechanistic basis of this haplotype-specific effect on disease risk, implicating elevated levels of MAPT expression, particularly via increased transcription and/or alterations in splicing. This conforms to an emerging picture of a shared mechanism that underlies the fundamental process(es) leading to neuronal death. Increased availability of the fibrillogenic protein substrates of the pathological aggregates that define several neurodegenerative proteopathies, eg α-synuclein in PD, β-amyloid in AD and tau in the tauopathies, contributes to causation and risk in the familial and sporadic forms of these disorders, respectively.

  3. Decreased nuclear beta-catenin, tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration in GSK-3beta conditional transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lucas, J J; Hernández, F; Gómez-Ramos, P; Morán, M A; Hen, R; Avila, J

    2001-01-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) has been postulated to mediate Alzheimer's disease tau hyperphosphorylation, beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity and presenilin-1 mutation pathogenic effects. By using the tet-regulated system we have produced conditional transgenic mice overexpressing GSK-3beta in the brain during adulthood while avoiding perinatal lethality due to embryonic transgene expression. These mice show decreased levels of nuclear beta-catenin and hyperphosphorylation of tau in hippocampal neurons, the latter resulting in pretangle-like somatodendritic localization of tau. Neurons displaying somatodendritic localization of tau often show abnormal morphologies and detachment from the surrounding neuropil. Reactive astrocytosis and microgliosis were also indicative of neuronal stress and death. This was further confirmed by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining of dentate gyrus granule cells. Our results demonstrate that in vivo overexpression of GSK-3beta results in neurodegeneration and suggest that these mice can be used as an animal model to study the relevance of GSK-3beta deregulation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Imaging of tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model and in Alzheimer patients compared to normal controls.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Shimada, Hitoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Ji, Bin; Maeda, Jun; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Ono, Maiko; Masamoto, Kazuto; Takano, Harumasa; Sahara, Naruhiko; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Chang, Qing; Saido, Takaomi C; Takashima, Akihiko; Lewis, Jada; Jang, Ming-Kuei; Aoki, Ichio; Ito, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Makoto

    2013-09-18

    Accumulation of intracellular tau fibrils has been the focus of research on the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Here, we have developed a class of tau ligands, phenyl/pyridinyl-butadienyl-benzothiazoles/benzothiazoliums (PBBs), for visualizing diverse tau inclusions in brains of living patients with AD or non-AD tauopathies and animal models of these disorders. In vivo optical and positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging of a transgenic mouse model demonstrated sensitive detection of tau inclusions by PBBs. A pyridinated PBB, [(11)C]PBB3, was next applied in a clinical PET study, and its robust signal in the AD hippocampus wherein tau pathology is enriched contrasted strikingly with that of a senile plaque radioligand, [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound-B ([(11)C]PIB). [(11)C]PBB3-PET data were also consistent with the spreading of tau pathology with AD progression. Furthermore, increased [(11)C]PBB3 signals were found in a corticobasal syndrome patient negative for [(11)C]PIB-PET. PMID:24050400

  5. Modulation of tau protein fibrillization by oleocanthal.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria Chiara; Margarucci, Luigi; Riccio, Raffaele; Casapullo, Agostino

    2012-09-28

    Among the phenolic compounds extracted from extra virgin olive oil, oleocanthal (1) has attracted considerable attention in the modulation of many human diseases, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Indeed, 1 is capable of altering the fibrillization of tau protein, which is one of the key factors at the basis of neurodegenerative diseases, and of covalently reacting with lysine ε-amino groups of the tau fragment K18 in an unspecific fashion. In the present study, an investigation of the recognition process and the reaction profile between 1 and the wild-type tau protein has been conducted by a circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry combined approach. As a result, 1 has been found to interact with tau-441, inducing stable conformational modifications of the protein secondary structure and also interfering with tau aggregation. These findings provide experimental support for the potential reduced risk of AD and related neurodegenerative diseases associated with olive oil consumption and may offer a new chemical scaffold for the development of AD-modulating agents. PMID:22988908

  6. Tau neutrino component to tritium beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1995-06-01

    A framework is given for explaining anomalous results of neutrino mass experiments that measure the high energy electron spectrum of tritium {beta} decay. The experimental results have been fit to a negative neutrino mass square. We show that there is a consistent phenomenological interpretation due to a positive mass tau neutrino component of the {beta} decay spectrum, with strong near threshold final state interactions with the He nucleus. If this enhancement is due to new interactions between low energy tau neutrinos and nuclei, then the tritium 0 decay experiments could be used as detectors for cosmic background tau neutrinos. The model predicts a distinctive spectrum shape that is consistent with a recent high statistics LLNL experiment. A fit to the experiment gives a tau neutrino mass of 23 eV. Tau neutrinos of this mass would dominate the mass of the universe. Requirements for a theoretical model are given, as well as models that realize different aspects of these requirements. While qualitatively successful, the theoretical models have such severe quantitative difficulties that the accuracy of the molecular physics of the T-{sup 3}He ion, assumed in the analysis of the experimental data, is called into question.

  7. Nuclear and cytoplasmic tau proteins from human nonneuronal cells share common structural and functional features with brain tau.

    PubMed

    Cross, D C; Muñoz, J P; Hernández, P; Maccioni, R B

    2000-05-01

    The heterogeneous family of tau proteins interacts with microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The tau isoforms have been shown to play a major role in neuronal polarity. However, tau-like proteins have been found in several other types of cells. Previous studies have also indicated the presence of a nuclear tau. The relationships between nuclear and cytoplasmic tau as well as the functional aspects of the nuclear tau are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using specific primers that a transcript with features of neuronal tau is present in human fibroblast and Huh-7 hepatoma cell lines. Additionally, we present the first isolation and characterization of cytosolic and nuclear tau-like proteins from nonneuronal cells. Nonneuronal cytosolic tau components were isolated using the perchloric acid precipitation approach, while nuclear tau was isolated after selective extractions using high-ionic strength buffers. The cytoplasmic tau of nonneuronal cells is composed of at least three isoforms, whereas two main isoforms were detected in nuclear tau. Interestingly, the cytoplasmic and nuclear tau components exhibited the capacity to promote tubulin polymerization in vitro. Immunofluorescence studies using monoclonal anti-tau antibodies indicated a discrete distribution of tau protein in both the interphase and mitotic nucleus. In the latter, tau colocalized with the chromosomal scaffold. These studies, together with previous evidence on tau roles in modulating microtubule growth from centrosomes, and its role in the interaction patterns that stabilize the integrity of the cytoskeletal network, strongly support the idea that tau is a multifunctional protein involved in fundamental cellular processes. PMID:10842324

  8. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies.

  9. Studies of {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} at BABAR and a search for a second-class current

    SciTech Connect

    Amo Sanchez, P. del; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.

    2011-02-01

    We report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.42{+-}0.11(stat){+-}0.07(syst))x10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})<9.9x10{sup -5}.

  10. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  11. Inhibition of tau fibrillization by oleocanthal via reaction with the amino groups of tau.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkai; Sperry, Jeffrey B; Crowe, Alex; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Amos B; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2009-08-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes microtubule assembly and stability. In Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies, tau fibrillizes and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles. Recently, oleocanthal isolated from extra virgin olive oil was found to display non-steroidal anti-inflammatory activity similar to ibuprofen. As our unpublished data indicates an inhibitory effect of oleocanthal on amyloid beta peptide fibrillization, we reasoned that it might inhibit tau fibrillization as well. Herein, we demonstrate that oleocanthal abrogates fibrillization of tau by locking tau into the naturally unfolded state. Using PHF6 consisting of the amino acid residues VQIVYK, a hexapeptide within the third repeat of tau that is essential for fibrillization, we show that oleocanthal forms an adduct with the lysine via initial Schiff base formation. Structure and function studies demonstrate that the two aldehyde groups of oleocanthal are required for the inhibitory activity. These two aldehyde groups show certain specificity when titrated with free lysine and oleocanthal does not significantly affect the normal function of tau. These findings provide a potential scheme for the development of novel therapies for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:19549281

  12. Search for new physics in B{yields}D*{tau}nu-bar {sub {tau}} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Nisandzic, Ivan

    2012-10-23

    B physics offers important tests of the Standard Model at low energies. Recently, BaBar observed significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations in the semileptonic B{yields}D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays. Interestingly, the measured leptonic B{yields}{tau}{nu} branching fraction also deviates from CKM unitarity predictions. Motivated by these results we investigate the most general set of lowest dimensional effective operators leading to modifications of b{yields}c(u) (semi)tauonic transitions. Allowing for general flavor violation, we find that among possible operator structures, new contributions from right-right vector and right-left scalar quark currents provide viable explanations of the anomalies. In addition, we identify a number of B{yields}D*{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} transition observables with the power to discriminate among the various effective operators' contributions. They are the differential decay rate, longitudinal D* polarization fraction, D*-{tau} opening angle asymmetry and the {tau} helicity asymmetry.

  13. Inhibition of tau fibrillization by oleocanthal via reaction with the amino groups of tau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenkai; Sperry, Jeffrey B.; Crowe, Alex; Trojanowski, John Q.; Smith, Amos B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes microtubule assembly and stability. In Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies, tau fibrillizes and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles. Recently, oleocanthal isolated from extra virgin olive oil was found to display non-steroidal anti-inflammatory activity similar to ibuprofen. Since our unpublished data indicates an inhibitory effect of oleocanthal on Aβ fibrillization, we reasoned that it might inhibit tau fibrillization as well. Herein we demonstrate that oleocanthal abrogates fibrillization of tau by locking tau into the naturally unfolded state. Using PHF6 consisting of the amino acid residues VQIVYK, a hexapeptide within the third repeat of tau that is essential for fibrillization, we show that oleocanthal forms an adduct with the lysine via initial Schiff base formation. Structure and function studies demonstrate that the two aldehyde groups of oleocanthal are required for the inhibitory activity. These two aldehyde groups show certain specificity when titrated with free lysine and oleocanthal does not significantly affect the normal function of tau. These findings provide a potential scheme for the development of novel therapies for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:19549281

  14. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  15. Structural determinants of Tau aggregation inhibitor potency.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Kelsey N; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-11-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers.

  16. Structural Determinants of Tau Aggregation Inhibitor Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J.; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers. PMID:24072703

  17. B Meson Decays With Tau Leptons in the Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Michael; /Freiburg U.

    2009-08-05

    We present measurements of B meson decays with {tau} leptons in the final state. These decays, while experimentally more challenging than those involving light leptons, provide enhanced sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model due to the large {tau} mass. We present measurements of the branching fractions of B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} and B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, as well as searches for the forbidden decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}} and B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}. These measurements are based on several hundred million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events recorded with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider.

  18. Atmospheric tau neutrinos in a multikiloton liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Janet; Gouvea, Andre de; Shalgar, Shashank; Spitz, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    An ultralarge liquid argon time projection chamber based neutrino detector will have the uncommon ability to detect atmospheric {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau} events. This paper discusses the most promising modes for identifying charged current {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau}, and shows that, with simple kinematic cuts, {approx}30 {nu}{sub {tau}}+{nu}{tau} interactions can be isolated in a 100 kt{center_dot}yr exposure, with greater than 4{sigma} significance. This sample is sufficient to perform flux-averaged total cross-section and cross-section shape parametrization measurements--the first steps toward using {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau} to search for physics beyond the standard model.

  19. Can we see tau-Flavour Violation at the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.; Gomez, M. E.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-02-10

    We study the conditions required for chi{sub 2}->chi+tau{sup +}-mu{sup +}- decays to yield observable tau flavour violation at the LHC, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density.

  20. Tau physics at p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  1. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  3. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  4. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  5. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  6. Observation of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and evidence for B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, A.; Rozanska, M.; Kapusta, P.; Matyja, A.; Ostrowicz, W.; Stypula, J.; Adachi, I.; Higuchi, T.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.; Aihara, H.

    2010-10-01

    We present measurements of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}decays in a data sample of 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find 446{sub -56}{sup +58} B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, and 146{sub -41}{sup +42} B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations. The latter signal provides the first evidence for this decay mode. The measured branching fractions are B(B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(2.12{sub -0.27}{sup +0.28}(stat){+-}0.29(syst))% and B(B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(0.77{+-}0.22(stat){+-}0.12(syst))%.

  7. Enumerative Geometry, Tau-Functions and Heisenberg-Virasoro Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we establish relations between three enumerative geometry tau-functions, namely the Kontsevich-Witten, Hurwitz and Hodge tau-functions. The relations allow us to describe the tau-functions in terms of matrix integrals, Virasoro constraints and Kac-Schwarz operators. All constructed operators belong to the algebra (or group) of symmetries of the KP hierarchy.

  8. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  9. Selective clearance of aberrant tau proteins and rescue of neurotoxicity by transcription factor EB

    PubMed Central

    Polito, Vinicia A; Li, Hongmei; Martini-Stoica, Heidi; Wang, Baiping; Yang, Li; Xu, Yin; Swartzlander, Daniel B; Palmieri, Michela; di Ronza, Alberto; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Sardiello, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Zheng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently discovered, transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a molecule shown to play central roles in cellular degradative processes. Here we investigate the role of TFEB in AD mouse models. In this study, we demonstrate that TFEB effectively reduces neurofibrillary tangle pathology and rescues behavioral and synaptic deficits and neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy with no detectable adverse effects when expressed in wild-type mice. TFEB specifically targets hyperphosphorylated and misfolded Tau species present in both soluble and aggregated fractions while leaving normal Tau intact. We provide in vitro evidence that this effect requires lysosomal activity and we identify phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) as a direct target of TFEB that is required for TFEB-dependent aberrant Tau clearance. The specificity and efficacy of TFEB in mediating the clearance of toxic Tau species makes it an attractive therapeutic target for treating diseases of tauopathy including AD. PMID:25069841

  10. C-Glycosylflavones Alleviate Tau Phosphorylation and Amyloid Neurotoxicity through GSK3β Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Zhang, Bei; Su, Wei Wen; Williams, Philip G; Li, Qing X

    2016-07-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common brain disorder worldwide. Aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation and accumulation play critical roles in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles highly associated with neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment in AD pathogenesis. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a key kinase responsible for tau hyperphosphorylation. Selective inhibition of GSK3β is a promising strategy in AD therapy. Corn silks (CS, Zea mays L.) have been traditionally used as a medicinal herb and recently noted for their potentially cognitive benefits. However, the neuroprotective components of CS and their molecular mechanism have received little attention to date. As part of our effort screening phytochemicals against a broad panel of kinases targeting AD tauopathy, we found inhibition of GSK3β by CS extracts. Subsequent bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation and identification of two 6-C-glycosylflavones, isoorientin (1) and 3'-methoxymaysin (2), with selective inhibition against GSK3β in vitro. Enzyme kinetics and molecular docking studies demonstrated that 1 specifically inhibited GSK3β via an ATP noncompetitive mechanism, acting as a substrate competitive inhibitor of GSK3β. Further in vitro cellular studies demonstrated that 1 effectively attenuated tau phosphorylation mediated by GSK3β and was neuroprotective against β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The C-glycosylflavones represent new lead candidates with a novel mechanism of action for the development of AD phytopharmaceuticals. PMID:27213824

  11. Activation of asparaginyl endopeptidase leads to Tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Tung, Yunn Chyn; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-06-14

    Neurofibrillary pathology of abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau is a key lesion of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, and its density in the brain directly correlates with dementia. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A, which in turn is regulated by inhibitor 2, I2(PP2A). In acidic conditions such as generated by brain ischemia and hypoxia, especially in association with hyperglycemia as in diabetes, I2(PP2A) is cleaved by asparaginyl endopeptidase at Asn-175 into the N-terminal fragment (I2NTF) and the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF). Both I2NTF and I2CTF are known to bind to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and inhibit its activity. Here we show that the level of activated asparaginyl endopeptidase is significantly increased, and this enzyme and I2(PP2A) translocate, respectively, from neuronal lysosomes and nucleus to the cytoplasm where they interact and are associated with hyperphosphorylated Tau in Alzheimer disease brain. Asparaginyl endopeptidase from Alzheimer disease brain could cleave GST-I2(PP2A), except when I2(PP2A) was mutated at the cleavage site Asn-175 to Gln. Finally, an induction of acidosis by treatment with kainic acid or pH 6.0 medium activated asparaginyl endopeptidase and consequently produced the cleavage of I2(PP2A), inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A, and hyperphosphorylation of Tau, and the knockdown of asparaginyl endopeptidase with siRNA abolished this pathway in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest the involvement of brain acidosis in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and asparaginyl endopeptidase-I2(PP2A)-protein phosphatase 2A-Tau hyperphosphorylation pathway as a therapeutic target.

  12. Estimation of Tau and Phosphorylated Tau181 in Serum of Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Rahul; Rai, Nitish; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Kusum; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Sadanand; Dey, Aparajit B.; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    The elevated level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Tau and phosphorylated Tau181 (p-Tau181) proteins are well established hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Elevated level of p-Tau181 can differentiate AD from other neurodegenerative disease. However, the expression level of these proteins in serum of AD patient is not well set up. This study sought to evaluate the level of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients for an alternative approach to establish protein-based markers by convenient way. Blood samples were collected from 39 AD patients, 37 MCI patients and 37 elderly individuals as controls. The levels of Tau and p-Tau181 in the serum of the different groups were measured by label free real time Surface Plasmon Resonance technology by using specific antibodies, and were further confirmed by the conventional western blot method. An appropriate statistical analysis, including Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), was performed. The concentrations of serum Tau and p-Tau181 were significantly higher (p<0.00001) in AD (Tau; 47.49±9.00ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.161±0.04 ng/μL) compared to MCI (Tau; 39.26±7.78 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.135±0.02 ng/μL) and were further higher compared to elderly controls (Tau; 34.92±6.58 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.122±0.01 ng/ μL). A significant (p<0.0001) downhill correlation was found between Tau as well as p-Tau181 levels with HMSE and MoCA score. This study for the first time reports the concentration of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD and MCI patients. The cutoff values of Tau and p-Tau181 of AD and MCI patients with sensitivity and specificity reveal that serum level of these proteins can be used as a predictive marker for AD and MCI. PMID:27459603

  13. Opposite effects of two estrogen receptors on tau phosphorylation through disparate effects on the miR-218/PTPA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan-Si; Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Dan; Huang, He-Zhou; Wei, Na; Tan, Lu; Chen, Jian-Guo; Man, Heng-Ye; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The two estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, mediate the diverse biological functions of estradiol. Opposite effects of ERα and ERβ have been found in estrogen-induced cancer cell proliferation and differentiation as well as in memory-related tasks. However, whether these opposite effects are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. Here, we find that ERα and ERβ play contrasting roles in regulating tau phosphorylation, which is a pathological hallmark of AD. ERα increases the expression of miR-218 to suppress the protein levels of its specific target, protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα). The downregulation of PTPα results in the abnormal tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (resulting in activation) and protein phosphatase 2A (resulting in inactivation), the major tau kinase and phosphatase. Suppressing the increased expression of miR-218 inhibits the ERα-induced tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the PTPα decline. In contrast, ERβ inhibits tau phosphorylation by limiting miR-218 levels and restoring the miR-218 levels antagonized the attenuation of tau phosphorylation by ERβ. These data reveal for the first time opposing roles for ERα and ERβ in AD pathogenesis and suggest potential therapeutic targets for AD. PMID:26111662

  14. MicroRNA-146a suppresses ROCK1 allowing hyperphosphorylation of tau in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Huang, Yue; Wang, Li-Ling; Zhang, Yong-Fang; Xu, Jing; Zhou, Yi; Lourenco, Guinevere F.; Zhang, Bei; Wang, Ying; Ren, Ru-Jing; Halliday, Glenda M.; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-146a is upregulated in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we show that the rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is a target of microRNA-146a in neural cells. Knockdown of ROCK1 mimicked the effects of microRNA-146a overexpression and induced abnormal tau phosphorylation, which was associated with inhibition of phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The ROCK1/PTEN pathway has been implicated in the neuronal hyperphosphorylation of tau that occurs in AD. To determine the function of ROCK1 in AD, brain tissue from 17 donors with low, intermediate or high probability of AD pathology were obtained and analyzed. Data showed that ROCK1 protein levels were reduced and ROCK1 colocalised with hyperphosphorylated tau in early neurofibrillary tangles. Intra-hippocampal delivery of a microRNA-146a specific inhibitor (antagomir) into 5xFAD mice showed enhanced hippocampal levels of ROCK1 protein and repressed tau hyperphosphorylation, partly restoring memory function in the 5xFAD mice. Our in vitro and in vivo results confirm that dysregulation of microRNA-146a biogenesis contributes to tau hyperphosphorylation and AD pathogenesis, and inhibition of this microRNA could be a viable novel in vivo therapy for AD. PMID:27221467

  15. First selective dual inhibitors of tau phosphorylation and Beta-amyloid aggregation, two major pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Marica; Schmitt, Christian; Miralinaghi, Parisa; Catto, Marco; Hartmann, Rolf W; Carotti, Angelo; Engel, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple factors account for the accumulation of neurocellular changes, which may begin several years before symptoms appear. The most important pathogenic brain changes that are contributing to the development of AD are the formation of the cytotoxic β-amyloid aggregates and of the neurofibrillary tangles, which originate from amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively. New therapeutic agents that target both major pathogenic mechanisms may be particularly efficient. In this study, we introduce bis(hydroxyphenyl)-substituted thiophenes as a novel class of selective, dual inhibitors of the tau kinase Dyrk1A and of the amyloid-β aggregation. PMID:25247807

  16. Evidence of the purely leptonic decay B- --> tau- nu(tau).

    PubMed

    Ikado, K; Abe, K; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Akemoto, M; Anipko, D; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barbero, M; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Choi, Y; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Flanagan, J; Fratina, S; Furukawa, K; Gabyshev, N; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Hinz, L; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Iida, N; Iijima, T; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kamitani, T; Kang, J H; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kikutani, E; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kinoshita, K; Koiso, H; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lesiak, T; Limosani, A; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Michizono, S; Mimashi, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Nagamine, T; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ogawa, Y; Ohmi, K; Ohshima, T; Ohuchi, N; Oide, K; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Park, C W; Park, H; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rozanska, M; Sakai, Y; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shidara, T; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stoeck, H; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yoshida, M; Yusa, Y; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zürcher, D

    2006-12-22

    We present the first evidence of the decay B- --> tau- nu(tau), using 414 fb(-1) of data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in hadronic modes. We detect the signal with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations including systematics and measure the branching fraction to be B(B- --> tau- nu(tau)) = (1.79(-0.49) +0.56(stat)(-0.51) +0.46(syst)) x 10(-4). This implies that fB = 0.229(-0.031) +0.036(stat)(-0.037) +0.034(syst) GeV and is the first direct measurement of this quantity. PMID:17280341

  17. Tau Lepton Flavor Violation Results from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, A.

    2009-12-01

    We report the recent results obtained by BABAR collaboration in lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches in the tau lepton sector, presenting 16 new results from τLLL (L = e, μ), τ→LV0 (V0 = ρ0, K*0, K*-0, Φ and τ→LKS.

  18. Tau Phosphorylation, Aggregation, and Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J.; Santa-María, I.; Pérez, M.; Hernández, F.; Moreno, F.

    2006-01-01

    Protein aggregation takes place in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is a controversy about the possible toxicity of these protein aggregates. In this review, this controversy is discussed, focussing on the tau aggregation that takes place in those disorders known as tauopathies. PMID:17047313

  19. Search for a low-mass higgs boson in Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau(+)tau(-) at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-30

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau+tau-, tau+-->e+nu(e)nu(tau), or tau+-->mu+nu(mu)nu(tau). The data sample contains 122x10(6) Upsilon(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a narrow structure in the studied tau+tau- invariant mass region of 4.03tau+tau-)<10.10 GeV/c2. We exclude at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) a low-mass Higgs boson decaying to tau+tau- with a product branching fraction B(Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0))xB(A(0)-->tau+tau-)>(1.5-16)x10(-5) across the m(tau+tau-) range. We also set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the tau+tau- decay of the eta(b) at B(eta(b)-->tau+tau-)<8%.

  20. Search for a low-mass higgs boson in Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau(+)tau(-) at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-30

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau+tau-, tau+-->e+nu(e)nu(tau), or tau+-->mu+nu(mu)nu(tau). The data sample contains 122x10(6) Upsilon(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a narrow structure in the studied tau+tau- invariant mass region of 4.03tau+tau-)<10.10 GeV/c2. We exclude at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) a low-mass Higgs boson decaying to tau+tau- with a product branching fraction B(Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0))xB(A(0)-->tau+tau-)>(1.5-16)x10(-5) across the m(tau+tau-) range. We also set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the tau+tau- decay of the eta(b) at B(eta(b)-->tau+tau-)<8%. PMID:19905799

  1. Measurement of the Semileptonic Anti-B to D(*) Tau Anti-Nu/Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Pegna, David; /Princeton U.

    2011-11-11

    Semileptonic B meson decays into final states containing the {tau} lepton are of interesting as they provide information on the Standard Model as well as a window on new physics effects. We present results on {bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)} {tau}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} decays where the second B in the event is fully reconstructed.

  2. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  3. Alzheimer-related decrease in CYFIP2 links amyloid production to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory loss

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sachin Suresh; Mizuno, Keiko; Ghosh, Anshua; Aziz, Wajeeha; Troakes, Claire; Daoud, Jason; Golash, Vidushi; Noble, Wendy; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss, plaques resulting from abnormal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and presence of neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Currently, it is not known what links these abnormalities together. Cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) has been suggested to regulate mRNA translation at synapses and this may include local synthesis of APP and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, a kinase that can phosphorylate tau. Further, CYFIP2 is part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein complex, which has been implicated in actin polymerization at synapses, a process thought to be required for memory formation. Our previous studies on p25 dysregulation put forward the hypothesis that CYFIP2 expression is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease and that this contributes to memory impairment, abnormal APP processing and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here, we tested this hypothesis. First, in post-mortem tissue CYFIP2 expression was reduced by ∼50% in severe Alzheimer’s hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus when normalized to expression of a neuronal or synaptic marker protein. Interestingly, there was also a trend for decreased expression in mild Alzheimer’s disease hippocampus. Second, CYFIP2 expression was reduced in old but not in young Tg2576 mice, a model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we tested the direct impact of reduced CYFIP2 expression in heterozygous null mutant mice. We found that in hippocampus this reduced expression causes an increase in APP and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein, but not mRNA expression, and elevates production of amyloid-β42. Reduced CYFIP2 expression also increases alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II protein expression, and this is associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau at serine-214. The reduced expression also

  4. Review of recent results on the /tau/ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This is a review of the recent results on the /tau/ lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus//2..pi../sup 0/..nu../sub /tau// with much improved precision, limits on decay modes containing /eta/ mesons, including the second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus///eta/..nu../sub /tau//, and limits on exotic decay modes. The implications of these results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  6. The self-assembly ability of First microtubule-binding repeat from tau and its modulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Lianxiu; Zeng Zhiyang; Du Jintang; Zhao Yufen; Li Yanmei . E-mail: liym@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-09-22

    Aggregation of abnormally phosphorylated tau in the form of tangs of paired helical filaments (PHFs) is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. It is of fundamental importance to study the mechanism of PHF formation and its modulation by phosphorylation. In this work, we have focused on First microtubule-binding repeat of tau encompassing an abnormal phosphorylation site Ser{sup 262}. The assembly propensities of this repeat and its corresponding phosphorylated form were investigated by turbidity and electron microscopy. Additionally, conformation of the two peptides is also analyzed through circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Our results reveal that both of them are capable of self-assembly and phosphorylation at Ser{sup 262} could speed up the process of assembly. A possible mechanism of PHF formation is proposed and enhancing effect of phosphorylation on assembly provides an explanation to its toxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  8. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413]. PMID:27222125

  9. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  10. The Disk around the Brown Dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Duchêne, Gaspard; Di Francesco, James; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-01

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10-4 M ⊙ (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10-4 M ⊙ and <2.7 × 10-4 M ⊙, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  11. Tau Binds to Multiple Tubulin Dimers with Helical Structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Han; Culver, Jacob A; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-07-29

    Understanding the mechanism by which tau binds to and promotes microtubule (MT) assembly as part of its native function may also provide insight into its loss of function that occurs in neurodegenerative disease. Both mechanistic and structural studies of tau have been hindered by its intrinsic disorder and highly dynamic nature. Here, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and acrylodan fluorescence screening to study the stoichiometry and structural features of tau-tubulin assemblies. Our results show that tau binds to multiple tubulin dimers, even when MT assembly is inhibited. Moreover, we observe helical structure in the repeat regions of the MT binding domain of tau in the tau-tubulin complex, reflecting partial folding upon binding. Our findings support a role for tau's intrinsic disorder in providing a flexible scaffold for binding tubulin and MTs and a disorder-to-order transition in mediating this important interaction.

  12. Effects of 3-repeat tau on taxol mobility through microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Fygenson, Deborah; Kim, Mahn Won

    2005-03-01

    Both the anti-cancer drug taxol and the microtubule-associated protein tau suppress dynamics of microtubules (MT). We have observed taxol mobility with full-length 3-repeat tau, one of six tau isoforms, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on MTs and compare with earlier results on recombinant full-length adult 4-repeat tau. Taxol mobility becomes highly sensitive to taxol concentration in the presence of 3-repeat tau (up to 1:1 molar ratio) as it does in the presence of 4-repeat tau, but is 2 to 3 times faster at low taxol concentrations. Fitting to a mean-field binding reaction model [J.L. Ross et.al, PNAS 101:12910-5 (2004)] suggests that the presence of 3-repeat tau enhances taxol movement through pores in the MT walls.

  13. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  14. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  15. Passive immunization with anti-Tau antibodies in two transgenic models: reduction of Tau pathology and delay of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiyun; Wu, Su; Murray, Tracey K; Kinley, Robert; Cella, Claire V; Sims, Helen; Buckner, Nicola; Hanmer, Jenna; Davies, Peter; O'Neill, Michael J; Hutton, Michael L; Citron, Martin

    2011-09-30

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and several related disorders (tauopathies). In the disease Tau aggregates and becomes hyperphosphorylated forming paired helical and straight filaments, which can further condense into higher order neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. The development of this pathology is consistently associated with progressive neuronal loss and cognitive decline. The identification of tractable therapeutic targets in this pathway has been challenging, and consequently very few clinical studies addressing Tau pathology are underway. Recent active immunization studies have raised the possibility of modulating Tau pathology by activating the immune system. Here we report for the first time on passive immunotherapy for Tau in two well established transgenic models of Tau pathogenesis. We show that peripheral administration of two antibodies against pathological Tau forms significantly reduces biochemical Tau pathology in the JNPL3 mouse model. We further demonstrate that peripheral administration of the same antibodies in the more rapidly progressive P301S tauopathy model not only reduces Tau pathology quantitated by biochemical assays and immunohistochemistry, but also significantly delays the onset of motor function decline and weight loss. This is accompanied by a reduction in neurospheroids, providing direct evidence of reduced neurodegeneration. Thus, passive immunotherapy is effective at preventing the buildup of intracellular Tau pathology, neurospheroids, and associated symptoms, although the exact mechanism remains uncertain. Tau immunotherapy should therefore be considered as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  16. Charged-Higgs-boson effects in the B{yields}D{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} differential decay distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nierste, Ulrich; Trine, Stephanie; Westhoff, Susanne

    2008-07-01

    We show that the decay mode B{yields}D{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} is competitive with and complementary to B{yields}{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} in the search for charged-Higgs effects. Updating the relevant form factors, we find that the differential distribution in the decay chain B{yields}D{nu}{sub {tau}}{tau}{sup -}[{yields}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}] excellently discriminates between standard model and charged-Higgs contributions. By measuring the D and {pi}{sup -} energies and the angle between the D and {pi}{sup -} three-momenta, one can determine the effective charged-Higgs coupling including a possible CP-violating phase.

  17. Metabolic changes over the course of aging in a mouse model of tau deposition.

    PubMed

    Joly-Amado, Aurélie; Serraneau, Karisa S; Brownlow, Milene; Marín de Evsikova, Caralina; Speakman, John R; Gordon, Marcia N; Morgan, Dave

    2016-08-01

    Weight loss and food intake disturbances that often precede cognitive decline and diagnosis have been extensively reported in Alzheimer's disease patients. Previously, we observed that transgenic mice overexpressing tau seemed to eat more food yet weigh less than nontransgenic littermates. Thus, the present longitudinal study measured the time course of changes in metabolic state over the lifespan of the tau depositing Tg4510 mouse model of tau deposition. Although body weight was comparable to nontransgenic littermates at 2 months of age, Tg4510 mice weighed less at older ages. This was accompanied by the accumulation of tau pathology and by dramatically increased activity in all phases of the 24-hour cycle. Resting metabolic rate was also increased at 7 months of age. At 12 months near the end of the Tg4510 lifespan, there was a wasting phase, with a considerable decrease of resting metabolic rate, although hyperactivity was maintained. These diverse changes in metabolism in a mouse model of tau deposition are discussed in the context of known changes in energy metabolism in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27318134

  18. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  19. Somatostatin, tau, and beta-amyloid within the anterior olfactory nucleus in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, D; Ubeda-Bañon, I; de la Rosa-Prieto, C; Argandoña-Palacios, L; Garcia-Muñozguren, S; Insausti, R; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2010-06-01

    Impaired olfaction is an early symptom of Alzheimer disease (AD). This likely to reflect neurodegenerative processes taking place in basal telencephalic structures that mediate olfactory processing, including the anterior olfactory nucleus. Betaeta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation in AD brain may relate to decline in somatostatin levels: somatostatin induces the expression of the Abeta-degrading enzyme neprilysin and somatostatin deficiency in AD may therefore reduce Abeta clearance. We have investigated the expression of somatostatin in the anterior olfactory nucleus of AD and control brain. We report that somatostatin levels were reduced by approximately 50% in AD brain. Furthermore, triple-immunofluorescence revealed co-localization of somatostatin expression with Abeta (65.43%) with Abeta and tau (19.75%) and with tau (2.47%). These data indicate that somatostatin decreases in AD and its expression may be linked with Abeta deposition.

  20. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  1. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  3. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  4. P44, the 'longevity-assurance' isoform of P53, regulates tau phosphorylation and is activated in an age-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Pehar, Mariana; Ko, Mi Hee; Li, Mi; Scrable, Heidi; Puglielli, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    p44 is a short isoform of p53 with 'longevity-assurance' activity. Overexpression of p44 in the mouse (p44(+/+) transgenic mice) causes a progeroid phenotype that mimics an accelerated form of aging. The phenotype includes abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-binding protein tau, synaptic deficits, and cognitive decline. Genetic engineering demonstrated that the phosphorylation status of tau acts upstream of the synaptic deficits. Here, we provide evidence that p44 promotes the phosphorylation of tau in the mouse. Specifically, we show that p44 binds to the promoter of tau kinases Dyrk1A, GSK3β, Cdk5, p35, and p39 and activates their transcription. The upregulation of the above kinases is followed by increased phosphorylation of tau. Finally, we show that p44 is preferentially found in the nucleus and that its levels increase with age in the mouse brain. Taken together, these results suggest that an imbalance in the p53:p44 ratio might be involved with the altered tau metabolism that characterizes aging. PMID:24341977

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano-Takahashi, Michiko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Tomizawa, Kayoko; Kato, Ryohei; Tanio, Michikazu; Shirota, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  6. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  7. Hsc70 rapidly engages tau after microtubule destabilization.

    PubMed

    Jinwal, Umesh K; O'Leary, John C; Borysov, Sergiy I; Jones, Jeffrey R; Li, Qingyou; Koren, John; Abisambra, Jose F; Vestal, Grant D; Lawson, Lisa Y; Johnson, Amelia G; Blair, Laura J; Jin, Ying; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2010-05-28

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau plays a crucial role in regulating the dynamic stability of microtubules during neuronal development and synaptic transmission. In a group of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, conformational changes in Tau are associated with the initial stages of disease pathology. Folding of Tau into the MC1 conformation, where the amino acids at residues 7-9 interact with residues 312-342, is one of the earliest pathological alterations of Tau in Alzheimer disease. The mechanism of this conformational change in Tau and the subsequent effect on function and association to microtubules is largely unknown. Recent work by our group and others suggests that members of the Hsp70 family play a significant role in Tau regulation. Our new findings suggest that heat shock cognate (Hsc) 70 facilitates Tau-mediated microtubule polymerization. The association of Hsc70 with Tau was rapidly enhanced following treatment with microtubule-destabilizing agents. The fate of Tau released from the microtubule was found to be dependent on ATPase activity of Hsc70. Microtubule destabilization also rapidly increased the MC1 folded conformation of Tau. An in vitro assay suggests that Hsc70 facilitates formation of MC1 Tau. However, in a hyperphosphorylating environment, the formation of MC1 was abrogated, but Hsc70 binding to Tau was enhanced. Thus, under normal circumstances, MC1 formation may be a protective conformation facilitated by Hsc70. However, in a diseased environment, Hsc70 may preserve Tau in a more unstructured state, perhaps facilitating its pathogenicity.

  8. Sex hormone-related neurosteroids differentially rescue bioenergetic deficits induced by amyloid-β or hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Amandine; Biliouris, Emily E; Lang, Undine E; Götz, Jürgen; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease marked by a progressive cognitive decline. Metabolic impairments are common hallmarks of AD, and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau protein--the two foremost histopathological signs of AD--have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Neurosteroids have recently shown promise in alleviating cognitive and neuronal sequelae of AD. The present study evaluates the impact of neurosteroids belonging to the sex hormone family (progesterone, estradiol, estrone, testosterone, 3α-androstanediol) on mitochondrial dysfunction in cellular models of AD: human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) stably transfected with constructs encoding (1) the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in overexpression of APP and Aβ, (2) wild-type tau (wtTau), and (3) mutant tau (P301L), that induces abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation. We show that while APP and P301L cells both display a drop in ATP levels, they present distinct mitochondrial impairments with regard to their bioenergetic profiles. The P301L cells presented a decreased maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, while APP cells exhibited, in addition, a decrease in basal respiration, ATP turnover, and glycolytic reserve. All neurosteroids showed beneficial effects on ATP production and mitochondrial membrane potential in APP/Aβ overexpressing cells while only progesterone and estradiol increased ATP levels in mutant tau cells. Of note, testosterone was more efficient in alleviating Aβ-induced mitochondrial deficits, while progesterone and estrogen were the most effective neurosteroids in our model of AD-related tauopathy. Our findings lend further support to the neuroprotective effects of neurosteroids in AD and may open new avenues for the development of gender-specific therapeutic approaches in AD. PMID:26198711

  9. Brain Intraventricular Injection of Amyloid-β in Zebrafish Embryo Impairs Cognition and Increases Tau Phosphorylation, Effects Reversed by Lithium

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Laura Roesler; Eltz, Natalia Silva; Hackman, Cristiana; Fonseca, Raphaela; Altenhofen, Stefani; Guerra, Heydi Noriega; Freitas, Vanessa Morais; Bonan, Carla Denise; Vianna, Monica Ryff Moreira Roca

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no effective treatment and commonly diagnosed only on late stages. Amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and exacerbated tau phosphorylation are molecular hallmarks of AD implicated in cognitive deficits and synaptic and neuronal loss. The Aβ and tau connection is beginning to be elucidated and attributed to interaction with different components of common signaling pathways. Recent evidences suggest that non-fibrillary Aβ forms bind to membrane receptors and modulate GSK-3β activity, which in turn phosphorylates the microtubule-associated tau protein leading to axonal disruption and toxic accumulation. Available AD animal models, ranging from rodent to invertebrates, significantly contributed to our current knowledge, but complementary platforms for mechanistic and candidate drug screenings remain critical for the identification of early stage biomarkers and potential disease-modifying therapies. Here we show that Aβ1–42 injection in the hindbrain ventricle of 24 hpf zebrafish embryos results in specific cognitive deficits and increased tau phosphorylation in GSK-3β target residues at 5dpf larvae. These effects are reversed by lithium incubation and not accompanied by apoptotic markers. We believe this may represent a straightforward platform useful to identification of cellular and molecular mechanisms of early stage AD-like symptoms and the effects of neuroactive molecules in pharmacological screenings. PMID:25187954

  10. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  11. The CDF-II tau physics program triggers, tau ID and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Pagliarone et al.

    2003-11-03

    The study of processes containing {tau} leptons in the final state will play an important role at Tevatron Run II. Such final states will be relevant both for electroweak studies and measurements as well as in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The present paper discusses the physics opportunities and challenges related to the implementation of new set of triggers able to select events containing tau candidates in the final state. They illustrate, in particular, the physics capabilities for a variety of new physics scenarios such as supersymmetry (SUSY), SUSY with Rp-parity violation, with Bilinear parity violation or models with the violation of lepton flavor. Finally, they present the first Run II results obtained using some of the described tau triggers.

  12. A Novel Triple Repeat Mutant Tau Transgenic Model That Mimics Aspects of Pick’s Disease and Fronto-Temporal Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rockenstein, Edward; Overk, Cassia R.; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Bisquert, Alejandro; Trejo-Morales, Margarita; Spencer, Brian; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are a group of disorders leading to cognitive and behavioral impairment in the aging population. While four-repeat (4R) Tau is more abundant in corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Alzheimer’s disease, three-repeat (3R) Tau is the most abundant splice, in Pick's disease. A number of transgenic models expressing wild-type and mutant forms of the 4R Tau have been developed. However, few models of three-repeat Tau are available. A transgenic mouse model expressing three-repeat Tau was developed bearing the mutations associated with familial forms of Pick's disease (L266V and G272V mutations). Two lines expressing high (Line 13) and low (Line 2) levels of the three-repeat mutant Tau were analyzed. By Western blot, using antibodies specific to three-repeat Tau, Line 13 expressed 5-times more Tau than Line 2. The Tau expressed by these mice was most abundant in the frontal-temporal cortex and limbic system and was phosphorylated at residues detected by the PHF-1, AT8, CP9 and CP13 antibodies. The higher-expressing mice displayed hyperactivity, memory deficits in the water maze and alterations in the round beam. The behavioral deficits started at 6-8 months of age and were associated with a progressive increase in the accumulation of 3R Tau. By immunocytochemistry, mice from Line 13 displayed extensive accumulation of 3R Tau in neuronal cells bodies in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex, CA1-3 regions, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Aggregates in the granular cells had a globus appearance and mimic Pick’s-like inclusions. There were abundant dystrophic neurites, astrogliosis and synapto-dendritic damage in the neocortex and hippocampus of the higher expresser line. The hippocampal lesions were moderately argyrophilic and Thioflavin-S negative. By electron microscopy, discrete straight filament aggregates were detected in some neurons in the hippocampus. This model holds promise for better understanding the natural

  13. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  14. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-06-28

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer's-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  15. Detection of D-aspartate in tau proteins associated with Alzheimer paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    Kenessey, A; Yen, S H; Liu, W K; Yang, X R; Dunlop, D S

    1995-03-27

    Paired helical filaments (PHF) characteristic of Alzheimer neurofibrillary lesions are known to contain a modified form of microtubule associated protein tau. These proteins, PHF-tau, differ from normal tau in the extent and the site of phosphorylation. To determine whether PHF-tau, tau proteins from normal adult brains (N-tau), tau proteins from Alzheimer brains not associated with PHF (A-tau), and tau proteins from fetal brains (F-tau) differ in racemization, these proteins were compared for their D-aspartate content. The results demonstrated that PHF-tau contain more D-aspartate than N-tau, A-tau and F-tau. The average percentage D-aspartate for these proteins, after a correction for background, are 4.9%, 2.8%, 1.6%, and 1% for PHF-tau, N-tau, A-tau and F-tau, respectively. It remains to be determined if the increase in D-aspartate is a consequence of PHF formation. It is also unknown if the change in D-aspartate content in PHF-tau is associated with phosphorylation, which alters the susceptibility of tau to proteolysis.

  16. Resonance Effective Theory Approach to {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2004-12-02

    The decays {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} are analyzed in the framework of the resonance effective theory of QCD, We derive the effective chiral Lagrangian relevant for the evaluation of the hadronic axial-vector current, taking into account the constraints imposed by QCD on the high energy asymptotic behaviour. Then we fit the unknown parameters to the spectral function and branching ratio measured by ALEPH, showing that the theory is in good agreement with experimental data. A detailed description of the work sketched here can be found.

  17. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  18. Quantitative Characterization of Heparin Binding to Tau Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hai-Li; Fernández, Cristina; Fan, Jun-Bao; Shewmaker, Frank; Chen, Jie; Minton, Allen P.; Liang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, principally composed of bundles of filaments formed by the microtubule-associated protein Tau, are a hallmark of a group of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin can induce Tau filament formation in vitro. Here we quantitatively characterize the interaction between recombinant human Tau fragment Tau244–372 and heparin (average molecular mass = 7 kDa) as well as heparin-induced fibril formation by using static light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, turbidity assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Our data clearly show that at physiological pH, heparin 7K, and human Tau244–372 form a tight 1:1 complex with an equilibrium association constant exceeding 106 m−1 under reducing conditions, triggering Tau fibrillization. In the absence of dithiothreitol, heparin shows a moderate binding affinity (105 m−1) to Tau244–372, similarly triggering Tau fibrillization. Further fibrillization kinetics analyses show that the lag time appears to be approximately invariant up to a molar ratio of 2:1 and then increases at larger ratios of heparin/Tau. The maximum slope representing the apparent rate constant for fibril growth increases sharply with substoichiometric ratios of heparin/Tau and then decreases to some extent with ratios of >1:1. The retarding effect of heparin in excess is attributed to the large increase in ionic strength of the medium arising from free heparin. Together, these results suggest that the formation of the 1:1 complex of Tau monomer and heparin plays an important role in the inducer-mediated Tau filament formation, providing clues to understanding the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19959468

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  2. Nuclear Tau and Its Potential Role in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bukar Maina, Mahmoud; Al-Hilaly, Youssra K; Serpell, Louise C

    2016-01-07

    Tau protein, found in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, forms aggregates in neurons that constitutes one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For nearly four decades, research efforts have focused more on tau's role in physiology and pathology in the context of the microtubules, even though, for over three decades, tau has been localised in the nucleus and the nucleolus. Its nuclear and nucleolar localisation had stimulated many questions regarding its role in these compartments. Data from cell culture, mouse brain, and the human brain suggests that nuclear tau could be essential for genome defense against cellular distress. However, its nature of translocation to the nucleus, its nuclear conformation and interaction with the DNA and other nuclear proteins highly suggest it could play multiple roles in the nucleus. To find efficient tau-based therapies, there is a need to understand more about the functional relevance of the varied cellular distribution of tau, identify whether specific tau transcripts or isoforms could predict tau's localisation and function and how they are altered in diseases like AD. Here, we explore the cellular distribution of tau, its nuclear localisation and function and its possible involvement in neurodegeneration.

  3. NMR Meets Tau: Insights into Its Function and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Smet, Caroline; Huvent, Isabelle; Gandhi, Neha S.; Gigant, Benoît; Despres, Clément; Qi, Haoling; Lopez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focus on what we have learned from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau. We consider both the mechanistic details of Tau: the tubulin relationship and its aggregation process. Phosphorylation of Tau is intimately linked to both aspects. NMR spectroscopy has depicted accurate phosphorylation patterns by different kinases, and its non-destructive character has allowed functional assays with the same samples. Finally, we will discuss other post-translational modifications of Tau and its interaction with other cellular factors in relationship to its (dys)function. PMID:27338491

  4. Tau approximation techniques for identification of coefficients in parabolic PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wade, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    A variant of the Tau method, called the weak Tau method, is developed on the basis of the weak form of the PDE for use in least-squares parameter estimation; also presented is a suitable abstract convergence framework. The emphasis is on the theoretical framework that allows treatment of the weak Tau method when it is applied to a wide class of inverse problems, including those for diffusion-advection equations, the Fokker-Planck model for population dynamics, and damped beam equations. Extensive numerical testing of the weak Tau method has demonstrated that it compares quite favorably with existing methods.

  5. The Importance of Tau Phosphorylation for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P.; Miller, Christopher C. J.; Lovestone, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Fibrillar deposits of highly phosphorylated tau are a key pathological feature of several neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and some frontotemporal dementias. Increasing evidence suggests that the presence of these end-stage neurofibrillary lesions do not cause neuronal loss, but rather that alterations to soluble tau proteins induce neurodegeneration. In particular, aberrant tau phosphorylation is acknowledged to be a key disease process, influencing tau structure, distribution, and function in neurons. Although typically described as a cytosolic protein that associates with microtubules and regulates axonal transport, several additional functions of tau have recently been demonstrated, including roles in DNA stabilization, and synaptic function. Most recently, studies examining the trans-synaptic spread of tau pathology in disease models have suggested a potential role for extracellular tau in cell signaling pathways intrinsic to neurodegeneration. Here we review the evidence showing that tau phosphorylation plays a key role in neurodegenerative tauopathies. We also comment on the tractability of altering phosphorylation-dependent tau functions for therapeutic intervention in AD and related disorders. PMID:23847585

  6. Salivary tau species are potential biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Sui, Yu-Ting; Peskind, Elaine R; Li, Ge; Hwang, HyeJin; Devic, Ivana; Ginghina, Carmen; Edgar, John Scott; Pan, Catherine; Goodlett, David R; Furay, Amy R; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Zhang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tau protein is a critical event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased phosphorylated tau and total tau levels, combined with reduced concentrations of amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ42) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but not in plasma or serum, have been generally accepted as sensitive AD diagnostic markers. However, obtaining CSF is a relatively invasive procedure that requires participation of specially trained medical professionals, i.e., CSF is not an ideal sample source for screening or early diagnosis of AD, which is essential to current and future neuroprotective treatments for the disease. Here, we identified tau, but not Aβ species, with mass spectrometry in human saliva, a body fluid that is much more accessible compared to CSF or even blood. Quantitative assessment of salivary levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau, and Aβ42 using highly sensitive Luminex assays revealed that, while Aβ42 was not detectable, the phosphorylated tau/tau ratio significantly increased in patients with AD compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that salivary tau species could be ideal biomarkers for AD diagnosis, especially at early stages of the disease or even screening asymptomatic subjects, allowing for a much larger therapeutic window for AD patients. PMID:21841250

  7. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  8. Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and |V{sub us}| Using Tau Lepton Decays to e{sup -{nu}}{sub e{nu}{tau}}, {mu}{sup -{nu}}{sub {mu}{nu}{tau}}, {pi}{sup -{nu}}{sub {tau},} and K{sup -{nu}}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.

    2010-07-30

    Using 467 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector, we measure (B({tau}{sup -{yields}}{mu}-{nu}{sub {mu}{nu}{tau}}))/B({tau}{sup -{yields}}e{sup -{nu}}{sub e{nu}{tau}})=(0.9796{+-}0.0016{+-}0.0036), (B({tau}{sup -{yields}}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}})/B({tau}{sup -{yields}}e{sup -{nu}}{sub e{nu}{tau}}))=(0.5945{+-}0.0014{+-}0.0061), and (B({tau}{sup -{yields}}K{sup -{nu}}{sub {tau}})/B({tau}{sup -{yields}}e{sup -{nu}}{sub e{nu}{tau}}))=(0.03882{+-}0.00032{+-}0.00057), where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. From these precision {tau} measurements, we test the standard model assumption of {mu}-e and {tau}-{mu} charge current lepton universality and provide determinations of |V{sub us}| experimentally independent of the decay of a kaon.

  9. Observation of B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup -}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} Decay at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Matyja, A.; Rozanska, M.; Bozek, A.; Lesiak, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Palka, H.; Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakamura, I.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.

    2007-11-09

    We report an observation of the decay B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup -}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} in a data sample containing 535x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find a signal with a significance of 5.2{sigma} and measure the branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup -}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(2.02{sub -0.37}{sup +0.40}(stat){+-}0.37(syst)) = %. This is the first observation of an exclusive B decay with a b{yields}c{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} transition.

  10. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  11. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-03-31

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  12. Fyn knock-down increases Aβ, decreases phospho-tau, and worsens spatial learning in 3xTg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Minami, S. Sakura; Clifford, Thomas G.; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Rebeck, G. William

    2011-01-01

    Fyn kinase phosphorylates tau and exacerbates Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunction. However, Fyn also increases the non-pathological cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), suggesting opposing roles for Fyn in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To determine the effect of Fyn on both Aβ and tau pathologies, we crossed homozygous AD triple transgenic (3xTg) mice harboring mutations in APP, presenilin-1, and tau with wild-type or Fyn knock-out mice to generate Fyn+/+3xTg+/− or Fyn+/−3xTg+/− mice. We found that Fyn+/−3xTg+/− mice had increased soluble and intracellular Aβ, and these changes were accompanied by impaired performance on the Morris water maze at 18 months. Fyn+/−3xTg+/− mice had decreased phosphorylated tau at 15–18 months (as did Fyn knock-out mice), but Fyn+/−3xTg+/− mice had increased phosphorylated tau by 24 months. In addition, we observed that Fyn+/−3xTg+/− males were delayed in developing Aβ pathology compared to females, and displayed better spatial learning performance at 18 months. Overall, these findings suggest that loss of Fyn at early stages of disease increases soluble A accumulation and worsens spatial learning in the absence of changes in tau phosphorylation. PMID:21741124

  13. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo. However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer’s disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited 18F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was 18F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β (18F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  14. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

  15. Searches for Lepton flavor violation in the decays tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma and tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lindsay, C D; Locke, C B; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a tau lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+/-7)x10{6} tau decays collected by the BABAR detector near the Upsilon(4S), Upsilon(3S) and Upsilon(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma)<3.3x10{-8} and B(tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma)<4.4x10{-8} at 90% confidence level. PMID:20366586

  16. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  17. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  18. Constraining new interactions with leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.; Silva, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The recent measurements of the Michel parameters in {tau} decays enable, for the first time, a thorough analysis of the leptonic sector. In general, in models beyond the standard model, these parameters will be altered through changes in the {ital W} and {ital Z} couplings, and/or through interactions mediated by new gauge bosons. We perform a complete, model-independent analysis of the constraints imposed by the present data on such boson-mediated interactions, and point out the existence of useful relations among the couplings.

  19. Evidence for an imbalance between tau O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation in the hippocampus of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Eleonora; Lefebvre, Tony; Gaetani, Silvana; dos Santos, Marc; Marrocco, Jordan; Mir, Anne-Marie; Cassano, Tommaso; Maccari, Stefania; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Mairesse, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein is linked to neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mounting evidence suggests that tau phosphorylation and O-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) are mutually exclusive post-translational modifications. O-GlcNAcylation depends on 3-5% of intracellular glucose that enters the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. To our knowledge, the existence of an imbalance between tau phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation has not been reported in animal models of AD, as yet. Here, we used triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice at 12 months, an age at which hyperphosphorylated tau is already detected and associated with cognitive decline. In these mice, we showed that tau was hyperphosphorylated on both Ser396 and Thr205 in the hippocampus, and to a lower extent and exclusively on Thr205 in the frontal cortex. Tau O-GlcNAcylation, assessed in tau immunoprecipitates, was substantially reduced in the hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice, with no changes in the frontal cortex or in the cerebellum. No changes in the expression of the three major enzymes involved in O-GlcNAcylation, i.e., glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase, O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase, and O-GlcNAc hydrolase were found in the hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice. These data demonstrate that an imbalance between tau phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation exists in AD mice, and strengthens the hypothesis that O-GlcNAcylation might be targeted by disease modifying drugs in AD.

  20. Amyloid-β Peptides and Tau Protein as Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Experimental and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.; Marklund, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in many severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF) using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques, and the complexity of TBI in the available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using methods such as rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  1. Studies of tau- to h- h- h+ nu and tau- to K- pi0 nu Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-24

    We present preliminary inclusive branching fraction measurements of {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} (h = {pi} or K) and {tau}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} decay modes using a sample of {tau}-pair events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The branching fractions of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} are measured with higher precision than previously published results and the inclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} is measured for the first time. In addition, the first measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi}{nu} and the measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{phi}{nu} are determined by means of a binned maximum likelihood fit to the K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distribution. These branching fractions are extracted by means of a migration matrix that accounts for the cross contamination between the {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} modes. The preliminary {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} branching fraction and invariant mass distributions are also presented in this paper.

  2. Importance of precision measurements in the tau sector

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1996-01-01

    {tau} decays provide a powerful tool to test the structure of the weak currents and the universality of their couplings to the {ital W} boson. The constraints implied by present data and the possible improvements at the {tau}cF are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The many faces of interferon tau.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Ying, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Zhou, Beiyan; Johnson, Greg A; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) was discovered as the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants, but is now known to have a plethora of physiological functions in the mammalian uterus. The mammalian uterus includes, from the outer surface to the lumen, the serosa, myometrium and endometrium. The endometrium consists of the luminal, superficial glandular, and glandular epithelia, each with a unique phenotype, stromal cells, vascular elements, nerves and immune cells. The uterine epithelia secrete or selectively transport molecules into the uterine lumen that are collectively known as histotroph. Histotroph is required for growth and development of the conceptus (embryo and its associated extra-embryonic membranes) and includes nutrients such as amino acids and glucose, enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, lymphokines, transport proteins for vitamins and minerals and extracellular matrix molecules. Interferon tau and progesterone stimulate transport of amino acids in histotroph, particularly arginine. Arginine stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway to induce proliferation, migration and protein synthesis by cells of the conceptus, and arginine is the substrate for synthesis of nitric oxide and polyamines required for growth and development of the conceptus. In ruminants, IFNT also acts in concert with progesterone from the corpus luteum to increase expression of genes for transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen, as well as proteases, protease inhibitors, growth factors for hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and other molecules critical for implantation and placentation. Collectively, the pleiotropic effects of IFNT contribute to survival, growth and development of the ruminant conceptus. PMID:25557050

  4. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  5. Search for the Decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-11-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/- using 383 x 10;{6} BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fraction for this decay can be substantially enhanced in new physics models. The kinematics of the tau from the signal B decay are inferred from the K+, mu, and other B in the event, which is fully reconstructed in one of a variety of hadronic decay modes, allowing the signal B candidate to be fully reconstructed. We observe no excess of events over the expected background and set a limit of B(B+-->K+ tau mu)<7.7 x 10(-5) at 90% confidence level, where the branching fraction is for the sum of the K+ tau- mu+ and K+ tau+mu- final states. We use this result to improve a model-independent bound on the energy scale of flavor-changing new physics. PMID:18233132

  6. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  7. CP violation tests for tau/top processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the following topics: tests for CP violation in top-quark production and decay processes. In particular, m{sub t} = 174 {plus_minus} 17 GeV implies good top-quark polarimetry because the W bosons in t-quark decays must be predominantly longitudinally polarized ({Gamma}{sub L}/{Gamma}{sub T} = 2.4). Tests for CP violation in tau lepton decays by the {tau} {yields} {rho}{nu} decay mode by usage of {rho} polarimetry signatures. Tests for complete measurement of the Z{sup 0},{gamma}* {yields} {tau}{sup {minus}}{tau}{sup +} vertex, including tests for CP violation in tau production processes.

  8. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  9. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  10. Characterization of two VQIXXK motifs for tau fibrillization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkai; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2006-12-26

    Tau proteins are building blocks of the filaments that form neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative tauopathies. It was recently reported that two VQIXXK motifs in the microtubule (MT) binding region, named PHF6 and PHF6*, are responsible for tau fibrillization. However, the exact role each of these motifs plays in this process has not been analyzed in detail. Using a recombinant human tau fragment containing only the four MT-binding repeats (K18), we show that deletion of either PHF6 or PHF6* affected tau assembly but only PHF6 is essential for filament formation, suggesting a critical role of this motif. To determine the amino acid residues within PHF6 that are required for tau fibrillization, a series of deletion and mutation constructs targeting this motif were generated. Deletion of VQI in either PHF6 or PHF6* lessened but did not eliminate K18 fibrillization. However, removal of the single K311 residue from PHF6 completely abrogated the fibril formation of K18. K311D mutation of K18 inhibited tau filament formation, while K311A and K311R mutations had no effect. These data imply that charge change at position 311 is important in tau fibril formation. A similar requirement of nonnegative charge at this position for fibrillization was observed with the full-length human tau isoform (T40), and data from these studies indicate that the formation of fibrils by T40K311D and T40K311P mutants is repressed at the nucleation phase. These findings provide important insights into the mechanisms of tau fibrillization and suggest targets for AD drug discovery to ameliorate neurodegeneration mediated by filamentous tau pathologies.

  11. Evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}with a semileptonic tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Inami, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mori, T.; Ohshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zhilich, V.; Zyukova, O.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Mohanty, G. B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a measurement of the decay B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}using a data sample containing 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. A sample of B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs are tagged by reconstructing one B{sup +} meson decaying semileptonically. We detect the B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}candidate in the recoil. We obtain a signal with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties, and measure the branching fraction to be B(B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}})=[1.54{sub -0.37}{sup +0.38}(stat){sub -0.31}{sup +0.29}(syst)]x10{sup -4}. This result confirms the evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}obtained in a previous Belle measurement that used a hadronic B tagging method.

  12. Measurement of the Semileptonic B-bar->D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}-bar{sub {tau}} Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Pegna, David

    2010-02-10

    Semileptonic B meson decays into final states containing the tau lepton are of interesting as they provide information on the Standard Model as well as a window on new physics effects. We present results on B-bar->D{sup (*)}taunu-bar{sub tau} decays where the second B in the event is fully reconstructed.

  13. High Affinity Radiopharmaceuticals Based Upon Lansoprazole for PET Imaging of Aggregated Tau in Alzheimer’s Disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Synthesis, Preclinical Evaluation, and Lead Selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally aggregated tau is the hallmark pathology of tauopathy neurodegenerative disorders and is a target for development of both diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies across the tauopathy disease spectrum. Development of carbon-11- or fluorine-18-labeled radiotracers with appropriate affinity and specificity for tau would allow noninvasive quantification of tau burden using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. We have synthesized [18F]lansoprazole, [11C]N-methyl lansoprazole, and [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole and identified them as high affinity radiotracers for tau with low to subnanomolar binding affinities. Herein, we report radiosyntheses and extensive preclinical evaluation with the aim of selecting a lead radiotracer for translation into human PET imaging trials. We demonstrate that [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole, on account of the favorable half-life of fluorine-18 and its rapid brain entry in nonhuman primates, favorable kinetics, low white matter binding, and selectivity for binding to tau over amyloid, is the lead compound for progression into clinical trials. PMID:24896980

  14. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition improves memory and reduces total tau levels in a mouse model of tau deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tau pathology is associated with a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Few treatments have been demonstrated to diminish the impact of tau pathology in mouse models and none are yet effective in humans. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an enzyme that removes acetyl groups from cytoplasmic proteins, rather than nuclear histones. Its substrates include tubulin, heat shock protein 90 and cortactin. Tubastatin A is a selective inhibitor of HDAC6. Modification of tau pathology by specific inhibition of HDAC6 presents a potential therapeutic approach in tauopathy. Methods We treated rTg4510 mouse models of tau deposition and non-transgenic mice with tubastatin (25 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) from 5 to 7 months of age. Cognitive behavior analysis, histology and biochemical analysis were applied to access the effect of tubastatin on memory, tau pathology and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume). Results We present data showing that tubastatin restored memory function in rTg4510 mice and reversed a hyperactivity phenotype. We further found that tubastatin reduced the levels of total tau, both histologically and by western analysis. Reduction in total tau levels was positively correlated with memory improvement in these mice. However, there was no impact on phosphorylated forms of tau, either by histology or western analysis, nor was there an impact on silver positive inclusions histologically. Conclusion Potential mechanisms by which HDAC6 inhibitors might benefit the rTg4510 mouse include stabilization of microtubules secondary to increased tubulin acetylation, increased degradation of tau secondary to increased acetylation of HSP90 or both. These data support the use of HDAC6 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against tau pathology. PMID:24576665

  15. Hadron structure in {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Roig, P.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the hadronization structure of both vector and axial-vector currents leading to {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays. At leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion, and considering only the contribution of the lightest resonances, we work out, within the framework of the resonance chiral Lagrangian, the structure of the local vertices involved in those processes. The couplings in the resonance theory are constrained by imposing the asymptotic behavior of vector and axial-vector spectral functions ruled by QCD. In this way we predict the hadron spectra and conclude that, contrary to previous assertions, the vector contribution dominates by far over the axial-vector one in all KK{pi} charge channels.

  16. First measurement of sigma (p anti-p ---> Z) . Br (Z ---> tau tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section for Z production times the branching fraction to {tau} leptons, {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}), in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the channel in which one {tau} decays into {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and the other into hadrons + {nu}{sub {tau}} or e{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 226 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The final sample contains 2008 candidate events with an estimated background of 55%. From this they obtain {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 237 {+-} 15(stat) {+-} 18(sys) {+-} 15(lum) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  17. CP Violation in Tau to K* Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, Mark; /Manchester U.

    2006-03-10

    A sample of {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}} decays with K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, using 123.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is used to search for a direct CP violation effect in the charged Higgs sector. No evidence of CP violation is found and the imaginary part of the charged Higgs coupling, {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}), in the Multi-Higgs-Doublet-Model is found to be at -0.284 < {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}) < 0.200 at 90% Confidence Level. In addition the installation of the kk2f Monte Carlo generator into the BaBar software framework is described.

  18. Deep photospheric flows in Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A.; Karp, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    From analysis of weak, unblended, ultraviolet lines observed in Tau Scorpii by Copernicus, the same line widths and the same slightly blue-depressed wings as found in the upper photospheric lines of the visual region are found. In addition, a radial-velocity discrepancy of about 6 km/s between weak and strong lines in the 1000-1300-A region is found. These results are in quantitative agreement with one another and with the results of the visual region. They imply that a flow of material is present even in the deep photosphere of this star. However, one cannot yet specify the geometry of the flow (outward-radial versus temperature-weighted convection columns). At the least, this flow alters the expected radiation-driven flow solution close to the photosphere. At the most, it could provide the heating of a chromosphere or a corona just outside the photosphere, as required by the imperfect flow model.

  19. Measurement of the Tau- to F1(1285) Pi- Nu/Tau Branching Fraction And a Search for Second-Class Currents in Tau to Eta-Prime(958) Pi- Nu/Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Alwyn, K.E.; /Manchester U.

    2011-12-01

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f1(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  20. Effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on human Tau fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingying; Teng, Ningning; Li, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Tau fibrillation is reported to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, in which the natural environment is very crowded in the cells. Understanding the role of crowding environments in regulating Tau fibrillation is of great importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. In this experiment, the effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte reagents in the crowding environment on Tau fibrillation were studied by thioflavin T binding, SDS-PAGE and TEM assays. Ficoll 70 and Dextran 70 of different concentrations were used as macromolecular crowding reagents inside the cells and showed a strong enhancing effect on the fibrillation of normal and hyperphosphorylated Tau. The enhancing effect of Dextran is stronger than that of Ficoll 70 at the same concentration. In addition, the cellular osmolyte sucrose was found to protect Tau against fibrillation, and inhibit the enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on Tau fibrillation. A possible model for the fibrillation process of Tau and the effect of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on this process was proposed based on these experimental results. The information obtained from our study can enhance the understanding of how proteins aggregate and avoid aggregation in crowded physiological environments and might lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in vivo.

  1. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  2. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP2) is a Plausible Etiological Factor and Potential Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer’s Disease: Comparison and Contrast with Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Kenneth; Kursula, Petri

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has long been viewed as a pathology that must be caused either by aberrant amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) processing, dysfunctional tau protein processing, or a combination of these two factors. This is a reasonable assumption because amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation are the defining histological features in AD, and because AβPP and tau mutations can cause AD in humans or AD-like features in animal models. Nonetheless, other protein players are emerging that one can argue are significant etiological players in subsets of AD and potentially novel, druggable targets. In particular, the microtubule-associated protein CRMP2 (collapsin response mediator protein-2) bears striking analogies to tau and is similarly relevant to AD. Like tau, CRMP2 dynamically regulates microtubule stability; it is acted upon by the same kinases; collects similarly in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs); and when sequestered in NFTs, complexes with critical synapse-stabilizing factors. Additionally, CRMP2 is becoming recognized as an important adaptor protein involved in vesicle trafficking, amyloidogenesis and autophagy, in ways that tau is not. This review systematically compares the biology of CRMP2 to that of tau in the context of AD and explores the hypothesis that CRMP2 is an etiologically significant protein in AD and participates in pathways that can be rationally engaged for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27079722

  3. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  4. Adaptive deployment of model reductions for tau-leaping simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng; Fu, Jin; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-05-01

    Multiple time scales in cellular chemical reaction systems often render the tau-leaping algorithm inefficient. Various model reductions have been proposed to accelerate tau-leaping simulations. However, these are often identified and deployed manually, requiring expert knowledge. This is time-consuming and prone to error. In previous work, we proposed a methodology for automatic identification and validation of model reduction opportunities for tau-leaping simulation. Here, we show how the model reductions can be automatically and adaptively deployed during the time course of a simulation. For multiscale systems, this can result in substantial speedups.

  5. Adaptive deployment of model reductions for tau-leaping simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jin; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple time scales in cellular chemical reaction systems often render the tau-leaping algorithm inefficient. Various model reductions have been proposed to accelerate tau-leaping simulations. However, these are often identified and deployed manually, requiring expert knowledge. This is time-consuming and prone to error. In previous work, we proposed a methodology for automatic identification and validation of model reduction opportunities for tau-leaping simulation. Here, we show how the model reductions can be automatically and adaptively deployed during the time course of a simulation. For multiscale systems, this can result in substantial speedups. PMID:26026435

  6. A measurement of the tau lepton lifetime at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saull, Patrick Richard Behrendt

    Data taken with the ARGUS detector at DESY, Hamburg, specifically toverlinetoverline pairs produced from e+e - collisions in the energy range (10.4-10.6)GeV, are used to make a precision measurement of the tau lifetime. A new method is introduced which is independent of the beam position and envelope, and applicable to tau events having one-three topology. Applied to ARGUS data the method yields a value for the tau lifetime of tt=287+/-11(st atistical)+/-8(systemat ic)fs.

  7. Search for lepton flavor violating decays tau+/--->l+/-omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a tau to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an omega vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B(tau(+/-)-->e;{+/-}omega)<1.1 x10 (-7) and B(tau(+/-)-->micro(+/-)omega)<1.0 x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:18352541

  8. Adaptive deployment of model reductions for tau-leaping simulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng; Fu, Jin; Petzold, Linda R

    2015-05-28

    Multiple time scales in cellular chemical reaction systems often render the tau-leaping algorithm inefficient. Various model reductions have been proposed to accelerate tau-leaping simulations. However, these are often identified and deployed manually, requiring expert knowledge. This is time-consuming and prone to error. In previous work, we proposed a methodology for automatic identification and validation of model reduction opportunities for tau-leaping simulation. Here, we show how the model reductions can be automatically and adaptively deployed during the time course of a simulation. For multiscale systems, this can result in substantial speedups.

  9. Caspase-Mediated Truncation of Tau Potentiates Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Caspase-mediated truncation of tau is associated with aggregation. We examined the impact of manipulation of caspase activity on intracellular aggregation of a mutant form of tau (3PO) that forms spontaneous aggregates. Treatment with the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk reduced both N and C-terminal tau truncation but did not significantly reduce aggregation. Treatment with staurosporine, which activated caspases, increased C-terminal but not N-terminal truncation and enhanced aggregation. These findings suggest that caspase activation is one potential route, rather than an obligatory initiation step, in aggregation, and that N- and C-terminal truncation contribute differentially to aggregation. PMID:22988541

  10. Disentangling perturbative and power corrections in precision tau decay analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, D.S.; Pivovarov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hadronic tau decay precision data are analyzed with account of both perturbative and power corrections of high orders within QCD. It is found that contributions of high order power corrections are essential for extracting a numerical value for the strange quark mass from the data on Cabibbo suppressed tau decays. We show that with inclusion of new five-loop perturbative corrections in the analysis the convergence of perturbation theory remains acceptable only for few low order moments. We obtain m{sub s}(M{sub {tau}})=130{+-}27 MeV in agreement with previous estimates.

  11. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  12. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  13. Conformation determines the seeding potencies of native and recombinant Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J; Isaacs, Adrian M; Hutton, Michael L; Szekeres, Philip G; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled "prion-like" species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs (275)VQIINK(280) and (306)VQIVYK(311) abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  14. Alzheimer disease-specific conformation of hyperphosphorylated paired helical filament-Tau is polyubiquitinated through Lys-48, Lys-11, and Lys-6 ubiquitin conjugation.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Diane; Thomas, Stefani N; Jeng, Young; Yang, Frank; Davies, Peter; Yang, Austin J

    2006-04-21

    One of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of paired helical filaments (PHFs) of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau. Tandem mass spectrometry was employed to examine PHF-Tau post-translational modifications, in particular protein phosphorylation and ubiquitination, to shed light on their role in the early stages of Alzheimer disease. PHF-Tau from Alzheimer disease brain was affinity-purified by MC1 monoclonal antibody to isolate a soluble fraction of PHF-Tau in a conformation unique to human AD brain. A large number of phosphorylation sites were identified by employing a data-dependent neutral loss algorithm to trigger MS3 scans of phosphopeptides. It was found that soluble PHF-Tau is ubiquitinated at its microtubule-binding domain at residues Lys-254, Lys-311, and Lys-353, suggesting that ubiquitination of PHF-Tau may be an earlier pathological event than previously thought and that ubiquitination could play a regulatory role in modulating the integrity of microtubules during the course of AD. Tandem mass spectrometry data for ubiquitin itself indicate that PHF-Tau is modified by three polyubiquitin linkages, at Lys-6, Lys-11, and Lys-48. Relative quantitative analysis indicates that Lys-48-linked polyubiquitination is the primary form of polyubiquitination with a minor portion of ubiquitin linked at Lys-6 and Lys-11. Because modification by Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains is known to serve as the essential means of targeting proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and it has been reported that modification at Lys-6 inhibits ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, a failure of the ubiquitin-proteasome system could play a role in initiating the formation of degradation-resistant PHF tangles.

  15. Age-dependent increases in tau phosphorylation in the brains of type 2 diabetic rats correlate with a reduced expression of p62.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Yoon-Jeong; Eggert, Simone; Chung, Kwang Chul; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Park, Sun Ah

    2013-10-01

    Aging increases the co-incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, the critical factors that contribute to the age-related increase in AD-T2DM comorbidity have yet to be clarified. In this study, aging effects and their relationship to AD-related pathology and T2DM as well as the underlying mechanisms of this process were investigated using obese rats with chronic T2DM. Tau pathology and its associated signaling pathways in the brain were compared between Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and corresponding non-diabetic controls at various ages. Tau phosphorylation at AD-related epitopes, including Thr212, Thr231, Ser262, and Ser396, increased with age in the soluble brain extracts of chronic OLETF rats and were accompanied by synaptic protein loss. There was also a marked age-dependent accumulation of polyubiquitinated substances in diabetic rats. Accordingly, tau proteins were highly polyubiquitinated in aged OLETF rats and a strong degree of co-localization existed between p-tau and ubiquitin in these neurons. In addition, the mRNA and protein levels of p62, a known cargo molecule that transports polyubiquitinated tau to proteasomal and autophagic degradation systems, decreased robustly with age in OLETF rats and there was an inverse correlation between protein levels of p62 and p-tau. The impaired degradation of polyubiquitinated p-tau due to age- and T2DM-dependent decreases in p62 transcription is a primary mechanism underlying increased AD-like pathology in a T2DM rat model as age increases. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms supporting the age-related increase in AD-T2DM comorbidity.

  16. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it expla