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Sample records for abnormal thyroid hormone

  1. A structural abnormality associated with graded levels of thyroid hormone insufficiency: Dose dependent increases in heterotopia volume

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large number of environmental contaminants reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone (TH), but clear markers of neurological insult associated with modest TH insufficiency are lacking. We have previously identified the presence of an abnormal cluster of misplaced neurons in ...

  2. Structural Abnormalities and Learning Impairments Induced by Low Level Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency: A Cross-Fostering Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe reductions in thyroid hormones (TH) during development alter brain structure and impair learning. Uncertainty surrounds both the impact oflower levels of TH disruption and the sensitivity of available metrics to detect neurodevelopmental deficits of this disruption. We ha...

  3. Relation of thyroid hormone abnormalities with subclinical inflammatory activity in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro; Alegre, Sarah Monte; Pavin, Elizabeth Joao; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). These thyroid hormone abnormalities have been associated with inflammatory activity in several conditions but this link remains unclear in DM. We assessed the influence of subclinical inflammation in TH metabolism in euthyroid diabetic patients. Cross-sectional study involving 258 subjects divided in 4 groups: 70 patients with T2DM and 55 patients with T1DM and two control groups of 70 and 63 non-diabetic individuals, respectively. Groups were paired by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). We evaluated the association between clinical and hormonal variables [thyrotropin, reverse T3 (rT3), total and free thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3)] with the inflammation markers C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Serum T3 and free T3 were lower in patients with diabetes (all P < 0.001) compared to the control groups. Interleukin-6 showed positive correlations with rT3 in both groups (P < 0.05). IL-6 was independently associated to FT3/rT3 (B = -0.193; 95% CI -0.31; -0.076; P = 0.002) and FT4/rT3 (B = -0.107; 95% CI -0.207; -0.006; P = 0.039) in the T1DM group. In the T2DM group, SAA (B = 0.18; 95% CI 0.089; 0.271; P < 0.001) and hs-CRP (B = -0.069; 95% CI -0.132; -0.007; P = 0.03) predicted FT3 levels. SAA (B = -0.16; 95% CI -0.26; -0.061; P = 0.002) and IL6 (B = 0.123; 95% CI 0.005; 0.241; P = 0.041) were related to FT4/FT3. In DM, differences in TH levels compared to non-diabetic individuals were related to increased subclinical inflammatory activity and BMI. Altered deiodinase activity was probably involved. These findings were independent of sex, age, BMI, and HbA1c levels.

  4. Thyroid hormone and obesity.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2012-10-01

    To review several of the most recent and most important clinical studies regarding the effects of thyroid treatments on weight change, associations between thyroid status and weight, and the effects of obesity and weight change on thyroid function. Weight decreases following treatment for hypothyroidism. However, following levothyroxine treatment for overt hypothyroidism, weight loss appears to be modest and mediated primarily by loss of water weight rather than fat. There is conflicting evidence about the effects of thyroidectomy on weight. In large population studies, even among euthyroid individuals, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone is typically positively associated with body weight and BMI. Both serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and T3 are typically increased in obese compared with lean individuals, an effect likely mediated, at least in part, by leptin. Finally, there is no consistent evidence that thyroid hormone treatment induces weight loss in obese euthyroid individuals, but thyroid hormone analogues may eventually be useful for weight loss. The interrelationships between body weight and thyroid status are complex.

  5. Impact of thyroid function abnormalities on reproductive hormones during menstrual cycle in premenopausal HIV infected females at NAUTH, Nnewi, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Emelumadu, Obiageli Fidelia; Igwegbe, Anthony Osita; Monago, Ifeoma Nwamaka; Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2017-01-01

    Background This was a prospective study designed to evaluate the impact of thyroid function abnormalities on reproductive hormones during menstrual cycle in HIV infected females at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, South-East Nigeria. Methods The study randomly recruited 35 Symptomatic HIV infected females and 35 Symptomatic HIV infected females on antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for not less than six weeks from an HIV clinic and 40 apparently heathy control females among the hospital staff of NAUTH Nnewi. They were all premenopausal females with regular menstrual cycle and aged between 15–45 years. Blood samples were collected at follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycle for assay of Thyroid indices (FT3, FT4 and TSH) and Reproductive indices (FSH, LH, Estrogen, Progesterone, Prolactin and Testosterone) using ELISA method. Results The result showed significantly higher FSH and LH but significantly lower progesterone (prog) and estrogen (E2) in the test females compared to control females at both phases of menstrual cycle (P<0.05). There was significantly lower FT3 but significantly higher TSH value in Symptomatic HIV females (P<0.05). FSH, LH and TSH values were significantly lowered while prog and FT3 were significantly higher in Symptomatic HIV on ART compared to Symptomatic HIV females (P<0.05). FT3, FT4, Prog and E2 were inversely correlated while FSH and LH were positively correlated with duration of HIV infection in HIV females (P<0.05 respectively). There was a direct correlation between CD4+ count and FT3 while inverse correlation was found between CD4+ count and TSH levels (P<0.05). Discussion The present study demonstrated hypothyroidism with a significant degree of primary hypogonadism in Symptomatic HIV infected females at both follicular and luteal phases of menstrual cycle which tends to normalize on treatments. PMID:28723963

  6. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY -- NEUROLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PROPYLTHIOURACIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone disruption to test the framework. Polyhaloge...

  7. Thyroid hormones and fetal brain development.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, H N; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M D

    2005-08-01

    Thyroid hormones are intricately involved in the developing fetal brain. The fetal central nervous system is sensitive to the maternal thyroid status. Critical amounts of maternal T3 and T4 must be transported across the placenta to the fetus to ensure the correct development of the brain throughout ontogeny. Severe mental retardation of the child can occur due to compromised iodine intake or thyroid disease. This has been reported in areas of the world with iodine insufficiency, New Guinea, and also in mother with thyroid complications such as hypothyroxinaemia and hyperthyroidism. The molecular control of thyroid hormones by deiodinases for the activation of thyroid hormones is critical to ensure the correct amount of active thyroid hormones are temporally supplied to the fetus. These hormones provide timing signals for the induction of programmes for differentiation and maturation at specific stages of development. Understanding these molecular mechanisms further will have profound implications in the clinical management of individuals affected by abnormal maternal of fetal thyroid status.

  8. New Insights into Thyroid Hormone Action

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Arturo; Hollenberg, Anthony N.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are endocrine messengers essential for normal development and function of virtually every vertebrate. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is exquisitely modulated to maintain nearly constant TH (T4 and T3) concentrations in circulation. However peripheral tissues and the CNS control the intracellular availability of TH, suggesting that circulating concentrations of TH are not fully representative of what each cell type sees. Indeed, recent work in the field has identified that TH transporters, deiodinases and thyroid hormone receptor coregulators can strongly control tissue-specific sensitivity to a set amount of TH. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the thyroid hormone receptors regulate target gene expression can vary by gene, tissue and cellular context. This review will highlight novel insights into the machinery that controls the cellular response to TH, which include unique signaling cascades. These findings shed new light into the pathophysiology of human diseases caused by abnormal TH signaling. PMID:28174093

  9. Thyroid hormones states and brain development interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osama M; El-Gareib, A W; El-Bakry, A M; Abd El-Tawab, S M; Ahmed, R G

    2008-04-01

    The action of thyroid hormones (THs) in the brain is strictly regulated, since these hormones play a crucial role in the development and physiological functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). Disorders of the thyroid gland are among the most common endocrine maladies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify in broad terms the interactions between thyroid hormone states or actions and brain development. THs regulate the neuronal cytoarchitecture, neuronal growth and synaptogenesis, and their receptors are widely distributed in the CNS. Any deficiency or increase of them (hypo- or hyperthyroidism) during these periods may result in an irreversible impairment, morphological and cytoarchitecture abnormalities, disorganization, maldevelopment and physical retardation. This includes abnormal neuronal proliferation, migration, decreased dendritic densities and dendritic arborizations. This drastic effect may be responsible for the loss of neurons vital functions and may lead, in turn, to the biochemical dysfunctions. This could explain the physiological and behavioral changes observed in the animals or human during thyroid dysfunction. It can be hypothesized that the sensitive to the thyroid hormones is not only remarked in the neonatal period but also prior to birth, and THs change during the development may lead to the brain damage if not corrected shortly after the birth. Thus, the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental abnormalities might be related to the thyroid hormones is plausible. Taken together, the alterations of neurotransmitters and disturbance in the GABA, adenosine and pro/antioxidant systems in CNS due to the thyroid dysfunction may retard the neurogenesis and CNS growth and the reverse is true. In general, THs disorder during early life may lead to distortions rather than synchronized shifts in the relative development of several central transmitter systems that leads to a multitude of irreversible morphological and biochemical

  10. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-06-13

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Generalized Resistance to Thyroid Hormone Associated with a Mutation in the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Akihiro; Takeda, Kyoko; Ain, Kenneth; Ceccarelli, Paola; Nakai, Akira; Seino, Susumu; Bell, Graeme I.; Refetoff, Samuel; Degroot, Leslie J.

    1989-11-01

    The syndrome of generalized resistance to thyroid hormone is characterized by elevated circulating levels of thyroid hormone in the presence of an overall eumetabolic state and failure to respond normally to triiodothyronine. We have evaluated a family with inherited generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for abnormalities in the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. A single guanine --> cytosine replacement in the codon for amino acid 340 resulted in a glycine --> arginine substitution in the hormone-binding domain of one of two alleles of the patient's thyroid hormone nuclear receptor β gene. In vitro translation products of this mutant human thyroid hormone nuclear receptor β gene did not bind triiodothyronine. Thus, generalized resistance to thyroid hormone can result from expression of an abnormal thyroid hormone nuclear receptor molecule.

  12. Thyroid hormone and cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Grant W

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) plays a key role in mammalian brain development. The developing brain is sensitive to both TH deficiency and excess. Brain development in the absence of TH results in motor skill deficiencies and reduced intellectual development. These functional abnormalities can be attributed to maldevelopment of specific cell types and regions of the brain including the cerebellum. TH functions at the molecular level by regulating gene transcription. Therefore, understanding how TH regulates cerebellar development requires identification of TH-regulated gene targets and the cells expressing these genes. Additionally, the process of TH-dependent regulation of gene expression is tightly controlled by mechanisms including regulation of TH transport, TH metabolism, toxicologic inhibition of TH signaling, and control of the nuclear TH response apparatus. This review will describe the functional, cellular, and molecular effects of TH deficit in the developing cerebellum and emphasize the most recent findings regarding TH action in this important brain region.

  13. [Thyroid hormone metabolism and action].

    PubMed

    Köhrle, Josef

    2004-05-01

    Reductive deiodination of thyroid hormones at the phenolic and tyrosyl ring leads to the activation or inactivation of the thyromimetic activity inherent to thyroid hormones. Alterations in the activities of the three selenocysteine-containing enzymes, the iodothyronine deiodinases, have been reported during development and in specific cells and tissues of the adult organism. Furthermore, pathophysiological changes in the deiodinase expression lead to therapeutically relevant disturbances of the homeostasis of thyroid hormones. Metabolisation of thyroid hormones by conjugation of their phenolic 4'-OH group, their alanine side chain or cleavage of their diphenylether bridge also contributes to both local and systemic supply of thyromimetic activity or hormone degradation. Further components mediating the pleiotropic action of thyroid hormones in part include redundant T3 receptors, binding and transport proteins, metabolising enzymes and T3-regulated gene products. This is achieved in a finely tuned manner with multiple feedback control, malfunction or complete failure of individual components and networks involved in the iodothyronine metabolism and thyroid hormone action can thus be compensated or prevented.

  14. Thyroid hormone metabolism and environmental chemical exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated dioxins and –furans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental toxicants that have been proven to influence thyroid metabolism both in animal studies and in human beings. In recent years polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) also have been found to have a negative influence on thyroid hormone metabolism. The lower brominated flame retardants are now banned in the EU, however higher brominated decabromo-diphenyl ether (DBDE) and the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) are not yet banned. They too can negatively influence thyroid hormone metabolism. An additional brominated flame retardant that is still in use is tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), which has also been shown to influence thyroid hormone metabolism. Influences of brominated flame retardants, PCDD/F’s and dioxin like-PCBs (dl-PCB’s) on thyroid hormone metabolism in adolescence in the Netherlands will be presented in this study and determined if there are reasons for concern to human health for these toxins. In the period 1987-1991, a cohort of mother-baby pairs was formed in order to detect abnormalities in relation to dioxin levels in the perinatal period. The study demonstrated that PCDD/Fs were found around the time of birth, suggesting a modulation of the setpoint of thyroid hormone metabolism with a higher 3,3’, 5,5’tetrathyroxine (T4) levels and an increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). While the same serum thyroid hormone tests (- TSH and T4) were again normal by 2 years of age and were still normal at 8-12 years, adolescence is a period with extra stress on thyroid hormone metabolism. Therefore we measured serum levels of TSH, T4, 3,3’,5- triiodothyronine (T3), free T4 (FT4), antibodies and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) in our adolescent cohort. Methods Vena puncture was performed to obtain samples for the measurement of thyroid hormone metabolism related parameters and the current serum dioxin (PCDD/Fs), PCB

  15. Molecular Aspects of Thyroid Hormone Actions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Leonard, Jack L.; Davis, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular actions of thyroid hormone may be initiated within the cell nucleus, at the plasma membrane, in cytoplasm, and at the mitochondrion. Thyroid hormone nuclear receptors (TRs) mediate the biological activities of T3 via transcriptional regulation. Two TR genes, α and β, encode four T3-binding receptor isoforms (α1, β1, β2, and β3). The transcriptional activity of TRs is regulated at multiple levels. Besides being regulated by T3, transcriptional activity is regulated by the type of thyroid hormone response elements located on the promoters of T3 target genes, by the developmental- and tissue-dependent expression of TR isoforms, and by a host of nuclear coregulatory proteins. These nuclear coregulatory proteins modulate the transcription activity of TRs in a T3-dependent manner. In the absence of T3, corepressors act to repress the basal transcriptional activity, whereas in the presence of T3, coactivators function to activate transcription. The critical role of TRs is evident in that mutations of the TRβ gene cause resistance to thyroid hormones to exhibit an array of symptoms due to decreasing the sensitivity of target tissues to T3. Genetically engineered knockin mouse models also reveal that mutations of the TRs could lead to other abnormalities beyond resistance to thyroid hormones, including thyroid cancer, pituitary tumors, dwarfism, and metabolic abnormalities. Thus, the deleterious effects of mutations of TRs are more severe than previously envisioned. These genetic-engineered mouse models provide valuable tools to ascertain further the molecular actions of unliganded TRs in vivo that could underlie the pathogenesis of hypothyroidism. Actions of thyroid hormone that are not initiated by liganding of the hormone to intranuclear TR are termed nongenomic. They may begin at the plasma membrane or in cytoplasm. Plasma membrane-initiated actions begin at a receptor on integrin αvβ3 that activates ERK1/2 and culminate in local membrane actions on

  16. Thyroid hormones and female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Juneo F; Ocarino, Natália M; Serakides, Rogéria

    2018-05-14

    Thyroid hormones are vital for the proper functioning of the female reproductive system, since they modulate the metabolism and development of ovarian, uterine and placental tissues. Therefore, hypo- and hyperthyroidism may result in subfertility or infertility in both women and animals. Other well-documented sequelae of maternal thyroid dysfunctions include menstrual/estral irregularity, anovulation, abortion, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, postpartum thyroiditis, and mental retardation in children. Several studies have been carried out involving prospective and retrospective studies of women with thyroid dysfunction, as well as in vivo and in vitro assays of hypo- and hyperthyroidism using experimental animal models and/or ovarian, uterine and placental cell culture. These studies have sought to elucidate the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones influence reproduction to better understand the physiology of the reproductive system and to provide better therapeutic tools for reproductive dysfunctions that originate from thyroid dysfunctions. Therefore, this review aims to summarize and update the available information related to the role of thyroid hormones in the morphophysiology of the ovary, uterus and placenta in women and animals and the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the female reproductive system.

  17. TSH (Thyroid-stimulating hormone) test

    MedlinePlus

    ... your blood ( hyperthyroidism ), or too little thyroid hormone ( hypothyroidism ). Symptoms of hyperthyroidism, also known as overactive thyroid, ... Bulging of the eyes Difficulty sleeping Symptoms of hypothyroidism, also known as underactive thyroid, include: Weight gain ...

  18. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-08-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  20. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  1. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  2. Thyroid hormone effects on mitochondrial energetics.

    PubMed

    Harper, Mary-Ellen; Seifert, Erin L

    2008-02-01

    Thyroid hormones are the major endocrine regulators of metabolic rate, and their hypermetabolic effects are widely recognized. The cellular mechanisms underlying these metabolic effects have been the subject of much research. Thyroid hormone status has a profound impact on mitochondria, the organelles responsible for the majority of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. However, mechanisms are not well understood. We review the effects of thyroid hormones on mitochondrial energetics and principally oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic and nongenomic mechanisms have been studied. Through the former, thyroid hormones stimulate mitochondriogenesis and thereby augment cellular oxidative capacity. Thyroid hormones induce substantial modifications in mitochondrial inner membrane protein and lipid compositions. Results are consistent with the idea that thyroid hormones activate the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation through various mechanisms involving inner membrane proteins and lipids. Increased uncoupling appears to be responsible for some of the hypermetabolic effects of thyroid hormones. ATP synthesis and turnover reactions are also affected. There appear to be complex relationships between mitochondrial proton leak mechanisms, reactive oxygen species production, and thyroid status. As the majority of studies have focused on the effects of thyroid status on rat liver preparations, there is still a need to address fundamental questions regarding thyroid hormone effects in other tissues and species.

  3. Thyroid hormone deiodination in birds.

    PubMed

    Darras, Veerle M; Verhoelst, Carla H J; Reyns, Geert E; Kühn, Eduard R; Van der Geyten, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Because the avian thyroid gland secretes almost exclusively thyroxine (T4), the availability of receptor-active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) has to be regulated in the extrathyroidal tissues, essentially by deiodination. Like mammals and most other vertebrates, birds possess three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, and D3) that closely resemble their mammalian counterparts, as shown by biochemical characterization studies in several avian species and by cDNA cloning of the three enzymes in chicken. The tissue distribution of these deiodinases has been studied in detail in chicken at the level of activity and mRNA expression. More recently specific antibodies were used to study cellular localization at the protein level. The abundance and distribution of the different deiodinases shows substantial variation during embryonic development and postnatal life. Deiodination in birds is subject to regulation by hormones from several endocrine axes, including thyroid hormones, growth hormone and glucocorticoids. In addition, deiodination is also influenced by external parameters, such as nutrition, temperature, light and also a number of environmental pollutants. The balance between the outer and inner ring deiodination resulting from the impact of all these factors ultimately controls T3 availability.

  4. Thyroid hormones: Possible roles in epilepsy pathology.

    PubMed

    Tamijani, Seyedeh Masoumeh Seyedhoseini; Karimi, Benyamin; Amini, Elham; Golpich, Mojtaba; Dargahi, Leila; Ali, Raymond Azman; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Mohamed, Zahurin; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) L-thyroxine and L-triiodothyronine, primarily known as metabolism regulators, are tyrosine-derived hormones produced by the thyroid gland. They play an essential role in normal central nervous system development and physiological function. By binding to nuclear receptors and modulating gene expression, THs influence neuronal migration, differentiation, myelination, synaptogenesis and neurogenesis in developing and adult brains. Any uncorrected THs supply deficiency in early life may result in irreversible neurological and motor deficits. The development and function of GABAergic neurons as well as glutamatergic transmission are also affected by THs. Though the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unknown, the effects of THs on inhibitory and excitatory neurons may affect brain seizure activity. The enduring predisposition of the brain to generate epileptic seizures leads to a complex chronic brain disorder known as epilepsy. Pathologically, epilepsy may be accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and eventually dysregulation of excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. Based on the latest evidence on the association between THs and epilepsy, we hypothesize that THs abnormalities may contribute to the pathogenesis of epilepsy. We also review gender differences and the presumed underlying mechanisms through which TH abnormalities may affect epilepsy here. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; McDougall, I.R.; Constine, L.S.

    1995-03-30

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves` disease or euthyroid Graves` ophthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benignmore » adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity. 39 refs.« less

  6. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  7. [Effect of aceclofenac on thyroid hormone binding and thyroid function].

    PubMed

    Nadler, K; Buchinger, W; Semlitsch, G; Pongratz, R; Rainer, F

    2000-01-01

    Influences of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) on concentrations of thyroid hormones are known for a long time. These effects could be explained with interference between NSAIDs and thyroid hormone binding. We investigated the effects of a single dose of aceclofenac on thyroid function and thyroid hormone binding in 18 healthy volunteers. Serum levels of free thyroid hormones (FT3, FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured with commercial available kids and thyroid hormone binding was estimated with a specially modified horizontal argarose-gel-electrophoresis prior to and 2 hours after receiving a single dose of aceclofenac. We found a significant decrease in T3 binding on TBG and a significant increase of albumin-bound T3. All other investigated thyroid hormone binding parameters, FT3 and FT4, showed no significant changes. We conclude that aceclofenac leads to a significant redistribution of T3 protein binding. These effects seem to be explained by T3 displacement from TBG induced by aceclofenac.

  8. Thyroid Dysfunction, Thyroid Hormone Replacement and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Boursi, Ben; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC) do not consider thyroid dysfunction as a risk factor for disease development. We sought to determine the risk of developing CRC in patients with thyroid dysfunction, with and without thyroid hormone replacement (THR). Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study using a large population-based medical records database from the United Kingdom. Study case patients were defined as those with any medical code of CRC. Subjects with familial colorectal cancer syndromes or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were excluded. For every case patient, four eligible control patients matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up before index date were selected using incidence density sampling. Exposure was THR therapy before index date. We further divided the THR unexposed group into patients with hypothyroidism (TSH > 4mg/dl), patients with hyperthyroidism (TSH < 0.4mg/dl), and subjects without documented thyroid abnormality. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CRC were estimated using conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified 20990 CRC patients and 82054 control patients. The adjusted odds ratio for CRC associated with THR was 0.88 (95% CI = 0.79 to 0.99, P = .03) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.55 to 0.83, P < .001) for treatment initiated five to 10 years and more than 10 years before index date, respectively. This protective association increased with cumulative duration of therapy. In contrast, hyperthyroidism (adjusted OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.36, P = .001) or untreated hypothyroidism (adjusted OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.24, P < .001) were associated with increased risk of CRC. Conclusion: Long-term THR is associated with a decreased risk of CRC. Hyperthyroidism and untreated hypothyroidism are associated with modestly elevated risk of CRC. PMID:25855726

  9. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known as...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known as...

  11. Association between thyroid hormones and TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stella; Bossi, Fleur; Toffoli, Barbara; Giudici, Fabiola; Bramante, Alessandra; Furlanis, Giulia; Stenner, Elisabetta; Secchiero, Paola; Zauli, Giorgio; Carretta, Renzo; Fabris, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that a circulating protein called TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) might have a role in the regulation of body weight and metabolism. Interestingly, thyroid hormones seem to increase TRAIL tissue expression. This study aimed at evaluating whether overt thyroid disorders affected circulating TRAIL levels. TRAIL circulating levels were measured in euthyroid, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid patients before and after thyroid function normalization. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation between thyroid hormones and TRAIL. Then, the stimulatory effect of both triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) on TRAIL was evaluated in vitro on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Circulating levels of TRAIL significantly increased in hyperthyroid and decreased in hypothyroid patients as compared to controls. Once thyroid function was restored, TRAIL levels normalized. There was an independent association between TRAIL and both fT3 and fT4. Consistent with these findings, T3 and T4 stimulated TRAIL release in vitro. Here we show that thyroid hormones are associated with TRAIL expression in vivo and stimulate TRAIL expression in vitro. Given the overlap between the metabolic effects of thyroid hormones and TRAIL, this work sheds light on the possibility that TRAIL might be one of the molecules mediating thyroid hormones peripheral effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Thyroid Hormones in Skeletal Development and Bone Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, J. H. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is an exquisitely sensitive and archetypal T3-target tissue that demonstrates the critical role for thyroid hormones during development, linear growth, and adult bone turnover and maintenance. Thyrotoxicosis is an established cause of secondary osteoporosis, and abnormal thyroid hormone signaling has recently been identified as a novel risk factor for osteoarthritis. Skeletal phenotypes in genetically modified mice have faithfully reproduced genetic disorders in humans, revealing the complex physiological relationship between centrally regulated thyroid status and the peripheral actions of thyroid hormones. Studies in mutant mice also established the paradigm that T3 exerts anabolic actions during growth and catabolic effects on adult bone. Thus, the skeleton represents an ideal physiological system in which to characterize thyroid hormone transport, metabolism, and action during development and adulthood and in response to injury. Future analysis of T3 action in individual skeletal cell lineages will provide new insights into cell-specific molecular mechanisms and may ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of the art. PMID:26862888

  13. Thyroid Hormone and Seasonal Rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Dardente, Hugues; Hazlerigg, David G.; Ebling, Francis J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation, and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone (TH) conversion. Here, we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of TH signaling within the medio-basal hypothalamus (MBH) through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, TH might also be involved in longer-term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the MBH, in seasonal rhythmicity. PMID:24616714

  14. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  15. Unexplained high thyroid stimulating hormone: a "BIG" problem.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Heidi; Connacher, Alan; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2009-01-01

    Macro-hormones and macro-enzymes are high molecular weight conjugates of hormones or enzymes, respectively, often with immunoglobulins. These are referred to as macromolecular complexes, and may cause artefactually elevated biochemical tests results. Macro enzymes of the most commonly measured serum enzymes have been identified and are recognised as a source of elevated measurements that may cause diagnostic confusion; macro-creatine kinase and macro-amylase are the two better known macro-enzymes in clinical practice. Literature on macro-hormones is largely restricted to macro-prolactin. We present a case of a clinically euthyroid patient, who had persistently elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) but free thyroxine within the reference limits. She underwent repeated thyroid investigations and thyroid hormone interference studies, until macro-TSH was identified as the most likely cause of unexplained elevated TSH. Following the identification and characterisation of this biochemical abnormality, she is no longer subject to repeated blood tests for assessment of thyroid function; the patient currently remains clinically euthyroid.

  16. Thyroid dysfunction, thyroid hormone replacement and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Boursi, Ben; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Current screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC) do not consider thyroid dysfunction as a risk factor for disease development. We sought to determine the risk of developing CRC in patients with thyroid dysfunction, with and without thyroid hormone replacement (THR). We conducted a nested case-control study using a large population-based medical records database from the United Kingdom. Study case patients were defined as those with any medical code of CRC. Subjects with familial colorectal cancer syndromes or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were excluded. For every case patient, four eligible control patients matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up before index date were selected using incidence density sampling. Exposure was THR therapy before index date. We further divided the THR unexposed group into patients with hypothyroidism (TSH > 4 mg/dl), patients with hyperthyroidism (TSH < 0.4 mg/dl), and subjects without documented thyroid abnormality. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CRC were estimated using conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified 20990 CRC patients and 82054 control patients. The adjusted odds ratio for CRC associated with THR was 0.88 (95% CI = 0.79 to 0.99, P = .03) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.55 to 0.83, P < .001) for treatment initiated five to 10 years and more than 10 years before index date, respectively. This protective association increased with cumulative duration of therapy. In contrast, hyperthyroidism (adjusted OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.36, P = .001) or untreated hypothyroidism (adjusted OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.24, P < .001) were associated with increased risk of CRC. Long-term THR is associated with a decreased risk of CRC. Hyperthyroidism and untreated hypothyroidism are associated with modestly elevated risk of CRC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  17. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  18. Effect of adrenal hormones on thyroid secretion and thyroid hormones on adrenal secretion in the sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, I R; Jacks, F

    1975-01-01

    1. Previous work has shown that after stressful stimuli, sheep initially secrete increased amounts of thyroid hormone, at a time when adrenal secretion is also elevated. 2. This study was designed to evaluate (a) any short-term activation or inhibition of thyroid secretion by exogenous cortisol or ACTH administered in quantities comparable to those secreted after stress in sheep and (b) any short-term effect that exogenous thyroxine or triiodothyronine may have on the concentration of plasma cortisol in the sheep. 3. Thyroid activity was measured by determination of plasma protein bound 125I (PB125I) and total 125I in thyroid vein and mixed venous (jugular) blood. Plasma cortisol and thyroxine concentrations were measured by a competitive protein-binding assay at intervals for up to 5 hr after commencement of the experiment. 4. No evidence of an activation of thyroid secretion was found during cortisol or ACTH infusion, as monitored by thyroid vein PB125I. Similarly there was no evidence of any inhibition of thyroid function, as measured by continued secretion of thyroid hormones into thyroid vein blood. 5. No effect on plasma cortisol concentration due to thyroid hormone treatment was observed. 6. It was concluded that (a) elevated circulating corticosteroids in physiological concentrations have no short-term effects on thyroid activity in the sheep and (b) the short-term alterations in thyroid and adrenal cortical secretion observed during stress in the sheep could not be attributed to direct interaction of elevated thyroid hormone concentrations with adrenal cortical secretion. PMID:170400

  19. Thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease: advances in thyroid hormone deiodination.

    PubMed

    Köhrle, Josef

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormone metabolism by the three deiodinase selenoproteins -- DIO1, DIO2, and DIO3 -- regulates the local availability of various iodothyronine metabolites and thus mediates their effects on gene expression, thermoregulation, energy metabolism, and many key reactions during the development and maintenance of an adult organism. Circulating serum levels of thyroid hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone, used as a combined indicator of thyroid hormone status, reflect a composite picture of: thyroid secretion; tissue-specific production of T(3) by DIO1 and DIO2 activity, which both contribute to circulating levels of T(3); and degradation of the prohormone T4, of the thyromimetically active T(3), of the inactive rT(3), of other iodothyronines metabolites with a lower iodine content and of thyroid hormone conjugates. Degradation reactions are catalyzed by either DIO1 or DIO3. Aberrant expression of individual deiodinases in disease, single nucleotide polymorphisms in their genes, and novel regulators of DIO gene expression (such as bile acids) provide a more complex picture of the fine tuning and the adaptation of systemic and local bioavailability of thyroid hormones.

  20. Thyroid Hormones and Growth in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750631

  1. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development.

  2. Effects of thyroid hormones on the heart.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Bonelo-Perdomo, Anilsa; Sierra-Torres, Carlos Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on heart function, mediated by genomic and non-genomic effects. Consequently, thyroid hormone deficiencies, as well as excesses, are expected to result in profound changes in cardiac function regulation and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Thyroid hormones upregulate the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-activated ATPase and downregulate the expression of phospholamban. Overall, hyperthyroidism is characterized by an increase in resting heart rate, blood volume, stroke volume, myocardial contractility, and ejection fraction. The development of "high-output heart failure" in hyperthyroidism may be due to "tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy". On the other hand, in a hypothyroid state, thyroid hormone deficiency results in lower heart rate and weakening of myocardial contraction and relaxation, with prolonged systolic and early diastolic times. Cardiac preload is decreased due to impaired diastolic function. Cardiac afterload is increased, and chronotropic and inotropic functions are reduced. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is relatively common in patients over 65 years of age. In general, subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and CHD events, but not of total mortality. The risk of CHD mortality and atrial fibrillation (but not other outcomes) in subclinical hyperthyroidism is higher among patients with very low levels of thyrotropin. Finally, medications such as amiodarone may induce hypothyroidism (mediated by the Wolff-Chaikoff), as well as hyperthyroidism (mediated by the Jod-Basedow effect). In both instances, the underlying cause is the high concentration of iodine in this medication. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroid-stimulating hormone pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michelle J; Erickson, Dana; Castro, M Regina; Atkinson, John L D

    2008-07-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are rare, representing < 2% of all pituitary adenomas. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with TSH-secreting or clinically silent TSH-immunostaining pituitary tumors among all pituitary adenomas followed at their institution between 1987 and 2003. Patient records, including clinical, imaging, and pathological and surgical characteristics were reviewed. Twenty-one patients (6 women and 15 men; mean age 46 years, range 26-73 years) were identified. Of these, 10 patients had a history of clinical hyperthyroidism, of whom 7 had undergone ablative thyroid procedures (thyroid surgery/(131)I ablation) prior to the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma. Ten patients had elevated TSH preoperatively. Seven patients presented with headache, and 8 presented with visual field defects. All patients underwent imaging, of which 19 were available for imaging review. Sixteen patients had macroadenomas. Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent transsphenoidal surgery at the authors' institution, 2 patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery at another facility, and 1 was treated medically. Patients with TSH-secreting tumors were defined as in remission after surgery if they had no residual adenoma on imaging and had biochemical evidence of hypo-or euthyroidism. Patients with TSH-immunostaining tumors were considered in remission if they had no residual tumor. Of these 18 patients, 9 (50%) were in remission following surgery. Seven patients had residual tumor; 2 of these patients underwent further transsphenoidal resection, 1 underwent a craniotomy, and 4 underwent postoperative radiation therapy (2 conventional radiation therapy, 1 Gamma Knife surgery, and 1 had both types of radiation treatment). Two patients had persistently elevated TSH levels despite the lack of evidence of residual tumor. On pathological analysis and immunostaining of the surgical specimen, 17 patients had samples that stained positively for

  4. Thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Venditti, P; Di Meo, S

    2006-02-01

    Hypermetabolic state in hyperthyroidism is associated with tissue oxidative injury. Available data indicate that hyperthyroid tissues exhibit an increased ROS and RNS production. The increased mitochondrial ROS generation is a side effect of the enhanced level of electron carriers, by which hyperthyroid tissues increase their metabolic capacity. Investigations of antioxidant defence system have returned controversial results. Moreover, other thyroid hormone-linked biochemical changes increase tissue susceptibility to oxidative challenge, which exacerbates the injury and dysfunction they suffer under stressful conditions. Mitochondria, as a primary target for oxidative stress, might account for hyperthyroidism linked tissue dysfunction. This is consistent with the inverse relationship found between functional recovery of ischemic hyperthyroid hearts and mitochondrial oxidative damage and respiration impairment. However, thyroid hormone-activated mitochondrial mechanisms provide protection against excessive tissue dysfunction, including increased expression of uncoupling proteins, proteolytic enzymes and transcriptional coactivator PGC-1, and stimulate opening of permeability transition pores.

  5. Common autoimmune biomarkers, thyroid hormonal abnormalities, and beta cells dysfunction in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Gozashti, Mohammadhossein; Najafipour, Hamid; Gholamhosseinian, Najar Ahmad; Bahramnejad, Abbas; Shokouhi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is autoimmune diabetes with a slow progression characterized by the presence of antibodies associated with Type I diabetes. The present study aimed to assess autoimmune characteristics in patients with LADA in Iran. We attempted to obtain a clear view of autoimmune conditions in LADA among our population. This study was sourced from the population-based survey of KERCARDS aiming assessment of cardiovascular risk factors among a great sample of Iranian population who were resident in Kerman, a great province in southern Iran. Among all diabetic patients who were negative for Anti Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) antibody test, 120 were selected as the controls and among 80 patients who were positive for this test diagnosed as LADA, the recorded files of 57 patients were complete considered as the cases. The level of thyroxin is significantly lower in patients with LADA compared with the controls so 73.7% and 45% of patients had normal level of thyroxin, respectively. Also, those with LADA had considerably lower levels of both thyroid peroxydaseantibody (TPO-Ab) and C-peptide when compared with non-LADA group. Using multivariate analyses and with the presence of baseline variables including gender, age, and duration of disease, the diagnosis of LADA was associated with lower serum levels of Anti-TPO, C-peptide, and thyroxin, but not associated with the level of Anti-TTG in serum. LADA patients may face with lower serum levels of C-peptide and thyroid-specific antibodies indicating insulin therapy requirement and authoimmune fundaments of the disease, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Thyroid hormone and the central control of homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amy; Mittag, Jens

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. More recently, it was shown that the hormone also modulates these systems by actions on the central autonomic control. Recent studies that either manipulated thyroid hormone signalling in anatomical areas of the brain or analysed seasonal models with an endogenous fluctuation in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels revealed that the hormone controls energy turnover. However, most of these studies did not progress beyond the level of anatomical nuclei; thus, the neuronal substrates as well as the molecular mechanisms remain largely enigmatic. This review summarises the evidence for a role of thyroid hormone in the central autonomic control of peripheral homeostasis and advocates novel strategies to address thyroid hormone action in the brain on a cellular level.

  7. Novel neural pathways for metabolic effects of thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Klieverik, Lars P; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2010-04-01

    The relation between thyrotoxicosis, the clinical syndrome resulting from exposure to excessive thyroid hormone concentrations, and the sympathetic nervous system remains enigmatic. Nevertheless, beta-adrenergic blockers are widely used to manage severe thyrotoxicosis. Recent experiments show that the effects of thyrotoxicosis on hepatic glucose production and insulin sensitivity can be modulated by selective hepatic sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation. Indeed, thyroid hormone stimulates hepatic glucose production via a sympathetic pathway, a novel central pathway for thyroid hormone action. Rodent studies suggest that similar neural routes exist for thyroid hormone analogues (e.g. thyronamines). Further elucidation of central effects of thyroid hormone on autonomic outflow to metabolic organs, including the thyroid and brown adipose tissue, will add to our understanding of hyperthyroidism. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thyroid hormone action on intermediary metabolism. Part I: respiration, thermogenesis and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Müller, M J; Seitz, H J

    1984-01-02

    The effect of thyroid hormones on mitochondrial respiration are summarized: T3 directly stimulates mitochondrial respiration and the synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Cytosolic ATP availability is increased by a thyroid hormone-induced increase in adenine nucleotide translocation across the mitochondrial membrane; the steady state ATP concentration and the cytosolic ATP/adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) ratio is even decreased in hyperthyroid tissues because of the simultaneous stimulation of the synthesis and consumption of ATP. With regard to the thyroid hormone-induced energy wasting processes, heart work, intra- and interorgan futile cycling and Na+/K+-ATPase are involved to varying degrees. As a consequence of the thyroid hormone-induced hydrolysis of ATP, thermogenesis is increased in hyper- and decreased in hypothyroidism. Despite an increased rate of glucose utilization, clinical and experimental hyperthyroidism is often characterized by an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test. This finding is due to the thyroid hormone-induced increase in intestinal glucose absorption as well as the still enhanced endogenous glucose production in the liver. Hypothyroid patients show a reduced glucose tolerance test because of a decrease in intestinal glucose absorption and a sometimes reduced glucose turnover. The thyroid hormone-induced alterations in glucose metabolism are most probably not due to alterations in serum insulin levels and/or to a peripheral insulin resistance at the receptor level.

  9. Alternate pathways of thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sing-Yung; Green, William L; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Hays, Marguerite T; Chopra, Inder J

    2005-08-01

    The major thyroid hormone (TH) secreted by the thyroid gland is thyroxine (T(4)). Triiodothyronine (T(3)), formed chiefly by deiodination of T(4), is the active hormone at the nuclear receptor, and it is generally accepted that deiodination is the major pathway regulating T(3) bioavailability in mammalian tissues. The alternate pathways, sulfation and glucuronidation of the phenolic hydroxyl group of iodothyronines, the oxidative deamination and decarboxylation of the alanine side chain to form iodothyroacetic acids, and ether link cleavage provide additional mechanisms for regulating the supply of active hormone. Sulfation may play a general role in regulation of iodothyronine metabolism, since sulfation of T(4) and T(3) markedly accelerates deiodination to the inactive metabolites, reverse triiodothyronine (rT(3)) and T(2). Sulfoconjugation is prominent during intrauterine development, particularly in the precocial species in the last trimester including humans and sheep, where it may serve both to regulate the supply of T(3), via sulfation followed by deiodination, and to facilitate maternal-fetal exchange of sulfated iodothyronines (e.g., 3,3'-diiodothyronine sulfate [T(2)S]). The resulting low serum T(3) may be important for normal fetal development in the late gestation. The possibility that T(2)S or its derivative, transferred from the fetus and appearing in maternal serum or urine, can serve as a marker of fetal thyroid function is being studied. Glucuronidation of TH often precedes biliary-fecal excretion of hormone. In rats, stimulation of glucuronidation by various drugs and toxins may lead to lower T(4) and T(3) levels, provocation of thyrotropin (TSH) secretion, and goiter. In man, drug induced stimulation of glucuronidation is limited to T(4), and does not usually compromise normal thyroid function. However, in hypothyroid subjects, higher doses of TH may be required to maintain euthyroidism when these drugs are given. In addition, glucuronidates and

  10. American Thyroid Association Guide to Investigating Thyroid Hormone Economy and Action in Rodent and Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Grant; Forrest, Douglas; Galton, Valerie Anne; Gereben, Balázs; Kim, Brian W.; Kopp, Peter A.; Liao, Xiao Hui; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Peeters, Robin P.; Refetoff, Samuel; Sharlin, David S.; Simonides, Warner S.; Weiss, Roy E.; Williams, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An in-depth understanding of the fundamental principles that regulate thyroid hormone homeostasis is critical for the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches for patients with thyroid disease. Summary: Important clinical practices in use today for the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, or thyroid cancer are the result of laboratory discoveries made by scientists investigating the most basic aspects of thyroid structure and molecular biology. In this document, a panel of experts commissioned by the American Thyroid Association makes a series of recommendations related to the study of thyroid hormone economy and action. These recommendations are intended to promote standardization of study design, which should in turn increase the comparability and reproducibility of experimental findings. Conclusions: It is expected that adherence to these recommendations by investigators in the field will facilitate progress towards a better understanding of the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone dependent processes. PMID:24001133

  11. Thyroid hormone accelerates the differentiation of adult hippocampal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, R; Desouza, L A; Nanavaty, I N; Kernie, S G; Vaidya, V A

    2012-09-01

    Disrupted thyroid hormone function evokes severe physiological consequences in the immature brain. In adulthood, although clinical reports document an effect of thyroid hormone status on mood and cognition, the molecular and cellular changes underlying these behavioural effects are poorly understood. More recently, the subtle effects of thyroid hormone on structural plasticity in the mature brain, in particular on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, have come to be appreciated. However, the specific stages of adult hippocampal progenitor development that are sensitive to thyroid hormone are not defined. Using nestin-green fluorescent protein reporter mice, we demonstrate that thyroid hormone mediates its effects on hippocampal neurogenesis by influencing Type 2b and Type 3 progenitors, although it does not alter proliferation of either the Type 1 quiescent progenitor or the Type 2a amplifying neural progenitor. Thyroid hormone increases the number of doublecortin (DCX)-positive Type 3 progenitors, and accelerates neuronal differentiation into both DCX-positive immature neurones and neuronal nuclei-positive granule cell neurones. Furthermore, we show that this increase in neuronal differentiation is accompanied by a significant induction of specific transcription factors involved in hippocampal progenitor differentiation. In vitro studies using the neurosphere assay support a direct effect of thyroid hormone on progenitor development because neurospheres treated with thyroid hormone are shifted to a more differentiated state. Taken together, our results indicate that thyroid hormone mediates its neurogenic effects via targeting Type 2b and Type 3 hippocampal progenitors, and suggests a role for proneural transcription factors in contributing to the effects of thyroid hormone on neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal progenitors. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. Modulation of thyroid hormone receptors by non-thyroidal stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    ErkenBrack, D.E.; Clemons, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of non-thyroidal stimuli to affect the binding affinity and capacity of solubilized nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones was studied in a normal homeostatic system (erythropoiesis) and a pathobiologic one (lung-ozone interaction). No significant effects on affinity were found, as Kd control values for receptors derived from rat bone marrow averaged 57 (+/- 28) pM while experimental (hypoxic) values averaged 89 (+/- 55) pM. Kd control values in rat lung were found to average 142 (+/- 22) pM while average values derived from experimental protocols with ozone and methimazole were 267 (+/- 44) pM and 161 (+/- 35) pMmore » respectively. Finally, Kd control values for receptors derived from cultured MEL cells averaged 19 (+/- 2.6) pM while experimental values during exposure to DMSO or IGF1 were 23 (+/- 3.6) pM and 26 (+/- 11) pM respectively. In contrast, binding capacity (expressed as fmoles of hormone bound per unit protein of solubilized receptor) was markedly perturbed in several tissues by various agents: ozone effects on lung were shown by an average control value of 3.3 (+/- 0.4) as opposed to an experimental average of 28 (+/- 1.9); and hypoxia effects on erythroid tissue were displayed by an average control value of 0.7 (+/- 0.07) as opposed to the experimental figure of 1.8 (+/- 0.03). In cultured MEL cells, binding capacity was seen to be increased from control values of 388 (+/- 15) sites/cell to 1243 (+/- 142) sites/cell after DMSO exposure and 2002 (+/- 10) sites/cell after IGF1 exposure. Parallel experiments done with receptors derived from rat liver yielded values similar to those reported by other investigators and were unaffected by the experimental agents.« less

  13. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves’ disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid. PMID:28751877

  14. Thyroid Hormone and Leptin in the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cristiane Fonte; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is primarily expressed in white adipose tissue; however, it is expressed in the hypothalamus and reproductive tissues as well. Leptin acts by activating the leptin receptors (Ob-Rs). Additionally, the regulation of several neuroendocrine and reproductive functions, including the inhibition of glucocorticoids and enhancement of thyroxine and sex hormone concentrations in human beings and mice are leptin functions. It has been suggested that thyroid hormones (TH) could directly regulate leptin expression. Additionally, hypothyroidism compromises the intracellular integration of leptin signaling specifically in the arcuate nucleus. Two TH receptor isoforms are expressed in the testis, TRa and TRb, with TRa being the predominant one that is present in all stages of development. The effects of TH involve the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli and Leydig cells during development, spermatogenesis, and steroidogenesis. In this context, TH disorders are associated with sexual dysfunction. An endocrine and/or direct paracrine effect of leptin on the gonads inhibits testosterone production in Leydig cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the effects of both hormones in the testis during hypothyroidism. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge regarding leptin and TH in the testis. PMID:25505448

  15. Thyroid profiles in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone and episodes of thyrotoxicosis, including repeated painless thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Matsuo; Otsuka, Fumiko; Tozaki, Teruaki; Ban, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Thyrotoxic disease can be difficult to recognize in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) because the clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis cannot be observed, and thyrotropin (TSH) may not be suppressed because of hormone resistance. Painless thyroiditis is a relatively common cause of thyrotoxicosis, but its occurrence in RTH has not been reported. We assessed the thyroid profile in a patient with RTH and episodes of thyrotoxicosis who experienced repeated painless thyroiditis. A 44-year-old Japanese woman with RTH, which was confirmed by the presence of a P453A mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene, showed a slight elevation of the basal levels of thyroid hormones, which indicated that her pituitary RTH was mild. She experienced a slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia concomitant with TSH suppression. A diagnosis of painless thyroiditis was made because of the absence of TSH receptor antibodies, low Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake by the thyroid gland, and transient suppression followed by a slight elevation of TSH following the elevation of thyroid hormones. The patient's complaints of general malaise and occasional palpitations did not change throughout the course of painless thyroiditis. Three years later, painless thyroiditis occurred again without any deterioration of the clinical manifestations. Mild pituitary RTH can be overcome by slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia during mild thyrotoxicosis. When pituitary resistance is severe and TSH is not suppressed, thyrotoxicosis may be overlooked.

  16. New Approaches to Thyroid Hormones and Purinergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Gabriel Fernandes; Buffon, Andréia; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar

    2013-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormones influence a wide variety of events at the molecular, cellular, and functional levels. Thyroid hormones (TH) play pivotal roles in growth, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, development, and metabolic homeostasis via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) by controlling the expression of TR target genes. Most of these effects result in pathological and physiological events and are already well described in the literature. Even so, many recent studies have been devoted to bringing new information on problems in controlling the synthesis and release of these hormones and to elucidating mechanisms of the action of these hormones unconventionally. The purinergic system was recently linked to thyroid diseases, including enzymes, receptors, and enzyme products related to neurotransmitter release, nociception, behavior, and other vascular systems. Thus, throughout this text we intend to relate the relationship between the TH in physiological and pathological situations with the purinergic signaling. PMID:23956925

  17. New approaches to thyroid hormones and purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Gabriel Fernandes; Buffon, Andréia; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar

    2013-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormones influence a wide variety of events at the molecular, cellular, and functional levels. Thyroid hormones (TH) play pivotal roles in growth, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, development, and metabolic homeostasis via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) by controlling the expression of TR target genes. Most of these effects result in pathological and physiological events and are already well described in the literature. Even so, many recent studies have been devoted to bringing new information on problems in controlling the synthesis and release of these hormones and to elucidating mechanisms of the action of these hormones unconventionally. The purinergic system was recently linked to thyroid diseases, including enzymes, receptors, and enzyme products related to neurotransmitter release, nociception, behavior, and other vascular systems. Thus, throughout this text we intend to relate the relationship between the TH in physiological and pathological situations with the purinergic signaling.

  18. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  19. Thyroid Hormone in the Clinic and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hercbergs, Aleck; Mousa, Shaker A; Leinung, Matthew; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J

    2018-06-01

    There is preclinical and recent epidemiological evidence that thyroid hormone supports breast cancer. These observations raise the issue of whether management of breast cancer in certain settings should include consideration of reducing the possible contribution of thyroid hormone to the advancement of the disease. In a preliminary experience, elimination of the clinical action of endogenous L-thyroxine (T 4 ) in patients with advanced solid tumors, including breast cancer, has favorably affected the course of the cancer, particularly when coupled with administration of exogenous 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T 3 ) (euthyroid hypothyroxinemia). We discuss in the current brief review the possible clinical settings in which to consider whether endogenous thyroid hormone-or exogenous thyroid hormone in the patient with hypothyroidism and coincident breast cancer-is significantly contributing to breast cancer outcome.

  20. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Disruption: Prevalence, Environmental Contaminants and Neurodevelopmental Consequences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for growth and development and particularly brain development. There are numerous environmental agents that lead to marginal reductions of circulating TH. Although it is clear that severe developmental hypothyroidism is profoundly detrimental to...

  1. The effects of thyroid hormones on brown adipose tissue in humans: a PET-CT study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiongyue; Miao, Qing; Ye, Hongying; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Zuo, Chuantao; Hua, Fengchun; Guan, Yihui; Li, Yiming

    2014-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for energy expenditure through thermogenesis, although its regulatory factors are not well known in humans. There is evidence suggesting that thyroid hormones affect BAT functions in some mammals, but the effects of thyroid hormones on BAT activity in humans are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of thyroid hormones on glucose metabolism of BAT and other organs in humans. Nine Graves' disease-caused hyperthyroid patients who were newly diagnosed and untreated were studied. Putative brown adipose tissue activity was determined by the integrated ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG) positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT). All hyperthyroid patients were treated with methimazole and had been monitored until their symptoms disappeared and thyroid hormone levels returned to normal. At the end, a second PET-CT scan was performed. The average follow-up period was 77 days. Meanwhile, compared with a group of seventy-five brown adipose tissue-negative controls, thyroid hormones of seventy-five BAT-positive healthy subjects were measured. Active brown adipose tissue was not present in any of the hyperthyroid patients. However, one patient with normalized thyroid function showed active BAT after therapy. The free T3 levels and free T4 levels were significantly lower in the 75 BAT-positive subjects than in the BAT-negative subjects. All hyperthyroid patients showed symmetrically increased uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose in skeletal muscles before treatment, whereas, the standardized uptake value was substantially decreased after treatment. Abnormally high circulating thyroid hormone levels may not increase brown adipose tissue activity, which may be limited by the increased obligatory thermogenesis of muscle in adult humans. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Inhibition of the Thyroid Hormone Pathway in Xenopus by Mercaptobenzothiazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibian metamorphosis is a thyroid hormone-dependent process that provides a potential model system to assess chemicals for their ability to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Several studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of this system to a variety of ...

  3. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-11-01

    Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification.

  4. Interactions between the thyroid hormones and the hormones of the growth hormone axis.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2003-12-01

    The normal secretion and action of the thyroid hormones and the hormones of the GH/IGF-I (growth hormone/ insulin-like growth factor I) axis are interdependent. Their interactions often differ in man from animal studies in rodents and sheep. Thus neonates with congenital hypothyroidism are of normal length in humans but IUGR (intrauterine growth retardation) in sheep. Postnatally normal GH/IGF-I secretion and action depends on an euthyroid state. Present knowledge on the interactions between the two axes is reviewed in states of hypo- and hyperthyroidism, states of GH/IGF-I deprivation and hypersecretion, as well as the relationship between IGF-I and thyroid cancer. Emphasis is given to data in children and aspects of linear growth and skeletal maturation.

  5. Thyroid hormones and their effects: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J

    2000-11-01

    The thyroid hormones are very hydrophobic and those that exhibit biological activity are 3',5',3,5-L-tetraiodothyronine (T4), 3',5,3-L-triiodothyronine (T3), 3',5',3-L-triiodothyronine (rT3) and 3,5',-L-diiothyronine (3,5-T2). At physiological pH, dissociation of the phenolic -OH group of these iodothyronines is an important determinant of their physical chemistry that impacts on their biological effects. When non-ionized these iodothyronines are strongly amphipathic. It is proposed that iodothyronines are normal constituents of biological membranes in vertebrates. In plasma of adult vertebrates, unbound T4 and T3 are regulated in the picomolar range whilst protein-bound T4 and T3 are maintained in the nanomolar range. The function of thyroid-hormone-binding plasma proteins is to ensure an even distrubtion throughout the body. Various iodothyronines are produced by three types of membrane-bound cellular deiodinase enzyme systems in vertebrates. The distribution of deiodinases varies between tissues and each has a distinct developmental profile. Thyroid hormones. (1) the nuclear receptor mode is especially important in the thyroid hormone axis that controls plasma and cellular levels of these hormones. (2) These hormones are strongly associated with membranes in tissues and normally rigidify these membranes. (3) They also affect the acyl composition of membrane bilayers and it is suggested that this is due to the cells responding to thyroid-hormone-induced membrane rigidificataion. Both their immediate effects on the physical state of membranes and the consequent changes in membrane composition result in several other thyroid hormone effects. Effects on metabolism may be due primarily to membrane acyl changes. There are other actions of thyroid hormones involving membrane receptors and influences on cellular interactions with the extracellulara matrix. The effects of thyroid hormones are reviewed and appear to b combinations of these various modes of action. During

  6. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  7. Selenium and the control of thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Köhrle, Josef

    2005-08-01

    Thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism and action require adequate availability of the essential trace elements iodine and selenium, which affect homeostasis of thyroid hormone-dependent metabolic pathways. The three selenocysteine-containing iodothyronine deiodinases constitute a novel gene family. Selenium is retained and deiodinase expression is maintained at almost normal levels in the thyroid gland, the brain and several other endocrine tissues during selenium deficiency, thus guaranteeing adequate local and systemic levels of the active thyroid hormone T(3). Due to their low tissue concentrations and their mRNA SECIS elements deiodinases rank high in the cellular and tissue-specific hierarchy of selenium distribution among various selenoproteins. While systemic selenium status and expression of abundant selenoproteins (glutathione peroxidase or selenoprotein P) is already impaired in patients with cancer, disturbed gastrointestinal resorption, unbalanced nutrition or patients requiring intensive care treatment, selenium-dependent deiodinase function might still be adequate. However, disease-associated alterations in proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, hormones and pharmaceuticals modulate deiodinase isoenzyme expression independent from altered selenium status and might thus pretend causal relationships between systemic selenium status and altered thyroid hormone metabolism. Limited or inadequate supply of both trace elements, iodine and selenium, leads to complex rearrangements of thyroid hormone metabolism enabling adaptation to unfavorable conditions.

  8. Direct effects of thyroid hormones on hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rohit A; Singh, Brijesh K; Yen, Paul M

    2018-05-01

    It has been known for a long time that thyroid hormones have prominent effects on hepatic fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis and metabolism. Indeed, hypothyroidism has been associated with increased serum levels of triglycerides and cholesterol as well as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Advances in areas such as cell imaging, autophagy and metabolomics have generated a more detailed and comprehensive picture of thyroid-hormone-mediated regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism at the molecular level. In this Review, we describe and summarize the key features of direct thyroid hormone regulation of lipogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, cholesterol synthesis and the reverse cholesterol transport pathway in normal and altered thyroid hormone states. Thyroid hormone mediates these effects at the transcriptional and post-translational levels and via autophagy. Given these potentially beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, it is possible that thyroid hormone analogues and/or mimetics might be useful for the treatment of metabolic diseases involving the liver, such as hypercholesterolaemia and NAFLD.

  9. [Advances in postoperative thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy in females with thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Song, F; Yi, H L

    2018-05-07

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common malignant carcinoma in female population.Postoperative long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH) suppression therapy can reduce the risk of recurrence for differentiated thyroid cancer and control the progress of the disease, but it also induces simultaneously subclinical hypothyroidism and imposes negative effect on female. In addition to cardiovascular disease, TSH suppression therapy can lead to the alteration of sex hormone metabolism, menstrual disorder, poor influence on pregnancy and osteoporosis. This article reviews the recent studies on postoperative TSH suppression therapy in women with thyroid cancer.

  10. Elevated levels of circulating thyroid hormone do not cause the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tammas; Denmark, Lawrence; Lieberman, Daniel Z

    2016-11-03

    Clinicians have been reluctant to use high dose thyroid (HDT) to treat affective disorders because high circulating levels of thyroid hormone have traditionally been equated with hyperthyroidism, and understood as the cause of the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism, such as osteoporosis and cardiac abnormalities. This conclusion is not supported by (HDT) research. A literature review of research related to the morbidity and mortality of HDT treatment was performed. There exists a large body of research involving the use of HDT treatment to prevent the recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer and to treat affective disorders. A review of this literature finds a lack of support for HDT as a cause of osteoporosis, nor is there support for an increase in morbidity or mortality associated with HDT. This finding contrasts with the well-established morbidity and mortality associated with Graves' disease, thyroiditis, and other endogenous forms of hyperthyroidism. The lack of evidence that exogenous HDT causes osteoporosis, cardiac abnormalities or increases mortality compared with the significant morbidity and mortality of hyperthyroidism requires an alternative cause for the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism. One possibility is an autoimmune mechanism. High circulating levels of thyroid hormone is not the cause of the sequela of hyperthyroidism. The reluctance to using high dose thyroid is unwarranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A thyroid hormone receptor mutation that dissociates thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Danielle S.; Sabet, Amin; Santiago, Leticia A.; Sidhaye, Aniket R.; Chiamolera, Maria I.; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M.; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is most often due to point mutations in the β-isoform of the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR-β). The majority of mutations involve the ligand-binding domain, where they block TH binding and receptor function on both stimulatory and inhibitory TH response elements. In contrast, a few mutations in the ligand-binding domain are reported to maintain TH binding and yet cause RTH in certain tissues. We introduced one such naturally occurring human RTH mutation (R429Q) into the germline of mice at the TR-β locus. R429Q knock-in (KI) mice demonstrated elevated serum TH and inappropriately normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, consistent with hypothalamic–pituitary RTH. In contrast, 3 hepatic genes positively regulated by TH (Dio1, Gpd1, and Thrsp) were increased in R429Q KI animals. Mice were then rendered hypothyroid, followed by graded T3 replacement. Hypothyroid R429Q KI mice displayed elevated TSH subunit mRNA levels, and T3 treatment failed to normally suppress these levels. T3 treatment, however, stimulated pituitary Gh levels to a greater degree in R429Q KI than in control mice. Gsta, a hepatic gene negatively regulated by TH, was not suppressed in R429Q KI mice after T3 treatment, but hepatic Dio1 and Thrsp mRNA levels increased in response to TH. Cardiac myosin heavy chain isoform gene expression also showed a specific defect in TH inhibition. In summary, the R429Q mutation is associated with selective impairment of TH-mediated gene repression, suggesting that the affected domain, necessary for TR homodimerization and corepressor binding, has a critical role in negative gene regulation by TH. PMID:19439650

  12. Mutations of the Thyroid Hormone Transporter MCT8 Cause Prenatal Brain Damage and Persistent Hypomyelination

    PubMed Central

    López-Espíndola, Daniela; Morales-Bastos, Carmen; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Lev, Dorit; Sugo, Ella; Verge, Charles F.; Refetoff, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mutations in the MCT8 (SLC16A2) gene, encoding a specific thyroid hormone transporter, cause an X-linked disease with profound psychomotor retardation, neurological impairment, and abnormal serum thyroid hormone levels. The nature of the central nervous system damage is unknown. Objective: The objective of the study was to define the neuropathology of the syndrome by analyzing brain tissue sections from MCT8-deficient subjects. Design: We analyzed brain sections from a 30th gestational week male fetus and an 11-year-old boy and as controls, brain tissue from a 30th and 28th gestational week male and female fetuses, respectively, and a 10-year-old girl and a 12-year-old boy. Methods: Staining with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostaining for myelin basic protein, 70-kDa neurofilament, parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k, and synaptophysin were performed. Thyroid hormone determinations and quantitative PCR for deiodinases were also performed. Results: The MCT8-deficient fetus showed a delay in cortical and cerebellar development and myelination, loss of parvalbumin expression, abnormal calbindin-D28k content, impaired axonal maturation, and diminished biochemical differentiation of Purkinje cells. The 11-year-old boy showed altered cerebellar structure, deficient myelination, deficient synaptophysin and parvalbumin expression, and abnormal calbindin-D28k expression. The MCT8-deficient fetal cerebral cortex showed 50% reduction of thyroid hormones and increased type 2 deiodinase and decreased type 3 deiodinase mRNAs. Conclusions: The following conclusions were reached: 1) brain damage in MCT8 deficiency is diffuse, without evidence of focal lesions, and present from fetal stages despite apparent normality at birth; 2) deficient hypomyelination persists up to 11 years of age; and 3) the findings are compatible with the deficient action of thyroid hormones in the developing brain caused by impaired transport to the target neural cells. PMID:25222753

  13. Prolonged weightlessness effect on postflight plasma thyroid hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1977-01-01

    Blood drawn before and after spaceflight from the nine Skylab astronauts showed a statistically significant increase in mean plasma thyroxine (T-4) of 1.4 micro g/dl and in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of 4 microunits ml. Concurrent triiodothyronine (T-3) levels decreased 27 ng/dl indicating inhibited conversion of T-4 to T-3. The T-3 decrease is postulated to be a result of the increased cortisol levels noted during and following each mission. These results confirm the thyroidal changes noted after the shorter Apollo flights and show that thyroid hormone levels change during spaceflight.

  14. Thyroid hormones induce browning of white fat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Contreras, Cristina; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The canonical view about the effect of thyroid hormones (THs) on thermogenesis assumes that the hypothalamus acts merely as a modulator of the sympathetic outflow on brown adipose tissue (BAT). Recent data have challenged that vision by demonstrating that THs act on the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates the thermogenic program in BAT, leading to increased thermogenesis and weight loss. Current data have shown that in addition to activation of brown fat, the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) might also be an important thermogenic mechanism. However, the possible central effects of THs on the browning of white fat remain unclear. Here, we show that 3,3′,5,5′ tetraiodothyroxyne (T4)-induced hyperthyroidism promotes a marked browning of WAT. Of note, central or VMH-specific administration of 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) recapitulates that effect. The specific genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the VMH reversed the central effect of T3 on browning. Finally, we also showed that the expression of browning genes in human WAT correlates with serum T4. Overall, these data indicate that THs induce browning of WAT and that this mechanism is mediated via the central effects of THs on energy balance. PMID:27913573

  15. Thyroid hormones induce browning of white fat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Contreras, Cristina; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Fernández-Real, José-Manuel; López, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The canonical view about the effect of thyroid hormones (THs) on thermogenesis assumes that the hypothalamus acts merely as a modulator of the sympathetic outflow on brown adipose tissue (BAT). Recent data have challenged that vision by demonstrating that THs act on the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates the thermogenic program in BAT, leading to increased thermogenesis and weight loss. Current data have shown that in addition to activation of brown fat, the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) might also be an important thermogenic mechanism. However, the possible central effects of THs on the browning of white fat remain unclear. Here, we show that 3,3',5,5' tetraiodothyroxyne (T 4 )-induced hyperthyroidism promotes a marked browning of WAT. Of note, central or VMH-specific administration of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T 3 ) recapitulates that effect. The specific genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the VMH reversed the central effect of T 3 on browning. Finally, we also showed that the expression of browning genes in human WAT correlates with serum T 4 Overall, these data indicate that THs induce browning of WAT and that this mechanism is mediated via the central effects of THs on energy balance. © 2017 The authors.

  16. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced in the pituitary that stimulates the thyroid gland to grow and produce thyroid hormone (TH). The concentration of TH controls developmental changes that take place in a wide variety of organisms. Many use the metaphoric ch...

  17. THYROID HORMONE RECEPTOR BETA GENE MUTATION (P453A) IN A TURKISH FAMILY PRODUCING RESISTANCE TO THYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktaroglu, Taner; Noel, Janet; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Refetoff, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Two members of a Turkish family, a mother and son, had thyroid function tests suggestive of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH). The clinical presentation was, however, different. The mother (proposita) had palpitation, weakness, tiredness, nervousness, dry mouth and was misdiagnosed as having multinodular toxic goiter which was treated with antithyroid drugs and partial thyroidectomy. Her younger son had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and primary encopresis, but normal intellectual quotient. Both had elevated serum iodothyronine levels with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. A mutation in one allele of the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene (P453A) was identified, providing a genetic confirmation for the diagnosis of RTH. PMID:18561095

  18. Direct Regulation of Mitochondrial RNA Synthesis by Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Enríquez, José A.; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Montoya, Julio

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the influence of in vivo treatment and in vitro addition of thyroid hormone on in organello mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and, in parallel, on the in organello footprinting patterns at the mtDNA regions involved in the regulation of transcription. We found that thyroid hormone modulates mitochondrial RNA levels and the mRNA/rRNA ratio by influencing the transcriptional rate. In addition, we found conspicuous differences between the mtDNA dimethyl sulfate footprinting patterns of mitochondria derived from euthyroid and hypothyroid rats at the transcription initiation sites but not at the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) binding region. Furthermore, direct addition of thyroid hormone to the incubation medium of mitochondria isolated from hypothyroid rats restored the mRNA/rRNA ratio found in euthyroid rats as well as the mtDNA footprinting patterns at the transcription initiation area. Therefore, we conclude that the regulatory effect of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial transcription is partially exerted by a direct influence of the hormone on the mitochondrial transcription machinery. Particularly, the influence on the mRNA/rRNA ratio is achieved by selective modulation of the alternative H-strand transcription initiation sites and does not require the previous activation of nuclear genes. These results provide the first functional demonstration that regulatory signals, such as thyroid hormone, that modify the expression of nuclear genes can also act as primary signals for the transcriptional apparatus of mitochondria. PMID:9858589

  19. Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathway for Neurodevelopmental Effects of Thyroid Peroxidase-Induced Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormones (TH) are needed for proper brain development and deficiencies lead to adverse neurological outcomes in humans and in animal models. Environmental chemicals have been shown to disrupt TH levels, yet the relationship between developmental exposur...

  20. BRAIN, LIVER AND THYROID BIOMARKERS REFLECT ENHANCED SENSITIVITY OF THE DEVELOPING RAT TO THYROID HORMONE DEPLETION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many developmental events are regulated at least in part by thyroid hormones. It was hypothesized that tissue biomarkers of thyroid status would be more accurate predictors of neurotoxicity than serum biomarkers in rats treated with the goitrogen propylthiouracil (PTU). Over seve...

  1. The interrelationships of thyroid and growth hormones: effect of growth hormone releasing hormone in hypo- and hyperthyroid male rats.

    PubMed

    Root, A W; Shulman, D; Root, J; Diamond, F

    1986-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and the thyroid hormones interact in the hypothalamus, pituitary and peripheral tissues. Thyroid hormone exerts a permissive effect upon the anabolic and metabolic effects of GH, and increases pituitary synthesis of this protein hormone. GH depresses the secretion of thyrotropin and the thyroid hormones and increases the peripheral conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine. In the adult male rat experimental hypothyroidism produced by ingestion of propylthiouracil depresses the GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in vivo and in vitro, reflecting the lowered pituitary stores of GH in the hypothyroid state. Short term administration of large amounts of thyroxine with induction of the hyperthyroid state does not affect the in vivo GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in this animal.

  2. Trends in thyroid hormone prescribing and consumption in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anna L; Hickey, Bryan; Hickey, Janis L; Pearce, Simon HS

    2009-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone replacement is one of the most commonly prescribed and cost effective treatments for a chronic disease. There have been recent changes in community prescribing policies in many areas of the UK that have changed patient access to necessary medications. This study aimed to provide a picture of thyroid hormone usage in the UK and to survey patient opinion about current community prescribing policies for levothyroxine. Methods Data on community prescriptions for thyroid hormones in England between 1998 and 2007, provided by the Department of Health, were collated and analysed. A survey of UK members of a patient support organisation (the British Thyroid Foundation) who were taking levothyroxine was carried out. Results The amount of prescribed thyroid hormones used in England has more than doubled, from 7 to almost 19 million prescriptions, over the last 10 years. The duration of prescriptions has reduced from 60 to 45 days, on average over the same time. Two thousand five hundred and fifty one responses to the patient survey were received. Thirty eight percent of levothyroxine users reported receiving prescriptions of 28 days' duration. 59% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with 28-day prescribing. Conclusion Amongst users of levothyroxine, there is widespread patient dissatisfaction with 28-day prescription duration. Analysis of the full costs of 28-day dispensing balanced against the potential savings of reduced wastage of thyroid medications, suggests that this is unlikely to be an economically effective public health policy. PMID:19432950

  3. Maternal thyroid hormone trajectories during pregnancy and child behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Wijnen, Hennie A A; Pop, Victor J M; van Baar, Anneloes L

    2017-08-01

    There is ample evidence demonstrating the importance of maternal thyroid hormones, assessed at single trimesters in pregnancy, for child cognition. Less is known, however, about the course of maternal thyroid hormone concentrations during pregnancy in relation to child behavioral development. Child sex might be an important moderator, because there are sex differences in externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems. The current study examined the associations between maternal thyroid hormone trajectories versus thyroid assessments at separate trimesters of pregnancy and child behavioral problems, as well as sex differences in these associations. In 442 pregnant mothers, serum levels of TSH and free T4 (fT4) were measured at 12, 24, and 36weeks gestation. Both mothers and fathers reported on their children's behavioral problems, between 23 and 60months of age. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to determine the number of different thyroid hormone trajectories. Three trajectory groups were discerned: 1) highest and non-increasing TSH with lowest fT4 that decreased least of the three trajectories; 2) increasing TSH and decreasing fT4 at intermediate levels; 3) lowest and increasing TSH with highest and decreasing fT4. Children of mothers with the most flattened thyroid hormone trajectories (trajectory 1) showed the most anxiety/depression symptoms. The following trimester-specific associations were found: 1) lower first-trimester fT4 was associated with more child anxiety/depression, 2) higher first-trimester TSH levels were related to more attention problems in boys only. A flattened course of maternal thyroid hormone concentrations during pregnancy was a better predictor of child anxiety/depression than first-trimester fT4 levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of thyroid hormone in trophoblast function, early pregnancy maintenance, and fetal neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Noriyuki; Tsujino, Taro; Maruo, Takeshi

    2004-11-01

    To review the literature on the roles of thyroid hormone in trophoblast function, early pregnancy maintenance, and fetal neurodevelopment. MEDLINE was searched for English-language papers published from 1971 to 2003, using the key words "brain," "hypothyroidism," "placenta," "pregnancy," "threatened abortion," "thyroid hormone," "thyroid hormone receptor," "thyroid hormone replacement therapy," "thyroid hormone-responsive gene," and "trophoblast." Transplacental transfer of thyroid hormone occurs before the onset of fetal thyroid hormone secretion. Thyroid hormone receptors and iodothyronine deiodinases are present in the placenta and the fetal central nervous system early in pregnancy, and thyroid hormone plays a crucial role both in trophoblast function and fetal neurodevelopment. Maternal hypothyroxinemia is associated with a high rate of spontaneous abortion and long-term neuropsychological deficits in children born of hypothyroid mothers. Maternal iodine deficiency also causes a wide spectrum of neuropsychological disorders in children, ranging from subclinical deficits in cognitive motor and auditory functions to hypothyroid-induced cognitive impairment in infants. However, these conditions are preventable when iodine supplementation is initiated before the second trimester. Although thyroid hormone replacement therapy is effective for reducing the adverse effects complicated by maternal hypothyroidism, the appropriate dose of thyroid hormone is mandatory in protecting the early stage of pregnancy. Close monitoring of maternal thyroid hormone status and ensuring adequate maternal thyroid hormone levels in early pregnancy are of great importance to prevent miscarriage and neuropsychological deficits in infants.

  5. Thyroid hormone levels in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W W; Kaptein, E M

    1989-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction and thyroid gland cytomegalovirus inclusions have been described in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC). We evaluated 80 patients with AIDS or ARC for the frequency of hypothalamic-pituitary or thyroid gland failure and altered serum thyroid hormone levels due to nonthyroidal disorders. One patient had subclinical hypothyroidism. Of these patients, 60% had low free triiodothyronine (T3) index values and 4% had low free thyroxine (T4) indexes; none of the latter had hypothalamic-pituitary or thyroid gland failure, since all serum cortisol values were greater than or equal to 552 nmol per liter (greater than or equal to 20 micrograms per dl) and all thyrotropin levels were less than or equal to 3 mU per liter (less than or equal to 3 microU per ml), respectively. Those who died had lower total T4 and T3, free T3 index, and albumin levels than those discharged from hospital. Serum total T4 and T3 levels correlated with albumin levels and total T3 with serum sodium levels. Serum total T3 levels best predicted the outcome of the hospital stay (accuracy = 82%). Thus, abnormal serum thyroid hormone levels in AIDS or ARC patients are most frequently due to nonthyroidal disorders, but hypothalamic-pituitary or thyroid gland failure may occur. PMID:2618039

  6. Early Temporal Effects of Three Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibitors in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid axis disruption is an important consideration when evaluating the risks associated with chemicals. Bioassay methods that include thyroid-related endpoints have been developed in a variety of species, including amphibians, whose metamorphic development is thyroid hormone ...

  7. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  8. [Thyroid hormones and the development of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Mussa, G C; Zaffaroni, M; Mussa, F

    1990-09-01

    The growth and differentiation of the central nervous system are closely related to the presence of iodine and thyroid hormones. During the first trimester of human pregnancy the development of the nervous system depends entirely on the availability of iodine; after 12 week of pregnancy it depends on the initial secretion of iodothyronine by the fetal thyroid gland. During the early stages of the development of the nervous system a thyroid hormone deficit may provoke alterations in the maturation of both noble nervous cells (cortical pyramidal cells, Purkinje cells) and glial cells. Hypothyroidism may lead to cellular hypoplasia and reduced dendritic ramification, gemmules and interneuronal connections. Experimental studies in hypothyroid rats have also shown alterations in the content and organization of neuronal intracytoplasmatic microtubules, the biochemical maturation of synaptosomes and the maturation of nuclear and cytoplasmatic T3 receptors. Excess thyroid hormones during the early stages of development may also cause permanent damage to the central nervous system. Hyperthyroidism may initially induce an acceleration of the maturation processes, including the migration and differentiation of cells, the extension of the dendritic processes and synaptogenesis. An excess of thyroid hormones therefore causes neuronal proliferation to end precociously leading to a reduction of the total number of gemmules. Experimental research and clinical studies have partially clarified the correlation between the maturation of the nervous system and thyroid function during the early stages of development; both a deficit and excess of thyroid hormones may lead to permanent anatomo-functional damage to the central nervous system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  10. Establishing Adverse Outcome Pathways of Thyroid Hormone Disruption in an Amphibian Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) provides a framework for understanding the relevance of toxicology data in ecotoxicological hazard assessments. The AOP concept can be applied to many toxicological pathways including thyroid hormone disruption. Thyroid hormones play a critical r...

  11. The Role of the Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation in the Onset of “Anemia of Aging”: Focus on Testosterone, IGF-1, and Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; De Vita, Francesca; Fisichella, Alberto; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Ceresini, Graziano; Cappola, Anne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a multifactorial condition whose prevalence increases in both sexes after the fifth decade of life. It is a highly represented phenomenon in older adults and in one-third of cases is “unexplained.” Ageing process is also characterized by a “multiple hormonal dysregulation” with disruption in gonadal, adrenal, and somatotropic axes. Experimental studies suggest that anabolic hormones such as testosterone, IGF-1, and thyroid hormones are able to increase erythroid mass, erythropoietin synthesis, and iron bioavailability, underlining a potential role of multiple hormonal changes in the anemia of aging. Epidemiological data more consistently support an association between lower testosterone and anemia in adult-older individuals. Low IGF-1 has been especially associated with anemia in the pediatric population and in a wide range of disorders. There is also evidence of an association between thyroid hormones and abnormalities in hematological parameters under overt thyroid and euthyroid conditions, with limited data on subclinical statuses. Although RCTs have shown beneficial effects, stronger for testosterone and the GH-IGF-1 axis and less evident for thyroid hormones, in improving different hematological parameters, there is no clear evidence for the usefulness of hormonal treatment in improving anemia in older subjects. Thus, more clinical and research efforts are needed to investigate the hormonal contribution to anemia in the older individuals. PMID:26779261

  12. The Role of the Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation in the Onset of "Anemia of Aging": Focus on Testosterone, IGF-1, and Thyroid Hormones.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; De Vita, Francesca; Fisichella, Alberto; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Ceresini, Graziano; Cappola, Anne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a multifactorial condition whose prevalence increases in both sexes after the fifth decade of life. It is a highly represented phenomenon in older adults and in one-third of cases is "unexplained." Ageing process is also characterized by a "multiple hormonal dysregulation" with disruption in gonadal, adrenal, and somatotropic axes. Experimental studies suggest that anabolic hormones such as testosterone, IGF-1, and thyroid hormones are able to increase erythroid mass, erythropoietin synthesis, and iron bioavailability, underlining a potential role of multiple hormonal changes in the anemia of aging. Epidemiological data more consistently support an association between lower testosterone and anemia in adult-older individuals. Low IGF-1 has been especially associated with anemia in the pediatric population and in a wide range of disorders. There is also evidence of an association between thyroid hormones and abnormalities in hematological parameters under overt thyroid and euthyroid conditions, with limited data on subclinical statuses. Although RCTs have shown beneficial effects, stronger for testosterone and the GH-IGF-1 axis and less evident for thyroid hormones, in improving different hematological parameters, there is no clear evidence for the usefulness of hormonal treatment in improving anemia in older subjects. Thus, more clinical and research efforts are needed to investigate the hormonal contribution to anemia in the older individuals.

  13. [Pediatric reference intervals : retrospective study on thyroid hormone levels].

    PubMed

    Ladang, A; Vranken, L; Luyckx, F; Lebrethon, M-C; Cavalier, E

    2017-01-01

    Defining reference range is an essential tool for diagnostic. Age and sexe influences on thyroid hormone levels have been already discussed. In this study, we are defining a new pediatric reference range for TSH, FT3 and FT4 for Cobas C6000 analyzer. To do so, we have taken in account 0 to 18 year old outclinic patients. During the first year of life, thyroid hormone levels change dramatically before getting stabilized around 3 years old. We also compared our results to those obtained in a Canadian large-scale prospective study (the CALIPER initiative).

  14. WOMEN IN CANCER THEMATIC REVIEW: Thyroid-stimulating hormone in thyroid cancer: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Nieto, Hannah; Boelaert, Kristien

    2016-11-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and the incidence is increasing rapidly worldwide. Appropriate diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with thyroid tumours are critical. Fine needle aspiration cytology remains the gold standard for diagnosing thyroid cancer, and although there have been significant refinements to this technique, diagnostic surgery is often required for patients suspected to have malignancy. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is higher in patients with malignant thyroid nodules than in those with benign disease, and TSH is proportionally increased in more aggressive tumours. Importantly, we have shown that the pre-operative serum TSH concentration independently predicts the presence of malignancy in subjects presenting with thyroid nodules. Establishing the use of TSH measurements in algorithms identifying high-risk thyroid nodules in routine clinical practice represents an exciting, cost-efficient and non-invasive approach to optimise thyroid cancer diagnosis. Binding of TSH to receptors on thyrocytes stimulates a number of growth promoting pathways both in normal and malignant thyroid cells, and TSH suppression with high doses of levothyroxine is routinely used after thyroidectomy to prevent cancer recurrence, especially in high-risk tumours. This review examines the relationship between serum TSH and thyroid cancer and reflects on the clinical potential of TSH measurements in diagnosis and disease monitoring. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... state, with many body systems developing abnormal function. Hypothyroidism Too little thyroid hormone from an underactive thyroid gland is called hypothyroidism. In hypothyroidism, the body's metabolism is slowed. Several ...

  16. Thyroid stimulating hormone increases hepatic gluconeogenesis via CRTC2.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujie; Wang, Laicheng; Zhou, Lingyan; Song, Yongfeng; Ma, Shizhan; Yu, Chunxiao; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Chao; Gao, Ling

    2017-05-05

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is positively correlated with abnormal glucose levels. We previously reported that TSH has direct effects on gluconeogenesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we observed increased fasting blood glucose and glucose production in a mouse model of subclinical hypothyroidism (only elevated TSH levels). TSH acts via the classical cAMP/PKA pathway and CRTC2 regulates glucose homeostasis. Thus, we explore whether CRTC2 is involved in the process of TSH-induced gluconeogenesis. We show that TSH increases CRTC2 expression via the TSHR/cAMP/PKA pathway, which in turn upregulates hepatic gluconeogenic genes. Furthermore, TSH stimulates CRTC2 dephosphorylation and upregulates p-CREB (Ser133) in HepG2 cells. Silencing CRTC2 and CREB decreases the effect of TSH on PEPCK-luciferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Finally, the deletion of TSHR reduces the levels of the CRTC2:CREB complex in mouse livers. This study demonstrates that TSH activates CRTC2 via the TSHR/cAMP/PKA pathway, leading to the formation of a CRTC2:CREB complex and increases hepatic gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  18. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-07-12

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems.

  19. Using Hashimoto thyroiditis as gold standard to determine the upper limit value of thyroid stimulating hormone in a Chinese cohort.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Chen, Dong-Ning; Cui, Jing; Xin, Zhong; Yang, Guang-Ran; Niu, Ming-Jia; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-11-06

    Subclinical hypothyroidism, commonly caused by Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This disorder is defined as merely having elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. However, the upper limit of reference range for TSH is debated recently. This study was to determine the cutoff value for the upper normal limit of TSH in a cohort using the prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis as "gold" calibration standard. The research population was medical staff of 2856 individuals who took part in health examination annually. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and other biochemistry parameters were tested. Meanwhile, thyroid ultrasound examination was performed. The diagnosis of HT was based on presence of thyroid antibodies (TPAb and TGAb) and abnormalities of thyroid ultrasound examination. We used two different methods to estimate the cutoff point of TSH based on the prevalence of HT. Joinpoint regression showed the prevalence of HT increased significantly at the ninth decile of TSH value corresponding to 2.9 mU/L. ROC curve showed a TSH cutoff value of 2.6 mU/L with the maximized sensitivity and specificity in identifying HT. Using the newly defined cutoff value of TSH can detect patients with hyperlipidemia more efficiently, which may indicate our approach to define the upper limit of TSH can make more sense from the clinical point of view. A significant increase in the prevalence of HT occurred among individuals with a TSH of 2.6-2.9 mU/L made it possible to determine the cutoff value of normal upper limit of TSH.

  20. Thyroid hormones regulate anxiety in the male mouse.

    PubMed

    Buras, Alexander; Battle, Loxley; Landers, Evan; Nguyen, Tien; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-02-01

    Thyroid hormone levels are implicated in mood disorders in the adult human but the mechanisms remain unclear partly because, in rodent models, more attention has been paid to the consequences of perinatal hypo and hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormones act via the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β isoforms, both of which are expressed in the limbic system. TR's modulate gene expression via both unliganded and liganded actions. Though the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) knockouts and a transgenic TRα1 knock-in mouse have provided us valuable insight into behavioral phenotypes such as anxiety and depression, it is not clear if this is because of the loss of unliganded actions or liganded actions of the receptor or due to locomotor deficits. We used a hypothyroid mouse model and supplementation with tri-iodothyronine (T3) or thyroxine (T4) to investigate the consequences of dysthyroid hormone levels on behaviors that denote anxiety. Our data from the open field and the light-dark transition tests suggest that adult onset hypothyroidism in male mice produces a mild anxiogenic effect that is possibly due to unliganded receptor actions. T3 or T4 supplementation reverses this phenotype and euthyroid animals show anxiety that is intermediate between the hypothyroid and thyroid hormone supplemented groups. In addition, T3 but not T4 supplemented animals have lower spine density in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and in the central amygdala suggesting that T3-mediated rescue of the hypothyroid state might be due to lower neuronal excitability in the limbic circuit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, Denise; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g., caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (THRs), even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of THRs and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones. PMID:23882187

  2. The role of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons on thyroid hormone disruption and cognitive function: a review.

    PubMed

    Builee, T L; Hatherill, J R

    2004-11-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential to normal brain development, influencing behavior and cognitive function in both adult and children. It is suggested that conditions found in TH abnormalities such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) share symptomatic behavioral impulses found in cases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other cognitive disorders. Disrupters of TH are various and prevalent in the environment. This paper reviews the mechanisms of TH disruption caused by the general class of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAH)'s acting as thyroid disrupters (TD). PHAHs influence the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, as mimicry agents affecting synthesis and secretion of TH. Exposure to PHAH induces liver microsomal enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) resulting in accelerated clearance of TH. PHAHs can compromise function of transport and receptor binding proteins such as transthyretin and aryl hydrocarbon receptors (Ahr). Glucose metabolism and catecholamine synthesis are disrupted in the brain by the presence of PHAH. Further, PHAH can alter brain growth and development by perturbing cytoskeletal formation, thereby affecting neuronal migration, elongation and branching. The complex relationships between PHAH and cognitive function are examined in regard to the disruption of T4 regulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, blood, brain, neurons, liver and pre and postnatal development.

  3. In vitro chemical screening assays to identify thyroid hormone disruptors.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of chemicals with potential to impact thyroid hormone function is a priority of the US EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). In vitro screening assays can be used to significantly reduce the number of chemicals that need to be considered for tes...

  4. Regulation of microglial development: a novel role for thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Lima, F R; Gervais, A; Colin, C; Izembart, M; Neto, V M; Mallat, M

    2001-03-15

    The postnatal development of rat microglia is marked by an important increase in the number of microglial cells and the growth of their ramified processes. We studied the role of thyroid hormone in microglial development. The distribution and morphology of microglial cells stained with isolectin B4 or monoclonal antibody ED1 were analyzed in cortical and subcortical forebrain regions of developing rats rendered hypothyroid by prenatal and postnatal treatment with methyl-thiouracil. Microglial processes were markedly less abundant in hypothyroid pups than in age-matched normal animals, from postnatal day 4 up to the end of the third postnatal week of life. A delay in process extension and a decrease in the density of microglial cell bodies, as shown by cell counts in the developing cingulate cortex of normal and hypothyroid animals, were responsible for these differences. Conversely, neonatal rat hyperthyroidism, induced by daily injections of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), accelerated the extension of microglial processes and increased the density of cortical microglial cell bodies above physiological levels during the first postnatal week of life. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunological analyses indicated that cultured cortical ameboid microglial cells expressed the alpha1 and beta1 isoforms of nuclear thyroid hormone receptors. Consistent with the trophic and morphogenetic effects of thyroid hormone observed in situ, T3 favored the survival of cultured purified microglial cells and the growth of their processes. These results demonstrate that thyroid hormone promotes the growth and morphological differentiation of microglia during development.

  5. Thyroid Hormone Differentially Modulates Warburg Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suhane, Sonal; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    Sustenance of cancer cells in vivo critically depends on a variety of genetic and metabolic adaptations. Aerobic glycolysis or Warburg effect has been a defining biochemical hallmark of transformed cells for more than five decades although a clear molecular basis of this observation is emerging only in recent years. In this study, we present our findings that thyroid hormone exerts its non-genomic and genomic actions in two model human breast cancer cell lines differentially. By laying a clear foundation for experimentally monitoring the Warburg phenotype in living cancer cells, we demonstrate that thyroid hormone-induced modulation of bioenergetic profiles in these two model cell lines depends on the degree of Warburg phenotype that they display. Further we also show that thyroid hormone can sensitize mitochondria in aggressive, triple-negative breast cancer cells favorably to increase the chemotherapeutic efficacy in these cells. Even though the role of thyroid hormone in modulating mitochondrial metabolism has been known, the current study accentuates the critical role it plays in modulating Warburg phenotype in breast cancer cells. The clinical significance of this finding is the possibility to devise strategies for metabolically modulating aggressive triple-negative tumors so as to enhance their chemosensitivity in vivo. PMID:21945435

  6. Silent pituitary macroadenoma co-secreting growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Sen, Orhan; Ertorer, M Eda; Aydin, M Volkan; Erdogan, Bulent; Altinors, Nur; Zorludemir, Suzan; Guvener, Nilgun

    2005-04-01

    Silent pituitary adenomas are a group of tumors showing heterogenous morphological features with no hormonal function observed clinically. To date no explanation has been provided as to why these tumors remain "silent". We report a case of a silent macroadenoma with both growth hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) staining and secretion but with no clinical manifestations, in particular, the absence of features of acromegaly or hyperthyroidism. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  7. The Influence of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Antibodies on Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Syed; Latif, Rauf; Zaidi, Mone; Davies, Terry F.

    2011-01-01

    Background We have shown that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) has a direct inhibitory effect on osteoclastic bone resorption and that TSH receptor (TSHR) null mice display osteoporosis. To determine the stage of osteoclast development at which TSH may exert its effect, we examined the influence of TSH and agonist TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Ab) on osteoclast differentiation from murine embryonic stem (ES) cells to gain insight into bone remodeling in hyperthyroid Graves' disease. Methods Osteoclast differentiation was initiated in murine ES cell cultures through exposure to macrophage colony stimulation factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor кB ligand, vitamin D, and dexamethasone. Results Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts formed in ∼12 days. This coincided with the expected downregulation of known markers of self renewal and pluripotency (including Oct4, Sox2, and REX1). Both TSH and TSHR-Abs inhibited osteoclastogenesis as evidenced by decreased development of TRAP-positive cells (∼40%–50% reduction, p = 0.0047), and by decreased expression, in a concentration-dependent manner, of osteoclast differentiation markers (including the calcitonin receptor, TRAP, cathepsin K, matrix metallo-proteinase-9, and carbonic anhydrase II). Similar data were obtained using serum immunoglobulin-Gs (IgGs) from patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease and known TSHR-Abs. TSHR stimulators inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA and protein expression, but increased the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), an antiosteoclastogenic human soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor кB ligand receptor. Neutralizing antibody to OPG reversed the inhibitory effect of TSH on osteoclast differentiation evidencing that the TSH effect was at least in part mediated by increased OPG. Conclusion These data establish ES-derived osteoclastogenesis as an effective model system to study the regulation of osteoclast differentiation in early development

  8. Effects of Thyroid Dysfunction on Reproductive Hormones in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Guo, Meng; Hu, Xusong; Weng, Xuechun; Tian, Ye; Xu, Kaili; Heng, Dai; Liu, Wenbo; Ding, Yu; Yang, Yanzhou; Zhang, Cheng

    2018-05-10

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a critical role in the development of ovarian cells. Although the effects of THs on female reproduction are of great interest, the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the effects of TH dysregulation on reproductive hormones in rats. Propylthiouracil (PTU) and L-thyroxine were administered to rats to induce hypo- and hyper-thyroidism, respectively, and the reproductive hormone profiles were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Ovarian histology was evaluated with H&E staining, and gene protein level or mRNA content was analyzed by western blotting or RT-PCR. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in both rat models were significantly decreased on day 21, although there were no significant changes at earlier time points. There were no significant differences in luteinizing hormone (LH) or progesterone levels between the treatment and the control groups. Both PTU and L-thyroxine treatments downregulated estradiol concentrations; however, the serum testosterone level was increased only in hypothyroid rats at day 21. In addition, the expression levels of FSH receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein were decreased in both rat models. Moreover, the onset of puberty was significantly delayed in the hypothyroid group. These results provide evidence that TH dysregulation alters reproductive hormone profiles, and that the initiation of the estrous cycle is postponed in hypothyroidism.

  9. THE THYROID HORMONE TRANSPORTER, MCT8, SELECTIVELY RESPONDS TO THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY IN THE DEVELOPMENT RAT BRAIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, it is not surprising that a variety of adaptive mechanisms are activated in response to TH insufficiency. However, not all brain regions respond in the same fashion to TH insufficiency. This observation...

  10. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K.; Bechmann, Lars P.; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C.; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. Methods 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. Results More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity. PMID:26147961

  11. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Olympia; Sydor, Svenja; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K; Bechmann, Lars P; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity.

  12. Fetal and Neonatal Iron Deficiency Exacerbates Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Effects on Male Thyroid Hormone Levels and Brain Thyroid Hormone-Responsive Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression. PMID:24424046

  13. Relational Stability of Thyroid Hormones in Euthyroid Subjects and Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E.M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Operating far from its equilibrium resting point, the thyroid gland requires stimulation via feedback-controlled pituitary thyrotropin (TSH) secretion to maintain adequate hormone supply. We explored and defined variations in the expression of control mechanisms and physiological responses across the euthyroid reference range. Methods We analyzed the relational equilibria between thyroid parameters defining thyroid production and thyroid conversion in a group of 271 thyroid-healthy subjects and 86 untreated patients with thyroid autoimmune disease. Results In the euthyroid controls, the FT3-FT4 (free triiodothyronine-free thyroxine) ratio was strongly associated with the FT4-TSH ratio (tau = −0.22, p < 0.001, even after correcting for spurious correlation), linking T4 to T3 conversion with TSH-standardized T4 production. Using a homeostatic model, we estimated both global deiodinase activity and maximum thyroid capacity. Both parameters were nonlinearly and inversely associated, trending in opposite directions across the euthyroid reference range. Within the panel of controls, the subgroup with a relatively lower thyroid capacity (<2.5 pmol/s) displayed lower FT4 levels, but maintained FT3 at the same concentrations as patients with higher functional and anatomical capacity. The relationships were preserved when extended to the subclinical range in the diseased sample. Conclusion The euthyroid panel does not follow a homogeneous pattern to produce random variation among thyroid hormones and TSH, but forms a heterogeneous group that progressively displays distinctly different levels of homeostatic control across the euthyroid range. This suggests a concept of relational stability with implications for definition of euthyroidism and disease classification. PMID:27843807

  14. Free and total thyroid hormones in humans at extreme altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Minakshi; Pal, K.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, R.; Sawhney, R. C.

    1995-03-01

    Alterations in circulatory levels of total T4 (TT4), total T3 (TT3), free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and T3 uptake (T3U) were studied in male and female sea-level residents (SLR) at sea level, in Armed forces personnel staying at high altitude (3750 m) for prolonged duration (acclimatized lowlanders, ALL) and in high-altitude natives (HAN). Identical studies were also performed on male ALL who trekked to an extreme altitude of 5080 m and stayed at an altitude of more than 6300 m for about 6 months. The total as well as free thyroid hormones were found to be significantly higher in ALL and HAN as compared to SLR values. Both male as well as female HAN had higher levels of thyroid hormones. The rise in hormone levels in different ALL ethnic groups drawn from amongst the southern and northern parts of the country was more or less identical. In both HAN and ALL a decline in FT3 and FT4 occurred when these subjects trekked at subzero temperatures to extreme altitude of 5080 m but the levels were found to be higher in ALL who stayed at 6300 m for a prolonged duration. Plasma TSH did not show any appreciable change at lower altitudes but was found to be decreased at extreme altitude. The increase in thyroid hormones at high altitude was not due to an increase in hormone binding proteins, since T3U was found to be higher at high altitudes. A decline in TSH and hormone binding proteins and an increase in the free moiety of the hormones is indicative of a subtle degree of tissue hyperthyroidism which may be playing an important role in combating the extreme cold and hypoxic environment of high altitudes.

  15. The role of thyroid hormones in stress response of fish.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash

    2011-06-01

    Thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)), the principal thyroid hormones (THs) secreted from the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish. The diverse actions of THs in fishes are primarily due to the sensitivity of thyroid axis to many physical, chemical and biological factors of both intrinsic and extrinsic origins. The regulation of THs homeostasis becomes more complex due to extrathyroidal deiodination pathways by which the delivery of biologically active T(3) to target cells has been controlled. As primary stress hormones and the end products of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) and brain-sympathetic-chromaffin (BSC) axes, cortisol and adrenaline exert its actions on its target tissues where it promote and integrate osmotic and metabolic competence. Despite possessing specific osmoregulatory and metabolic actions at cellular and whole-body levels, THs may fine-tune these processes in accordance with the actions of hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. Evidences are presented that THs can modify the pattern and magnitude of stress response in fishes as it modifies either its own actions or the actions of stress hormones. In addition, multiple lines of evidence indicate that hypothalamic and pituitary hormones of thyroid and interrenal axes can interact with each other which in turn may regulate THs/cortisol-mediated actions. Even though it is hard to define these interactions, the magnitude of stress response in fish has been shown to be modified by the changes in the status of THs, pointing to its functional relationship with endocrine stress axes particularly with the interrenal axis. The fine-tuned mechanism that operates in fish during stressor-challenge drives the THs to play both fundamental and modulator roles in stress response by controlling osmoregulation and metabolic regulation. A major role of THs in stress response is thus evident in fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped.

  17. Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Disease in Relation to Perchlorate Dose and Residence Near a Superfund Site

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Rasor, Marianne O’Neill; Lee, Jennifer S.; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. Objectives In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Methods Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: 1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; 2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and 3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20–50 years during 1988–1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] and free thyroxine [fT4]) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Results Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. Conclusions No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  18. Pre-operative ultrasound identification of thyroiditis helps predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement after thyroid lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lilah F; Iupe, Isabella M; Edeiken-Monroe, Beth S; Warneke, Carla L; Hansen, Mandy O; Evans, Douglas B; Lee, Jeffrey E; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Perrier, Nancy D

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether pre-operative thyroiditis identified by ultrasound (US) could help predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement (THR) following thyroid lobectomy. Data from patients who underwent thyroid lobectomy in 2006-2011, were not taking THR pre-operatively, and had ≥1 month of follow-up were reviewed retrospectively. THR was prescribed for relatively elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and hypothyroid symptoms. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the percentage of patients who required THR at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate prognostic factors for requiring post-thyroid lobectomy THR. During follow-up, 45 of 98 patients required THR. Median follow-up among patients not requiring THR was 11.6 months (range, 1.2 to 51.3 months). Six months after thyroid lobectomy, 22% of patients were taking THR (95% confidence interval [CI], 15-32%); the proportion increased to 46% at 12 months (95% CI, 36-57%) and 55% at 18 months (95% CI, 43-67%). On univariate analysis, significant prognostic factors for postoperative THR included a pre-operative TSH level >2.5 μ international units [IU]/mL (hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; 95% CI, 1.4-5.5; P = .004) and pathology-identified thyroiditis (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.3; P = .005). Patients with both pre-operative TSH >2.5 μIU/mL and US-identified thyroiditis had a 5.8-fold increased risk of requiring postoperative THR (95% CI, 2.4-13.9; P<.0001). A pre-operative TSH level >2.5 μIU/mL significantly increases the risk of requiring THR after thyroid lobectomy. Thyroiditis can add to that prediction and guide pre-operative patient counseling and surgical decision making. US-identified thyroiditis should be reported and post-thyroid lobectomy patients followed long-term (≥18 months).

  19. Kcne2 deletion uncovers its crucial role in thyroid hormone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Torsten K.; King, Elizabeth C.; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Paroder, Monika; Purtell, Kerry; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene; Lerner, Daniel J.; Carrasco, Nancy; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction affects 1–4% of the population worldwide, causing defects including neurodevelopmental disorders, dwarfism and cardiac arrhythmia. Here, we show that KCNQ1 and KCNE2 form a TSH-stimulated, constitutively-active, thyrocyte K+ channel required for normal thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Targeted disruption of Kcne2 impaired thyroid iodide accumulation up to 8-fold, impaired maternal milk ejection and halved milk T4 content, causing hypothyroidism, 50% reduced litter size, dwarfism, alopecia, goiter, and cardiac abnormalities including hypertrophy, fibrosis, and reduced fractional shortening. The alopecia, dwarfism and cardiac abnormalities were alleviated by T3/T4 administration to pups, by supplementing dams with T4 pre- and postpartum, or by pre-weaning surrogacy with Kcne2+/+ dams; conversely these symptoms were elicited in Kcne2+/+ pups by surrogacy with Kcne2−/− dams. The data identify a critical thyrocyte K+ channel, provide a possible novel therapeutic avenue for thyroid disorders, and predict an endocrine component to some previously-identified KCNE2- and KCNQ1-linked human cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:19767733

  20. Evaluation of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) alone as a first-line thyroid function test (TFT) in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Kende, M; Kandapu, S

    2002-01-01

    In the Port Moresby General Hospital, the Chemical Pathology Department assays both thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) on all requests for a thyroid function test (TFT). The cost of assaying both tests is obviously higher than either test alone. In order to minimize the cost of a TFT we aimed to determine if TSH or FT4 alone as a first-line test would be adequate in assessing the thyroid hormone status of patients. We analyzed TFT records from January 1996 to May 2000 in the Port Moresby General Hospital. A total of 3089 TSH and 2867 FT4 were assayed at an annual reagent cost of Papua New Guinea kina 14,500. When TSH alone is used as a first-line test at the Port Moresby General Hospital, the biochemical status of 95% of patients will be appropriately categorized as euthyroidism, hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism with only 5% discrepant (ie, normal TSH with abnormal FT4) results. In contrast, using FT4 alone as a first-line test correctly classifies only 84% of TFTs. Euthyroid status is observed in 50% of patients and FT4 assays on these samples will be excluded appropriately if a TSH-only protocol is adopted. Furthermore, we will save a quarter of the yearly cost of TFTs on reagents alone by performing TSH only. We conclude that TSH alone is an adequate first-line thyroid function test in Papua New Guinea and when it is normal no further FT4 test is necessary unless clinically indicated.

  1. Effect of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone on serum thyroxin and thyroid scintigraphy in euthyroid cats.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Ingrid M; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vandermeulen, Eva; Duchateau, Luc; Gommeren, Kris; Daminet, Sylvie

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the thyroidal response to administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) by means of serum total thyroxine (TT(4)) concentration and pertechnetate uptake by the thyroid gland in six healthy euthyroid spayed female cats. A pertechnetate scan was performed on day 1 to calculate thyroid/salivary gland (T/S) uptake ratio. On day 3, 25 microg rhTSH was injected intravenously. Six hours later the thyroid scan was repeated as on day 1. Blood was drawn for serum TT(4) measurement prior to injection of rhTSH and performance of the pertechnetate scan. Statistically significant differences in mean serum TT(4) concentration, T/S uptake ratio before and 6h after rhTSH administration and T/S uptake ratio between left and right lobes were noted. We can conclude that 25 microg rhTSH increases pertechnetate uptake in the thyroid glands of cats, this should be taken into account when thyroid scintigraphy after rhTSH administration is interpreted.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Control Developmental Maturation of the Middle Ear and the Size of the Ossicular Bones

    PubMed Central

    Cordas, Emily A.; Ng, Lily; Hernandez, Arturo; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is critical for auditory development and has well-known actions in the inner ear. However, less is known of thyroid hormone functions in the middle ear, which contains the ossicles (malleus, incus, stapes) that relay mechanical sound vibrations from the outer ear to the inner ear. During the later stages of middle ear development, prior to the onset of hearing, middle ear cavitation occurs, involving clearance of mesenchyme from the middle ear cavity while the immature cartilaginous ossicles attain appropriate size and ossify. Using in situ hybridization, we detected expression of Thra and Thrb genes encoding thyroid hormone receptors α1 and β (TRα1 and TRβ, respectively) in the immature ossicles, surrounding mesenchyme and tympanic membrane in the mouse. Thra+/PV mice that express a dominant-negative TRα1 protein exhibited deafness with elevated auditory thresholds and a range of middle ear abnormalities including chronic persistence of mesenchyme in the middle ear into adulthood, markedly enlarged ossicles, and delayed ossification of the ossicles. Congenitally hypothyroid Tshr−/− mice and TR-deficient Thra1−/−;Thrb−/− mice displayed similar abnormalities. These findings demonstrate that middle ear maturation is TR dependent and suggest that the middle ear is a sensitive target for thyroid hormone in development. PMID:22253431

  3. Developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency and brain development: A role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)?*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal brain development. Even subclinical hypothyroidism experienced in utero can result in neuropsychological deficits in children despite normal thyroid status at birth. Neurotrophins have been implicated in a host of brain cellular func...

  4. Thyroid hormone status and pituitary function in adult rats given oral doses of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is widely distributed and persistent in humans and wildlife. Prior toxicological studies have reported decreased total and free thyroid hormones in serum without a major compensatory rise in thyrotropin (TSH) or altered thyroid gland histology. Alt...

  5. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  6. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY AND BRAIN DEVELOPMENT -- DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICITY AT LOW LEVELS OF HORMONE DISRUPTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies during development produce deleterious effects on brain structure and function. The degree to which TH must be perturbed to induce neurotoxicity remains unclear. The present study was conducted as part of a Cooperative Agreement between US EPA, U...

  7. Chronic food restriction and the circadian rhythms of pituitary-adrenal hormones, growth hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Armario, A; Montero, J L; Jolin, T

    1987-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to food restriction so that they ate 65% of food ingested by control rats. While control rats had free access to food over the 24-hour period, food-restricted rats were provided with food daily at 10 a.m. The experimental period lasted for 34 days. On day 35, rats from both experimental groups were killed at 08.00, 11.00, 14.00, 24.00 and 02.00 h. Food restriction modified the circadian rhythms of ACTH and corticosterone. In addition, total circulating corticosterone throughout the day was higher in food-restricted than in control rats. In contrast, food restriction resulted in depressed secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and growth hormone. The results indicate that time of food availability entrained circadian corticosterone rhythm but not thyroid-stimulating hormone and growth hormone rhythms.

  8. Thyroid, cortisol and growth hormone levels in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Udenze, Ifeoma Christiana; Olowoselu, Olusola Festus; Egbuagha, Ephraim Uchenna; Oshodi, Temitope Adewunmi

    2017-01-01

    The similarities in presentation of cortisol excess, growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome suggest that subtle abnormalities of these endocrine hormones may play a causal role in the development of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the levels of cortisol, thyroid and growth hormones in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome and determine the relationship between levels of these hormones and components of the syndrome. This was a case control study conducted at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. Participants were fifty adult men and women with the metabolic syndrome, and fifty, age and sex matched males and females without the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the NCEP-ATPIII criteria. Written Informed consent was obtained from the participants. Socio demographic and clinical data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Venous blood was collected after an over-night fast. The Ethics committee of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, approved the study protocol. Comparison of continuous variables was done using the Student's t test. Correlation analysis was employed to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Triiodotyronine (T3) was significantly decreased (p<0.001) and thyroxine (T4 ) significantly increased ( p<0.001) in metabolic syndrome compared to healthy controls. T3 correlated positively and significantly with waist circumference (p=0.004), glucose (p= 0.002), total cholesterol ( p=0.001) and LDL- cholesterol ( p<0.001 ) and negatively with body mass index ( p<0.001 )and triglyceride ( p=0.026). T4 had a negative significant correlation with waist circumference (p=0.004). Cortisol and growth hormone levels were similar in metabolic syndrome and controls. Cortisol however had a positive significant correlation with waist/hip ratio (p<0.001) while growth hormone correlated positively with

  9. Thyroid hormones in chronic heat exposed men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertner, A.; Israeli, R.; Lev, A.; Cassuto, Y.

    1983-03-01

    Previous reports have indicated that thyroid gland activity, is depressed in the heat. Total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) serum levels in 17 workers of the metal work shop at a plant near the Dead Sea and 8 workers in Beer Sheva, Israel were examined. The metal workshop of the plant near the Dead Sea is part of a large chemical plant. The one in Beer Sheva is part of a large construction company. Maintenance work, as well as metal work projects are performed in both workshops. During the work shifts, the workers of the Dead Sea plant were exposed to temperatures ranging from 30 36°C (May Oct.) and 14 21°C (Dec. Feb). In Beer Sheva the range was 25 32°C (June Sept.) and 10 17°C (Dec. Feb.). Total T4 was measured by competitive protein binding and total T3 by radioimmunoassay in blood drawn before work (0700) in July and January. In summer. T4 was higher and T3 was lower for both groups than in winter. The observed summer T3 decrease may result from depressed extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. We conclude that the regulation of energy metabolism in hot climates may be related to extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3.

  10. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Antibodies in Pregnancy: Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Ines; Giuliani, Cesidio; Napolitano, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Graves’ disease is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in women of childbearing age. Approximately 1% of pregnant women been treated before, or are being treated during pregnancy for Graves’ hyperthyroidism. In pregnancy, as in not pregnant state, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) antibodies (TRAbs) are the pathogenetic hallmark of Graves’ disease. TRAbs are heterogeneous for molecular and functional properties and are subdivided into activating (TSAbs), blocking (TBAbs), or neutral (N-TRAbs) depending on their effect on TSHR. The typical clinical features of Graves’ disease (goiter, hyperthyroidism, ophthalmopathy, dermopathy) occur when TSAbs predominate. Graves’ disease shows some peculiarities in pregnancy. The TRAbs disturb the maternal as well as the fetal thyroid function given their ability to cross the placental barrier. The pregnancy-related immunosuppression reduces the levels of TRAbs in most cases although they persist in women with active disease as well as in women who received definitive therapy (radioiodine or surgery) before pregnancy. Changes of functional properties from stimulating to blocking the TSHR could occur during gestation. Drug therapy is the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism during gestation. Antithyroid drugs also cross the placenta and therefore decrease both the maternal and the fetal thyroid hormone production. The management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy should be aimed at maintaining euthyroidism in the mother as well as in the fetus. Maternal and fetal thyroid dysfunction (hyperthyroidism as well as hypothyroidism) are in fact associated with several morbidities. Monitoring of the maternal thyroid function, TRAbs measurement, and fetal surveillance are the mainstay for the management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy. This review summarizes the biochemical, immunological, and therapeutic aspects of Graves’ disease in pregnancy focusing on the role of the TRAbs in maternal and fetal

  11. Clear cell variant of follicular thyroid carcinoma with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone value: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clear cell carcinomas of the thyroid gland with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone value are very rare, but clear cell changes are described in most reported cases of thyroidal lesions. Case presentation In this report, we describe the case of a 50-year-old Caucasian woman with a normal thyroid-stimulating hormone level who underwent surgery to treat a multi-nodular goiter. The pathology was a clear cell variant of follicular thyroid carcinoma. The tumor was 1cm in diameter and consisted of pure clear cells. Conclusion Clear cell variants of follicular thyroid carcinoma are rarely seen, especially it is misdiagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with a clear cell variant of follicular thyroid carcinoma with an interesting pathology. PMID:24884725

  12. Induction of metamorphosis in the sand dollar Peronella japonica by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Seki, M; Amemiya, S; Yamasu, K; Suyemitsu, T; Ishihara, K

    1998-06-01

    The larva of the sand dollar Peronella japonica lacks a mouth and gut, and undergoes metamorphosis into a juvenile sand dollar without feeding. In the present study, it was found that thyroid hormones accelerate the metamorphosis of P. japonica larvae. The contents of thyroid hormones in larvae increased gradually during development. Thiourea and potassium perchlorate, inhibitors of thyroid hormone synthesis, delayed larval metamorphosis and simultaneously repressed an increase in the content of thyroxine in the larval body. These results suggest that the P. japonica larva has a system for synthesis of thyroid hormones that act as factors for inducing metamorphosis.

  13. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus.

  14. The Association Between the Levels of Thyroid Hormones and Peripheral Nerve Conduction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan-Fan; Yang, Li-Zhen

    2018-06-26

    Type 2 diabetes has an underlying pathology with thyroid dysfunction. However, few studies have investigated the association between thyroid hormones and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between thyroid hormones and electrophysiological properties of peripheral nerves in type 2 diabetes. The medical records of 308 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study. Subjects stratified by sex were divided into subgroups based on the diagnosis of nerve conduction study. The nerve conduction parameters were separately described with the spectrum of thyroid hormones. Multivariate regression models to analyze the potential links between thyroid hormones and nerve conduction parameters. The serum free triiodine thyronine levels between normal and abnormal nerve conduction groups were statistically different in total (4.55±0.65 vs 4.37±0.63, P<0.05) and female diabetic patients (4.46±0.50 vs 4.14±0.57, P<0.01). Moreover, the summed amplitude and velocity Z score of female and male increased with free triiodine thyronine levels (P<0.05). Sex-specific binary logistic regression models showed that free triiodine thyronine levels were associated with decreased odds of abnormal nerve conduction diagnosis (odds ratio [95%CI]=0.151[0.047-0.186]) and low tertile of summed amplitude Z score (odds ratio [95%CI]=0.283[0.099-0.809]) in female. In total patients, free triiodine thyronine level was negatively associated with odds of abnormal nerve conduction (odds ratio [95%CI]=0.436 [0.226-0.842]), low tertile of summed velocity (odds ratio [95%CI]=0.44[0.226-0.858]) and amplitude (odds ratio [95%CI]=0.436[0.227-0.838) Z score. Serum free triiodine thyronine level is associated with nerve conduction in diabetes. Low free triiodine thyronine may be a potential risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Stimulation of thyroid hormone secretion by thyrotropin in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed Central

    St Aubin, D J

    1987-01-01

    Bovine thyroid stimulating hormone administered to three beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, was effective in producing an increase in circulating levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine. A single dose of 10 I.U. of thyroid stimulating hormone resulted in a 145% increase in triiodothyronine and a 35% increase in thyroxine after nine hours in a whale tested within two hours after capture. The response was less pronounced in an animal tested with the same does on two occasions after four and eight weeks in captivity. In the third whale, 10 I.U. of thyroid stimulating hormone given on each of three consecutive days produced a marked increase in triiodothyronine and thyroxine. The elevation of thyroxine concentration persisted for at least two days after the last injection of thyroid stimulating hormone. A subsequent decrease in thyroxine to levels below baseline signalled the suppression of endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone. This preliminary study helps to establish a protocol for testing thyroid function in cetaceans. PMID:3651900

  16. [Thyroid proteins in endemic goitre and their relationship to the intrathyroidal thyroid hormone concentration].

    PubMed

    Platzer, S; Groebner, P; Hausen, A; Obendorf, L; Riccabona, G

    1980-02-01

    According to several reports we suspected that the pathogenesis of endemic goitre cannot be explained by iodine deficiency only, but that other--partially endogenous--goitrogenic factors must be present. We therefore studied 16 cases of "euthyroid" endemic goitre from the endemic goitre area of the province of Bolzano in Italy. After fractionation of tissue homogenates, T 4 and T 3 were measured by RIA and the I concentration was also termined. Thyroglobulin and its fractions were measured by ultracentrifuge procedures after assessment of the total protein concentration. Evaluation of the present results suggests that an insufficient synthesis of thyroglobulin in the examined goitres induces an inadequate adaptation of the organism to iodine deficiency, which, in turn, decreases the thyroid hormone concentration in thyroid tissue and enhances goitrogenesis. Considering the normal iodine content of the examined tissues, there obviously seems to be two intrathyroidal iodine pools, one of which supplies the body with thyroid hormones under pituitary stimulation even though its thyroglobulin pool is reduced, while a significant amount of the thyroidal iodine pool is bound in metabolically inert protein molecules and therefore increases the goitrogenic effect of iodine deficiency.

  17. IN VITRO METABOLISM OF THYROID HORMONES BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN UDP-GLUCORONOSYLTRANSFERASES AND SULFOTRANSFERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors can decrease thyroid hormone levels via the induction of hepatic uridinediphosphate-glucoronosyltransferases (UGTs) and sulfotransferases (SULTs). Due to their ability to catalyze glucuronidation and sulfation of hormones and xenobiotics, UGTs and SULTs play ...

  18. Thyroid hormones in the elderly sick: "T4 euthyroidism".

    PubMed

    Burrows, A W; Shakespear, R A; Hesch, R D; Cooper, E; Aickin, C M; Burke, C W

    1975-11-22

    Thyroid function and serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were investigated in 79 euthyroid geriatric patients. Of the 59 inpatients and 20 outpatients 35 (59%) and 2, respectively, had low T3 levels. In contrast, 7 (12%) and 6 (30%), respectively, had raised T4 levels. Two further patients were excluded from the study because of raised levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Thyroxine-binding globulin was greatly increased in both groups of patients, but low serum albumin levels were present in 31 (39%). Despite these changes free T3 and T4 indices closely followed total T3 and T4 levels. The difference between the two groups of patients did not correlate with body weight, diagnostic categories, age, drug treatment, or duration of stay in hospital.

  19. Thyroid hormones in the elderly sick: "T4 euthyroidism".

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, A W; Shakespear, R A; Hesch, R D; Cooper, E; Aickin, C M; Burke, C W

    1975-01-01

    Thyroid function and serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were investigated in 79 euthyroid geriatric patients. Of the 59 inpatients and 20 outpatients 35 (59%) and 2, respectively, had low T3 levels. In contrast, 7 (12%) and 6 (30%), respectively, had raised T4 levels. Two further patients were excluded from the study because of raised levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Thyroxine-binding globulin was greatly increased in both groups of patients, but low serum albumin levels were present in 31 (39%). Despite these changes free T3 and T4 indices closely followed total T3 and T4 levels. The difference between the two groups of patients did not correlate with body weight, diagnostic categories, age, drug treatment, or duration of stay in hospital. PMID:811313

  20. Thyroid Hormone Role and Economy in the Developing Testis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) exhibit pleiotropic regulatory effects on growth, development, and metabolism, and it is becoming increasingly apparent that the developing testis is an important target for them. Testicular development is highly dependent on TH status. Both hypo- and hyperthyroidism affect testis size and the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli, Leydig, and germ cells, with consequences for steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and male fertility. These observations suggest that an appropriate content of TH and by implication TH action in the testis, whether the result of systemic hormonal levels or regulatory mechanisms at the local level, is critical for normal testicular and reproductive function. The available evidence indicates the presence in the developing testis of a number of transporters, deiodinases and receptors that could play a role in the timely delivery of TH action on testicular cells. These include the thyroid hormone receptor alpha (THRA), the MCT8 transporter, the TH-activating deiodinase DIO2, and the TH-inactivating deiodinase DIO3, all of which appear to modulate testicular TH economy and testis outcomes. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bisphenol A influences oestrogen- and thyroid hormone-regulated thyroid hormone receptor expression in rat cerebellar cell culture.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Virág; Horváth, Tamás L; Tóth, István; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyó, László Vilmos; Kiss, Dávid Sándor; Jócsák, Gergely; Kerti, Annamária; Naftolin, Frederick; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) and oestrogens are crucial in the regulation of cerebellar development. TH receptors (TRs) mediate these hormone effects and are regulated by both hormone families. We reported earlier that THs and oestradiol (E 2 ) determine TR levels in cerebellar cell culture. Here we demonstrate the effects of low concentrations (10 -10 M) of the endocrine disruptor (ED) bisphenol A (BPA) on the hormonal (THs, E 2 ) regulation of TRα,β in rat cerebellar cell culture. Primary cerebellar cell cultures, glia-containing and glia-destroyed, were treated with BPA or a combination of BPA and E 2 and/or THs. Oestrogen receptor and TH receptor mRNA and protein levels were determined by real-time qPCR and Western blot techniques. The results show that BPA alone decreases, while BPA in combination with THs and/or E 2 increases TR mRNA expression. In contrast, BPA alone increased receptor protein expressions, but did not further increase them in combination with THs and/or E 2 . The modulatory effects of BPA were mediated by the glia; however, the degree of changes also depended on the specific hormone ligand used. The results signify the importance of the regulatory mechanisms interposed between transcription and translation and raise the possibility that BPA could act to influence nuclear hormone receptor levels independently of ligand-receptor interaction.

  2. Targeting the thyroid gland with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-nanoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Cosco, Donato; Gaspari, Marco; Celano, Marilena; Wolfram, Joy; Voce, Pasquale; Puxeddu, Efisio; Filetti, Sebastiano; Celia, Christian; Ferrari, Mauro; Russo, Diego; Fresta, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Various tissue-specific antibodies have been attached to nanoparticles to obtain targeted delivery. In particular, nanodelivery systems with selectivity for breast, prostate and cancer tissue have been developed. Here, we have developed a nanodelivery system that targets the thyroid gland. Nanoliposomes have been conjugated to the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which binds to the TSH receptor (TSHr) on the surface of thyrocytes. The results indicate that the intracellular uptake of TSH-nanoliposomes is increased in cells expressing the TSHr. The accumulation of targeted nanoliposomes in the thyroid gland following intravenous injection was 3.5-fold higher in comparison to untargeted nanoliposomes. Furthermore, TSH-nanoliposomes encapsulated with gemcitabine showed improved anticancer efficacy in vitro and in a tumor model of follicular thyroid carcinoma. This drug delivery system could be used for the treatment of a broad spectrum of thyroid diseases to reduce side effects and improve therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer risk and clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid nodules harboring thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Mon, Sann Y; Riedlinger, Gregory; Abbott, Collette E; Seethala, Raja; Ohori, N Paul; Nikiforova, Marina N; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Hodak, Steven P

    2018-05-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene mutations play a critical role in thyroid cell proliferation and function. They are found in 20%-82% of hyperfunctioning nodules, hyperfunctioning follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), and papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). The diagnostic importance of TSHR mutation testing in fine needle aspiration (FNA) specimens remains unstudied. To examine the association of TSHR mutations with the functional status and surgical outcomes of thyroid nodules, we evaluated 703 consecutive thyroid FNA samples with indeterminate cytology for TSHR mutations using next-generation sequencing. Testing for EZH1 mutations was performed in selected cases. The molecular diagnostic testing was done as part of standard of care treatment, and did not require informed consent. TSHR mutations were detected in 31 (4.4%) nodules and were located in exons 281-640, with codon 486 being the most common. Allelic frequency ranged from 3% to 45%. Of 16 cases (12 benign, 3 FTC, 1 PTC) with surgical correlation, 15 had solitary TSHR mutations and 1 PTC had comutation with BRAF V600E. Hyperthyroidism was confirmed in all 3 FTC (2 overt, 1 subclinical). Of 5 nodules with solitary TSHR mutations detected at high allelic frequency, 3 (60%) were FTC. Those at low allelic frequency (3%-22%) were benign. EZH1 mutations were detected in 2 of 4 TSHR-mutant malignant nodules and neither of 2 benign nodules. We report that TSHR mutations occur in ∼5% thyroid nodules in a large consecutive series with indeterminate cytology. TSHR mutations may be associated with an increased cancer risk when present at high allelic frequency, even when the nodule is hyperfunctioning. Benign nodules were however most strongly correlated with TSHR mutations at low allelic frequency. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Nuclear Import and Export of the Thyroid Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jibo; Roggero, Vincent R; Allison, Lizabeth A

    2018-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptors, TRα1 and TRβ1, are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that forms one of the most abundant classes of transcription factors in multicellular organisms. Although primarily localized to the nucleus, TRα1 and TRβ1 shuttle rapidly between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The fine balance between nuclear import and export of TRs has emerged as a critical control point for modulating thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression. Mutagenesis studies have defined two nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs that direct nuclear import of TRα1: NLS-1 in the hinge domain and NLS-2 in the N-terminal A/B domain. Three nuclear export signal (NES) motifs reside in the ligand-binding domain. A combined approach of shRNA-mediated knockdown and coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed that nuclear entry of TRα1 is facilitated by importin 7, likely through interactions with NLS-2, and importin β1 and the adapter importin α1 interacting with both NLS-1 and NLS-2. Interestingly, TRβ1 lacks NLS-2 and nuclear import depends solely on the importin α1/β1 heterodimer. Heterokaryon and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching shuttling assays identified multiple exportins that play a role in nuclear export of TRα1, including CRM1 (exportin 1), and exportins 4, 5, and 7. Even single amino acid changes in TRs dramatically alter their intracellular distribution patterns. We conclude that mutations within NLS and NES motifs affect nuclear shuttling activity, and propose that TR mislocalization contributes to the development of some types of cancer and Resistance to Thyroid Hormone syndrome. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular basis for the autoreactivity against thyroid stimulating hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Kohn, L D; Kosugi, S; Ban, T; Saji, M; Ikuyama, S; Giuliani, C; Hidaka, A; Shimura, H; Akamizu, T; Tahara, K

    1992-01-01

    The present report identifies an important immunogenic region of the TSH receptor and determinants on the TSH receptor for the two types of autoantibodies seen in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and hypothyroid idiopathic myxedema, TSAbs and TSBAbs, respectively. The immunogenic domain with no important functional determinants, is contained within residues 303-382 and involves residues 352-366 in particular. There are determinants flanking the immunogenic domain on the C-terminal portion of the receptor which are the TSBAb and high affinity TSH binding sites: residues 295-306, 387-395, and tyrosine 385. Determinants on the N-terminal portion of the external domain, centered on residues 38-45, are TSAb interactions linked to low affinity TSH binding important for signal generation: threonine 40 and residues 30-33, 34-37, 42-45, 52-56, and 58-61. These determinants are conserved in human and rat receptors, are not present in gonadotropin receptors, and are each related to separate actions of TSH: binding vs. signal generation. They can, therefore, account for organ specific autoimmunity and the different disease expression effected by TSBAbs vs TSAbs, i.e. hypo- vs. hyperthyroidism, respectively. It is proposed that, in the thyroid, hormonal (TSH, insulin, hydrocortisone, IGF-I) suppression of class I genes might be one means of preserving self-tolerance in the face of the hormone action to increase the expression of tissue specific genes such as thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. Inappropriately high class I expression in the thyroid, i.e. if induced by interferon, viruses, or some as yet unknown agent, would contribute to the generation of autoimmune disease. Thus, it would result in increased antigen presentation to the immune system, particularly those autoantigens increased by TSH and its cAMP signal such as thyroglobulin or thyroid peroxidase, or whose turnover is increased by TSH and its cAMP signal, such as the TSH receptor. In the case of the latter, peptide

  6. Thyroid function testing in primary care: overused and under-evidenced? A study examining which clinical features correspond to an abnormal thyroid function result.

    PubMed

    Werhun, Alexander; Hamilton, William

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic testing is increasing in primary care, including for thyroid disease. This study examined which clinical features were associated with an abnormal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) result. This was a cross-sectional study in one general practice of 16,487 patients in Exeter, Devon, UK. We examined the primary care records relating to every TSH test taken in the year from August 2012, and extracted symptoms and/or the indication for testing. Associations with an abnormal result were tested using multivariable logistic regression. A cohort study was then performed of 100 patients newly recorded with each of the six features associated with an abnormal test result in the cross-sectional study, and the proportions tested for TSH and the results of that testing identified. Two thousand thirty-five patients (12% of the practice population) had TSH testing in the year. Of these 35 (1.7%) had a TSH >4.5 mIU/l, suggesting hypothyroidism, and 7 (0.3%) had TSH <0.01 mIu/l suggesting hyperthyroidism. Features associated with an abnormal TSH were: pregnancy, odds ratio 41 (95% confidence interval 9.3-180), constipation 9.7 (2.1-45), palpitations 23 (3.4-150), hair loss, 21 (2.0-230), weight gain, 18 (1.6-190) and diarrhoea, 13 (1.2-130); in separate analyses only pregnancy and constipation were associated with a raised TSH, and the remaining four features with a low TSH. The diagnostic yield of thyroid disease in this study was 2.1% suggests testing could be better targeted without missing diagnoses. The symptoms associated with thyroid disease differ from those generally reported. This may represent fewer patients presenting with advanced disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The environmental contaminant tributyltin leads to abnormalities in different levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in female rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marcelle Novaes; Santos-Silva, Ana Paula; Rodrigues-Pereira, Paula; Paiva-Melo, Francisca Diana; de Lima Junior, Niedson Correa; Teixeira, Mariana Pires; Soares, Paula; Dias, Glaecir Roseni Munstock; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; de Carvalho, Denise Pires; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; Miranda-Alves, Leandro

    2018-06-11

    Tributyltin is a biocide used in nautical paints, aiming to reduce fouling of barnacles in ships. Despite the fact that many effects of TBT on marine species are known, studies in mammals have been limited, especially those evaluating its effect on the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subchronic exposure to TBT on the HPT axis in female rats. Female Wistar rats received vehicle, TBT 200 ng kg -1 BW d -1 or 1000 ng kg -1 BW d -1 orally by gavage for 40 d. Hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, liver and blood samples were collected. TBT200 and TBT1000 thyroids showed vacuolated follicular cells, with follicular hypertrophy and hyperplasia. An increase in epithelial height and a decrease in the thyroid follicle and colloid area were observed in TBT1000 rats. Moreover, an increase in the epithelium/colloid area ratio was observed in both TBT groups. Lower TRH mRNA expression was observed in the hypothalami of TBT200 and TBT1000 rats. An increase in Dio1 mRNA levels was observed in the hypothalamus and thyroid in TBT1000 rats only. TSH serum levels were increased in TBT200 rats. In TBT1000 rats, there was a decrease in total T4 serum levels compared to control rats, whereas T3 serum levels did not show significant alterations. We conclude that TBT exposure can promote critical abnormalities in the HPT axis, including changes in TRH mRNA expression and serum TSH and T4 levels, in addition to affecting thyroid morphology. These findings demonstrate that TBT disrupts the HPT axis. Additionally, the changes found in thyroid hormones suggest that TBT may interfere with the peripheral metabolism of these hormones, an idea corroborated by the observed changes in Dio1 mRNA levels. Therefore, TBT exposition might interfere not only with the thyroid axis but also with thyroid hormone metabolism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of thyroid hormones in biological samples using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster presentation will describe analytical chemistry methods for measuring thyroid hormones and related precursors and metabolites in very small tissue or plasma samples. These methods are amenable to measure thyroid hormones in amphibian tadpoles or small mammals used as ...

  9. Thyroid Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... beats. All of these activities are your body's metabolism. Thyroid problems include Goiter - enlargement of the thyroid gland Hyperthyroidism - when your thyroid gland makes more thyroid hormones ...

  10. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (DE-71)Interferes with Thyroid Hormone Action Independent Of Effects On Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone in Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are routinely found in human tissues including cord blood and breast milk. PBDEs may interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) during development, which could produce neurobehavioral deficits. An assumption in experimental and epidemiological stud...

  11. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  12. Paradigm Shift in Thyroid Hormone Mechanism of Action | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is one of the primary endocrine regulators of human metabolism and homeostasis. Acting through three forms of the thyroid hormone receptor (THR; alpha-1, beta-1, and beta-2), TH regulates target gene expression in nearly every cell in the body, modulating fundamental processes, such as basal metabolic rate, long bone growth, and neural maturation. TH is

  13. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor Antibodies in Thyroid Eye Disease-Methodology and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Diana, Tanja; Kahaly, George J

    2018-05-02

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TSHR-Ab) cause autoimmune hyperthyroidism and are prevalent in patients with related thyroid eye disease (TED). To provide a historical perspective on TSHR-Ab and to present evidence-based recommendations for clinical contemporary use. The authors review the recent literature pertaining to TSHR-Ab in patients with TED and describe the various immunoassays currently used for detecting TSHR-Ab and their clinical applications. We provide a historical summary and description of the various methods used to detect TSHR-Ab, foremost, the functional TSHR-Ab. Increasing experimental and clinical data demonstrate the clinical usefulness of cell-based bioassays for measurements of functional TSHR-Ab in the diagnosis and management of patients with autoimmune TED and in the characterization of patients with autoimmune-induced hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, especially the functional stimulating antibodies, are sensitive, specific, and reproducible biomarkers for patients with autoimmune TED and correlate well with clinical disease activity and clinical severity. Unlike competitive-binding assays, bioassays have the advantage of indicating not only the presence of antibodies but also their functional activity and potency. Measurement of TSHR-Ab (especially stimulating antibodies) is a clinically useful tool for the management of patients with TED.

  14. Thyroid hormones upregulate apolipoprotein E gene expression in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Corina; Fuior, Elena V.; Trusca, Violeta G.

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein mainly involved in lipid metabolism, is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Despite numerous attempts to elucidate apoE gene regulation in the brain, the exact mechanism is still uncovered. The mechanism of apoE gene regulation in the brain involves the proximal promoter and multienhancers ME.1 and ME.2, which evolved by gene duplication. Herein we questioned whether thyroid hormones and their nuclear receptors have a role in apoE gene regulation in astrocytes. Our data showed that thyroid hormones increase apoE gene expression in HTB14 astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This effect can be intermediatedmore » by the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) which is expressed in these cells. In the presence of triiodothyronine (T3) and 9-cis retinoic acid, in astrocytes transfected to overexpress TRβ and retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), apoE promoter was indirectly activated through the interaction with ME.2. To determine the location of TRβ/RXRα binding site on ME.2, we performed DNA pull down assays and found that TRβ/RXRα complex bound to the region 341–488 of ME.2. This result was confirmed by transient transfection experiments in which a series of 5′- and 3′-deletion mutants of ME.2 were used. These data support the existence of a biologically active TRβ binding site starting at 409 in ME.2. In conclusion, our data revealed that ligand-activated TRβ/RXRα heterodimers bind with high efficiency on tissue-specific distal regulatory element ME.2 and thus modulate apoE gene expression in the brain. - Highlights: • T3 induce a dose-dependent increase of apoE expression in astrocytes. • Thyroid hormones activate apoE promoter in a cell specific manner. • Ligand activated TRβ/RXRα bind on the distal regulatory element ME.2 to modulate apoE. • The binding site of TRβ/RXRα heterodimer is located at 409 bp on ME.2.« less

  15. The impact of thyroid hormones on patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Matthias; Haupt, Lukas; Hucke, Florian; Bota, Simona; Bucsics, Theresa; Trauner, Michael; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Sieghart, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism has recently been proposed as predisposing factor for HCC development. However, the role of thyroid hormones (TH) in established HCC is largely unclear. We investigated the impact of TH on clinical characteristics and prognosis of HCC patients. Of 838 patients diagnosed with nonsurgical HCC at the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology/Medical University of Vienna between 1992 and 2012, 667 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The associations of thyroid function tests with patient, liver, and tumor characteristics as well as their impact on overall survival (OS) were investigated. Thyroid hormone substitution was more often observed in patients with low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration and in patients with elevated free tetraiodthyronine (fT4). Patients with high TSH (>3.77uU/ml) concentrations had larger tumors, while the opposite was true for patients with low TSH (<0.44uU/ml) concentrations. Subjects with elevated fT4 (>1.66ng/dl) were more likely to have elevated CRP. While TSH was only associated with OS in univariate analysis (≤1.7 vs. >1.7uU/ml, median OS (95%CI), 12.3 (8.9-15.7 months) vs. 7.3 months (5.4-9.2 months); p = 0.003), fT4 (≤1.66 vs. >1.66ng/dl, median OS (95%CI), 10.6 (7.5-13.6 months) vs. 3.3 months (2.2-4.3 months); p = 0.007) remained an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR (95%CI) for fT4>1.66ng/dl, 2.1 (1.3-3.3); p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. TSH and fT4 were associated with prognostic factors of HCC (i.e., tumor size, CRP level). Elevated fT4 concentrations were independently associated with poor prognosis in HCC. Further studies are needed to characterize the role of TH in HCC in detail.

  16. Do unliganded thyroid hormone receptors have physiological functions?

    PubMed

    Chassande, O

    2003-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for the development of vertebrates and exerts numerous homeostatic functions in adults. TH acts through nuclear receptors which control the transcription of target genes. Unliganded and liganded thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) have been shown to exert opposite effects on the transcription of target genes in vitro. However, the occurance of an aporeceptor activity in vivo and its potential physiological significance has not been clearly addressed. Several data generated using experimental hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in wild type and TR knockout mice support the notion that apoTRs have an intrinsic activity in several tIssues. ApoTRs, and in particular TRalpha1, are predominant during the early stages of vertebrate development and must be turned into holoTRs for post-natal development to proceed normally. However, the absence of striking alterations of embryonic and fetal development in mice devoid of TRs indicates that apoTRs do not play a fundamental role. During development, as well as in adults, apoTRs rather appears as a system which increases the range of transcriptional responses to moderate variations of T3.

  17. Pleiotropic Effects of Thyroid Hormones: Learning from Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Martha; Chávez, Edmundo; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism induces several metabolic changes that allow understanding some physiopathological mechanisms. Under experimental hypothyroid conditions in rats, heart and kidney are protected against oxidative damage induced by ischemia reperfusion. An increased resistance to opening of the permeability transition pore seems to be at the basis of such protection. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate of hypothyroid kidney is low as a result of adenosine receptors-induced renal vasoconstriction. The vascular tone of aorta is also regulated by adenosine in hypothyroid conditions. In other context, thyroid hormones regulate lipoprotein metabolism. High plasma level of LDL cholesterol is a common feature in hypothyroidism, due to a low expression of the hepatic LDL receptor. In contrast, HDL-cholesterol plasma levels are variable in hypothyroidism; several proteins involved in HDL metabolism and structure are expressed at lower levels in experimental hypothyroidism. Based on the positive influence of thyroid hormones on lipoprotein metabolism, thyromimetic drugs are promising for the treatment of dyslipidemias. In summary, hypothyroid status has been useful to understand molecular mechanisms involved in ischemia reperfusion, regulation of vascular function and intravascular metabolism of lipoproteins. PMID:21760977

  18. Thyroid organotypic rat and human cultures used to investigate drug effects on thyroid function, hormone synthesis and release pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com; Heale, Jason; Sinclair, John R.

    Drug induced thyroid effects were evaluated in organotypic models utilizing either a rat thyroid lobe or human thyroid slices to compare rodent and human response. An inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) function led to a perturbation in the expression of key genes in thyroid hormone synthesis and release pathways. The clinically used thiourea drugs, methimazole (MMI) and 6-n-propyl-2-thioruacil (PTU), were used to evaluate thyroid drug response in these models. Inhibition of TPO occurred early as shown in rat thyroid lobes (2 h) and was sustained in both rat (24–48 h) and human (24 h) with ≥ 10 μM MMI. Thyroidmore » from rats treated with single doses of MMI (30–1000 mg/kg) exhibited sustained TPO inhibition at 48 h. The MMI in vivo thyroid concentrations were comparable to the culture concentrations (∼ 15–84 μM), thus demonstrating a close correlation between in vivo and ex vivo thyroid effects. A compensatory response to TPO inhibition was demonstrated in the rat thyroid lobe with significant up-regulation of genes involved in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis (Tpo, Dio1, Slc5a5, Tg, Tshr) and the megalin release pathway (Lrp2) by 24 h with MMI (≥ 10 μM) and PTU (100 μM). Similarly, thyroid from the rat in vivo study exhibited an up-regulation of Dio1, Slc5a5, Lrp2, and Tshr. In human thyroid slices, there were few gene expression changes (Slc5a5, ∼ 2-fold) and only at higher MMI concentrations (≥ 1500 μM, 24 h). Extended exposure (48 h) resulted in up-regulation of Tpo, Dio1 and Lrp2, along with Slc5a5 and Tshr. In summary, TPO was inhibited by similar MMI concentrations in rat and human tissue, however an increased sensitivity to drug treatment in rat is indicated by the up-regulation of thyroid hormone synthesis and release gene pathways at concentrations found not to affect human tissue. -- Highlights: ► Novel model of rat thyroid or human thyroid slices to evaluate pathways of injury. ► TPO inhibition by MMI or PTU

  19. Thyroid Storm Caused by a Chinese Herb Contaminated with Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Maude; Vandenberghe, Hilde; Thompson, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Atrial fibrillation • confusion • hyperthermia • tachycardia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Intubation • cardioversion Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Adverse events of drug therapy Background: We report a case of thyroid storm caused by consuming a Chinese herb contaminated with thyroid hormones. Case Report: A 70-year-old man presented to an emergency department after 2 days of nausea, vomiting, and weakness. Three days previously, he had started taking Cordyceps powder and “Flower Man Sang Hung” as recommended by his Chinese physician. Following admission, the patient deteriorated and was eventually diagnosed with thyroid storm complicated by rapid atrial fibrillation requiring cardioversion, intubation, and intensive care admission. The analysis of the Chinese herb “Flower Man Sang Hung” was positive for levothyroxine. The patient was extubated 11 days after admission and discharged to a rehabilitation centre after 17 days of hospitalization. The Chinese medicine physician was informed of the events. Conclusions: Herbal products can be the source of illness, medication interactions, and contamination. Awareness should be raised among Chinese medicine physicians, allopathic physicians, and their patients. Clinicians should also have a low threshold of suspicion to seek laboratory analysis of suspect substances when the cause of the clinical presentation is unclear. PMID:25644333

  20. Thyroid Hormones Are Transport Substrates and Transcriptional Regulators of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 2B1.

    PubMed

    Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Ferreira, Celio; Schaefer, Anima M; Oufir, Mouhssin; Seibert, Isabell; Hamburger, Matthias; Tirona, Rommel G

    2018-07-01

    Levothyroxine replacement therapy forms the cornerstone of hypothyroidism management. Variability in levothyroxine oral absorption may contribute to the well-recognized large interpatient differences in required dose. Moreover, levothyroxine-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are thought to be caused by altered oral bioavailability. Interestingly, little is known regarding the mechanisms contributing to levothyroxine absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we aimed to determine whether the intestinal drug uptake transporter organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1) may be involved in facilitating intestinal absorption of thyroid hormones. We also explored whether thyroid hormones regulate OATP2B1 gene expression. In cultured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney II/OATP2B1 cells and in OATP2B1-transfected Caco-2 cells, thyroid hormones were found to inhibit OATP2B1-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate. Competitive counter-flow experiments evaluating the influence on the cellular accumulation of estrone-3-sulfate in the steady state indicated that thyroid hormones were substrates of OATP2B1. Additional evidence that thyroid hormones were OATP2B1 substrates was provided by OATP2B1-dependent stimulation of thyroid hormone receptor activation in cell-based reporter assays. Bidirectional transport studies in intestinal Caco-2 cells showed net absorptive flux of thyroid hormones, which was attenuated by the presence of the OATP2B1 inhibitor, atorvastatin. In intestinal Caco-2 and LS180 cells, but not in liver Huh-7 or HepG2 cells, OATP2B1 expression was induced by treatment with thyroid hormones. Reporter gene assays revealed thyroid hormone receptor α -mediated transactivation of the SLCO2B1 1b and the SLCO2B1 1e promoters. We conclude that thyroid hormones are substrates and transcriptional regulators of OATP2B1. These insights provide a potential mechanistic basis for oral levothyroxine dose variability and drug interactions. Copyright © 2018 by The American

  1. The progestin norethisterone affects thyroid hormone-dependent metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis tadpoles at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Claudia; Krüger, Angela; Schöning, Viola; Lutz, Ilka

    2018-04-15

    Previously, levonorgestrel (LNG) has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor of the amphibian thyroid system. In the present study, we investigated whether anti-thyroidal effects are a common property of progestins other than LNG. Premetamorphic Xenopus laevis tadpoles were exposed to norethisterone (NET) and dienogest DIE (each at 0.1-10nM) and LNG (10nM) until completion of metamorphosis. LNG and NET at all concentrations caused a significant developmental retardation whereas DIE did not impair time to metamorphosis. In LNG and 10nM NET exposed animals, tsh mRNA levels increased considerably later than the developmental delay occurred and thyroid histopathology showed no signs of TSH-hyperstimulation. Instead, thyroid glands from these treatments appeared inactive in producing thyroid hormones. Thyroidal transcript levels of dio2 and dio3 were increased by treatments with LNG and NET at 1nM and 10nM, whereas iyd mRNA was reduced by LNG and 10nM NET. Expression of slc5α5 was not changed by any treatment. Effects of DIE differed from those induced by LNG and NET. No developmental delay was measurable; however, tshβ and dio2 mRNAs were increased in pituitary glands of tadpoles exposed to 1.0nM and 10nM DIE. Thyroid histopathology displayed no abnormalities and thyroidal mRNA expression of the genes analyzed (slc5α5, iyd, dio2, dio3) was not changed by DIE. Overall, our results provide evidence that the anti-thyroidal effects already known from LNG are also present in another progestin, namely NET, even at environmentally relevant concentrations. In conclusion we suggest that progestins do not only pose an environmental risk in terms of their impact on reproductive success of aquatic vertebrates, but also with respect to their anti-thyroidal properties affecting amphibian metamorphosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thyroid hormones and the central nervous system of mammals (Review).

    PubMed

    Di Liegro, Italia

    2008-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs) L-thyroxine (T4) and L-triiodothyronine (T3) have a profound influence on the development and maturation of the mammalian brain, both before and after birth. Any impairment in the supply of THs to the developing nervous system leads to severe and irreversible changes in both the overall architecture and functions of the brain and causes, in humans, neurological and motor deficits known as cretinism. Pronounced neurological symptoms are also commonly observed in adult patients suffering from both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, and it has recently emerged that certain symptoms might result from the reduced brain uptake, rather than the insufficient production, of THs. Most of the effects of THs are mediated by two classes of nuclear receptors (α and β isoforms), which belong to the c-erbA superfamily of transcriptional regulators and are expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally regulated manner. Interestingly, the nuclear TH receptors (nTRs) act as both ligand-independent gene repressors and ligand-dependent gene activators. On the other hand, negatively-regulated genes, which can be stimulated in the absence of THs and repressed by THs, have also been observed. Due to this complex pattern of regulation, the effects of receptor dysfunction do not exactly overlap the effects of hormone deficiency or excess. Moreover, non-genomic mechanisms of TH action have been described in many tissues, including the brain, some of which seem to be mediated by integrins and to be calcium-dependent. Intracellular receptors, distinct from nTRs, are present in the mitochondria, where a matrix-associated, T3-dependent transcriptional regulator of approximately 43 kDa has been described. Finally, complex patterns of pituitary and/or peripheral resistance to thyroid hormones (RTH), characterized by elevated plasma levels of THs and non-suppressible thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), have been identified. This review summarizes the major advances

  3. Associations between pituitary imaging abnormalities and clinical and biochemical phenotypes in children with congenital growth hormone deficiency: data from an international observational study.

    PubMed

    Deal, Cheri; Hasselmann, Caroline; Pfäffle, Roland W; Zimmermann, Alan G; Quigley, Charmian A; Child, Christopher J; Shavrikova, Elena P; Cutler, Gordon B; Blum, Werner F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to investigate the etiology of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This study examined relationships between MRI findings and clinical/hormonal phenotypes in children with GHD in the observational Genetics and Neuroendocrinology of Short Stature International Study, GeNeSIS. Clinical presentation, hormonal status and first-year GH response were compared between patients with pituitary imaging abnormalities (n = 1,071), patients with mutations in genes involved in pituitary development/GH secretion (n = 120) and patients with idiopathic GHD (n = 7,039). Patients with hypothalamic-pituitary abnormalities had more severe phenotypes than patients with idiopathic GHD. Additional hormonal deficiencies were found in 35% of patients with structural abnormalities (thyroid-stimulating hormone > adrenocorticotropic hormone > luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone > antidiuretic hormone), most frequently in patients with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). Patients with the triad [ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), pituitary aplasia/hypoplasia and stalk defects] had a more severe phenotype and better response to GH treatment than patients with isolated abnormalities. The sex ratio was approximately equal for patients with SOD, but there was a significantly higher proportion of males (approximately 70%) in the EPP, pituitary hypoplasia, stalk defects, and triad categories. This large, international database demonstrates the value of classification of GH-deficient patients by the presence and type of hypothalamic-pituitary imaging abnormalities. This information may assist family counseling and patient management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  5. Gene Expression as a Biomarker of Effect of Thyroid Hormone Action in Developing Brain: Relation to Serum Hormones.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is a known effect of environmental contaminants. Although animal models of developmental TH deficiency can predict the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system, the effects of moderate TH insufficiencies have proved more diffic...

  6. The Mechanism of the Calorigenic Action of Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Edelman, Isidore S.

    1971-01-01

    In an earlier study, we proposed that thyroid hormone stimulation of energy utilization by the Na+ pump mediates the calorigenic response. In this study, the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) on total oxygen consumption (Q OO2), the ouabain-sensitive oxygen consumption [Q OO2(t)], and NaK-ATPase in liver, kidney, and cerebrum were measured. In liver, ∼90% of the increase in Q OO2 produced by T3 in either thyroidectomized or euthyroid rats was attributable to the increase in Q OO2(t). In kidney, the increase in Q OO2(t) accounted for 29% of the increase in Q OO2 in thyroidectomized and 46% of the increase in Q OO2 in euthyroid rats. There was no demonstrable effect of T3 in euthyroid rats on Q OO2 or Q OO2(t) of cerebral slices. The effects of T3 on NaK-ATPase activity in homogenates were as follows: In liver +81% from euthyroid rats and +54% from hypothyroid rats. In kidney, +21% from euthyroid rats and +69% from hypothyroid rats. T3 in euthyroid rats produced no significant changes in NaK-ATPase or Mg-ATPase activity of cerebral homogenates. Liver plasma membrane fractions showed a 69% increase in NaK-ATPase and no significant changes in either Mg-ATPase or 5'-nucleotidase activities after T3 injection. These results indicate that thyroid hormones stimulate NaK-ATPase activity differentially. This effect may account, at least in part, for the calorigenic effects of these hormones. PMID:4252666

  7. Sex-steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from contaminated and reference lakes in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grain, D.A.; Guillette, L.J.; Pickford, D.B.; Percival, H.F.; Woodward, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-171?? (E2), testosterone (T), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) in juvenile alligators (60-140 cm total length) from two contaminated lakes and one reference lake in Florida. First, the data were analyzed by comparing hormone concentrations among males and females from the different lakes. Whereas there were no differences in plasma E2 concentrations among animals of the three lakes, male alligators from the contaminated lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee) had significantly lower plasma T concentrations compared 10 males from the reference take (Lake Woodruff). Concentrations of thyroid hormones also differed in animals of the three lakes, with T4 concentrations being elevated in Lake Okeechobee males compared to Lake Woodruff males. Second, the relationship between body size and hormone concentration was examined using regression analysis. Most notably for steroid hormones, no clear relationship was detected between E2 and total length in Apopka females (r2 0.09, p = 0.54) or between T and total length in Apopka males (r2 = 0.007, p = 0.75). Females from Apopka (r2 = 0.318, p = 0.09) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.222, p = 0.09) exhibited weak correlations between T3 and total length. Males from Apopka (r2 = 0.015, p = 0.66) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.128, p = 0.19) showed no correlation between T4 and total length. These results indicate: some of the previously reported abnormalities in steroid hormones of hatchling alligators persist, at least, through the juvenile years; steroid and thyroid hormones are related to body size in juvenile alligators from the reference lake, whereas alligators living in lakes Apopka and Okeechobee experience alterations in circulating thyroid and steroid

  8. Peripheral thyroid hormone levels and hepatic thyroid hormone deiodinase gene expression in dairy heifers on the day of ovulation and during the early peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, Marie Margarete; Mense, Kirsten; Linden, Matthias; Raliou, Mariam; Sandra, Olivier; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Hoedemaker, Martina; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-09-08

    Before the onset of fetal thyroid hormone production, the transplacental delivery of maternal thyroid hormones is necessary for embryonic and fetal development. Therefore, the adaptation of maternal thyroid hormone metabolism may be important for pregnancy success and embryo survival. The aims of this study were to determine the thyroid hormone levels during the early peri-implantation period until day 18 and on the day of ovulation, to determine whether pregnancy success is dependent on a "normothyroid status" and to determine whether physiological adaptations in maternal thyroid hormone metabolism occur, which may be necessary to provide sufficient amounts of biologically active T3 to support early pregnancy. Therefore, blood samples obtained on the day of ovulation (day 0) and days 14 and 18 of the Holstein-Friesian heifers (n = 10) during the respective pregnant, non-pregnant and negative control cycles were analyzed for thyroid-stimulating-hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Liver biopsies (day 18) from pregnant and respective non-pregnant heifers were analyzed for mRNA expression of the most abundant hepatic thyroid hormone deiodinase (DIO1) by real time qPCR. Although liver DIO1 mRNA expression did not differ between the pregnant and non-pregnant heifers on day 18, the serum concentrations of TSH and T3 on day 18 were higher in non-pregnant heifers compared to pregnant heifers (P < 0.05). Moreover, T3 decreased between day 0 and 18 in pregnant heifers (P < 0.001). In conclusion, no associations between thyroid hormone patterns on day 18 and pregnancy success were detected. During the early peri-implantation period, TSH and T3 may be affected by the pregnancy status because both TSH and T3 were lower on day 18 in pregnant heifers compared to non-pregnant dairy heifers. In further studies, the thyroid hormone axis should be evaluated throughout the entire gestation to confirm these data and identify other possible effects of

  9. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks

  10. Increased Procurement of Thoracic Donor Organs After Thyroid Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2015-01-01

    Hormonal therapy to the brain-dead organ donor can include thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine [T3] or levothyroxine [T4]), antidiuretic hormone, corticosteroids, or insulin. There has been a controversy on whether thyroid hormone enables more organs to be procured. Data on 63,593 donors of hearts and lungs (2000-2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Documentation on T3/T4 was available in all donors (study 1), and in 40,124 details of all 4 hormones were recorded (study 2). In this cohort, group A (23,022) received T3/T4 and group B (17,102) no T3/T4. Univariate analyses and multiple regressions were performed. Posttransplant graft and recipient survival at 1 and 12 months were compared. In study 1, 30,962 donors received T3/T4, with 36.59% providing a heart and 20.05% providing 1 or both lungs. Of the 32,631 donors who did not receive T3/T4, only 29.62% provided a heart and 14.61% provided lungs, an increase of 6.97% hearts and 5.44% lungs from T3/T4-treated donors (both P < 0.0001). In study 2, 34.99% of group A provided a heart and 20.99% provided lungs. In group B only 25.76% provided a heart and 15.09% provided lungs, an increase of 9.23% (hearts) and 5.90% (lungs), respectively, in group A (both P < 0.0001). The results of multiple regression analyses indicated a beneficial effect of T3/T4 on heart (P < 0.0001) and lung (P < 0.0001) procurement independent of other factors. T3/T4 therapy to the donor was associated with either improved posttransplant graft and recipient survival or no difference in survival. T3/T4 therapy results in more transplantable hearts and lungs, with no detriment to posttransplant graft or recipient survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thyroid hormone concentrations differ between donkeys and horses.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F J; Perez-Ecija, R A; Toribio, R E; Estepa, J C

    2013-03-01

    Reference intervals for thyroid hormones (TH) concentrations have not been previously established for donkeys, leading to potential misdiagnosis of thyroid disease. To determine the normal values of TH in healthy adult donkeys and compare them to TH values from healthy adult horses. Thirty-eight healthy Andalusian donkeys and 19 healthy Andalusian horses from 2 different farms were used. Donkeys were divided into 3 age groups: <5, 5-10 and >11 years and into 2 gender groups. Serum concentrations of fT3, tT3, rT3, fT4 and tT4 were quantified by radioimmunoassay. All blood samples were collected the same day in the morning. None of the animals had received any treatment for 30 days prior to sampling or had any history of disease. Both farms were in close proximity and under similar management. Differences between groups were determined using a one-way ANOVA analysis followed by Fisher's LSD test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Serum TH concentrations were higher in donkeys than in horses (P<0.01). Donkeys <5 years had higher serum rT3, fT4 and tT4 concentrations than donkeys >5 years (P<0.05). Furthermore, older donkeys (>11 years) had lower serum fT3 and tT3 concentrations than younger donkeys' groups (<5 and 5-10 years, P<0.05). TH concentrations were not different between genders (fT3: P = 0.06; tT3: P = 0.08; rT3: P = 0.15; fT4: P = 0.89; and tT4: P = 0.19). Thyroid hormone concentrations are different between healthy adult donkeys and horses. Establishing species-specific TH reference ranges is important when evaluating clinicopathologic data in equids in order to avoid the misdiagnosis of thyroid gland dysfunction. Further studies to elucidate the physiological mechanisms leading to these differences are warranted. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  12. The evolutionary and integrative roles of transthyretin in thyroid hormone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, G

    2002-10-01

    In larger mammals, thyroid hormone-binding plasma proteins are albumin, transthyretin (TTR) and thyroxine (T4)-binding globulin. They differ characteristically in affinities and release rates for T4 and triiodothyronine (T3). Together, they form a 'buffering' system counteracting thyroid hormone permeation from aqueous to lipid phases. Evolution led to important differences in the expression pattern of these three proteins in tissues. In adult liver, TTR is only made in eutherians and herbivorous marsupials. During development, it is also made in tadpole and fish liver. More intense TTR synthesis than in liver is found in the choroid plexus of reptilians, birds and mammals, but none in the choroid plexus of amphibians and fish, i.e. species without a neocortex. All brain-made TTR is secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid, where it becomes the major thyroid hormone-binding protein. During ontogeny, the maximum TTR synthesis in the choroid plexus precedes that of the growth rate of the brain and occurs during the period of maximum neuroblast replication. TTR is only one component in a network of factors determining thyroid hormone distribution. This explains why, under laboratory conditions, TTR-knockout mice show no major abnormalities. The ratio of TTR affinity for T4 over affinity for T3 is higher in eutherians than in reptiles and birds. This favors T4 transport from blood to brain providing more substrate for conversion of the biologically less active T4 into the biologically more active T3 by the tissue-specific brain deiodinases. The change in affinity of TTR during evolution involves a shortening and an increase in the hydrophilicity of the N-terminal regions of the TTR subunits. The molecular mechanism for this change is a stepwise shift of the splice site at the intron 1/exon 2 border of the TTR gene. The shift probably results from a sequence of single base mutations. Thus, TTR evolution provides an example for a molecular mechanism of positive Darwinian

  13. Thyroid abnormalities among first-degree relatives of children with congenital hypothyroidism: an ultrasound survey.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Atoosa; Haghighi, Mahshid; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Hashemipour, Mahin; Amini, Massoud; Hovsepian, Silva

    2008-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is caused by thyroid dysgenesis and dyshormonogenesis. Evidence suggests the presence of genetic factors in both types of pathogenesis. We investigated whether an increased incidence of thyroid abnormalities could be shown by ultrasonography among first-degree relatives of children with CH. In this case-control study the presence of both developmental and non-developmental thyroid abnormalities was studied among first-degree relatives of CH patients and healthy children. Assessments included neck ultrasonography and thyroid function tests. The data obtained from parents, siblings and children were compared in the case and control groups. In the case group, 92 patients, 172 parents and 57 siblings, and in the control group, 82 healthy children, 160 parents and 39 siblings were studied. Thyroid developmental abnormalities were more prevalent among parents (3.5 vs. 0%, p = 0.03) and siblings (10.5 vs. 0, p = 0.01) of CH patients than the control group. Non-developmental abnormalities were not significantly different between the case and control groups (17 vs. 13%, p = 0.3). Thyroid developmental abnormalities were more prevalent among parents and siblings of CH patients than the control group, confirming the familial component of this entity. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  15. The Role of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Prevention of Digestive System Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals. PMID:23924944

  16. Thyroid hormone concentrations in captive and free-ranging West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; MacKenzie, D S; Worthy, G A

    2000-12-01

    Because thyroid hormones play a critical role in the regulation of metabolism, the low metabolic rates reported for manatees suggest that thyroid hormone concentrations in these animals may also be reduced. However, thyroid hormone concentrations have yet to be examined in manatees. The effects of captivity, diet and water salinity on plasma total triiodothyronine (tT(3)), total thyroxine (tT(4)) and free thyroxine (fT(4)) concentrations were assessed in adult West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus). Free-ranging manatees exhibited significantly greater tT(4) and fT(4) concentrations than captive adults, regardless of diet, indicating that some aspect of a captive existence results in reduced T(4) concentrations. To determine whether this reduction might be related to feeding, captive adults fed on a mixed vegetable diet were switched to a strictly sea grass diet, resulting in decreased food consumption and a decrease in body mass. However, tT(4) and fT(4) concentrations were significantly elevated over initial values for 19 days. This may indicate that during periods of reduced food consumption manatees activate thyroid-hormone-promoted lipolysis to meet water and energetic requirements. Alterations in water salinity for captive animals did not induce significant changes in thyroid hormone concentrations. In spite of lower metabolic rates, thyroid hormone concentrations in captive manatees were comparable with those for other terrestrial and marine mammals, suggesting that the low metabolic rate in manatees is not attributable to reduced circulating thyroid hormone concentrations.

  17. The role of thyroid hormone signaling in the prevention of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Simmen, Frank A

    2013-08-06

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  18. Hormonal and echocardiographic abnormalities in adult patients with sickle-cell anemia in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Garadah, Taysir S; Jaradat, Ahmed A; Alalawi, Mohammed E; Hassan, Adla B

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenal, thyroid, and parathyroid gland hormonal changes are recognized in children with homozygous (HbSS) sickle-cell anemia (SCA), but are not clear in adult patients with SCA. Aim To assess the metabolic and endocrine abnormalities in adult patients with SCA and evaluate left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions compared with patients with no SCA and further study the relationship between serum levels of cortisol, free thyroxine (T4), and testosterone with serum ferritin. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 82 patients with adult HbSS SCA compared with a sex- and age-matched control group. The serum levels of cortisol, parathyroid hormone (PTH), testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free T4 were compared. Blood levels of hemoglobin, reticulocyte count, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), vitamin D3, and ferritin were also compared. Pulsed Doppler echo was performed to evaluate the LV mass, wall thickness, and cavity dimensions with diastolic filling velocities of early (E) and atria (A) waves. Biometric data were analyzed as mean ± standard deviation between the two groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed between serum levels of ferritin as independent variable and testosterone, cortisol, and thyroid hormones. Results A total of 82 adult patients with HbSS SCA were enrolled who had a mean age of 21±5.7 years, with 51 males (62%). Patients with SCA compared with the control group had significantly lower hemoglobin, body mass index, cortisol, vitamin D3, testosterone, and T4. Furthermore, there were significantly high levels of reticulocyte count, PTH, TSH, ferritin, LDH, ALP, and uric acid. The incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency was 7% and 4.8%, respectively, with hypogonadism 9.8% and vitamin D3 deficiency 61%. There were inverse relationships between ferritin as independent variable and serum levels of testosterone, T4, and cortisol

  19. Interconnection between thyroid hormone signalling pathways and parvovirus cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, J M; Laudet, V; Adelmant, G; Stéhelin, D; Rommelaere, J

    1993-01-01

    Nonstructural (NS) proteins of autonomous parvoviruses can repress expression driven by heterologous promoters, an activity which thus far has not been separated from their cytotoxic effects. It is shown here that, in transient transfection assays, the NS-1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) activates the promoter of the human c-erbA1 gene, encoding the thyroid hormone (T3) receptor alpha. The endogenous c-erbA1 promoter is also a target for induction upon MVMp infection. Moreover, T3 was found to up-modulate the level of cell sensitivity to parvovirus attack. These data suggest an interconnection between T3 signalling and NS cytotoxic pathways. Images PMID:8230488

  20. Relationship between thyroid stimulating hormone and night shift work.

    PubMed

    Moon, So-Hyun; Lee, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Night shift work has well-known adverse effects on health. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between thyroid diseases and night shift work. This study aimed to examine night shift workers and their changes in thyroid stimulating hormones (TSH) levels over time. Medical check-up data (2011-2015) were obtained from 967 female workers at a university hospital in Incheon, Korea. Data regarding TSH levels were extracted from the records, and 2015 was used as a reference point to determine night shift work status. The relationships between TSH levels and night shift work in each year were analyzed using the general linear model (GLM). The generalized estimating equation (GEE) was used to evaluate the repeated measurements over the 5-year period. The GEE analysis revealed that from 2011 to 2015, night shift workers had TSH levels that were 0.303 mIU/L higher than the levels of non-night shift workers (95 % CI: 0.087-0.519 mIU/L, p  = 0.006) after adjusting for age and department. When we used TSH levels of 4.5 ≥ mIU/L to identify subclinical hypothyroidism, night shift workers exhibited a 1.399 fold higher risk of subclinical hypothyroidism (95 % CI: 1.050-1.863, p  = 0.022), compared to their non-night shift counterparts. This result of this study suggests that night shift workers may have an increased risk of thyroid diseases, compared to non-night shift workers.

  1. Thyroid hormones regulate skeletal muscle regeneration after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna Lúcia R C; Albuquerque, João Paulo C; Matos, Marina S; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Rosenthal, Doris; da Costa, Vânia Maria Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroid statuses during the initial phase of skeletal muscle regeneration in rats. To induce hypo- or hyperthyroidism, adult male Wistar rats were treated with methimazole (0.03%) or T4 (10 μg/100 g), respectively, for 10 days. Three days before sacrifice, a crush injury was produced in the solear muscles of one half of the animals, while the other half remained intact. T3, T4, TSH, and leptin serum levels were not affected by the injury. Serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly increased in hyperthyroid and hyper-injury animals. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by the significant increase in serum TSH levels in hypothyroid and hypo-injury animals. Injury increased cell infiltration and macrophage accumulation especially in hyperthyroid animals. Both type 2 and type 3 deiodinases were induced by lesion, and the opposite occurred with the type 1 isoform, at least in the control and hyperthyroid groups. Injury increased both MyoD and myogenin expression in all the studied groups, but only MyoD expression was increased by thyroidal status only at the protein level. We conclude that thyroid hormones modulate skeletal muscle regeneration possibly by regulating the inflammatory process, as well as MyoD and myogenin expression in the injured tissue.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Availability and Action during Brain Development in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Bárez-López, Soledad; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play an essential role in the development of all vertebrates; in particular adequate TH content is crucial for proper neurodevelopment. TH availability and action in the brain are precisely regulated by several mechanisms, including the secretion of THs by the thyroid gland, the transport of THs to the brain and neural cells, THs activation and inactivation by the metabolic enzymes deiodinases and, in the fetus, transplacental passage of maternal THs. Although these mechanisms have been extensively studied in rats, in the last decade, models of genetically modified mice have been more frequently used to understand the role of the main proteins involved in TH signaling in health and disease. Despite this, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying THs availability in the mouse brain. This mini-review article gathers information from findings in rats, and the latest findings in mice regarding the ontogeny of TH action and the sources of THs to the brain, with special focus on neurodevelopmental stages. Unraveling TH economy and action in the mouse brain may help to better understand the physiology and pathophysiology of TH signaling in brain and may contribute to addressing the neurological alterations due to hypo and hyperthyroidism and TH resistance syndromes. PMID:28855863

  3. Thyroid Hormone Availability and Action during Brain Development in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Bárez-López, Soledad; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play an essential role in the development of all vertebrates; in particular adequate TH content is crucial for proper neurodevelopment. TH availability and action in the brain are precisely regulated by several mechanisms, including the secretion of THs by the thyroid gland, the transport of THs to the brain and neural cells, THs activation and inactivation by the metabolic enzymes deiodinases and, in the fetus, transplacental passage of maternal THs. Although these mechanisms have been extensively studied in rats, in the last decade, models of genetically modified mice have been more frequently used to understand the role of the main proteins involved in TH signaling in health and disease. Despite this, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying THs availability in the mouse brain. This mini-review article gathers information from findings in rats, and the latest findings in mice regarding the ontogeny of TH action and the sources of THs to the brain, with special focus on neurodevelopmental stages. Unraveling TH economy and action in the mouse brain may help to better understand the physiology and pathophysiology of TH signaling in brain and may contribute to addressing the neurological alterations due to hypo and hyperthyroidism and TH resistance syndromes.

  4. Neonatal thyroid hormone levels in association with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Kristen; Anderson, Meredith; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle C

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical in early neurodevelopment, but few studies have examined whether neonatal TH levels influence risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study linked California neonatal screening data with live birth and Department of Developmental Services records to examine newborn TH levels in relation to ASD. Thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured in newborn bloodspots as part of routine screening, in 1996 and 2002, respectively. Mean levels of T4 and TSH were compared between ASD cases and non-cases. Four hundred forty-seven thousand, fifty-nine screened, singleton births from 1996 and 446,424 from 2002 were examined, including 4,818 ASD cases. Binomial regression, using categories of T4 and TSH percentiles was used to calculate crude and adjusted risk ratios (RR). Covariates included maternal and child factors, gestational age, and age at blood draw. No significant associations were found with TSH levels and ASD in crude or adjusted analyses. ASD cases had significantly lower mean T4 levels than non-cases, but this association was no longer significant in adjusted analyses (RR in individuals in lowest 5th percentile of T4 levels = 1.13, 95% 0.93-1.37). However, this association appeared stronger in certain subgroup analyses, particularly among neonates with blood draw ≥48 hr from birth (RR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.08, 2.60), when TH levels become more stable. Thus, results from this large, population-based study did not suggest strong associations between neonatal TH and ASD, but certain subgroups of newborns with the lowest T4 levels may have modestly increased ASD risk. Autism Res 2016. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Autism Res 2017, 10: 585-592. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Thyroid organotypic rat and human cultures used to investigate drug effects on thyroid function, hormone synthesis and release pathways.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Alison E M; Heale, Jason; Sinclair, John R; Morris, Stephen; Rowe, Josh M; Fisher, Robyn L

    2012-04-01

    Drug induced thyroid effects were evaluated in organotypic models utilizing either a rat thyroid lobe or human thyroid slices to compare rodent and human response. An inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) function led to a perturbation in the expression of key genes in thyroid hormone synthesis and release pathways. The clinically used thiourea drugs, methimazole (MMI) and 6-n-propyl-2-thioruacil (PTU), were used to evaluate thyroid drug response in these models. Inhibition of TPO occurred early as shown in rat thyroid lobes (2 h) and was sustained in both rat (24-48 h) and human (24 h) with ≥ 10 μM MMI. Thyroid from rats treated with single doses of MMI (30-1000 mg/kg) exhibited sustained TPO inhibition at 48 h. The MMI in vivo thyroid concentrations were comparable to the culture concentrations (~15-84 μM), thus demonstrating a close correlation between in vivo and ex vivo thyroid effects. A compensatory response to TPO inhibition was demonstrated in the rat thyroid lobe with significant up-regulation of genes involved in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis (Tpo, Dio1, Slc5a5, Tg, Tshr) and the megalin release pathway (Lrp2) by 24h with MMI (≥ 10 μM) and PTU (100 μM). Similarly, thyroid from the rat in vivo study exhibited an up-regulation of Dio1, Slc5a5, Lrp2, and Tshr. In human thyroid slices, there were few gene expression changes (Slc5a5, ~2-fold) and only at higher MMI concentrations (≥ 1500 μM, 24h). Extended exposure (48 h) resulted in up-regulation of Tpo, Dio1 and Lrp2, along with Slc5a5 and Tshr. In summary, TPO was inhibited by similar MMI concentrations in rat and human tissue, however an increased sensitivity to drug treatment in rat is indicated by the up-regulation of thyroid hormone synthesis and release gene pathways at concentrations found not to affect human tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thyroid hormonal disturbances related to treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-alpha and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cassia; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Zambrini, Heverton; Marui, Suemi

    2011-01-01

    To characterize thyroid disturbances induced by interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Interferon-alpha is used to treat chronic hepatitis C infections. This compound commonly induces both autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. We prospectively selected 26 patients with chronic hepatitis C infections. Clinical examinations, hormonal evaluations, and color-flow Doppler ultrasonography of the thyroid were performed before and during antiviral therapy. Of the patients in our study, 54% had no thyroid disorders associated with the interferon-alpha therapy but showed reduced levels of total T3 along with a decrease in serum alanine aminotransferase. Total T4 levels were also reduced at 3 and 12 months, but free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels remained stable. A total of 19% of the subjects had autoimmune interferon-induced thyroiditis, which is characterized by an emerge of antithyroid antibodies or overt hypothyroidism. Additionally, 16% had non-autoimmune thyroiditis, which presents as destructive thyroiditis or subclinical hypothyroidism, and 11% remained in a state of euthyroidism despite the prior existence of antithyroidal antibodies. Thyrotoxicosis with destructive thyroiditis was diagnosed within three months of therapy, and ultrasonography of these patients revealed thyroid shrinkage and discordant change in the vascular patterns. Decreases in the total T3 and total T4 levels may be related to improvements in the hepatocellular lesions or inflammatory changes similar to those associated with nonthyroidal illnesses. The immune mechanisms and direct effects of interferon-alpha can be associated with thyroiditis. Interferon-alpha and ribavirin induce autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis and hormonal changes (such as decreased total T3 and total T4 levels), which occur despite stable free T4 and TSH levels. A thyroid hormonal evaluation, including the analysis of the free T4, TSH, and antithyroid

  7. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone associated with a base mutation in the hormone-binding domain of the human 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine receptor-beta.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Nakamura, H; Tagami, T; Miyoshi, Y; Nogimori, T; Mitsuma, T; Imura, H

    1993-05-01

    Point mutations in the human T3 receptor-beta (TR beta) gene causing single amino acid substitutions have been identified in several different kindreds with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone. Until now, no study has been reported on the TR gene in cases of pituitary resistance (PRTH). In the present study, we analyzed the TR beta gene in a 30-yr-old Japanese female with PRTH. She exhibited clinical features of hyperthyroidism, elevated serum thyroid hormone levels accompanied by inappropriately increased secretion of TSH, mildly elevated basal metabolic rate, and increased urinary excretion of hydroxyproline. No pituitary tumor was detected. DNA fragments of exons 3-8 of the genomic TR beta gene were generated by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by a single stranded conformation polymorphism method. Exon 7 of the patient's TR beta gene showed an abnormal band, suggesting the existence of mutation(s). By subcloning and sequencing the DNA, a point mutation was identified in one allele at nucleotide 1297 (C to T), which altered the 333rd amino acid, arginine, to tryptophan. Neither of her apparently normal parents had any mutations of the TR beta gene. In vitro translation products of the mutant TR beta gene showed remarkably decreased T3-binding activity (Ka, 2.1 x 10(8) M-1; normal TR beta Ka, 1.1 x 10(10) M-1). Since the molecular defect detected in a patient with PRTH is similar to that seen in subjects with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone, both types of the syndrome may represent a continuous spectrum of the same etiological defect with variable tissue resistance to thyroid hormone.

  8. Novel Insights on Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, a subfamily of family A G protein-coupled receptors. The TSHR is of great importance for the growth and function of the thyroid gland. The TSHR and its endogenous ligand TSH are pivotal proteins with respect to a variety of physiological functions and malfunctions. The molecular events of TSHR regulation can be summarized as a process of signal transduction, including signal reception, conversion, and amplification. The steps during signal transduction from the extra- to the intracellular sites of the cell are not yet comprehensively understood. However, essential new insights have been achieved in recent years on the interrelated mechanisms at the extracellular region, the transmembrane domain, and intracellular components. This review contains a critical summary of available knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction at the TSHR, for example, the key amino acids involved in hormone binding or in the structural conformational changes that lead to G protein activation or signaling regulation. Aspects of TSHR oligomerization, signaling promiscuity, signaling selectivity, phenotypes of genetic variations, and potential extrathyroidal receptor activity are also considered, because these are relevant to an understanding of the overall function of the TSHR, including physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological perspectives. Directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23645907

  9. Thyroid hormone is essential for pituitary somatotropes and lactotropes.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J H; Kendall, S K; Brinkmeier, M L; Greco, T L; Watkins-Chow, D E; Campos-Barros, A; Lloyd, R V; Camper, S A

    1999-04-01

    Mice homozygous for a disruption in the alpha-subunit essential for TSH, LH, and FSH activity (alphaGsu-/-) exhibit hypothyroidism and hypogonadism similar to that observed in TSH receptor-deficient hypothyroid mice (hyt) and GnRH-deficient hypogonadal mutants (hpg). Although the five major hormone-producing cells of the anterior pituitary are present in alphaGsu-/- mice, the relative proportions of each cell type are altered dramatically. Thyrotropes exhibit hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and somatotropes and lactotropes are underrepresented. The size and number of gonadotropes in alphaGsu mutants are not remarkable in contrast to the hypertrophy characteristic of gonadectomized animals. The reduction in lactotropes is more severe in alphaGsu mutants (13-fold relative to wild-type) than in hyt or hpg mutants (4.5- and 1.5-fold, respectively). In addition, T4 replacement therapy of alphaGsu mutants restores lactotropes to near-normal levels, illustrating the importance of T4, but not alpha-subunit, for lactotrope proliferation and function. T4 replacement is permissive for gonadotrope hypertrophy in alphaGsu mutants, consistent with the role for T4 in the function of gonadotropes. This study reveals the importance of thyroid hormone in developing the appropriate proportions of anterior pituitary cell types.

  10. Hatching the Cleidoic Egg: The Role of Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, Bert; Grommen, Sylvia V.H.; Darras, Veerle M.

    2013-01-01

    A major life stage transition in birds and other oviparous sauropsids is the hatching of the cleidoic egg. Not unlike amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in these species can be regarded as a transition from a relatively well-protected “aqueous” environment to a more hazardous and terrestrial life outside the egg, a transition in which thyroid hormones (THs) (often in concert with glucocorticoids) play an important role. In precocial birds such as the chicken, the perihatch period is characterized by peak values of THs. THs are implicated in the control of muscle development, lung maturation and the switch from chorioallantoic to pulmonary respiration, yolk sac retraction, gut development and induction of hepatic genes to accommodate the change in dietary energy source, initiation of thermoregulation, and the final stages of brain maturation as well as early post-hatch imprinting behavior. There is evidence that, at least for some of these processes, THs may have similar roles in non-avian sauropsids. In altricial birds such as passerines on the other hand, THs do not rise significantly until well after hatching and peak values coincide with the development of endothermy. It is not known how hatching-associated processes are regulated by hormones in these animals or how this developmental mode evolved from TH-dependent precocial hatching. PMID:23755041

  11. Increased oxidative metabolism and neurotransmitter cycling in the brain of mice lacking the thyroid hormone transporter SLC16A2 (MCT8).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago B; Ceballos, Ainhoa; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Nuñez, Barbara; Refetoff, Samuel; Cerdán, Sebastian; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) cause a severe X-linked intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. MCT8 is a specific thyroid hormone (T4 and T3) transporter and the patients also present unusual abnormalities in the serum profile of thyroid hormone concentrations due to altered secretion and metabolism of T4 and T3. Given the role of thyroid hormones in brain development, it is thought that the neurological impairment is due to restricted transport of thyroid hormones to the target neurons. In this work we have investigated cerebral metabolism in mice with Mct8 deficiency. Adult male mice were infused for 30 minutes with (1-(13)C) glucose and brain extracts prepared and analyzed by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic inactivation of Mct8 resulted in increased oxidative metabolism as reflected by increased glutamate C4 enrichment, and of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions as observed by the increases in glutamine C4 and GABA C2 enrichments, respectively. These changes were distinct to those produced by hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Similar increments in glutamate C4 enrichment and GABAergic neurotransmission were observed in the combined inactivation of Mct8 and D2, indicating that the increased neurotransmission and metabolic activity were not due to increased production of cerebral T3 by the D2-encoded type 2 deiodinase. In conclusion, Mct8 deficiency has important metabolic consequences in the brain that could not be correlated with deficiency or excess of thyroid hormone supply to the brain during adulthood.

  12. Purification and characterization of rat liver nuclear thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, K; DeGroot, L J

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear thyroid hormone receptor was purified to 904 pmol of L-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) binding capacity per mg of protein with 2.5-5.2% recovery by sequentially using hydroxylapatite column chromatography, ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, DNA-cellulose column chromatography, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography, and heparin-Sepharose column chromatography. Assuming that one T3 molecule binds to the 49,000-Da unit of the receptor, we reproducibly obtained 6.4-14.7 micrograms of receptor protein with 4.2-4.9% purity from 4-5 kg of rat liver. Elution of receptor from the heparin-Sepharose column was performed using 10 mM pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, which was observed to diminish binding of receptor to heparin-Sepharose or DNA-cellulose. This effect was specific for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, since related compounds were not effective. Purified receptor bound T3 with high affinity (6.0 X 10(9) liter/mol), and the order of affinity of iodothyronine analogues to purified receptor was identical to that observed with crude receptor preparations [3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid greater than L-T3 greater than D-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (D-T3) greater than L-thyroxine greater than D-thyroxine]. Purified receptor had a sedimentation coefficient of 3.4 S, Stokes radius of 34 A, and calculated molecular mass of 49,000. Among several bands identified by silver staining after electrophoresis in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, one 49,000-Da protein showed photoaffinity labeling with [125I]thyroxine that was displaceable with excess unlabeled T3. The tryptic fragment and endogenous proteinase-digested fragment of the affinity-labeled receptor showed saturable binding in 27,000-Da and 36,000-Da peptides, respectively. These molecular masses are in agreement with estimates from gel filtration and gradient sedimentation, indicating that affinity labeling occurred at the hormone binding domain of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor. This procedure reproducibly

  13. MODEST THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING DEVELOPMENT INDUCES A CELLULAR MALFORMATION IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: A MODEL OF CORTICAL DYSPLASIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing body of evidence that subtle decreases in maternal thyroid hormone during gestation can impact fetal brain development. The present study examined the impact of graded levels of thyroid hormone insufficiency on brain development in rodents. Maternal thyroid ho...

  14. Screening the Tox21 10K library for thyroid stimulating hormone receptor agonist and antagonist activity (SOT annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) regulates thyroid hormone (TH) production via binding to its receptor (TSHR). The roles of TSHR in human pathologies including hyper/hypothyroidism, Grave’s disease, and thyroid cancer are known, but it is currently unknown whether TSHR is an imp...

  15. Contrasting Phenotypes in Resistance to Thyroid Hormone Alpha Correlate with Divergent Properties of Thyroid Hormone Receptor α1 Mutant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Moran, Carla; Agostini, Maura; McGowan, Anne; Schoenmakers, Erik; Fairall, Louise; Lyons, Greta; Rajanayagam, Odelia; Watson, Laura; Offiah, Amaka; Barton, John; Price, Susan; Schwabe, John; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2017-07-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα), a disorder characterized by tissue-selective hypothyroidism and near-normal thyroid function tests due to thyroid receptor alpha gene mutations, is rare but probably under-recognized. This study sought to correlate the clinical characteristics and response to thyroxine (T4) therapy in two adolescent RTHα patients with the properties of the THRA mutation, affecting both TRα1 and TRα2 proteins, they harbored. Clinical, auxological, biochemical, and physiological parameters were assessed in each patient at baseline and after T4 therapy. Heterozygous THRA mutations occurring de novo were identified in a 17-year-old male (patient P1; c.788C>T, p.A263V mutation) investigated for mild pubertal delay and in a 15-year-old male (patient P2; c.821T>C, p.L274P mutation) with short stature (0.4th centile), skeletal dysplasia, dysmorphic facies, and global developmental delay. Both individuals exhibited macrocephaly, delayed dentition, and constipation, together with a subnormal T4/triiodothyronine (T3) ratio, low reverse T3 levels, and mild anemia. When studied in vitro, A263V mutant TRα1 was transcriptionally impaired and inhibited the function of its wild-type counterpart at low (0.01-10 nM) T3 levels, with higher T3 concentrations (100 nM-1 μM) reversing dysfunction and such dominant negative inhibition. In contrast, L274P mutant TRα1 was transcriptionally inert, exerting significant dominant negative activity, only overcome with 10 μM of T3. Mirroring this, normal expression of KLF9, a TH-responsive target gene, was achieved in A263V mutation-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells following 1 μM of T3 exposure, but with markedly reduced expression levels in L274P mutation-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells, even with 10 μM of T3. Following T4 therapy, growth, body composition, dyspraxia, and constipation improved in P1, whereas growth retardation and constipation in P2 were unchanged

  16. RISK ASSESSMENT OF THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION AND MIXTURES IN MARINE BIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Varieties of chemicals alter thyroid hormones (THs) in vertabrates. The importance of THs during neurodevelopment, suggest that these chemicals would likely be developmental neurotoxicants. A number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between exposure to p...

  17. 20180311 - Screening the 10K Tox21 chemical library for thyroid hormone receptor modulators (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few ligands for the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) have been identified outside of endogenous ligands and pharmaceuticals, which suggests that TR is a very selective nuclear receptor (NR). However, large and diverse chemical libraries, particularly of environmental chemicals, have...

  18. Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Transporter Protein Expression during Tissue-specific Metamorphic Events in Xenopus tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) induces the dramatic morphological and physiological changes that together comprise amphibian metamorphosis. TH-responsive tissues vary widely with developmental timing of TH-induced changes. How larval tadpole tissues are able to employ distinct metamorphi...

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THYROID HORMONES IN THE RAT SERA CONTAINING PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), a persistent and bioaccumulative acid, is widely distributed in humans and wildlife. Prior studies with PFOS (rats and monkeys) have observed decreased total and free thyroid hormones (TH) in serum without a rise in thyrotropin (TSH). Measuremen...

  20. Computational Modeling of Thyroid Hormone Regulated Neurodevelopment for Chemical Prioritization (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for normal brain development. Environmental chemicals may disrupt TH homeostasis through a variety of physiological systems including membrane transporters, serum transporters, synthesis and catabolic enzymes, and nuclear receptors. Current comp...

  1. Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

  2. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Impairs Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Adult Male Offspring.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe thyroid hormone (TH) insufficiency during early development results in alterations in brain structure and function. Many environmental agents produce subtle alterations in TH status, but the dose-response relationships for such effects are unclear. We have previously demon...

  3. Tissue-specific regulation of malic enzyme by thyroid hormone in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sood, A; Schwartz, H L; Oppenheimer, J H

    1996-05-15

    Two recent studies have claimed that thyroid hormone administration accelerates malic enzyme gene expression in the neonatal brain in contrast to the well-documented lack of effect of triiodothyronine on malic enzyme gene expression in the adult brain. Since these observations conflict with earlier observations in our laboratory, we reinvestigated the effect of thyroid hormone status on the ontogeny of malic enzyme gene expression in the neonatal rat. Neither hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism influenced the ontogenesis of malic enzyme activity in neonatal brain whereas the patterns of gene expression and enzyme activity in liver were markedly affected. Our results suggest that tissue-specific factors in brain block thyroid hormone-induced gene expression by thyroid hormone.

  4. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  5. DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY ALTERS THE AMPLITUDE OF THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: The thyroid hormone (TH) system is one of the targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Since TH is essential for proper brain development, disruption by exposure to chemicals during development can result in adverse neurological outcomes. Previous studies revealed th...

  6. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Induces Cortical Brain Malformation and Learning Impairments: A Cross-Fostering Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for brain development, but animal models of well-defined and sensitive downstream apical neurotoxic outcomes associated with developmental TH disruption are lacking. A structural anomaly, a cortical heterotopia, in the brains of hypothyroid rat...

  7. Screening the 10K Tox21 chemical library for thyroid hormone receptor modulators

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few ligands for the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) have been identified outside of endogenous ligands and pharmaceuticals, which suggests that TR is a very selective nuclear receptor (NR). However, large and diverse chemical libraries, particularly of environmental chemicals, have...

  8. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT REDUCES PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND INHIBITORY FUNCTION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  9. Mechanism-based testing strategy using in vitro approaches for identification of thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system is involved in several important physiological processes, including regulation of energy metabolism, growth and differentiation, development and maintenance of brain function, thermo-regulation, osmo-regulation, and axis of regulation of other endo...

  10. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis is Impaired by Transient and Moderate Developmental Thyroid Hormone Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe thyroid hormone (TH) deprivation during development impairs neurogenesis throughout the brain. The hippocampus also maintains a capacity for neurogenesis throughout life which is reduced in adult-onset hypothyroidism. This study examined hippocampal volume in the neonate a...

  11. EFFECTS OF BDE-47 ON NUCLEAR RECEPTOR REGULATED GENES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) can decrease thyroid hormone levels via the induction of hepatic uridinediphosphate-glucoronosyltransferase, (UGTs) which catalyze glucuronidation of T4 resulting in T4-glucuronide excretion. Bas...

  12. Tissue-specific thyroid hormone regulation of gene transcripts encoding iodothyronine deiodinases and thyroid hormone receptors in striped parrotfish (Scarus iseri).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kaitlin M; Lema, Sean C

    2011-07-01

    In fish as in other vertebrates, the diverse functions of thyroid hormones are mediated at the peripheral tissue level through iodothyronine deiodinase (dio) enzymes and thyroid hormone receptor (tr) proteins. In this study, we examined thyroid hormone regulation of mRNAs encoding the three deiodinases dio1, dio2 and dio3 - as well as three thyroid hormone receptors trαA, trαB and trβ - in initial phase striped parrotfish (Scarus iseri). Parrotfish were treated with dissolved phase T(3) (20 nM) or methimazole (3 mM) for 3 days. Treatment with exogenous T(3) elevated circulating T(3), while the methimazole treatment depressed plasma T(4). Experimentally-induced hyperthyroidism increased the relative abundance of transcripts encoding trαA and trβ in the liver and brain, but did not affect trαB mRNA levels in either tissue. In both sexes, methimazole-treated fish exhibited elevated dio2 transcripts in the liver and brain, suggesting enhanced outer-ring deiodination activity in these tissues. Accordingly, systemic hyperthyroidism elevated relative dio3 transcript levels in these same tissues. In the gonad, however, patterns of transcript regulation were distinctly different with elevated T(3) increasing mRNAs encoding dio2 in testicular and ovarian tissues and dio3, trαA and trαB in the testes only. Thyroid hormone status did not affect dio1 transcript abundance in the liver, brain or gonads. Taken as a whole, these results demonstrate that thyroidal status influences relative transcript abundance for dio2 and dio3 in the liver, provide new evidence for similar patterns of dio2 and dio3 mRNA regulation in the brain, and make evident that fish exhibit tr subtype-specific transcript abundance changes to altered thyroid status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Expression in Developing Brain is Altered by Modest Reductions in Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is a known effect of environmental contaminants. Although animal models of developmental TH deficiency can predict the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system, the effects of moderate TH insufficiencies have not been adequatel...

  14. HPLC-ICP/MS Analysis of Thyroid Hormone and Related Iodinated Compounds in Tissues and Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying thyroid hormone (TH) and the synthetic precursors and metabolic products of TH is important for developing models of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis as well as for understanding the effects of xenobiotics on HPT axis function. In this study, the developm...

  15. Analysis of thyroid hormones in gland and serum using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (THs), which are critical for growth and development in all vertebrates, can be impacted through chemical perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. Amphibian and mammalian models are being used to address this research priority within US EPA...

  16. Thyroid hormones and coronary artery calcification in euthyroid men and women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Rampal, Sanjay; Zhao, Di; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lima, Joao A; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-09-01

    Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether thyroid hormone levels within the normal range are also associated with atherosclerosis measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC). We conducted a cross-sectional study of 41 403 apparently healthy young and middle-aged men and women with normal thyroid hormone levels. Free thyroxin, free triiodothyronine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were measured by electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. CAC score was measured by multidetector computed tomography. The multivariable adjusted CAC ratios comparing the highest versus the lowest quartile of thyroid hormones were 0.74 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.91; P for trend <0.001) for free thyroxin, 0.81 (0.66-1.00; P for trend=0.05) for free triiodothyronine, and 0.78 (0.64-0.95; P for trend=0.01) for thyroid-stimulating hormone. Similarly, the odds ratios for detectable CAC (CAC >0) comparing the highest versus the lowest quartiles of thyroid hormones were 0.87 (0.79-0.96; P for linear trend <0.001) for free thyroxin, 0.90 (0.82-0.99; P for linear trend=0.02) for free triiodothyronine, and 0.91 (0.83-1.00; P for linear trend=0.03) for thyroid-stimulating hormone. In a large cohort of apparently healthy young and middle-aged euthyroid men and women, low-normal free thyroxin and thyroid-stimulating hormone were associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical coronary artery disease and with a greater degree of coronary calcification. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Paradigm Shift in Thyroid Hormone Mechanism of Action | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is one of the primary endocrine regulators of human metabolism and homeostasis. Acting through three forms of the thyroid hormone receptor (THR; alpha-1, beta-1, and beta-2), TH regulates target gene expression in nearly every cell in the body, modulating fundamental processes, such as basal metabolic rate, long bone growth, and neural maturation. TH is also essential for proper development and differentiation of all cells of the human body.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl substances exposure and thyroid hormones in humans: epidemiological observations and implications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play crucial roles in normal neurodevelopment of fetus and child. Many chemicals can affect control and homeostasis of thyroid hormones, and eventually lead to various adverse health effects including neurodevelopmental disorders. Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are among the thyroid disrupting chemicals that can be encountered among general human population. Due to their unique physicochemical characteristics, PFASs have been used as surfactants and surface coating materials in many applications. Therefore, PFASs have been frequently detected in humans and environment worldwide. In cross-sectional studies using nationally representative general human populations of United States, several PFASs have shown significant associations with thyroid hormones. Moreover, among pregnant women and their infants, not only major PFASs such as perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid, but also those with shorter or longer carbon chains showed significant associations with thyroid hormones. Often demographic characteristics such as sex, age, and disease status appear to influence the associations between PFASs exposure and thyroid hormones. In general, major PFASs showed hypothyroidism effects among pregnant women and infants. As 8 carbon based PFASs have been phased out, those with shorter or longer carbon chains have been used in growing amount as replacement. However, only limited information is available for their occurrences and toxicity among humans. Further investigations on these substituting PFASs are required. In addition, efforts are warranted to identify sources of and mitigate exposure to these thyroid disrupting chemicals especially during pregnancy and early stages of life. PMID:28443254

  19. Comparison of the in vitro effects of TCDD, PCB 126 and PCB 153 on thyroid-restricted gene expression and thyroid hormone secretion by the chicken thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Katarzyńska, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Kowalik, Kinga; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126; a coplanar PCB congener) and 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153; non-coplanar PCB) on mRNA expression of thyroid-restricted genes, i.e. sodium iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG), and thyroid hormone secretion from the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. Relative expression levels of NIS, TG and TPO genes and thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) secretion from the thyroidal explants were quantified by the real-time qPCR and RIA methods, respectively. In comparison with the control group, TCDD and PCB 126 significantly increased mRNA expression of TPO and TG genes. TCDD did not affect NIS mRNA levels, but PCB 126 decreased its expression. No effect of PCB 153 on the expression of these genes was observed. TCDD and PCB 126 significantly decreased T4 and T3 secretion. There was no significant effect of PCB 153 on these hormone secretions. In conclusion, the results obtained show that in comparison with non-coplanar PCB 153, TCDD and coplanar PCB 126 can directly affect thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion, and in consequence, they may disrupt the endocrine function of the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thyroid hormone actions on male reproductive system of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Tovo-Neto, Aldo; da Silva Rodrigues, Maira; Habibi, Hamid R; Nóbrega, Rafael Henrique

    2018-04-17

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in the regulation of many biological processes of vertebrates, such as growth, metabolism, morphogenesis and reproduction. An increasing number of studies have been focused on the involvement of THs in the male reproductive system of vertebrates, in particular of fish. Therefore, this mini-review aims to summarize the main findings on THs role in male reproductive system of fish, focusing on sex differentiation, testicular development and spermatogenesis. The existing data in the literature have demonstrated that THs exert their roles at the different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In general a positive correlation has been shown between THs and fish reproductive status; where THs are associated with testicular development, growth and maturation. Recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of THs in spermatogenesis have been unraveled in zebrafish testis. THs promote germ cell proliferation and differentiation by increasing a stimulatory growth factor of spermatogenesis produced by Sertoli cells. In addition, THs enhanced the gonadotropin-induced androgen release in zebrafish testis. Next to their functions in the adult testis, THs are involved in the gonadal sex differentiation through modulating sex-related gene expression, and testicular development via regulation of Sertoli cell proliferation. In conclusion, this mini-review showed that THs modulate the male reproductive system during the different life stages of fish. The physiological and molecular mechanisms showed a link between the thyroid and reproduction, suggesting a possibly co-evolution and interdependence of these two systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between thyroid functions and urinary growth hormone secretion in patients with hyper- and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Murao, K; Takahara, J; Sato, M; Tamaki, M; Niimi, M; Ishida, T

    1994-10-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an important role in growth hormone (GH) synthesis and secretion. To study the relationship between thyroid function and urinary GH secretion in the hyperthyroid and hypothyroid states, we measured thyroid hormones, simultaneously with serum and urinary GH levels, in 54 patients with thyroid diseases. GH-releasing hormone (GRH) test was performed in 18 patients in order to evaluate serum and urinary GH responses to GRH in hyper- and hypothyroid states. Serum thyroid hormone levels were strongly correlated with the urinary GH levels in the patients, and the correlation was greater than that between serum thyroid hormone and serum GH levels. Urinary GH levels were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid patients than in the euthyroid and hypothyroid patients, although serum GH levels were not significantly different among these three groups. Serum GH response to GRH was significantly decreased in hyperthyroid patients as compared to euthyroid patients. However, urinary GH levels after GRH administration were not decreased in the hyperthyroid patients. These results suggest that hyperthyroid states increase GH in urine and may accelerate the urinary clearance of GH.

  2. Values of molecular markers in the differential diagnosis of thyroid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, T M P B; Rushdhi, M; Ranasinghe, A D C U; Dassanayake, R S

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid cancer (TC), follicular adenoma (FA) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are three of the most frequently reported abnormalities that affect the thyroid gland. A frequent co-occurrence along with similar histopathological features is observed between TC and FA as well as between TC and HT. The conventional diagnostic methods such as histochemical analysis present complications in differential diagnosis when these abnormalities occur simultaneously. Hence, the authors recognize novel methods based on screening genetic defects of thyroid abnormalities as viable diagnostic and prognostic methods that could complement the conventional methods. We have extensively reviewed the existing literature on TC, FA and HT and also on three genes, namely braf, nras and ret/ptc, that could be used to differentially diagnose the three abnormalities. Emphasis was also given to the screening methods available to detect the said molecular markers. It can be conferred from the analysis of the available data that the utilization of braf, nras and ret/ptc as markers for the therapeutic evaluation of FA and HT is debatable. However, molecular screening for braf, nras and ret/ptc mutations proves to be a conclusive method that could be employed to differentially diagnose TC from HT and FA in the instance of a suspected co-occurrence. Thyroid cancer patients can be highly benefited from the screening for the said genetic markers, especially the braf gene due to its diagnostic value as well as due to the availability of personalized medicine targeted specifically for braf mutants.

  3. Thyroid hormone concentrations in foals affected by perinatal asphyxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Alessandro; Panzani, Sara; Govoni, Nadia; Castagnetti, Carolina; Veronesi, Maria Cristina

    2013-10-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis has specific functions, mostly related to metabolic activities, cell differentiation, and development. To the authors' knowledge, there are no studies about thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in foals affected by perinatal asphyxia syndrome (PAS). Hence, the aims of the study are (1) to evaluate plasma TH concentrations (T3 and T4) in healthy foals during the first 7 days of life; (2) to evaluate plasma TH concentration (T3 and T4) in critically ill foals affected by PAS during the first 7 days of hospitalization; and (3) to compare TH concentrations between surviving and nonsurviving critically ill foals. Forty-five Standardbred foals were enrolled in this prospective observational study: 21 healthy foals (group 1) and 24 foals affected by PAS (group 2). Jugular blood samples were collected within 10 minutes from birth/admission and every 24 hours for 7 days (t0-t7). TH concentrations were analyzed by RIA. In both groups, T3 concentration was significantly lower at t4, t5, t6, and t7 compared with t1 (P < 0.05), and T4 concentration was significantly higher at birth than at all other time points (P < 0.01). No differences were found in TH concentrations at admission between surviving (n = 20) and nonsurviving (n = 4) foals. Statistical comparison between healthy and PAS foals divided into age groups showed significantly lower TH concentrations at t0 in PAS foals <12 hours old at admission (P < 0.01). In conclusion, PAS may cause lower T3 and T4 concentrations in affected foals than in age-matched healthy foals, as reported for other systemic illnesses, such as sepsis and prematurity. TH concentrations showed no prognostic value, which maybe due to the small number of nonsurviving foals in this study. Further studies are needed to find out if thyroid replacement therapy could be useful in the treatment of critically ill foals affected by PAS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reactivity of thyroid papillary carcinoma cells to thyroid stimulating hormone-dominated endocrine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuqin; Zhang, Xia; Wang, Yutao

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on the proliferation of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells and the therapeutic effect of levothyroxine sodium (TH). PTC cells (TPC-1) were cultured using 0.1, 1.0 and 10 U/l TSH and 10−2, 10−4 and 10−6 mol/l TH. After the appropriate concentration was screened, TPC-1 cells were further divided into control group, TSH group, TH group and TSH+TH group. The cell proliferation was detected via methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method, TPC-1 cell cycle was detected via flow cytometer, and the mRNA and protein expression of cyclin D1 were detected via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with control group, TSH significantly promoted the proliferation of TPC-1 cells (P<0.05 or P<0.01), obviously promoted the transition of TPC-1 cells from G1 phase to S phase (P<0.01) and remarkably increased the mRNA and protein expression of cyclin D1 (P<0.01); but TH had a significant inhibitory effect on these results of TSH (P<0.05 or P<0.01). TSH can promote the proliferation of PTC cells, and the appropriate complement of TH can inhibit its proliferation. PMID:29250166

  5. Myxedema coma and cardiac ischemia in relation to thyroid hormone replacement therapy in a 38-year-old Japanese woman.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Asaba, Koichi; Takao, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2007-12-01

    Although thyroid hormone deficiency, either clinical or subclinical, is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, coronary ischemia in a premenopausal woman in her 30s is relatively rare. A 38-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with severe breathlessness and depressed consciousness. Physical examination found facial, abdominal, and pretibial edema; coarse hair, hoarse voice, and dry skin; engorged jugular veins; a distant heart sound; and reduced bilateral entry of air into the chest. Laboratory examinations revealed severe hypothyroidism, hyperlipidemia, and elevated serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). A computed tomography scan showed massive pleural and pericardial effusions. After 3 months of levothyroxine replacement therapy (initial dose: 12.5 microg/d; maintenance dose: 125 microg/d), all abnormal laboratory values associated with hypothyroidism returned to within normal ranges, with the exception of a transient and paradoxical rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. However, 3 weeks after the initiation of therapy, the patient reported intermittent chest pains during the course of therapy, and a coronary artery angiogram revealed diffuse stenosis of all 3 branches. The patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, with subsequent improvement in coronary perfusion. Careful cardiovascular evaluation is recommended before the start of thyroid hormone replacement therapy. In addition, care should be taken in the interpretation of serum biomarkers of malignancy (eg, CEA, CA125) in patients with myxedema, as values may be elevated in a hypothyroid state. Long-standing hypothyroidism may be associated with severe coronary atherosclerosis, even in a relatively young, premenopausal woman. The potential adverse cardiovascular effects of thyroid hormone must be considered during replacement therapy, even in relatively young patients.

  6. Associations between Repeated Measures of Maternal Urinary Phthalate Metabolites and Thyroid Hormone Parameters during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Lauren E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maintaining thyroid homeostasis during pregnancy is essential for normal fetal growth and development. Growing evidence suggests that phthalates interfere with normal thyroid function. Few human studies have investigated the degree to which phthalates may affect thyroid hormone levels in particularly susceptible populations such as pregnant women. Objectives: We examined the associations between repeated measures of urinary phthalate metabolites and plasma thyroid hormone levels in samples collected at up to four time points per subject in pregnancy. Additionally, we investigated the potential windows of susceptibility to thyroid hormone disturbances related to study visit of sample collection. Methods: Data were obtained from pregnant women (n = 439) participating in a nested case–control study of preterm birth with 116 cases and 323 controls. We measured 9 phthalate metabolite concentrations in urine samples collected at up to four study visits per subject during pregnancy (median = 10, 18, 26, and 35 weeks of gestation, respectively). We also measured a panel of thyroid function markers in plasma collected at the same four time points per subject during pregnancy. Results: Although our results were generally null, in repeated measures analyses we observed that phthalate metabolites were largely inversely associated with thyrotropin and positively associated with free and total thyroid hormones. Cross-sectional analyses by study visit revealed that the magnitude and/or direction of these relationships varied by timing of exposure during gestation. Conclusions: These results support previous reports showing the potential for environmental phthalate exposure to alter circulating levels of thyroid hormones in pregnant women. Citation: Johns LE, Ferguson KK, McElrath TF, Mukherjee B, Meeker JD. 2016. Associations between repeated measures of maternal urinary phthalate metabolites and thyroid hormone parameters during pregnancy. Environ Health Perspect

  7. The hippocampal formation: morphological changes induced by thyroid, gonadal and adrenal hormones.

    PubMed

    Gould, E; Woolley, C S; McEwen, B S

    1991-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is of considerable interest due to its proposed role in a number of important functions, including learning and memory processes. Manipulations of thyroid, gonadal and adrenal hormones have been shown to influence hippocampal physiology as well as learning and memory. The cellular events which underlie these hormone-induced functional changes are largely unexplored. However, studies suggest that hormonal manipulations during development and in adulthood result in dramatic morphological changes within the hippocampal formation. Because neuronal physiology has been suggested to depend upon neuronal morphology, we have been determining the morphologic sensitivity of hippocampal neurons to thyroid and steroid hormones in an effort to elucidate possible structural mechanisms to account for differences in hippocampal function. In this review, hormone-induced structural changes in the developing and adult hippocampal formation are discussed, with particular emphasis on their functional relevance. Sex differences, as well as the developmental effects of thyroid hormone and glucocorticoids, are described. Moreover, the effects of ovarian steroids, thyroid hormone and glucocorticoids on neuronal morphology in the hippocampal formation of the adult rat are reviewed. These hormone-induced structural changes may account, at least in part, for previously reported hormone-induced changes in hippocampal function.

  8. The effect of vasopressin on hormone secretion and blood flow from the thyroid vein in sheep with exteriorized thyroids.

    PubMed

    Falconer, I R

    1968-12-01

    1. Vasopressin has been shown to activate the thyroid in some species, and also to be released into the bloodstream after emotional and other stresses.2. Emotional stimuli applied to sheep have previously been shown to increase thyroid secretion and the possible influence of vasopressin in this process has been investigated. Sheep bearing exteriorized thyroid glands were used, so that thyroid vein blood could be collected in undisturbed conscious animals.3. (125)I or (131)I (50 muc) was injected I.M. into the sheep; 4-7 days later, samples of thyroid vein blood were collected at 10 min intervals for 4 hr, and the concentration of total and protein bound (125)I or (131)I was measured. Intravenous infusions of 0.3, 3.0 or 31 m-u./min arginine or lysine vasopressin, or close arterial infusions of 3.0 or 31 m-u./min arginine vasopressin were administered 1.5 hr after commencement of blood sampling. Blood flow from the thyroid was measured by a plethysmographic technique during similar experiments.4. No significant changes in thyroid hormone secretion were observed as a result of vasopressin infusion, and it was concluded that vasopressin release does not play a part in the activation of the thyroid resulting from emotional stimulus in the sheep.

  9. Predictive Modeling of a Mixture of Thyroid Hormone Disrupting Chemicals that Affect Production and Clearance of Thyroxine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) disrupting compounds interfere with both thyroidal and extrathyroidal mechanisms to decrease circulating thyroxine (T4). This research tested the hypothesis that serum T4 concentrations of rodents exposed to a mixture of both TH synthesis inhibitors (pesticid...

  10. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  11. Alien/CSN2 gene expression is regulated by thyroid hormone in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tenbaum, Stephan P; Juenemann, Stefan; Schlitt, Thomas; Bernal, Juan; Renkawitz, Rainer; Muñoz, Alberto; Baniahmad, Aria

    2003-02-01

    Alien has been described as a corepressor for the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). Corepressors are coregulators that mediate gene silencing of DNA-bound transcriptional repressors. We describe here that Alien gene expression in vivo is regulated by thyroid hormone both in the rat brain and in cultured cells. In situ hybridization revealed that Alien is widely expressed in the mouse embryo and also throughout the rat brain. Hypothyroid animals exhibit lower expression of both Alien mRNAs and protein levels as compared with normal animals. Accordingly, we show that Alien gene is inducible after thyroid hormone treatment both in vivo and in cell culture. In cultured cells, the hormonal induction is mediated by either TRalpha or TRbeta, while cells lacking detectable amounts of functional TR lack hormonal induction of Alien. We have detected two Alien-specific mRNAs by Northern experiments and two Alien-specific proteins in vivo and in cell lines by Western analysis, one of the two forms representing the CSN2 subunit of the COP9 signalosome. Interestingly, both Alien mRNAs and both detected proteins are regulated by thyroid hormone in vivo and in cell lines. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the existence of at least two Alien genes in rodents. Taken together, we conclude that Alien gene expression is under control of TR and thyroid hormone. This suggests a negative feedback mechanism between TR and its own corepressor. Thus, the reduction of corepressor levels may represent a control mechanism of TR-mediated gene silencing.

  12. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Mutation Causes a Severe and Thyroxine-Resistant Skeletal Dysplasia in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, J. H. Duncan; Boyde, Alan; Zikmund, Tomas; Evans, Holly; Croucher, Peter I.; Zhu, Xuguang; Park, Jeong Won

    2014-01-01

    A new genetic disorder has been identified that results from mutation of THRA, encoding thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1). Affected children have a high serum T3:T4 ratio and variable degrees of intellectual deficit and constipation but exhibit a consistently severe skeletal dysplasia. In an attempt to improve developmental delay and alleviate symptoms of hypothyroidism, patients are receiving varying doses and durations of T4 treatment, but responses have been inconsistent so far. Thra1PV/+ mice express a similar potent dominant-negative mutant TRα1 to affected individuals, and thus represent an excellent disease model. We hypothesized that Thra1PV/+ mice could be used to predict the skeletal outcome of human THRA mutations and determine whether prolonged treatment with a supraphysiological dose of T4 ameliorates the skeletal abnormalities. Adult female Thra1PV/+ mice had short stature, grossly abnormal bone morphology but normal bone strength despite high bone mass. Although T4 treatment suppressed TSH secretion, it had no effect on skeletal maturation, linear growth, or bone mineralization, thus demonstrating profound tissue resistance to thyroid hormone. Despite this, prolonged T4 treatment abnormally increased bone stiffness and strength, suggesting the potential for detrimental consequences in the long term. Our studies establish that TRα1 has an essential role in the developing and adult skeleton and predict that patients with different THRA mutations will display variable responses to T4 treatment, which depend on the severity of the causative mutation. PMID:24914936

  13. Thyroid hormones determine developmental mode in sand dollars (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Reitzel, Adam M; Hodin, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions in larval nutritional mode have occurred on numerous occasions independently in many marine invertebrate phyla. Although the evolutionary transition from feeding to nonfeeding development has received considerable attention through both experimental and theoretical studies, mechanisms underlying the change in life history remain poorly understood. Facultative feeding larvae (larvae that can feed but will complete metamorphosis without food) presumably represent an intermediate developmental mode between obligate feeding and nonfeeding. Here we show that an obligatorily feeding larva can be transformed into a facultative feeding larva when exposed to the thyroid hormone thyroxine. We report that larvae of the subtropical sand dollar Leodia sexiesperforata (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) completed metamorphosis without exogenous food when treated with thyroxine, whereas the starved controls (no thyroxine added) did not. Leodia sexiesperforata juveniles from the thyroxine treatment were viable after metamorphosis but were significantly smaller and contained less energy than sibling juveniles reared with exogenous food. In a second starvation experiment, using an L. sexiesperforata female whose eggs were substantially larger than in the first experiment (202+/-5 vs. 187+/-5 microm), a small percentage of starved L. sexiesperforata larvae completed metamorphosis in the absence of food. Still, thyroxine-treated larvae in this experiment completed metamorphosis faster and in much higher numbers than in the starved controls. Furthermore, starved larvae of the sand dollar Mellita tenuis, which developed from much smaller eggs (100+/-2 microm), did not complete metamorphosis either with or without excess thyroxine. Based on these data, and from recent experiments with other echinoids, we hypothesize that thyroxine plays a major role in echinoderm metamorphosis and the evolution of life history transitions in this group. We discuss our results in the

  14. Periods of sensitivity to thyroid hormone during the development of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Uziel, A

    1986-01-01

    Cochlear structures are sensitive to the morphogenetic effect of thyroid hormone during the whole duration of maturation. For each structure, there exists a period of maximal sensitivity to thyroid hormone which corresponds to the period of development during which the structure of interest undergoes its main morphological changes (6 to 13 days for the inner sulcus epithelium, 6 to 10 days for the pillars, the 2nd and a part of the 3rd postnatal week for OHCs and their efferent innervation in rats). These periods of sensitivity can be considered as critical periods because cochlear structures are maximally vulnerable to thyroid deficiency during these periods.

  15. Plurihormonal pituitary adenoma immunoreactive for thyroid-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin.

    PubMed

    Luk, Cynthia T; Kovacs, Kalman; Rotondo, Fabio; Horvath, Eva; Cusimano, Michael; Booth, Gillian L

    2012-01-01

    To describe the case of a patient with an unusual plurihormonal pituitary adenoma with immunoreactivity for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), growth hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and α-subunit. We report the clinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathology findings of a patient symptomatic from a plurihormonal pituitary adenoma and describe her outcome after surgical treatment. A 60-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with headaches, blurry vision, fatigue, palpitations, sweaty hands, and weight loss. Her medical history was notable for hyperthyroidism, treated intermittently with methimazole. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a pituitary macroadenoma (2.3 by 2.2 by 2.0 cm), and preoperative blood studies revealed elevated levels of TSH at 6.11 mIU/L, free thyroxine at 3.6 ng/dL, and free triiodothyronine at 6.0 pg/mL. She underwent an uncomplicated transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma. Immunostaining of tumor tissue demonstrated positivity for not only TSH but also growth hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and α-subunit. The Ki-67 index of the tumor was estimated at 2% to 5%, and DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase immunostaining was mostly negative. Electron microscopy showed the ultrastructural phenotype of a glycoprotein-producing adenoma. Postoperatively, her symptoms and hyperthyroidism resolved. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas are rare. Furthermore, recent reports suggest that 31% to 36% of adenomas may show evidence of secretion of multiple pituitary hormones. This case emphasizes the importance of considering pituitary causes of thyrotoxicosis and summarizes the clinical and pathology findings in a patient with a plurihormonal pituitary adenoma.

  16. Effects of Sample Handling and Analytical Procedures on Thyroid Hormone Concentrations in Pregnant Women's Plasma.

    PubMed

    Villanger, Gro Dehli; Learner, Emily; Longnecker, Matthew P; Ask, Helga; Aase, Heidi; Zoeller, R Thomas; Knudsen, Gun P; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Zeiner, Pål; Engel, Stephanie M

    2017-05-01

    Maternal thyroid function is a critical mediator of fetal brain development. Pregnancy-related physiologic changes and handling conditions of blood samples may influence thyroid hormone biomarkers. We investigated the reliability of thyroid hormone biomarkers in plasma of pregnant women under various handling conditions. We enrolled 17 pregnant women; collected serum and plasma were immediately frozen. Additional plasma aliquots were subjected to different handling conditions before the analysis of thyroid biomarkers: storage at room temperature for 24 or 48 hours before freezing and an extra freeze-thaw cycle. We estimated free thyroid hormone indices in plasma based on T3 uptake. High correlations between plasma and serum (>0.94) and intraclass correlation coefficients for plasma handling conditions (0.96 to 1.00) indicated excellent reliability for all thyroid hormone biomarkers. Delayed freezing and freeze-thaw cycles did not affect reliability of biomarkers of thyroid function in plasma during pregnancy. See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B180.

  17. Thyroid hormone stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism via activation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; You, Seo-Hee; Zhou, Jin; Siddique, Mobin M.; Bay, Boon-Huat; Zhu, Xuguang; Privalsky, Martin L.; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Stevens, Robert D.; Summers, Scott A.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Lazar, Mitchell A.; Yen, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, thyroid hormones (THs) have been known to exert powerful catabolic effects, leading to weight loss. Although much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms used by TH receptors (TRs) to regulate gene expression, little is known about the mechanisms by which THs increase oxidative metabolism. Here, we report that TH stimulation of fatty acid β-oxidation is coupled with induction of hepatic autophagy to deliver fatty acids to mitochondria in cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of autophagy by autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) siRNA markedly decreased TH-mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in cell culture and in vivo. Consistent with this model, autophagy was altered in livers of mice expressing a mutant TR that causes resistance to the actions of TH as well as in mice with mutant nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). These results demonstrate that THs can regulate lipid homeostasis via autophagy and help to explain how THs increase oxidative metabolism. PMID:22684107

  18. Maternal thyroid hormones are essential for neural development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Saraiva, João; Florindo, Claudia; Power, Deborah M

    2014-07-01

    Teleost eggs contain an abundant store of maternal thyroid hormones (THs), and early in zebrafish embryonic development, all the genes necessary for TH signaling are expressed. Nonetheless the function of THs in embryonic development remains elusive. To test the hypothesis that THs are fundamental for zebrafish embryonic development, an monocarboxilic transporter 8 (Mct8) knockdown strategy was deployed to prevent maternal TH uptake. Absence of maternal THs did not affect early specification of the neural epithelia but profoundly modified later dorsal specification of the brain and spinal cord as well as specific neuron differentiation. Maternal THs acted upstream of pax2a, pax7, and pax8 genes but downstream of shha and fgf8a signaling. The lack of inhibitory spinal cord interneurons and increased motoneurons in the mct8 morphants is consistent with their stiff axial body and impaired mobility. The mct8 mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation in humans, and the cellular and molecular consequences of MCT8 knockdown during embryonic development in zebrafish provides new insight into the potential role of THs in this condition.

  19. Maternal Thyroid Hormones Are Essential for Neural Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Florindo, Claudia; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost eggs contain an abundant store of maternal thyroid hormones (THs), and early in zebrafish embryonic development, all the genes necessary for TH signaling are expressed. Nonetheless the function of THs in embryonic development remains elusive. To test the hypothesis that THs are fundamental for zebrafish embryonic development, an monocarboxilic transporter 8 (Mct8) knockdown strategy was deployed to prevent maternal TH uptake. Absence of maternal THs did not affect early specification of the neural epithelia but profoundly modified later dorsal specification of the brain and spinal cord as well as specific neuron differentiation. Maternal THs acted upstream of pax2a, pax7, and pax8 genes but downstream of shha and fgf8a signaling. The lack of inhibitory spinal cord interneurons and increased motoneurons in the mct8 morphants is consistent with their stiff axial body and impaired mobility. The mct8 mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation in humans, and the cellular and molecular consequences of MCT8 knockdown during embryonic development in zebrafish provides new insight into the potential role of THs in this condition. PMID:24877564

  20. Guidelines for the Treatment of Hypothyroidism: Prepared by the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Thyroid Hormone Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Antonio C.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Burman, Kenneth D.; Cappola, Anne R.; Celi, Francesco S.; Cooper, David S.; Kim, Brian W.; Peeters, Robin P.; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sawka, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Methods: Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. Results: We reviewed the

  1. Guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism: prepared by the american thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

    PubMed

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Bianco, Antonio C; Bauer, Andrew J; Burman, Kenneth D; Cappola, Anne R; Celi, Francesco S; Cooper, David S; Kim, Brian W; Peeters, Robin P; Rosenthal, M Sara; Sawka, Anna M

    2014-12-01

    A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. We reviewed the following therapeutic

  2. Serum thyrotropin and thyroid hormone levels in elderly and middle-aged euthyroid persons.

    PubMed

    Hershman, J M; Pekary, A E; Berg, L; Solomon, D H; Sawin, C T

    1993-08-01

    To determine whether serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels are altered in euthyroid older persons compared with middle-aged adults. Serum TSH and thyroid hormone levels were measured in a large group of older persons (> 70 years old, n = 216) and their middle-aged offspring (40-60 years old, n = 211) after excluding those with clinical or historical evidence of thyroid disease or abnormal thyroid function. Serum TSH, thyroxine (T4), free T4 index, estimated free T4, triiodothyronine (T3), estimated free T3, and ferritin levels were measured on the Abbott IMx instrument. Peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured by radioimmunoassay using Kronus kits. Overall, serum TSH showed a log-normal distribution. The geometric mean TSH (mU/L) and 95% confidence limits in the older persons, 1.24 (0.29-5.4), did not differ significantly from that in the middle-aged, 1.45 (0.54-3.9). The mean TSH in the 264 women, 1.37 (0.34-5.5), was similar to that of the 163 men, 1.30 (0.48-3.5). The mean TSH in older women, 1.21 (0.22-6.6), was slightly but significantly lower than that in middle-aged women, 1.52 (0.55-4.2). However, when euthyroid women with positive antibodies were excluded, this difference was not significant. Four of the 123 older women had TSH < 0.1 mU/L, but none of the men or middle-aged women had a suppressed serum TSH. The mean TSH in older men, 1.28 (0.43-3.8), was similar to that in middle-aged men, 1.32 (0.55-3.2). Free T4 was slightly higher in older women than middle-aged women. There were no significant correlations between TSH and any thyroid hormone level. Serum ferritin, measured as a potential marker for the action of thyroid hormone, did not correlate with any measure of thyroid function. At least one antibody level was > 10 U/mL in 14.6% of older women, 15.6% of middle-aged women, 4.3% of older men, and no middle-aged men. When those with milder elevations of antibody levels were included (at least one level > 1 U/mL), the prevalence was 32% of older

  3. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  4. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C; Miller, Mark D; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Liaw, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000-2003, a period when much of the area's water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = -0.70; 95% CI: -1.06, -0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = -0.053; 95% CI: -0.092, -0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC, Miller MD, Pearce EN, Valentin-Blasini L, DeLorenze G, Hoofnagle AN, Liaw J. 2016. Thyroid

  5. Developmental and cell-specific expression of thyroid hormone transporters in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sharlin, David S; Visser, Theo J; Forrest, Douglas

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the development of the cochlea and auditory function. Cochlear response tissues, which express thyroid hormone receptor β (encoded by Thrb), include the greater epithelial ridge and sensory epithelium residing inside the bony labyrinth. However, these response tissues lack direct blood flow, implying that mechanisms exist to shuttle hormone from the circulation to target tissues. Therefore, we investigated expression of candidate thyroid hormone transporters L-type amino acid transporter 1 (Lat1), monocarboxylate transporter (Mct)8, Mct10, and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 (Oatp1c1) in mouse cochlear development by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence analysis. L-type amino acid transporter 1 localized to cochlear blood vessels and transiently to sensory hair cells. Mct8 localized to the greater epithelial ridge, tympanic border cells underlying the sensory epithelium, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and spiral ganglion neurons, partly overlapping with the Thrb expression pattern. Mct10 was detected in a highly restricted pattern in the outer sulcus epithelium and weakly in tympanic border cells and hair cells. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 localized primarily to fibrocytes in vascularized tissues of the spiral limbus and spiral ligament and to tympanic border cells. Investigation of hypothyroid Tshr(-/-) mice showed that transporter expression was delayed consistent with retardation of cochlear tissue maturation but not with compensatory responses to hypothyroidism. The results demonstrate specific expression of thyroid hormone transporters in the cochlea and suggest that a network of thyroid hormone transport underlies cochlear development.

  6. Developmental and Cell-Specific Expression of Thyroid Hormone Transporters in the Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Sharlin, David S.; Visser, Theo J.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the development of the cochlea and auditory function. Cochlear response tissues, which express thyroid hormone receptor β (encoded by Thrb), include the greater epithelial ridge and sensory epithelium residing inside the bony labyrinth. However, these response tissues lack direct blood flow, implying that mechanisms exist to shuttle hormone from the circulation to target tissues. Therefore, we investigated expression of candidate thyroid hormone transporters L-type amino acid transporter 1 (Lat1), monocarboxylate transporter (Mct)8, Mct10, and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 (Oatp1c1) in mouse cochlear development by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence analysis. L-type amino acid transporter 1 localized to cochlear blood vessels and transiently to sensory hair cells. Mct8 localized to the greater epithelial ridge, tympanic border cells underlying the sensory epithelium, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and spiral ganglion neurons, partly overlapping with the Thrb expression pattern. Mct10 was detected in a highly restricted pattern in the outer sulcus epithelium and weakly in tympanic border cells and hair cells. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 localized primarily to fibrocytes in vascularized tissues of the spiral limbus and spiral ligament and to tympanic border cells. Investigation of hypothyroid Tshr−/− mice showed that transporter expression was delayed consistent with retardation of cochlear tissue maturation but not with compensatory responses to hypothyroidism. The results demonstrate specific expression of thyroid hormone transporters in the cochlea and suggest that a network of thyroid hormone transport underlies cochlear development. PMID:21878515

  7. Optimized FPGA Implementation of the Thyroid Hormone Secretion Mechanism Using CAD Tools.

    PubMed

    Alghazo, Jaafar M

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to implement the secretion mechanism of the Thyroid Hormone (TH) based on bio-mathematical differential eqs. (DE) on an FPGA chip. Hardware Descriptive Language (HDL) is used to develop a behavioral model of the mechanism derived from the DE. The Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism is simulated with the interaction of the related stimulating and inhibiting hormones. Synthesis of the simulation is done with the aid of CAD tools and downloaded on a Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) Chip. The chip output shows identical behavior to that of the designed algorithm through simulation. It is concluded that the chip mimics the Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism. The chip, operating in real-time, is computer-independent stand-alone system.

  8. Type 3 deiodinase deficiency results in functional abnormalities at multiple levels of the thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Arturo; Martinez, M Elena; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Van Sande, Jacqueline; Refetoff, Samuel; Galton, Valerie Anne; St Germain, Donald L

    2007-12-01

    The type 3 deiodinase (D3) is a selenoenzyme that inactivates thyroid hormones and is highly expressed during development and in the adult central nervous system. We have recently observed that mice lacking D3 activity (D3KO mice) develop perinatal thyrotoxicosis followed in adulthood by a pattern of hormonal levels that is suggestive of central hypothyroidism. In this report we describe the results of additional studies designed to investigate the regulation of the thyroid axis in this unique animal model. Our results demonstrate that the thyroid and pituitary glands of D3KO mice do not respond appropriately to TSH and TRH stimulation, respectively. Furthermore, after induction of severe hypothyroidism by antithyroid treatment, the rise in serum TSH in D3KO mice is only 15% of that observed in wild-type mice. In addition, D3KO animals rendered severely hypothyroid fail to show the expected increase in prepro-TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Finally, treatment with T(3) results in a serum T(3) level in D3KO mice that is much higher than that in wild-type mice. This is accompanied by significant weight loss and lethality in mutant animals. In conclusion, the absence of D3 activity results in impaired clearance of T(3) and significant defects in the mechanisms regulating the thyroid axis at all levels: hypothalamus, pituitary, and thyroid.

  9. Action of specific thyroid hormone receptor α(1) and β(1) antagonists in the central and peripheral regulation of thyroid hormone metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    van Beeren, Hermina C; Kwakkel, Joan; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2012-12-01

    The iodine-containing drug amiodarone (Amio) and its noniodine containing analogue dronedarone (Dron) are potent antiarrhythmic drugs. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the major metabolite of Amio, desethylamiodarone, acts as a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α(1) and β(1) antagonist, whereas the major metabolite of Dron debutyldronedarone acts as a selective TRα(1) antagonist. In the present study, Amio and Dron were used as tools to discriminate between TRα(1) or TRβ(1) regulated genes in central and peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Three groups of male rats received either Amio, Dron, or vehicle by daily intragastric administration for 2 weeks. We assessed the effects of treatment on triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)) plasma and tissue concentrations, deiodinase type 1, 2, and 3 mRNA expressions and activities, and thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10), and organic anion transporter 1C1 (OATP1C1). Amio treatment decreased serum T(3), while serum T(4) and thyrotropin (TSH) increased compared to Dron-treated and control rats. At the central level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, Amio treatment decreased hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression, while increasing pituitary TSHβ and MCT10 mRNA expression. Amio decreased the pituitary D2 activity. By contrast, Dron treatment resulted in decreased hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression only. Upon Amio treatment, liver T(3) concentration decreased substantially compared to Dron and control rats (50%, p<0.01), but liver T(4) concentration was unaffected. In addition, liver D1, mRNA, and activity decreased, while the D3 activity and mRNA increased. Liver MCT8, MCT10, and OATP1C1 mRNA expression were similar between groups. Our results suggest an important role for TRα1 in the regulation of hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression, whereas TRβ plays a dominant role in pituitary and liver thyroid

  10. Combined Growth Hormone and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Deficiency in a Japanese Patient with a Novel Frameshift Mutation in IGSF1.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yumi; Abe, Kiyomi; Muroya, Koji; Hanakawa, Junko; Oto, Yuji; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Adachi, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated that loss-of-function mutations in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 gene (IGSF1, OMIM 300888) cause congenital central hypothyroidism with macroorchidism. We conducted a next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation screening for pituitary hormone deficiencies to elucidate molecular mechanisms other than anatomical abnormalities of the pituitary that might be responsible for multiple anterior hormone deficiency in a male patient who originally visited our institute complaining of short stature. He was born large for gestational age (4,370 g, +3.0 SD) after an obstructed labour. Endocrinological evaluation revealed growth hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a discontinuity of the pituitary stalk with an ectopic posterior lobe and a hypoplastic anterior lobe, likely explaining multiple anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. We identified a novel hemizygous IGSF1 mutation (c.1137_1138delCA, p.Asn380Glnfs*6) in the patient. In reviewing the literature, we noticed that all reported Japanese male IGSF1 mutation carriers were born larger than mean standards for gestational age (mean birth weight SD score of +2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0-3.0). This case suggests that more attention should be paid to intrauterine growth and birth history when patients are suspected of having an IGSF1 mutation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Persistence of a circadian rhythmicity for thyroid hormones in plasma and thyroid of hibernating male Rana ridibunda.

    PubMed

    Kühn, E R; Delmotte, N M; Darras, V M

    1983-06-01

    The presence and circadian rhythmicity of thyroid hormones was studied in plasma and the thyroid gland of male Rana ridibunda before and during hibernation. Hibernating January frogs do have a lower T3 and T4 content of their thyroid gland whereas plasma levels of T3 are maintained and of T4 increased compared to fed September or October frogs. It seems likely that the increased photoperiod in January will be responsible for this increased T4 secretion, since controlled laboratory experiments performed in December did not reveal any influence of low temperature on circulating T3 or T4 levels. Also feeding does not influence circulating levels and thyroid content of thyroid hormones in frogs kept at room temperature during the month of January. A circadian rhythmicity of T3 and T4 in the thyroid gland is present in fed October frogs and in non fed December frogs acclimated at 5 degrees C for 12 days with an acrophase for T3 at approximately 1500 h and for T4 at around 1900 h, whereas in plasma only T3 does have circadian variations (acrophase about midnight) but not T4. When December frogs are acclimated to room temperature for 12 days, frogs are active again, but do not eat and have a lower body weight than frogs hibernating at 5 degrees C. Their T3 content of the thyroid gland has disappeared, but T4 thyroid content and plasma levels of T3 and T4 are maintained. As in hibernating frogs, no circadian variations in T4 plasma concentrations are present whereas the circadian thyroid T4 rhythm disappears. At the same time a dampening in rhythmicity for plasma T3 as judged by the significantly lower amplitude occurs. It is concluded that the persistence of circulating levels of thyroid hormones and of a circadian cyclicity for T3 in plasma in non feeding hibernating frogs may reflect the special metabolic state e.g. availability of food reserves in these animals.

  12. Thyroid hormone use: trends in the United States from 1960 through 1988.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, S C; Gross, T P; Kennedy, D L

    1991-01-01

    Thyroid hormone preparations comprised over 1% of all prescriptions filled by retail pharmacies during 1988 in the conterminous United States, i.e., the 48 contiguous states. Their large market share gives the patterns of their use substantial public health importance. This article describes prescription thyroid hormone use in the United States from 1960 through 1988, using pharmaceutical marketing research data collected from panels of retail pharmacies and office-based physicians. Although the use of natural products has declined by over 50% since 1960, about one fourth of all thyroid hormone prescriptions were for natural preparations as recently as 1988. Per capita thyroid mentions (i.e., patient-physician contacts during which a thyroid agent of any kind was recommended, prescribed, dispensed, administered, ordered to be given by a hospital, or given as a sample) doubled during this period among those over 59 years old. Per capita mentions for synthetic thyroid products increased fourfold and tenfold among men and women in this age group, respectively. Use for weight loss, despite the label's boxed warning indicating it to be ineffective and potentially dangerous, has diminished but persists. Obesity was second only to hypothyroidism among the diagnoses underlying thyroid product mentions.

  13. SEX-STEROID AND THYROID HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE LAKES IN FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-...

  14. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)-synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA-responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1-expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and cognition in older people.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Anna K; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Tilvis, Reijo S; Strandberg, Timo E

    2016-01-01

    high TSH concentrations and cognitive decline are both very common among older people and could be linked. to assess cognition in our cohort of 335 home-dwelling older people (75 years and older) and to cross-sectionally relate the results to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. Our special focus was on the upper normal TSH range and subclinical hypothyroidism. cognitive performance was evaluated using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-nb). The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale was used to evaluate severity of cognitive disorder. The APOEε4 genotype was also defined. Subjects were divided into quartiles based on the TSH concentrations, and results were compared between these groups. expected relations were observed between CERAD domains and both educational level and APOEε4 genotype. Female sex significantly associated with better performance in Boston naming (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.27-0.85). In the whole cohort, higher TSH concentrations tended to associate with better scores in most parts of the CERAD-nb tests, but differences were not statistically significant. However, subjects with the highest TSH concentration (90th TSH percentile, range 4.14-14.4 mU/l) had better CDR scores compared with subjects with the lowest TSH concentration (10th percentile, range 0.001-0.63 mIU/l; OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.014-0.76). our results do not support the notion that higher TSH concentrations, not even in the range of subclinical hypothyroidism, would adversely affect cognition among older people. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Change of body height is regulated by thyroid hormone during metamorphosis in flatfishes and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Ke, Zhonghe; Xia, Jianhong; He, Fang; Bao, Baolong

    2016-09-15

    Flatfishes with more body height after metamorphosis should be better adapted to a benthic lifestyle. In this study, we quantified the changes in body height during metamorphosis in two flatfish species, Paralichthys olivaceus and Platichthys stellatus. The specific pattern of cell proliferation along the dorsal and ventral edge of the body to allow fast growth along the dorsal/ventral axis might be related to the change of body height. Thyroid hormone (T4 and T3) and its receptors showed distribution or gene expression patterns similar to those seen for the cell proliferation. 2-Mercapto-1-methylimidazole, an inhibitor of endogenous thyroid hormone synthesis, inhibited cell proliferation and decreased body height, suggesting that the change in body shape was dependent on the local concentration of thyroid hormone to induce cell proliferation. In addition, after treatment with 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole, zebrafish larvae were also shown to develop a slimmer body shape. These findings enrich our knowledge of the role of thyroid hormone during flatfish metamorphosis, and the role of thyroid hormone during the change of body height during post-hatching development should help us to understand better the biology of metamorphosis in fishes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional analysis of a proline to serine mutation in codon 453 of the thyroid hormone receptor {beta}1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ozata, M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Takeda, Teiji

    Mutations in the gene encoding human thyroid hormone receptor {beta}(hTR{beta}) have been associated with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH). This disorder is associated with significant behavoral abnormalities. We examined the hTR{beta} gene in a family with members who manifest inappropriately normal TSH, elevated free T{sub 4}, and free and total T{sub 3}. Sequence analysis showed a cytosine to thymine transition at nucleotide 1642 in one allele of the index patient`s genomic DNA. This altered proline to serine at codon 453. The resulting mutant receptor when expressed in vitro bound DNA with high affinity, but the T{sub 3} affinity ofmore » the receptor was impaired. The mutant TR demonstrated a dominant negative effect when cotransfected with two isoforms of wild-type receptor and also in the presence of TR variant {alpha}2 in COS-1 cells. Mutations of codon 453 occur more frequently than at other sites, and four different amino acid substitutions have been reported. Significant differences in phenotype occur among affected individuals, varying from normality to moderately severe GRTH. There is no clear correlation between K{sub a} or in vitro function of the mutant receptor, and phenotype. This study extends the association between GRTH and illness, and indicates that early diagnosis and counseling are needed in families with TR{beta}1 abnormalities. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  18. BRAFV600E mutation contributes papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hashimoto thyroiditis with resistance to thyroid hormone: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Wanjia; Liu, Xiaohong; He, Qingqing; Zhang, Zongjing; Jiang, Zhaoshun

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal hereditary disorder characterized by increased serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels with unsuppressed or increased thyrotropin concentration. It remains unknown whether the coexistence of RTH with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is incidental or whether it possesses a genetic or pathophysiological association. In the present study, a case of RTH with PTC and HT in an 11-year-old Chinese patient was examined and the clinical presentation of RTH with PTC was discussed. In addition, the possible associations between RTH, PTC and HT were determined. HT was confirmed in the patient using an autoimmune assay and thyroid ultrasound. RTH was diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations, laboratory information and gene analysis, and PTC was diagnosed according to histological results. Results of BRAFV600E mutation analysis were positive. A literature review of 14 cases of RTH with PTC was included for comparison. The present case report indicates an association of RTH with PTC and HT coexistence in the patient. Close follow-up, histological evaluation and BRAFV600E mutation detection should be performed in each RTH case with HT, since a persistent increase in TSH may be a risk factor for the development of thyroid neoplasm. PMID:28928829

  19. BRAFV600E mutation contributes papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hashimoto thyroiditis with resistance to thyroid hormone: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wanjia; Liu, Xiaohong; He, Qingqing; Zhang, Zongjing; Jiang, Zhaoshun

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal hereditary disorder characterized by increased serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels with unsuppressed or increased thyrotropin concentration. It remains unknown whether the coexistence of RTH with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is incidental or whether it possesses a genetic or pathophysiological association. In the present study, a case of RTH with PTC and HT in an 11-year-old Chinese patient was examined and the clinical presentation of RTH with PTC was discussed. In addition, the possible associations between RTH, PTC and HT were determined. HT was confirmed in the patient using an autoimmune assay and thyroid ultrasound. RTH was diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations, laboratory information and gene analysis, and PTC was diagnosed according to histological results. Results of BRAF V600E mutation analysis were positive. A literature review of 14 cases of RTH with PTC was included for comparison. The present case report indicates an association of RTH with PTC and HT coexistence in the patient. Close follow-up, histological evaluation and BRAF V600E mutation detection should be performed in each RTH case with HT, since a persistent increase in TSH may be a risk factor for the development of thyroid neoplasm.

  20. Thyroid hormonal disturbances related to treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-alpha and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cassia; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Zambrini, Heverton; Marui, Suemi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize thyroid disturbances induced by interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. INTRODUCTION: Interferon-alpha is used to treat chronic hepatitis C infections. This compound commonly induces both autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. METHODS: We prospectively selected 26 patients with chronic hepatitis C infections. Clinical examinations, hormonal evaluations, and color-flow Doppler ultrasonography of the thyroid were performed before and during antiviral therapy. RESULTS: Of the patients in our study, 54% had no thyroid disorders associated with the interferon-alpha therapy but showed reduced levels of total T3 along with a decrease in serum alanine aminotransferase. Total T4 levels were also reduced at 3 and 12 months, but free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels remained stable. A total of 19% of the subjects had autoimmune interferon-induced thyroiditis, which is characterized by an emerge of antithyroid antibodies or overt hypothyroidism. Additionally, 16% had non-autoimmune thyroiditis, which presents as destructive thyroiditis or subclinical hypothyroidism, and 11% remained in a state of euthyroidism despite the prior existence of antithyroidal antibodies. Thyrotoxicosis with destructive thyroiditis was diagnosed within three months of therapy, and ultrasonography of these patients revealed thyroid shrinkage and discordant change in the vascular patterns. DISCUSSION: Decreases in the total T3 and total T4 levels may be related to improvements in the hepatocellular lesions or inflammatory changes similar to those associated with nonthyroidal illnesses. The immune mechanisms and direct effects of interferon-alpha can be associated with thyroiditis. CONCLUSION: Interferon-alpha and ribavirin induce autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis and hormonal changes (such as decreased total T3 and total T4 levels), which occur despite stable free T4 and TSH levels. A thyroid hormonal evaluation

  1. Thyroid function abnormalities and cognitive impairment in elderly people: results of the Invecchiare in Chianti study.

    PubMed

    Ceresini, Graziano; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Morganti, Simonetta; Usberti, Elisa; Chezzi, Carlo; Valcavi, Rita; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M; Cappola, Anne R; Valenti, Giorgio; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate thyroid function testing abnormalities in older persons and to explore the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and cognition. Cross-sectional. Community-based. One thousand one hundred seventy-one men and women aged 23 to 102. Thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma concentrations of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3). Cognition was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Prevalence of overt and subclinical thyroid dysfunction was evaluated in different age groups (<65 vs > or =65). Age trends in TSH, FT4, and FT3 were examined in euthyroid participants. The cross-sectional association between thyroid dysfunction and MMSE score was evaluated adjusting for confounders. Subclinical hypothyroidism and subclinical hyperthyroidism were more prevalent in older than in younger participants (subclinical hypothyroidism, 3.5% vs 0.4%, P<.03; subclinical hyperthyroidism, 7.8% vs 1.9%, P<.002). In euthyroid participants, TSH and FT3 declined with age, whereas FT4 increased. Older participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism had lower MMSE scores than euthyroid subjects (22.61+/-6.88 vs 24.72+/-4.52, P<.03). In adjusted analyses, participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism were significantly more likely to have cognitive dysfunction (hazard rate=2.26, P=.003). Subtle age-related changes in FT3, FT4, and TSH occur in individuals who remain euthyroid. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is the most prevalent thyroid dysfunction in Italian older persons and is associated with cognitive impairment.

  2. Transcriptomic and phenotypic profiling in developing zebrafish exposed to thyroid hormone receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, Derik E.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Waters, Katrina M.

    There is a need to develop novel, high-throughput screening and prioritization methods to identify chemicals with adverse estrogen, androgen, and thyroid activity to protect human health and the environment and is of interest to the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The current aim is to explore the utility of zebrafish as a testing paradigm to classify endocrine activity using phenotypically anchored transcriptome profiling. Transcriptome analysis was conducted on embryos exposed to 25 estrogen-, androgen-, or thyroid-active chemicals at a concentration that elicited adverse malformations or mortality at 120 hours post-fertilization in 80% of the animals exposed. Analysis of the top 1000more » significant differentially expressed transcripts across all treatments identified a unique transcriptional and phenotypic profile for thyroid hormone receptor agonists, which can be used as a biomarker screen for potential thyroid hormone agonists.« less

  3. Graves' disease: an analysis of thyroid hormone levels and hyperthyroid signs and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Trzepacz, P T; Klein, I; Roberts, M; Greenhouse, J; Levey, G S

    1989-11-01

    Assessment of disease severity for patients with hyperthyroidism involves clinical evaluation and laboratory testing. To determine if there is a correlation between symptoms and thyroid function test results, we prospectively studied hyperthyroid patients using a standardized symptom rating scale and serum thyroid function parameters. We examined 25 patients with untreated, newly diagnosed Graves' disease using the Hyperthyroid Symptom Scale (HSS) and serum levels of thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) relative insulin area (RIA), and estimates of free thyroxine index (FTI). In addition, we compared thyroid hormone levels with standard measures of depression and anxiety in these patients. When regression analyses controlling for age were performed, none of these symptom ratings were associated with FTI or T3 RIA. The HSS was correlated with goiter size and anxiety ratings and was inversely correlated with age. The present study suggests that there is no relationship between the clinical assessment of disease severity and serum levels of thyroid hormone in untreated Graves' disease.

  4. Thyroid ultrasound abnormalities in persons exposed during childhood to 131I from the Hanford nuclear site.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Kenneth J; Onstad, Lynn; Hamilton, Thomas E; Davis, Scott

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 740,000 Ci of 131I were released into the atmosphere from the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State during 1944-1957. The Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), conducted to determine if thyroid disease is increased among persons exposed as children to that 131I, also investigated whether thyroid ultrasound (US) abnormalities might be increased. The HTDS cohort (n = 5199) was selected from 1940-1946 births to mothers with usual residence in seven Washington counties. Of these, 4350 were located alive, 3447 attended HTDS clinics (1992-1997), and 3440 (1747 females) had evaluable clinical results and sufficient data to characterize their Hanford 131I exposures. US abnormalities were observed in 55.5% of women and 37.4% of men. Thyroid radiation doses from Hanford 131I, which could be estimated for 3191 evaluable participants, ranged from 0.0029 to 2823 mGy (mean, 174 mGy). Estimated dose was not significantly associated with the prevalence of any US abnormality (p = 0.21), US nodules with maximum dimension 5 mm or more (p = 0.64), or average number of US nodules per person (p = 0.80 for nodules with maximum dimension 5 mm or more). These results remained unchanged after accounting for factors that might confound or modify dose-response relationships and for uncertainty of the dose estimates. This study does not support the hypothesis that 131I exposure at Hanford's dose levels and dose rates during infancy and childhood increases the prevalence of adult thyroid US abnormalities.

  5. Isolation of a thyroid hormone-responsive gene by immunoprecipitation of thyroid hormone receptor-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1994-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) receptor (TR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that acts through specific binding sites in the promoter region of target genes. In order to identify new genes that are regulated by T3, we used anti-TR antiserum to immunoprecipitate TR-DNA complexes from GH4 cell nuclei that had previously been treated with a restriction enzyme. Screening of the immunopurified, cloned DNA for TR binding sites by electrophoretic mobility shift assay yielded 53 positive clones. A subset of these clones was specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-TR antiserum and may therefore represent biologically significant binding sites. One of these clones, clone 122, was characterized in detail. It includes sequences highly related to the NICER long terminal repeat-like element and contains three TR binding sites as determined by DNase I footprinting. Two of the clone 122 TR binding sites are located upstream of the TATA box, and one is located downstream. The TR binding site downstream from the promoter was necessary and sufficient to confer T3-dependent regulation in transient transfection experiments. Expression of a reporter construct under the control of the clone 122 promoter region was activated by TR in the absence of ligand and returned to basal levels after T3 addition. Clone 122 sequences hybridize to at least two different mRNAs of approximately 6 and 10 kb from GH4 cells. The levels of both of these mRNAs increased upon removal of T3. Our studies suggest that specific immunoprecipitation of chromatin allows identification of binding sites and target genes for transcription factors. Images PMID:7935476

  6. GLIS3 is indispensable for TSH/TSHR-dependent thyroid hormone biosynthesis and follicular cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Soon; Kumar, Dhirendra; Liao, Grace; Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; Gerrish, Kevin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Refetoff, Samuel; Jothi, Raja; Jetten, Anton M.

    2017-01-01

    Deficiency in Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3) in humans is associated with the development of congenital hypothyroidism. However, the functions of GLIS3 in the thyroid gland and the mechanism by which GLIS3 dysfunction causes hypothyroidism are unknown. In the current study, we demonstrate that GLIS3 acts downstream of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TSH receptor (TSHR) and is indispensable for TSH/TSHR-mediated proliferation of thyroid follicular cells and biosynthesis of thyroid hormone. Using ChIP-Seq and promoter analysis, we demonstrate that GLIS3 is critical for the transcriptional activation of several genes required for thyroid hormone biosynthesis, including the iodide transporters Nis and Pds, both of which showed enhanced GLIS3 binding at their promoters. The repression of cell proliferation of GLIS3-deficient thyroid follicular cells was due to the inhibition of TSH-mediated activation of the mTOR complex 1/ribosomal protein S6 (mTORC1/RPS6) pathway as well as the reduced expression of several cell division–related genes regulated directly by GLIS3. Consequently, GLIS3 deficiency in a murine model prevented the development of goiter as well as the induction of inflammatory and fibrotic genes during chronic elevation of circulating TSH. Our study identifies GLIS3 as a key regulator of TSH/TSHR-mediated thyroid hormone biosynthesis and proliferation of thyroid follicular cells and uncovers a mechanism by which GLIS3 deficiency causes neonatal hypothyroidism and prevents goiter development. PMID:29083325

  7. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) exposures and thyroid hormones in children at age 3 years.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ann M; Braun, Joseph M; Webster, Glenys M; Thomas Zoeller, R; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sjödin, Andreas; Yolton, Kimberly; Lanphear, Bruce P; Chen, Aimin

    2018-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) reduce serum thyroid hormone concentrations in animal studies, but few studies have examined the impact of early-life PBDE exposures on thyroid hormone disruption in childhood. We used data from 162 mother-child pairs from the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment Study (2003-2006, Cincinnati, OH). We measured PBDEs in maternal serum at 16 ± 3 weeks gestation and in child serum at 1-3 years. Thyroid hormones were measured in serum at 3 years. We used multiple informant models to investigate associations between prenatal and early-life PBDE exposures and thyroid hormone levels at age 3 years. Prenatal PBDEs were associated with decreased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels at age 3 years. A 10-fold increase in prenatal ∑PBDEs (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, and -153) was associated with a 27.6% decrease (95% CI -40.8%, -11.3%) in TSH. A ten-fold increase in prenatal ∑PBDEs was associated with a 0.25 pg/mL (0.07, 0.43) increase in free triiodothyronine (FT 3 ). Child sex modified associations between prenatal PBDEs and thyroid hormones, with significant decrements in TSH among females and decreased free T 4 (FT 4 ) in males. Prenatal ∑PBDEs were not associated with TT 4 , FT 4 , or total T 3 . These findings suggest an inverse relationship between prenatal ∑PBDEs and TSH at 3 years. Associations may be sexually dimorphic, with an inverse relationship between prenatal BDE-47 and -99 and TSH in females and null associations among males. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of two over-the-counter natural thyroid hormone preparations in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Csako, G; Corso, D M; Kestner, J; Bokser, A D; Kennedy, P E; Pucino, F

    1992-04-01

    To determine the pharmacologic activity of over-the-counter (OTC) thyroid preparations. In vitro analysis and a prospective, crossover study in vivo. Tertiary care center. Two healthy adult volunteers. Three OTC preparations (Thyrotrophin PMG [bovine thyroid PMG extract], Thyro Forte [thyroid lymphogland concentrate with synergistic complex], and Thyro Complex [thyroid lyophilized gland concentrate with synergistic complex]) were analyzed in vitro. Volunteers were administered two times the manufacturer's maximum recommended daily dose of either Thyrotrophin PMG or Thyro Forte for one week, washed out for four to five weeks, and crossed over to receive the opposite tablet preparation for an additional week. The triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) contents of OTC preparations were measured by HPLC. Vital signs, serum total and free T4, total T3, thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroxine binding globulin, thyroglobulin, and general chemistry tests (including glucose and cholesterol) were monitored before, during, and between administration of the products. HPLC analysis of the three OTC preparations showed no T4 but did show possible T3 in two of these products. We found no definite clinical or laboratory evidence of thyroid hormone excess with either product. Healthcare professionals should advise against the use of these scientifically unsound and relatively expensive OTC thyroid preparations, of which the therapeutic efficacy is unknown.

  9. Use of thyroid-stimulating hormone tests for identifying primary hypothyroidism in family medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Birk-Urovitz, Elizabeth; Elisabeth Del Giudice, M; Meaney, Christopher; Grewal, Karan

    2017-09-01

    To assess the use of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) tests for identifying primary hypothyroidism in 2 academic family medicine settings. Descriptive study involving a retrospective electronic chart review of family medicine patients who underwent TSH testing. Two academic family practice sites: one site is within a tertiary hospital in Toronto, Ont, and the other is within a community hospital in Newmarket, Ont. A random sample of 205 adult family medicine patients who had 1 or more TSH tests for identifying potential primary hypothyroidism between July 1, 2009, and September 15, 2013. Exclusion criteria included a previous diagnosis of any thyroid condition or abnormality, as well as pregnancy or recent pregnancy within the year preceding the study period. The proportion of normal TSH test results and the proportion of TSH tests that did not conform to test-ordering guidelines. Of the 205 TSH test results, 200 (97.6%, 95% CI 94.4% to 99.2%) showed TSH levels within the normal range. All 5 patients with abnormal TSH test results had TSH levels above the upper reference limits. Nearly one-quarter (22.4%, 95% CI 16.9% to 28.8%) of tests did not conform to test-ordering guidelines. All TSH tests classified as not conforming to test-ordering guidelines showed TSH levels within normal limits. There was a significant difference ( P < .001) between the proportions of nonconforming TSH tests at the tertiary site (14.3%, 95% CI 8.2% to 22.5%) and the community site (31.0%, 95% CI 22.1% to 41.0%). Preliminary analyses examining which variables might be associated with abnormal TSH levels showed that only muscle cramps or myalgia ( P = .0286) and a history of an autoimmune disorder ( P = .0623) met or approached statistical significance. In this study, the proportion of normal TSH test results in the context of primary hypothyroidism case finding and screening was high, and the overall proportion of TSH tests that did not conform to test-ordering guidelines was relatively

  10. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  11. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  12. Peripheral blood natural killer cells and mild thyroid abnormalities in women with reproductive failure

    PubMed Central

    Triggianese, P; Perricone, C; Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, MS; Perricone, R; De Carolis, C

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells have been reported in women with primary infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and several studies have been presented to define cutoff values for abnormal peripheral blood NK cell levels in this context. Elevated levels of NK cells were observed in infertile/RSA women in the presence of thyroid autoimmunity (TAI), while no studies have been carried out, to date, on NK cells in infertile/RSA women with non-autoimmune thyroid diseases. The contribution of this study is two-fold: (1) the evaluation of peripheral blood NK cell levels in a cohort of infertile/RSA women, in order to confirm related data from the literature; and (2) the assessment of NK cell levels in the presence of both TAI and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in order to explore the possibility that the association between NK cells and thyroid function is not only restricted to TAI but also to SCH. In a retrospective study, 259 age-matched women (primary infertility [n = 49], primary RSA [n = 145], and secondary RSA [n = 65]) were evaluated for CD56+CD16+NK cells by flow cytometry. Women were stratified according to thyroid status: TAI, SCH, and without thyroid diseases (ET). Fertile women (n = 45) were used as controls. Infertile/RSA women showed higher mean NK cell levels than controls. The cutoff value determining the abnormal NK cell levels resulted ⩾15% in all the groups of women. Among the infertile/RSA women, SCH resulted the most frequently associated thyroid disorder while no difference resulted in the prevalence of TAI and ET women between patients and controls. A higher prevalence of women with NK cell levels ⩾15% was observed in infertile/RSA women with SCH when compared to TAI/ET women. According to our data, NK cell assessment could be used as a diagnostic tool in women with reproductive failure and we suggest that the possible association between NK cell levels and thyroid function can be described not only

  13. Thyroid hormones and menstrual cycle function in a longitudinal cohort of premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Melanie H; Howards, Penelope P; Darrow, Lyndsey A; Meadows, Juliana W; Kesner, James S; Spencer, Jessica B; Terrell, Metrecia L; Marcus, Michele

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that hyperthyroid and hypothyroid women experience menstrual irregularities more often compared with euthyroid women, but reasons for this are not well-understood and studies on thyroid hormones among euthyroid women are lacking. In a prospective cohort study of euthyroid women, this study characterised the relationship between thyroid hormone concentrations and prospectively collected menstrual function outcomes. Between 2004-2014, 86 euthyroid premenopausal women not lactating or taking hormonal medications participated in a study measuring menstrual function. Serum thyroid hormones were measured before the menstrual function study began. Women then collected first morning urine voids and completed daily bleeding diaries every day for three cycles. Urinary oestrogen and progesterone metabolites (estrone 3-glucuronide (E 1 3G) and pregnanediol 3-glucuronide (Pd3G)) and follicle-stimulating hormone were measured and adjusted for creatinine (Cr). Total thyroxine (T 4 ) concentrations were positively associated with Pd3G and E 1 3G. Women with higher (vs lower) T 4 had greater luteal phase maximum Pd3G (Pd3G = 11.7 μg/mg Cr for women with high T 4 vs Pd3G = 9.5 and 8.1 μg/mg Cr for women with medium and low T 4 , respectively) and greater follicular phase maximum E 1 3G (E 1 3G = 41.7 ng/mg Cr for women with high T 4 vs E 1 3G = 34.3 and 33.7 ng/mg Cr for women with medium and low T 4 , respectively). Circulating thyroid hormone concentrations were associated with subtle differences in menstrual cycle function outcomes, particularly sex steroid hormone levels in healthy women. Results contribute to the understanding of the relationship between thyroid function and the menstrual cycle, and may have implications for fertility and chronic disease. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Clinical experience with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH): whole-body scanning with iodine-131.

    PubMed

    Reiners, C; Luster, M; Lassmann, M

    1999-01-01

    Whole-body scanning (WBS) with iodine-131 (I-131) is currently used together with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement in the diagnostic follow-up of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. One of the main disadvantages of I-131 WBS is its requirement of repeated weeks-long withdrawal of thyroid hormone suppression therapy (THST) to raise endogenous thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) production. This results in hypothyroidism and associated abnormalities, discomfort and morbidity. Recently, however, a series of multicentre clinical studies established the efficacy, safety, non-antigenicity, and quality of life benefits of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen, thyrotropin alfa, Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA, USA) in promoting radioiodine uptake and permitting sensitive I-131 WBS in patients on THST after initial therapy of well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Thus in everyday practice, rhTSH administration may in many cases supersede THST withdrawal as a preparative method for I-131 imaging. With the use of rhTSH, as whenever I-131 WBS is performed, useful and accurate imaging requires meticulous attention to good scanning practices. These include use of appropriate equipment, proper timing, sufficient scanning time, vigilance against artifacts and iodine contamination, and consideration of additional imaging in the case of ambiguous 48-hour scans. Whole-body retention of I-131 is approximately 50% greater during hypothyroidism after THST withdrawal than during euthyroidism on THST and rhTSH. Therefore, it is important to use an adequate diagnostic activity of > or =4 mCi (148 MBq) to compensate for the faster radioiodine clearance in the euthyroid state permitted by rhTSH administration. Ongoing dosimetric research eventually may provide more specific guidance regarding radioiodine activities for diagnostic, and, particularly, therapeutic purposes, with the use of rhTSH.

  15. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E. M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2017-01-01

    In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the euthyroid range. Appropriate reactions to internal or external challenges are defined by unique solutions and homeostatic equilibria. Permissible variations in an individual are much more closely constrained than over a population. Current diagnostic definitions of subclinical thyroid dysfunction are laboratory based, and do not concur with treatment recommendations. An appropriate TSH level is a homeostatic concept that cannot be reduced to a fixed range consideration. The control mode may shift from feedback to tracking where TSH becomes positively, rather than inversely related with FT4. This is obvious in pituitary disease and severe non-thyroid illness, but extends to other prevalent conditions including aging, obesity, and levothyroxine (LT4) treatment. Treatment targets must both be individualized and respect altered equilibria on LT4. To avoid amalgamation bias, clinically meaningful stratification is required in epidemiological studies. In conclusion, pituitary TSH cannot be readily interpreted as a sensitive mirror image of thyroid function because the negative TSH–FT4 correlation is frequently broken, even inverted, by common conditions. The interrelationships between TSH and thyroid hormones and the interlocking elements of the control system are individual, dynamic, and adaptive. This demands a paradigm shift of its diagnostic use. PMID:29375474

  16. Increased sensitivity of thyroid hormone-mediated signaling despite prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Scheibner, Michael; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Jaques, John T; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2017-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) can increase cellular metabolism. Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid gland responsiveness, in an effort to suppress cellular metabolism and abate starvation. However, in prolonged-fasted, elephant seal pups, cellular TH-mediated proteins are up-regulated and TH levels are maintained with fasting duration. The function and contribution of the thyroid gland to this apparent paradox is unknown and physiologically perplexing. Here we show that the thyroid gland remains responsive during prolonged food deprivation, and that its function and production of TH increase with fasting duration in elephant seals. We discovered that our modeled plasma TH data in response to exogenous thyroid stimulating hormone predicted cellular signaling, which was corroborated independently by the enzyme expression data. The data suggest that the regulation and function of the thyroid gland in the northern elephant seal is atypical for a fasted animal, and can be better described as, "adaptive fasting". Furthermore, the modeling data help substantiate the in vivo responses measured, providing unique insight on hormone clearance, production rates, and thyroid gland responsiveness. Because these unique endocrine responses occur simultaneously with a nearly strict reliance on the oxidation of lipid, these findings provide an intriguing model to better understand the TH-mediated reliance on lipid metabolism that is not otherwise present in morbidly obese humans. When coupled with cellular, tissue-specific responses, these data provide a more integrated assessment of thyroidal status that can be extrapolated for many fasting/food deprived mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early Phthalates Exposure in Pregnant Women Is Associated with Alteration of Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Liang, Wei-Yen; Li, Sih-Syuan; Huang, Han-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies revealed that phthalate exposure could alter thyroid hormones during the last trimester of pregnancy. However, thyroid hormones are crucial for fetal development during the first trimester. We aimed to clarify the effect of phthalate exposure on thyroid hormones during early pregnancy. Method We recruited 97 pregnant women who were offered an amniocentesis during the early trimester from an obstetrics clinic in southern Taiwan from 2013 to 2014. After signing an informed consent form, we collected amniotic fluid and urine samples from pregnant women to analyze 11 metabolites, including mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono-butyl phthalate (MnBP), of 9 phthalates using liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. We collected blood samples from each subject to analyze serum thyroid hormones including thyroxine (T4), free T4, and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG). Results Three phthalate metabolites were discovered to be >80% in the urine samples of the pregnant women: MEP (88%), MnBP (81%) and MECPP (86%). Median MnBP and MECPP levels in pregnant Taiwanese women were 21.5 and 17.6 μg/g-creatinine, respectively, that decreased after the 2011 Taiwan DEHP scandal. Results of principal component analysis suggested two major sources (DEHP and other phthalates) of phthalates exposure in pregnant women. After adjusting for age, gestational age, TBG, urinary creatinine, and other phthalate metabolites, we found a significantly negative association between urinary MnBP levels and serum T4 (β = –5.41; p-value = 0.012; n = 97) in pregnant women using Bonferroni correction. Conclusion We observed a potential change in the thyroid hormones of pregnant women during early pregnancy after DnBP exposure. Additional study is necessitated to clarify these associations. PMID:27455052

  18. Influence of obesity and surgical weight loss on thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Chikunguwo, Silas; Brethauer, Stacy; Nirujogi, Vijaya; Pitt, Tracy; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Chand, Bipan; Schauer, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The pathophysiologic relationship between morbid obesity and thyroid hormones is not well understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of obesity and weight reduction after bariatric surgery on thyroid hormone levels. Patients who underwent gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding at our institution, had no previous diagnosis of thyroid disorder, were not taking medication that could affect the thyroid function evaluation, and who were nonsmokers were included in this retrospective evaluation. The association between the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T(4)) levels and body mass index (BMI), and the influence of weight loss after bariatric surgery on these hormones were investigated at different points (preoperatively and 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery). A total of 86 patients met the study criteria. The TSH levels correlated positively with BMI (P <.001, r = .91) within the BMI range of 30-67 kg/m(2). The mean BMI change from 49 to 32 kg/m(2) after bariatric surgery was associated with a mean reduction in the TSH level from 4.5 to 1.9 microU/mL. Free T(4) showed no association with BMI and was not significantly influenced by weight loss. Before bariatric surgery, 10.5% of the subjects had laboratory values consistent with subclinical hypothyroidism. After bariatric surgery, 100% of these patients experienced significant weight reduction with simultaneous resolution of their subclinical hypothyroidism. The results of our study have demonstrated a statistically significant positive association between serum TSH within the normal range and BMI. No association was found between BMI and free T(4) serum levels. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in study group was 10.5%. Weight loss after bariatric surgery improved or normalized thyroid hormone levels.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Transporters MCT8 and OATP1C1 Control Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mayerl, Steffen; Schmidt, Manuel; Doycheva, Denica; Darras, Veerle M; Hüttner, Sören S; Boelen, Anita; Visser, Theo J; Kaether, Christoph; Heuer, Heike; von Maltzahn, Julia

    2018-06-05

    Thyroid hormone (TH) transporters are required for the transmembrane passage of TH in target cells. In humans, inactivating mutations in the TH transporter MCT8 cause the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, characterized by severe neuromuscular symptoms and an abnormal TH serum profile, which is fully replicated in Mct8 knockout mice and Mct8/Oatp1c1 double-knockout (M/O DKO) mice. Analysis of tissue TH content and expression of TH-regulated genes indicate a thyrotoxic state in Mct8-deficient skeletal muscles. Both TH transporters are upregulated in activated satellite cells (SCs). In M/O DKO mice, we observed a strongly reduced number of differentiated SCs, suggesting an impaired stem cell function. Moreover, M/O DKO mice and mice lacking both transporters exclusively in SCs showed impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Our data provide solid evidence for a unique gate-keeper function of MCT8 and OATP1C1 in SC activation, underscoring the importance of a finely tuned TH signaling during myogenesis. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Accuracy of episodic autobiographical memory in children with early thyroid hormone deficiency using a staged event.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Karen A; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Rovet, Joanne F

    2014-07-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) is a highly constructive cognitive process that often contains memory errors. No study has specifically examined AM accuracy in children with abnormal development of the hippocampus, a crucial brain region for AM retrieval. Thus, the present study investigated AM accuracy in 68 typically and atypically developing children using a staged autobiographical event, the Children's Autobiographical Interview, and structural magnetic resonance imaging. The atypically developing group consisted of 17 children (HYPO) exposed during gestation to insufficient maternal thyroid hormone (TH), a critical substrate for hippocampal development, and 25 children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH), who were compared to 26 controls. Groups differed significantly in the number of accurate episodic details recalled and proportion accuracy scores, with controls having more accurate recollections of the staged event than both TH-deficient groups. Total hippocampal volumes and anterior hippocampal volumes were positively correlated with proportion accuracy scores, but not total accurate episodic details, in HYPO and CH. In addition, greater severity of TH deficiency predicted lower proportion accuracy scores in both HYPO and CH. Overall, these results indicate that children with early TH deficiency have deficits in AM accuracy and that the anterior hippocampus may play a particularly important role in accurate AM retrieval. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid surgery, requiring treatment with thyroid hormone (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). This is especially true if you had ... Disease Graves’ Eye Disease Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Hyperthyroidism (Overactive) Hypothyroidism (Underactive) Iodine Deficiency Low Iodine Diet Medullary Thyroid ...

  2. Increased Oxidative Metabolism and Neurotransmitter Cycling in the Brain of Mice Lacking the Thyroid Hormone Transporter Slc16a2 (Mct8)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Ceballos, Ainhoa; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Nuñez, Barbara; Refetoff, Samuel; Cerdán, Sebastian; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) cause a severe X-linked intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. MCT8 is a specific thyroid hormone (T4 and T3) transporter and the patients also present unusual abnormalities in the serum profile of thyroid hormone concentrations due to altered secretion and metabolism of T4 and T3. Given the role of thyroid hormones in brain development, it is thought that the neurological impairment is due to restricted transport of thyroid hormones to the target neurons. In this work we have investigated cerebral metabolism in mice with Mct8 deficiency. Adult male mice were infused for 30 minutes with (1-13C) glucose and brain extracts prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic inactivation of Mct8 resulted in increased oxidative metabolism as reflected by increased glutamate C4 enrichment, and of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions as observed by the increases in glutamine C4 and GABA C2 enrichments, respectively. These changes were distinct to those produced by hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Similar increments in glutamate C4 enrichment and GABAergic neurotransmission were observed in the combined inactivation of Mct8 and D2, indicating that the increased neurotransmission and metabolic activity were not due to increased production of cerebral T3 by the D2-encoded type 2 deiodinase. In conclusion, Mct8 deficiency has important metabolic consequences in the brain that could not be correlated with deficiency or excess of thyroid hormone supply to the brain during adulthood. PMID:24098341

  3. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on rat thyroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Guang; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yi-He

    2009-05-01

    The potential toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an environmentally persistent organic pollutant, is of great concern. The present study examines the ability of PFOS to disturb thyroid function and the possible mechanisms involved in PFOS-induced thyroid hormone alteration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1.7, 5.0, and 15.0 mg/L of PFOS in drinking water for 91 consecutive days. Serum was collected for analysis of total and free thyroxine (T4), total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyrotrophin (TSH). Thyroid and liver were removed for the measurement of endpoints closely related to thyroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism following PFOS exposure. Determined endpoints were the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for two isoforms of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases (UGT1A6 and UGT1A1) and type 1 deiodinase (DIO1) in liver, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), TSH receptor (TSHR), and DIO1 in thyroid as well as the activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO). Serum total T4 level decreased significantly at all applied dosages, whereas total T3 level increased markedly only at 1.7 mg/L of PFOS. No statistically significant toxic effects of PFOS on serum TSH were observed. Hepatic UGTIA1, but not UGT1A6, mRNA was up-regulated at 5.0 and 15.0 mg/L of PFOS. Treatment with PFOS lowered hepatic DIO1 mRNA at 15.0 mg/L but increased thyroidal DIO1 mRNA dose dependently. The activity of TPO, NIS, and TSHR mRNA in thyroid were unaffected by PFOS treatment. These results indicate that increased hepatic T4 glucuronidation via UGT1A1 and increased thyroidal conversion of T4 to T3 via DIO1 were responsible in part for PFOS-induced hypothyroxinemia in rats.

  4. Sex Differences in Brain Thyroid Hormone Levels during Early Post-Hatching Development in Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Hayase, Shin; Aoki, Naoya; Takehara, Akihiko; Ishigohoka, Jun; Matsushima, Toshiya; Wada, Kazuhiro; Homma, Koichi J

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are closely linked to the hatching process in precocial birds. Previously, we showed that thyroid hormones in brain had a strong impact on filial imprinting, an early learning behavior in newly hatched chicks; brain 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) peaks around hatching and imprinting training induces additional T3 release, thus, extending the sensitive period for imprinting and enabling subsequent other learning. On the other hand, blood thyroid hormone levels have been reported to increase gradually after hatching in altricial species, but it remains unknown how the brain thyroid hormone levels change during post-hatching development of altricial birds. Here, we determined the changes in serum and brain thyroid hormone levels of a passerine songbird species, the zebra finch using radioimmunoassay. In the serum, we found a gradual increase in thyroid hormone levels during post-hatching development, as well as differences between male and female finches. In the brain, there was clear surge in the hormone levels during development in males and females coinciding with the time of fledging, but the onset of the surge of thyroxine (T4) in males preceded that of females, whereas the onset of the surge of T3 in males succeeded that of females. These findings provide a basis for understanding the functions of thyroid hormones during early development and learning in altricial birds.

  5. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine controls macrophage maturation and functions: protective role during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Cristiana; Buldorini, Marcella; Assi, Emma; Cazzato, Denise; De Palma, Clara; Clementi, Emilio; Cervia, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The endocrine system participates in regulating macrophage maturation, although little is known about the modulating role of the thyroid hormones. In vitro results demonstrate a negative role of one such hormone, triiodothyronine (T3), in triggering the differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes into unpolarized macrophages. T3-induced macrophages displayed a classically activated (M1) signature. A T3-induced M1-priming effect was also observed on polarized macrophages because T3 reverses alternatively activated (M2) activation, whereas it enhances that of M1 cells. In vivo, circulating T3 increased the content of the resident macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, whereas it reduced the content of the recruited monocyte-derived cells. Of interest, T3 significantly protected mice against endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharide i.p. injection; in these damaged animals, decreased T3 levels increased the recruited (potentially damaging) cells, whereas restoring T3 levels decreased recruited and increased resident (potentially beneficial) cells. These data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of T3 is coupled to the modulation of peritoneal macrophage content, in a context not fully explained by the M1/M2 framework. Thyroid hormone receptor expression analysis and the use of different thyroid hormone receptor antagonists suggest thyroid hormone receptor β1 as the major player mediating T3 effects on macrophages. The novel homeostatic link between thyroid hormones and the pathophysiological role of macrophages opens new perspectives on the interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence of Thyroid Function Test Abnormalities in Patients Receiving Immune-Checkpoint Inhibitors for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha Subhash; Oury, Anais; Daniels, Gregory A; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Patel, Sandip Pravin

    2018-05-16

    With the advent of immune-checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1), immune-related adverse events such as thyroid function test abnormalities (TFTAs) are common, with a reported incidence range of 2%-15% depending upon the ICI used. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence of TFTAs retrospectively in patients who received ICI therapy. A total of 285 patients were reviewed (178 male, 107 female; 16-94 years of age), of whom 218 had no baseline TFTAs, 61 had baseline TFTAs, and 6 had a history of thyroidectomy (excluded). At least one dose of ipilimumab and/or nivolumab or pembrolizumab was administered. Post-ICI therapy TFTAs were classified according to standard definitions of thyroid conditions when possible. A total of 35% (76/218) patients had new-onset TFTAs on ICI therapy. Of note, 70.5% (43/61) had baseline TFTAs that were exacerbated by ICI therapy. The median times to new-onset or exacerbated baseline TFTA were 46 and 33 days, respectively. Of note, 64.5% (20/31) of patients on both ipilimumab and nivolumab had new-onset TFTAs, compared with 31.3% (15/48) on ipilimumab, 31.5% (28/89) on nivolumab, and 26% (13/50) on pembrolizumab. The incidence of TFTAs with ICI therapy was higher than previously reported. Patients with baseline TFTAs and/or who were receiving ipilimumab and nivolumab combination therapy had a higher incidence of TFTAs than patients receiving single-agent ICI therapy. We recommend more frequent evaluation of thyroid function in the first 8 weeks, especially in patients with baseline TFTAs. Increased use of immune-checkpoint inhibitors in cancer treatment has highlighted the importance of monitoring for and treating immune-related adverse events. This study was conducted to assess the incidence of thyroid function test abnormalities retrospectively in patients with cancer on immune-checkpoint inhibitors, which is not known exactly. This study is unique in that it included patients with a variety of histologic

  7. Deletion of the Thyroid Hormone-Activating Type 2 Deiodinase Rescues Cone Photoreceptor Degeneration but Not Deafness in Mice Lacking Type 3 Deiodinase.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lily; Liu, Hong; St Germain, Donald L; Hernandez, Arturo; Forrest, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    Type 2 deiodinase amplifies and type 3 deiodinase depletes levels of the active form of thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine. Given the opposing activities of these enzymes, we tested the hypothesis that they counteract each other's developmental functions by investigating whether deletion of type 2 deiodinase (encoded by Dio2) modifies sensory phenotypes in type 3 deiodinase-deficient (Dio3-/-) mice. Dio3-/- mice display degeneration of retinal cones, the photoreceptors that mediate daylight and color vision. In Dio2-/- mice, cone function was largely normal but deletion of Dio2 in Dio3-/- mice markedly recovered cone numbers and electroretinogram responses, suggesting counterbalancing roles for both enzymes in cone survival. Both Dio3-/- and Dio2-/- strains exhibit deafness with cochlear abnormalities. In Dio3-/-;Dio2-/- mice, deafness was exacerbated rather than alleviated, suggesting unevenly balanced actions by these enzymes during auditory development. Dio3-/- mice also exhibit an atrophic thyroid gland, low thyroxine, and high triiodothyronine levels, but this phenotype was ameliorated in Dio3-/-;Dio2-/- mice, indicating counterbalancing roles for the enzymes in determining the thyroid hormone status. The results suggest that the composite action of these two enzymes is a critical determinant in visual and auditory development and in setting the systemic thyroid hormone status.

  8. Food restriction in young Japanese quails: effects on growth, metabolism, plasma thyroid hormones and mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rønning, Bernt; Mortensen, Anne S; Moe, Børge; Chastel, Olivier; Arukwe, Augustine; Bech, Claus

    2009-10-01

    Young birds, in their post-natal growth period, may reduce their growth and metabolism when facing a food shortage. To examine how such responses can be mediated by endocrine-related factors, we exposed Japanese quail chicks to food restriction for either 2 days (age 6-8 days) or 5 days (age 6-11 days). We then measured growth and resting metabolic rate (RMR), and circulating 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) levels as well as expression patterns of genes involved in growth (insulin-like growth factor-I: IGF-I) and thyroid hormone signalling (thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta: TSHbeta, type II iodothyronine deiodinase: D2, thyroid hormone receptors isoforms: TRalpha and TRbeta). The food-restricted chicks receiving a weight-maintenance diet showed reductions in structural growth and RMR. Plasma levels of both T3 and T4 were reduced in the food-restricted birds, and within the 5 days food-restricted group there was a positive correlation between RMR and T3. IGF-I mRNA showed significantly higher abundance in the liver of ad libitum fed birds at day 8 compared with food-restricted birds. In the brain, TSHbeta mRNA level tended to be lower in food-restricted quails on day 8 compared with controls. Furthermore, TRalpha expression was lower in the brain of food-restricted birds at day 8 compared with birds fed ad libitum. Interestingly, brain D2 mRNA was negatively correlated with plasma T3 levels, tending to increase with the length of food restriction. Overall, our results show that food restriction produced significant effects on circulating thyroid hormones and differentially affected mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway. Thus, we conclude that the effects of food restriction observed on growth and metabolism were partly mediated by changes in the endocrine-related factors investigated.

  9. Analysis of iodine-131-induced early thyroid hormone variations in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Gu, Aichun; Pan, Yifan; Yang, Liwen; Ma, Yubo

    2016-11-01

    This prospective study aimed to assess iodine-131 (I)-induced early thyroid hormone variations in Graves' disease (GD) and determine the associated factors. One hundred and seventy-one GD patients treated with I were evaluated (47 men, 124 women). I was administered at 9.0±4.9 mCi on average. Serum free triiodothyronine and free thyroxin were measured within 24 h before treatment and 8 (3-14) days after treatment. Patients were divided into increase, no change, and decrease groups, respectively, on the basis of hormone variations after treatment. χ-Test, analysis of variance, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare groups in terms of sex, age, course of disease, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, antithyroid drug (ATD) pretreatment time, time of ATD discontinuation before I treatment, 24 h thyroid I uptake, thyroid weight, I activity, and I activity/thyroid weight (μCi/g). The Spearman method was used for correlation analyses. Twenty-seven, 20, and 124 cases were assigned to increase, no change, and decrease groups, respectively. Significant differences were found among groups in the time of ATD discontinuation before I treatment [the median duration for methimazole was 11 (5-26), 16 (10-30), and 21 (1-30) days, P=0.000, the median duration for propylthiouracil was 12.5 (5-24), 22 (11-26), and 26 (21-30) days, P=0.000], thyroid weight (93.5±33.6, 90.3±48.8, and 74.1±26.0 g, P=0.003), and μCi/g (84.8±11.8, 100.4±24.9, and 121.1±44.0 μCi/g, P=0.000). Interestingly, μCi/g was negatively and positively correlated to the possibility of hormone increase and decrease, respectively. No significant differences were found in the other parameters assessed. At the early stage of I treatment for GD, few patients showed increased thyroid hormone levels. Key factors may include time of ATD discontinuation before I treatment and μCi/g. High μCi/g might decrease thyroid hormone levels in early treatment, making it safe.

  10. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and adverse left ventricular remodeling following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Martin; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Reinstadler, Sebastian Johannes; Mueller, Lukas; Tiller, Christina; Brenner, Christoph; Mayr, Agnes; Henninger, Benjamin; Mair, Johannes; Klug, Gert; Metzler, Bernhard

    2018-04-01

    Adverse left ventricular remodeling is one of the major determinants of heart failure and mortality in patients surviving ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is a key cardiovascular regulator; however, the relationship between hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid status and post-STEMI left ventricular remodeling is unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations and the development of left ventricular remodeling following reperfused STEMI. In this prospective observational study of 102 consecutive STEMI patients, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were measured at the first day after infarction and 4 months thereafter. Cardiac magnetic resonance scans were performed within the first week as well as at 4 months follow-up to determine infarct characteristics, myocardial function and as primary endpoint left ventricular remodeling, defined as a 20% or greater increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Patients with left ventricular remodeling ( n=15, 15%) showed significantly lower concentrations of baseline (1.20 [0.92-1.91] vs. 1.73 [1.30-2.60] mU/l; P=0.02) and follow-up (1.11 [0.86-1.28] vs. 1.51 [1.15-2.02] mU/l; P=0.002) thyroid-stimulating hormone. The association between baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone and left ventricular remodeling remained significant after adjustment for major clinical (peak high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and C-reactive protein, heart rate; odds ratio (OR) 5.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.52-18.63; P=0.01) and cardiac magnetic resonance predictors of left ventricular remodeling (infarct size, microvascular obstruction, ejection fraction; OR 4.59, 95% CI 1.36-15.55; P=0.01). Furthermore, chronic thyroid-stimulating hormone was related to left ventricular remodeling independently of chronic left ventricular remodeling correlates (infarct size, ejection fraction, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular

  11. Hypopituitarism in the elderly in the presence of elevated thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

    PubMed Central

    Beringer, T.; McClements, B.; Weir, I.; Gilmore, D.; Kennedy, L.

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of primary hypothyroidism with hypopituitarism in elderly patients are reported. The elevated levels of thyroid stimulating hormone led to delay in the recognition of accompanying pituitary failure. Elderly patients should not be commenced on thyroxine replacement therapy until the possibility of hypopituitarism and cortisol deficiency has been excluded. PMID:3256811

  12. THE EFFECTS OF LOW DOSE PTU ON ENDPOINTS OF THYROID HORMONE ACTION IN THE DEVELOPING BRAIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, there is concern that any factor that reduces TH levels may permanently alter brain development. As part of an EPA Cooperative Agreement, the goal of this work was to characterize the degree to which cir...

  13. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = -0.261 to -0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = -0.229 to -0.165 for T3; r = -0.293 to -0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans.

  14. Hypothalamic mTOR pathway mediates thyroid hormone-induced hyperphagia in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Varela, Luis; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Gallego, Rosalía; Vázquez, María J; Roa, Juan; Gándara, Marina; Schoenmakers, Erik; Nogueiras, Rubén; Chatterjee, Krishna; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism is characterized in rats by increased energy expenditure and marked hyperphagia. Alterations of thermogenesis linked to hyperthyroidism are associated with dysregulation of hypothalamic AMPK and fatty acid metabolism; however, the central mechanisms mediating hyperthyroidism-induced hyperphagia remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that hyperthyroid rats exhibit marked up-regulation of the hypothalamic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway associated with increased mRNA levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased mRNA levels of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), an area where mTOR co-localizes with thyroid hormone receptor-α (TRα). Central administration of thyroid hormone (T3) or genetic activation of thyroid hormone signalling in the ARC recapitulated hyperthyroidism effects on feeding and the mTOR pathway. In turn, central inhibition of mTOR signalling with rapamycin in hyperthyroid rats reversed hyperphagia and normalized the expression of ARC-derived neuropeptides, resulting in substantial body weight loss. The data indicate that in the hyperthyroid state, increased feeding is associated with thyroid hormone-induced up-regulation of mTOR signalling. Furthermore, our findings that different neuronal modulations influence food intake and energy expenditure in hyperthyroidism pave the way for a more rational design of specific and selective therapeutic compounds aimed at reversing the metabolic consequences of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. TRICLOSAN ALTERS THYROID HORMONES HOMEOSTASIS VIA UP-REGULATION OF HEPATIC CATABOLISM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) is a chlorinated phenolic antibacterial compound used in household and hygiene products. The structural similarity of triclosan to thyroid hormones, in vitro studies demonstrating activation of the human pregnane X receptor (PXR)...

  16. In Vivo Regulation of Human Skeletal Muscle Gene Expression by Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Karine; Viguerie, Nathalie; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash; Barbe, Pierre; Thalamas, Claire; Storey, John D.; Brown, Patrick O.; Barsh, Greg S.; Langin, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of metabolism that modulate transcription via nuclear receptors. Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased metabolic rate, protein breakdown, and weight loss. Although the molecular actions of thyroid hormones have been studied thoroughly, their pleiotropic effects are mediated by complex changes in expression of an unknown number of target genes. Here, we measured patterns of skeletal muscle gene expression in five healthy men treated for 14 days with 75 μg of triiodothyronine, using 24,000 cDNA element microarrays. To analyze the data, we used a new statistical method that identifies significant changes in expression and estimates the false discovery rate. The 381 up-regulated genes were involved in a wide range of cellular functions including transcriptional control, mRNA maturation, protein turnover, signal transduction, cellular trafficking, and energy metabolism. Only two genes were down-regulated. Most of the genes are novel targets of thyroid hormone. Cluster analysis of triiodothyronine-regulated gene expression among 19 different human tissues or cell lines revealed sets of coregulated genes that serve similar biologic functions. These results define molecular signatures that help to understand the physiology and pathophysiology of thyroid hormone action. [The list of transcripts corresponding to up-regulated and down-regulated genes is available as a web supplement at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11827947

  17. METABOLISM OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS IN HUMAN ASTROCYTES AND EFFECTS ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this proposed study, hydroxylated PBDEs and brominated phenols likely will be formed in astrocytes as a result of cytochrome p450-mediated metabolism. Previous studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) affect the regulation of thyroid hormones at the bloo...

  18. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model for the Thyroid Hormones in the Pregnant Rat and Fetus.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental PBPK model is constructed to quantitatively describe the tissue economy of the thyroid hormones (THs), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), in the rat. The model is also used to link maternal (THs) to rat fetal tissues via placental transfer. THs are importan...

  19. TRICLOSAN AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION: EVIDENCE FOR ALTERATIONS IN THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact Statement: Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) is a chlorinated phenolic antibacterial compound found as an active ingredient in many personal care and household products. Recent studies suggest that triclosan may alter thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis via ...

  20. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo determination of thyroid hormone modulating activity of benzothiazoles

    EPA Science Inventory

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of six benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone ...

  1. Moderate Perinatal Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Alters Visual System Function in Adult Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical for many aspects of neurodevelopment, such as the visual system, but may be disrupted by many environmental contaminants. The experimental data demonstrating a role for TH on visual system development generally derives from studies in which deve...

  2. Thyroid hormone elevations during acute psychiatric illness: relationship to severity and distinction from hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Roca, R P; Blackman, M R; Ackerley, M B; Harman, S M; Gregerman, R I

    1990-01-01

    Acute psychiatric illness may be accompanied by transient hyperthyroxinemia. The mechanism of this phenomenon was examined by determining the role of thyrotropin (TSH) in the genesis of this state. Serial measurements of TSH, thyroxine (T4), free T4 index (FT4I), triiodothyronine (T3), and free T3 index (FT3I) were performed in 45 acutely hospitalized patients with major psychiatric disorders. Twenty-two (49%) patients exhibited significant elevations (greater than or equal to 2 SD above mean value of controls) of one or more thyroid hormone (or index) levels. Among depressed patients with elevated FT4I, TSH was higher (p less than .05) on the day of the peak FT4I than on the day of the FT4I nadir. There were significant positive correlations between psychiatric symptom severity and levels of FT4I among both depressed (p less than .01) and schizophrenic (p less than .025) patients. These data show that elevations of T4, FT4I, T3, and FT3I are common among psychiatric inpatients, especially early in their hospitalization, and that levels of thyroid hormones are correlated with severity of psychiatric symptomatology. TSH is higher early in the acute phase of illness and is not suppressed in the face of elevated thyroid hormone levels, a finding that distinguishes this phenomenon from ordinary hyperthyroidism. Elevations of peripheral thyroid hormone levels, particularly among depressed patients, may result from a centrally-mediated hypersecretion of TSH.

  3. Thyroid Hormone Indices in Computer Workers with Emphasis on the Role of Zinc Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Hegazy, Noha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Hammouda, Hamdy A A; Shaban, Eman Essam

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of computer monitor-emitted radiation on thyroid hormones and the possible protective role of zinc supplementation. The study included three groups. The first group (group B) consisted of 42 computer workers. This group was given Zinc supplementation in the form of one tablet daily for eight weeks. The second group (group A) comprised the same 42 computer workers after zinc supplementation. A group of 63 subjects whose job does not entail computer use was recruited as a control Group (Group C). All participants filled a questionnaire including detailed medical and occupational histories. They were subjected to full clinical examination. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and zinc levels were measured in all participants. TSH, FT3, FT4 and zinc concentrations were decreased significantly in group B relative to group C. In group A, all tested parameters were improved when compared with group B. The obtained results revealed that radiation emitted from computers led to changes in TSH and thyroid hormones (FT3 and FT4) in the workers. Improvement after supplementation suggests that zinc can ameliorate hazards of such radiation on thyroid hormone indices.

  4. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS. M.N. Logan1, J.R. Thibodeaux2, R.G. Hanson2, C. Lau2. 1North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC, 2Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Perfluor...

  5. ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Stoker, Tammy E.1; Laws, Susan C.1; Ferrell, Janet M.1; Cooper, Ralph L.1.

    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The...

  6. Ammonium Perchlorate Induces Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency and a Cortical Heterotopia in the Rat Brain

    EPA Science Inventory

    A morphological defect, a cortical heterotopia, has been observed in the brains of rat pups exposed in utero to moderate doses of the thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis inhibitor propylthioruracil (PTU). TH insufficiency during late gestation/early postnatal period is required to ind...

  7. Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency in the Pregnant Rat Induces Cortical Heterotopia in Offspring: PTU vs Perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the presence of a structural defect, a heterotopia in the brains of rat pups exposed in utero to the thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis inhibitor propylthioruracil (PTU). TH insufficiency during late gestation/early postnatal period is required to induce ...

  8. The Nature of Compensatory Response to Low Thyroid Hormone in Developing Brain.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Thyroid hormone is essential for normal brain development, but the degree to which the developing brain is sensitive to small perturbations in serum thyroxin is not clear. An important concept related to this is that the developing brain possesses potent mechanisms to co...

  9. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, S W; Akintola, A A; Roelfsema, F; van der Spoel, E; Cobbaert, C M; Ballieux, B E; Egri, P; Kvarta-Papp, Z; Gereben, B; Fekete, C; Slagboom, P E; van der Grond, J; Demeneix, B A; Pijl, H; Westendorp, R G J; van Heemst, D

    2015-06-19

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism.

  10. Modulating the function of the immune system by thyroid hormones and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Jara, Evelyn L; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Llanos, Carolina; Fardella, Carlos; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Riedel, Claudia A

    2017-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a close bidirectional communication and regulation between the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Thyroid hormones (THs) can exert responses in various immune cells, e.g., monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes, affecting several inflammation-related processes (such as, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species generation, and cytokines production). The interactions between the endocrine and immune systems have been shown to contribute to pathophysiological conditions, including sepsis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and viral infections. Under these conditions, TH therapy could contribute to restoring normal physiological functions. Here we discuss the effects of THs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on the immune system and the contribution to inflammation and pathogen clearance, as well as the consequences of thyroid pathologies over the function of the immune system. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased cell membrane permeability to Na+ and K+ induced by thyroid hormone in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Asano, Y

    1978-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) increased Na+ dependent respiration accompanied by an increase in NaK-ATPase activity. Administration of T3 increased intracellular K+ concentration and Na/K ratio in thyroidectomized rats, and the Na+ efflux rate constant incubated in oxygenized Na+, K+-Ringers in euthyroid rats. However, the magnitude of the changes in intracellular K+ concentration was modest or invisible in comparison to the changes in QO2(t) and NaK-ATPase activity. The Na+ and K+ efflux rate constants in K+-free +ouabain Ringers were increased by T3 in both thyroidectomized and euthyroid rats. Thus, thyroid hormone stimulates not only Na pump but also the permeability of cell membrane to Na+ and K+. The both effects might contribute to the thyroid thermogenesis.

  12. Comparative study of thyroid hormone and antithyroid antibody levels in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengkai; Zhang, Zhenjian

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of thyroid hormone and antithyroid antibodies and their relationship with pregnancy outcome in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and diabetic patients. Fifty patients with GDM and 50 pregnant patients with diabetes were selected. Their levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, FT3, FT4, TGab, TSH, TPOab were measured until parturition. There were no statistically significant differences in the age, gestational age, weight, FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin between the two groups (P>0.05). The levels of FT3 and FT4 in patients with GDM were significantly lower than those in diabetic pregnant patients, while the levels of TSH, TGab, TPOab of GDM patients were significantly higher than in diabetic pregnant patients (P<0.05). The total incidence rates of premature delivery, post-term birth and cesarean section in patients with GDM were significantly higher than those in diabetic pregnant patients. At six-month follow-up, the intellectual levels of infants delivered by patients with GDM were significantly lower than those of diabetic pregnant patients (P<0.05). The levels of thyroid hormones and related antibodies in patients with GDM were abnormal, which may have affected outcome of pregnancy and the intellectual level of their infants.

  13. Regulation of mammary gland sensitivity to thyroid hormones during the transition from pregnancy to lactation.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Connor, E E; Wood, D L

    2008-10-01

    Thyroid hormones are galactopoietic and help to establish the mammary gland's metabolic priority during lactation. Expression patterns for genes that can alter tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone activity were evaluated in the mammary gland and liver of cows at 53, 35, 20, and 7 days before expected parturition, and 14 and 90 days into the subsequent lactation. Transcript abundance for the three isoforms of iodothyronine deiodinase, type I (DIO1), type II (DIO2) and type III (DIO3), thyroid hormone receptors alpha1 (TRalpha1), alpha2 (TRalpha2) and beta1 (TRbeta1), and retinoic acid receptors alpha (RXRalpha) and gamma (RXRgamma), which act as coregulators of thyroid hormone receptor action, were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. The DIO3 is a 5-deiodinase that produces inactive iodothyronine metabolites, whereas DIO1 and DIO2 generate the active thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine, from the relatively inactive precursor, thyroxine. Low copy numbers of DIO3 transcripts were present in mammary gland and liver. DIO2 was the predominant isoform expressed in mammary gland and DIO1 was the predominant isoform expressed in liver. Quantity of DIO1 mRNA in liver tissues did not differ with physiological state, but tended to be lowest during lactation. Quantity of DIO2 mRNA in mammary gland increased during lactation (P < 0.05), with copy numbers at 90 days of lactation 6-fold greater than at 35 and 20 days prepartum. When ratios of DIO2/DIO3 mRNA were evaluated, the increase was more pronounced (>100-fold). Quantity of TRbeta1 mRNA in mammary gland increased with onset of lactation, whereas TRalpha1 and TRalpha2 transcripts did not vary with physiological state. Conversely, quantity of RXRalpha mRNA decreased during late gestation to low levels during early lactation. Data suggest that increased expression of mammary TRbeta1 and DIO2, and decreased RXRalpha, provide a mechanism to increase thyroid hormone activity within the mammary gland during

  14. Changes of thyroid hormone levels and related gene expression in zebrafish on early life stage exposure to triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoying; Chang, Juhua; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Guonian

    2011-11-01

    In this study, zebrafish was exposed to triadimefon. Thyroid hormones levels and the expression of related genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta), deiodinases (dio1 and dio2) and the thyroid hormone receptor (thraa and thrb) were evaluated. After triadimefon exposure, increased T4 can be explained by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH-beta). The conversion of T4 to T3 (deiodinase type I-dio1) was decreased, which reduced the T3 level. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (thrb) mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated, possibly as a response to the decreased T3 levels. The overall results indicated that triadimefon exposure could alter gene expression in the HPT axis and that mechanisms of disruption of thyroid status by triadimefon could occur at several steps in the synthesis, regulation, and action of thyroid hormones. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Exaggerated thyroid stimulating hormone secretion in children exposed to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Boyarskaya, O Y; Kopilova, O V

    2008-02-01

    We present results of a long-term study of the morpho-functional state of the thyroid gland and of the functional capacities of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal system, as shown by thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation, in different groups of children who suffered from the Chernobyl accident. It was shown that the thyroid gland of the children who were evacuated from the 30-km zone was damaged most severely due to the influence of radioactive iodine (131I). Living on radionuclide-polluted territories in conditions of iodine deficiency has been an additional contributory factor in the development of thyroid gland diseases. Latent functional deficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal system can be one of the reasons leading to oncopathology of the thyroid gland.

  16. Thyroid Function Abnormalities and Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly. Results of the InCHIANTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Ceresini, Graziano; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Morganti, Simonetta; Usberti, Elisa; Chezzi, Carlo; Valcavi, Rita; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M.; Cappola, Anne R.; Valenti, Giorgio; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate thyroid function testing abnormalities in older persons and to explore the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and cognition. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Community-based Participants 1171 men and women aged 23-102 yrs Measurements Thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma concentrations of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3). Cognition was evaluated by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Prevalence of overt and subclinical thyroid dysfunction was evaluated in different age groups (<65 versus ≥65 years). Age trends in TSH, FT4, and FT3 were examined in euthyroid participants. The cross-sectional association of thyroid dysfunction with MMSE score was evaluated adjusting for confounders. Results Both subclinical hypothyroidism and subclinical hyperthyroidism were more prevalent in older than in younger participants (Subclinical hypothyroidism, 0.4 % vs 3.5 % in younger vs older participants, respectively, P<.03 Subclinical hyperthyroidism, 1.9 % vs 7.8 % in younger vs older participants, respectively, P<.002). In euthyroid participants TSH and FT3 declined with age while FT4 increased. Old participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism had a lower MMSE score than euthyroid subjects (22.61 ± 6.88 vs 24.72 ± 4.52, P<.03). In adjusted analyses, participants with subclinical hyperthyroidism were significantly more likely to have cognitive dysfunction (HR: 2.26, P= .003). Conclusion Subtle age-related changes in FT3, FT4 and TSH occur in individuals who remain euthyroid. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is the most prevalent thyroid dysfunction in Italian older persons and is associated with cognitive impairment. PMID:19054181

  17. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. CIRCULATING THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR MESSENGER RNA AS A MARKER OF TUMOR AGGRESSIVENESS IN PATIENTS WITH PAPILLARY THYROID MICROCARCINOMA.

    PubMed

    Aliyev, Altay; Gupta, Manjula; Nasr, Christian; Hatipoglu, Betul; Milas, Mira; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR mRNA) is detectable in the peripheral blood of patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTmC). The aim of this study was to analyze the utility of TSHR mRNA status as a marker of tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTmC. Preoperative TSHR mRNA values were obtained in 152 patients who underwent thyroidectomy and were found to have PTmC on final pathology. Clinical parameters were analyzed from an institutional review board-approved database using χ(2) and t tests. Preoperatively, TSHR mRNA was detected in the peripheral blood in 46% of patients, which was less than that for macroscopic papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (80%) but higher than for benign thyroid disease (18%) (P<.001). The focus of cancer was larger in the TSHR mRNA-positive group compared to the negative group (0.41 vs. 0.30 cm, respectively, P = .015). The prevalence of tall-cell variant was higher in the TSHR mRNA positive group. The rates of lymph node (LN) metastasis (16% vs. 10%), multifocality (46% vs. 49%), and extra-thyroidal extension (10% vs. 5%) were similar between the TSHR mRNA-positive and-negative groups, respectively. In patients 45 years or older, rate of LN metastasis was higher in those who were TSHR mRNA positive (10%) versus negative (2%) (P = .039). TSHR mRNA positivity predicted a higher likelihood of radioactive iodine treatment (36% vs. 17%, P = .009) postoperatively. This study shows that TSHR mRNA, which is a marker of circulating thyroid cancer cells, is detectable in about half of patients with PTmC. The positivity of this marker predicts a higher likelihood of LN involvement in patients with PTmC who are 45 years or older.

  19. Thyroid hormone analogs for the treatment of dyslipidemia: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Delitala, Giuseppe; Sioni, Paolo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of dyslipidemia is a major burden for public health. Thyroid hormone regulates lipid metabolism by binding the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), but the use of thyroid hormone to treat dyslipidemia is not indicated due to its deleterious effects on heart, bone, and muscle. Thyroid hormone analogs have been conceived to selectively activate TR in the liver, thus reducing potential side-effects. The authors searched the PubMed database to review TR and the action of thyromimetics in vitro and in animal models. Then, all double-blind, placebo controlled trials that analyzed the use of thyroid hormone analog for the treatment of dyslipidemia in humans were included. Finally, the ongoing research on the use of TR agonists was searched, searching the US National Institutes of Health Registry and the WHO International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP). Thyromimetics were tested in humans for the treatment of dyslipidemia, as a single therapeutic agent or as an add-on therapy to the traditional lipid-lowering drugs. In most trials, thyromimetics lowered total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, but their use has been associated with adverse side-effects, both in pre-clinical studies and in humans. The use of thyromimetics for the treatment of dyslipidemia is not presently recommended. Future possible clinical applications might include their use to promote weight reduction. Thyromimetics might also represent an interesting alternative, both for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and type 2 diabetes due to their positive effects on insulin sensitivity. Finally, additional experimental and clinical studies are needed for a better comprehension of the effect(s) of a long-term therapy.

  20. Utilizing mass spectrometry imaging to map the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine and thyroxine in Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Sato, Tomohiko; Morisasa, Mizuki; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Sugiura, Yuki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Suematsu, Makoto; Mori, Tsukasa

    2018-02-01

    Thyroid hormones are not only responsible for thermogenesis and energy metabolism in animals, but also have an important role in cell differentiation and development. Amphibian metamorphosis provides an excellent model for studying the remodeling of the body. This metamorphic organ remodeling is induced by thyroid hormones, and a larval body is thus converted into an adult one. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry (MS) imaging technology is expected to be a suitable tool for investigating small bioreactive molecules. The present study describes the distribution of the thyroid hormones, i.e., triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) and their inactive form reverse T3 (rT3) in Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles using two different types of imaging techniques, MS/MS and Fourier transform (FT)-MS imaging. As a result of MS/MS imaging, we demonstrated that T3 was mainly distributed in the gills. T4 was faintly localized in the eyes, inner gills, and intestine during metamorphosis. The intensity of T3 in the gills and the intensity of T4 in the body fluids were increased during metamorphosis. Moreover, the localization of the inactive form rT3 was demonstrated to be separate from T3, namely in the intestine and muscles. In addition, FT-MS imaging could utilize simultaneous imaging including thyroid hormone. This is the first report to demonstrate the molecular distribution of thyroid hormones themselves and to discriminate T3, T4, and rT3 in animal tissues.

  1. Assessing Waste Water Treatment Plant Effluent for Thyroid Hormone Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much information has been coming to light on the estrogenic and androgenic activity of chemicals present in the waste water stream and in surface waters, but much less is known about the presence of chemicals with thyroid activity. To address this issue, we have utilized two assa...

  2. The Thyroid Hormone Receptors Inhibit Hepatic Interleukin-6 Signaling During Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Valiño, Arturo José; Regadera, Javier; Alemany, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Decreased thyroidal hormone production is found during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock in animals as well as in critically ill patients. Here we studied the role of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in activation of STAT3, NF-κB and ERK, which play a key role in the response to inflammatory cytokines during sepsis. TR knockout mice showed down-regulation of hepatic inflammatory mediators, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) in response to LPS. Paradoxically, STAT3 and ERK activity were higher, suggesting that TRs could act as endogenous repressors of these pathways. Furthermore, hyperthyroidism increased cytokine production and mortality in response to LPS, despite decreasing hepatic STAT3 and ERK activity. This suggested that TRs could directly repress the response of the cells to inflammatory mediators. Indeed, we found that the thyroid hormone T3 suppresses IL-6 signalling in macrophages and hepatocarcinoma cells, inhibiting STAT3 activation. Consequently, the hormone strongly antagonizes IL-6-stimulated gene transcription, reducing STAT3 recruitment and histone acetylation at IL-6 target promoters. In conclusion, TRs are potent regulators of inflammatory responses and immune homeostasis during sepsis. Reduced responses to IL-6 should serve as a negative feedback mechanism for preventing deleterious effects of excessive hormone signaling during infections. PMID:27484112

  3. The Thyroid Hormone Receptors Inhibit Hepatic Interleukin-6 Signaling During Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Valiño, Arturo José; Regadera, Javier; Alemany, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2016-08-03

    Decreased thyroidal hormone production is found during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock in animals as well as in critically ill patients. Here we studied the role of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in activation of STAT3, NF-κB and ERK, which play a key role in the response to inflammatory cytokines during sepsis. TR knockout mice showed down-regulation of hepatic inflammatory mediators, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) in response to LPS. Paradoxically, STAT3 and ERK activity were higher, suggesting that TRs could act as endogenous repressors of these pathways. Furthermore, hyperthyroidism increased cytokine production and mortality in response to LPS, despite decreasing hepatic STAT3 and ERK activity. This suggested that TRs could directly repress the response of the cells to inflammatory mediators. Indeed, we found that the thyroid hormone T3 suppresses IL-6 signalling in macrophages and hepatocarcinoma cells, inhibiting STAT3 activation. Consequently, the hormone strongly antagonizes IL-6-stimulated gene transcription, reducing STAT3 recruitment and histone acetylation at IL-6 target promoters. In conclusion, TRs are potent regulators of inflammatory responses and immune homeostasis during sepsis. Reduced responses to IL-6 should serve as a negative feedback mechanism for preventing deleterious effects of excessive hormone signaling during infections.

  4. Multiple steroid and thyroid hormones detected in baleen from eight whale species

    PubMed Central

    Lysiak, Nadine S; Robbins, Jooke; Moore, Michael J; Seton, Rosemary E; Torres, Leigh; Buck, C Loren

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that some hormones are present in baleen powder from bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) and North Atlantic right (Eubalaena glacialis) whales. To test the potential generalizability of this technique for studies of stress and reproduction in large whales, we sought to determine whether all major classes of steroid and thyroid hormones are detectable in baleen, and whether these hormones are detectable in other mysticetes. Powdered baleen samples were recovered from single specimens of North Atlantic right, bowhead, blue (Balaenoptera [B.]musculus), sei (B. borealis), minke (B. acutorostrata), fin (B. physalus), humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) and gray (Eschrichtius robustus) whales. Hormones were extracted with a methanol vortex method, after which we tested all species with commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIAs, Arbor Assays) for progesterone, testosterone, 17β-estradiol, cortisol, corticosterone, aldosterone, thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine, representing a wide array of steroid and thyroid hormones of interest for whale physiology research. In total, 64 parallelism tests (8 species × 8 hormones) were evaluated to verify good binding affinity of the assay antibodies to hormones in baleen. We also tested assay accuracy, although available sample volume limited this test to progesterone, testosterone and cortisol. All tested hormones were detectable in baleen powder of all species, and all assays passed parallelism and accuracy tests. Although only single individuals were tested, the consistent detectability of all hormones in all species indicates that baleen hormone analysis is likely applicable to a broad range of mysticetes, and that the EIA kits tested here perform well with baleen extract. Quantification of hormones in baleen may be a suitable technique with which to explore questions that have historically been difficult to address in large whales, including pregnancy and inter-calving interval, age of sexual maturation

  5. Hyperkalemia develops in some thyroidectomized patients undergoing thyroid hormone withdrawal in preparation for radioactive iodine ablation for thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Imaizumi, Misa; Usa, Toshiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-05-01

    Hyponatremia is observed in hypothyroidism, but it is not known if hypo- or hyperkalemia is associated with hypothyroidism. To study these questions, we determined serum potassium (K(+)) levels in thyroidectomized patients undergoing levothyroxine withdrawal before radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for thyroid carcinoma. We retrospectively studied the records of 108 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma followed by levothyroxine withdrawal and then ablation with RAI at Nagasaki University Hospital from 2009-2013. Blood samples were analyzed for serum K(+) concentrations when patients were euthyroid just before levothyroxine withdrawal and hypothyroid 21 days after levothyroxine withdrawal. We determined the proportion of patients who developed hyperkalemia (K(+) ≥5 mEq/L) and hypokalemia (K(+) ≤3.5 mEq/L). Five (4.6%) patients developed hyperkalemia and 2 (1.9%) patients developed hypokalemia after levothyroxine withdrawal. The mean serum K(+) level after levothyroxine withdrawal was significantly higher than before levothyroxine withdrawal (4.23 ± 0.50 mEq/L vs. 4.09 ± 0.34 mEq/L; P<.001). After levothyroxine withdrawal, serum K(+) values were significantly correlated with age, serum sodium and creatinine levels, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate but not with serum free thyroxine or thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations. The finding of an elevated serum K(+) of >0.5 mEq/L after levothyroxine withdrawal was more prevalent with age >60 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.66; P = .026) and with the use of angiotensin-II receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (OR, 3.53; P = .033) in a multivariate analysis. Hyperkalemia develops in a small percentage of hypothyroid patients after thyroid hormone withdrawal, especially in patients over 60 years of age who are using antihypertensive agents that inhibit the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system.

  6. Thyroid hormone independent associations between serum TSH levels and indicators of bone turnover in cured patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Karen A; van der Deure, Wendy M; Peeters, Robin P; Hamdy, Neveen A; Stokkel, Marcel P; Corssmit, Eleonora P; Romijn, Johannes A; Visser, Theo J; Smit, Johannes W

    2008-07-01

    It has been proposed that TSH has thyroid hormone-independent effects on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism. This concept is still controversial and has not been studied in human subjects in detail. We addressed this question by studying relationships between serum TSH concentration and indicators of bone turnover, after controlling for triiodothyronine (T(3)), free thyroxine (FT(4)), and non-thyroid factors relevant to BMD and bone metabolism. We also studied the contribution of the TSH receptor (TSHR)-Asp727Glu polymorphism to these relationships. We performed a cross-sectional study with 148 patients, who had been thyroidectomized for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We measured BMD of the femoral neck and lumbar spine. FT(4), T(3), TSH, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide levels, C-cross-linking terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, and urinary N-telopeptide of collagen cross-links were measured. Genotypes of the TSHR-Asp727Glu polymorphism were determined by Taqman assay. We found a significant, inverse correlation between serum TSH levels and indicators of bone turnover, which was independent of serum FT(4) and T(3) levels as well as other parameters influencing bone metabolism. We found that carriers of the TSHR-Asp727Glu polymorphism had an 8.1% higher femoral neck BMD, which was, however, no longer significant after adjusting for body mass index. We conclude that in this group of patients, serum TSH was related to indicators of bone remodeling independently of thyroid hormone levels. This may point to a functional role of the TSHR in bone in humans. Further research into this mechanism needs to be performed.

  7. D2-Thr92Ala, thyroid hormone levels and biochemical hypothyroidism in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Procopciuc, Lucia Maria; Caracostea, Gabriela; Hazi, Georgeta; Nemeti, Georgiana; Stamatian, Florin

    2017-02-01

    To identify if there is a relationship between the deiodinase D2-Thr92Ala genetic variant, thyroid hormone levels and biochemical hypothyroidism in preeclampsia. We genotyped 125 women with preeclampsia and 131 normal pregnant women using PCR-RFLP. Serum thyroid hormone levels were determined using ELISA. Our study showed higher TSH and FT4 levels and lower FT3 levels in women with preeclampsia compared to normal pregnant women, with statistical significance for women with mild and severe preeclampsia. The risk to develop pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), mild or severe preeclampsia was increased in carriers of at least one D2-Ala92 allele. TSH and FT4 levels were significantly higher and FT3 levels were significantly lower in preeclamptic women with severe preeclampsia if they carried the D2-Ala92 allele compared to non-carriers. Pregnant women with PIH and mild preeclampsia, carriers of at least one D2-Ala92 allele, delivered at lower gestational age neonates with a lower birth weight compared to non-carriers, but the results were statistically significant only in severe preeclampsia. The D2-Thr92Ala genetic variant is associated with the severity and the obstetric outcome of preeclampsia, and it also influences thyroid hormone levels. The study demonstrates non-thyroidal biochemical hypothyroidism - as a result of deiodination effects due to D2 genotypes.

  8. Thyroid hormones and mortality risk in euthyroid individuals: the Kangbuk Samsung health study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Won Kon; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-07-01

    Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, both overt and subclinical, are associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The association between thyroid hormones and mortality in euthyroid individuals, however, is unclear. To examine the prospective association between thyroid hormones levels within normal ranges and mortality endpoints. A prospective cohort study of 212 456 middle-aged South Korean men and women who had normal thyroid hormone levels and no history of thyroid disease at baseline from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2009. Free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3), and TSH levels were measured by RIA. Vital status and cause of death ascertainment were based on linkage to the National Death Index death certificate records. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 730 participants died (335 deaths from cancer and 112 cardiovascular-related deaths). FT4 was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR = 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.63-0.95, comparing the highest vs lowest quartile of FT4; P for linear trend = .01), and FT3 was inversely associated cancer mortality (HR = 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.45-0.85; P for linear trend = .001). TSH was not associated with mortality endpoints. In a large cohort of euthyroid men and women, FT4 and FT3 levels within the normal range were inversely associated with the risk of all-cause mortality and cancer mortality, particularly liver cancer mortality.

  9. Increased insulin sensitivity in intrauterine growth retarded newborns--do thyroid hormones play a role?

    PubMed

    Setia, Sajita; Sridhar, M G; Koner, B C; Bobby, Zachariah; Bhat, Vishnu; Chaturvedula, Lata

    2007-02-01

    Thyroid hormones are necessary for normal brain development. We studied thyroid hormone profile and insulin sensitivity in intrauterine growth retarded (IUGR) newborns to find correlation between insulin sensitivity and thyroid status in IUGR newborns. Fifty IUGR and fifty healthy control infants were studied at birth. Cord blood was collected for determination of T(3), T(4), TSH, glucose and insulin levels. IUGR newborns had significantly lower insulin, mean+/-S.D., 5.25+/-2.81 vs. 11.02+/-1.85microU/ml, but significantly higher insulin sensitivity measured as glucose to insulin ratio (G/I), 9.80+/-2.91 vs. 6.93+/-1.08 compared to healthy newborns. TSH was also significantly higher 6.0+/-2.70 vs. 2.99+/-1.05microU/ml with significantly lower T(4), 8.65+/-1.95 vs. 9.77+/-2.18microg/dl, but similar T(3) levels, 100.8+/-24.36 vs. 101.45+/-23.45ng/dl. On stepwise linear regression analysis in IUGR infants, insulin sensitivity was found to have a significant negative association with T(4) and significant positive association with TSH. Thyroid hormones may play a role in increased insulin sensitivity at birth in IUGR.

  10. A case of myxedema coma caused by isolated thyrotropin stimulating hormone deficiency and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Keiji; Hino, Yasuhisa; Ohara, Takeshi; Chihara, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Myxedema coma (MC) is a rare, but often fatal endocrine emergency. The majority of cases that occur in elderly women with long-standing primary hypothyroidism are caused by particular triggers. Conversely, MC of central origin is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of MC with both central and primary origins. A 56-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital due to loss of consciousness; a chest x-ray demonstrated severe cardiomegaly. Low body temperature, bradycardia, and pericardial effusion suggested the presence of hypothyroidism. Endocrinological examination revealed undetectable levels of serum free thyroxine (T(4)) and free triiodothyronine (T(3)), whereas serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were not elevated. The woman's serum anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody and anti-thyroglobulin antibody tests were positive, indicating that she had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Provocative tests to the anterior pituitary revealed that she had TSH and growth hormone (GH) deficiency; however, GH levels were restored after supplementation with levothyroxine for 5 months. This was not only a rare case of MC with TSH deficiency and Hashimoto's thyroiditis; the patient also developed severe osteoporosis and possessed transient elevated levels of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This atypical case may suggest the role of anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, as well as hypothyroidism, in the regulation of bone metabolism.

  11. Distribution of thyroid hormone and thyrotropin receptors in reproductive tissues of adult female rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Anaya-Hernández, Arely; Méndez-Tepepa, Maribel; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas-Romero, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions are related to anovulation, miscarriages, and infertility in women and laboratory animals. Mechanisms associated with these effects are unknown, although indirect or direct actions of thyroid hormones and thyrotropin could be assumed. The present study aimed to identify the distribution of thyroid hormones (TRs) and thyrotropin (TSHR) receptors in reproductive organs of female rabbits. Ovary of virgin and pregnant rabbits, as well as the oviduct, uterus, and vagina of virgin rabbits were excised, histologically processed, and cut. Slices from these organs were used for immunohistochemical studies for TRα1-2, TRß1, and TSHR. The presence of TRs and TSHR was found in the primordial, primary, secondary, tertiary, and Graafian follicles of virgin rabbits, as well as in the corpora lutea, corpora albicans, and wall of hemorrhagic cysts of pregnant rabbits. Oviductal regions (fimbria-infundibulum, ampulla, isthmus, and utero-tubal junction), uterus (endometrium and myometrium), and vagina (abdominal, pelvic, and perineal portions) of virgin rabbits showed anti-TRs and anti-TSHR immunoreactivity. Additionally, the distal urethra, paravaginal ganglia, levator ani and iliococcygeus muscles, dorsal nerve and body of the clitoris, perigenital skin, and prostate had TRs and TSHR. The wide presence of TRs and TSHR in female reproductive organs suggests varied effects of thyroid hormones and thyrotropin in reproduction.

  12. Persistent Graves' hyperthyroidism despite rapid negative conversion of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assay results: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Kitazawa, Masaru; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Minagawa, Shinichi; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2017-02-06

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by hyperthyroidism, and patients exhibit thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. The major methods of measuring circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody include the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays. Although the diagnostic accuracy of these assays has been improved, a minority of patients with Graves' disease test negative even on second-generation and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins. We report a rare case of a thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin-positive patient with Graves' disease who showed rapid lowering of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin levels following administration of the anti-thyroid drug thiamazole, but still experienced Graves' hyperthyroidism. A 45-year-old Japanese man presented with severe hyperthyroidism (serum free triiodothyronine >25.0 pg/mL; reference range 1.7 to 3.7 pg/mL) and tested weakly positive for thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins on second-generation tests (2.1 IU/L; reference range <1.0 IU/L). Within 9 months of treatment with oral thiamazole (30 mg/day), his thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin titers had normalized, but he experienced sustained hyperthyroidism for more than 8 years, requiring 15 mg/day of thiamazole to correct. During that period, he tested negative on all first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays, but thyroid scintigraphy revealed diffuse and increased uptake, and thyroid ultrasound and color flow Doppler imaging showed typical findings of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The possible explanations for serial changes in the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin results in our patient include the presence of thyroid

  13. Effects of thyroid hormones on the antioxidative status in the uterus of young adult rats

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Lingfa; WEI, Quanwei; FEDAIL, Jaafar Sulieman; SHI, Fangxiong; NAGAOKA, Kentaro; WATANABE, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones and oxidative stress play significant roles in the normal functioning of the female reproductive system. Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS), participates in the regulation of thyroid function and is also a good biomarker for assessment of the oxidative stress status. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate effects of thyroid hormones on uterine antioxidative status in young adult rats. Thirty immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hypothyroid (hypo-T) and hyperthyroid (hyper-T). The results showed the body weights decreased significantly in both the hypo-T and hyper-T groups and that uterine weights were decreased significantly in the hypo-T group. The serum concentrations of total triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), as well as estradiol (E2), were significantly decreased in the hypo-T group, but increased in the hyper-T group. The progesterone (P4) concentrations in the hypo- and hyperthyroid rats markedly decreased. Immunohistochemistry results provided evidence that thyroid hormone nuclear receptor α/β (TRα/β) and three NOS isoforms were located in different cell types of rat uteri. The NO content and total NOS and inducible NOS (iNOS) activities were markedly diminished in the hypo-T group but increased in the hyper-T group. Moreover, the activities of both glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) exhibited significant decreases and increases in the hypo-T and hyper-T groups, respectively. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in both the hypo-T and hyper-T groups showed a significant increase. Total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in the hypo- and hyper-T rats markedly decreased. In conclusion, these results indicated that thyroid hormones have an important influence on the modulation of uterine antioxidative status. PMID:25797533

  14. Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Eggesbø, Merete; Thomsen, Cathrine; Jørgensen, Jens V.; Becher, Georg; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date. Objectives To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Methods We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the “Norwegian Human Milk Study” (HUMIS), 2003–2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers. Results The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of magnitude higher. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Conclusions We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed. PMID:21601188

  15. The heterochronic gene Lin28 regulates amphibian metamorphosis through disturbance of thyroid hormone function.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Gundermann, Daniel G; Muñoz, Rosana; Bruno, Renzo; Larraín, Juan

    2017-05-15

    Metamorphosis is a classic example of developmental transition, which involves important morphological and physiological changes that prepare the organism for the adult life. It has been very well established that amphibian metamorphosis is mainly controlled by Thyroid Hormone (TH). Here, we show that the heterochronic gene Lin28 is downregulated during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. Lin28 overexpression before activation of TH signaling delays metamorphosis and inhibits the expression of TH target genes. The delay in metamorphosis is rescued by incubation with exogenous TH, indicating that Lin28 works upstream or parallel to TH. High-throughput analyses performed before any delay on metamorphosis or change in TH signaling showed that overexpression of Lin28 reduces transcript levels of several hormones secreted by the pituitary, including the Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH), and regulates the expression of proteins involved in TH transport, metabolism and signaling, showing that Lin28 disrupts TH function at different levels. Our data demonstrates that the role of Lin28 in controlling developmental transitions is evolutionary conserved and establishes a functional interaction between Lin28 and thyroid hormone function introducing a new regulatory step in perinatal development with implications for our understanding of endocrine disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomics and CSF analyses implicate thyroid hormone in hippocampal sclerosis of aging

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Katsumata, Yuriko; Nho, Kwangsik; Artiushin, Sergey C.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Wang, Wang-Xia; Abner, Erin L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Kukull, Walter A.; Fardo, David W.

    2016-01-01

    We report evidence of a novel pathogenetic mechanism in which thyroid hormone dysregulation contributes to dementia in elderly persons. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 12p12 were the initial foci of our study: rs704180 and rs73069071. These SNPs were identified by separate research groups as risk alleles for non-Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration. We found that the rs73069071 risk genotype was associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) pathology among people with the rs704180 risk genotype (National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center/Alzheimer’s Disease Genetic Consortium data; n=2,113, including 241 autopsy-confirmed HS cases). Further, both rs704180 and rs73069071 risk genotypes were associated with widespread brain atrophy visualized by MRI (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data; n=1,239). In human brain samples from the Braineac database, both rs704180 and rs73069071 risk genotypes were associated with variation in expression of ABCC9, a gene which encodes a metabolic sensor protein in astrocytes. The rs73069071 risk genotype was also associated with altered expression of a nearby astrocyte-expressed gene, SLCO1C1. Analyses of human brain gene expression databases indicated that the chromosome 12p12 locus may regulate particular astrocyte-expressed genes induced by the active form of thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine (T3). This is informative biologically because the SLCO1C1 protein transports thyroid hormone into astrocytes from blood. Guided by the genomic data, we tested the hypothesis that altered thyroid hormone levels could be detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from persons with HS pathology. Total T3 levels in CSF were elevated in HS cases (p<0.04 in two separately analyzed groups), but not in Alzheimer’s disease cases, relative to controls. No change was detected in the serum levels of thyroid hormone (T3 or T4) in a subsample of HS cases prior to death. We conclude that brain thyroid hormone

  17. Thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism: US national assessment.

    PubMed

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Mwangi, Raphael; McCoy, Rozalina G; Yao, Xiaoxi; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Singh Ospina, Naykky M; O'Keeffe, Derek T; De Ycaza, Ana E Espinosa; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Coddington, Charles C; Stan, Marius N; Brito, Juan P; Montori, Victor M

    2017-01-25

     To estimate the effectiveness and safety of thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism.  Retrospective cohort study.  Large US administrative database between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014.  5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as untreated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration 2.5-10 mIU/L.  Thyroid hormone therapy.  Pregnancy loss and other pre-specified maternal and fetal pregnancy related adverse outcomes.  Among 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, 843 with a mean pre-treatment TSH concentration of 4.8 (SD 1.7) mIU/L were treated with thyroid hormone and 4562 with a mean baseline TSH concentration of 3.3 (SD 0.9) mIU/L were not treated (P<0.01). Pregnancy loss was significantly less common among treated women (n=89; 10.6%) than among untreated women (n=614; 13.5%) (P<0.01). Compared with the untreated group, treated women had lower adjusted odds of pregnancy loss (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.82) but higher odds of preterm delivery (1.60, 1.14 to 2.24), gestational diabetes (1.37, 1.05 to 1.79), and pre-eclampsia (1.61, 1.10 to 2.37); other pregnancy related adverse outcomes were similar between the two groups. The adjusted odds of pregnancy loss were lower in treated women than in untreated women if their pre-treatment TSH concentration was 4.1-10 mIU/L (odds ratio 0.45, 0.30 to 0.65) but not if it was 2.5-4.0 mIU/L (0.91, 0.65 to 1.23) (P<0.01).  Thyroid hormone treatment was associated with decreased risk of pregnancy loss among women with subclinical hypothyroidism, especially those with pre-treatment TSH concentrations of 4.1-10 mIU/L. However, the increased risk of other pregnancy related adverse outcomes calls for additional studies evaluating the safety of thyroid hormone treatment in this patient population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  18. THYROID STATUS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE SITES ON LAKE OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to environmental contaminants has been shown to alter normal thyroid function in various wildlife species, including the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Abnormalities in circulating levels of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) have been reported in juven...

  19. Disruption of thyroid hormone functions by low dose exposure of tributyltin: an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2014-09-15

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin chloride (TBTCl), are environmental contaminants that are commonly found in the antifouling paints used in ships and other vessels. The importance of TBTCl as an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) in different animal models is well known; however, its adverse effects on the thyroid gland are less understood. Hence, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the thyroid-disrupting effects of this chemical using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. We used HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells for the in vitro studies, as they are a thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-positive and thyroid responsive cell line. For the in vivo studies, Swiss albino male mice were exposed to three doses of TBTCl (0.5, 5 and 50μg/kg/day) for 45days. TBTCl showed a hypo-thyroidal effect in vivo. Low-dose treatment of TBTCl exposure markedly decreased the serum thyroid hormone levels via the down-regulation of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (Tg) genes by 40% and 25%, respectively, while augmenting the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expression was up-regulated in the thyroid glands of treated mice by 6.6-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice (p<0.05). In the transient transactivation assays, TBTCl suppressed T3 mediated transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, TBTCl was found to decrease the expression of TR. The present study thus indicates that low concentrations of TBTCl suppress TR transcription by disrupting the physiological concentrations of T3/T4, followed by the recruitment of NCoR to TR, providing a novel insight into the thyroid hormone-disrupting effects of this chemical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endocrinology Update: Thyroid Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid disease affects nearly every organ system in the body. Hypothyroidism is a state of thyroid hormone insufficiency that results in decreased metabolism and secondary effects including fatigue and weight gain. Primary hypothyroidism typically is a result of autoimmune thyroiditis or iodine deficiency and is assessed by measurement of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level. This level usually is elevated in patients with hypothyroidism and low in patients with hyperthyroidism. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice for hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a state of thyroid hormone excess, which increases the metabolic rate and causes symptoms including anxiety and tremor. Graves disease is the most common etiology in developed countries. Patients with hyperthyroidism are evaluated with measurement of TSH and free thyroxine levels. Management options include antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, and surgery. Thyroid nodules are detected commonly in family medicine, and may or may not be associated with thyroid hormone abnormalities. Patients with thyroid nodules should be evaluated with TSH level measurement and thyroid ultrasonography to guide further testing. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  1. Neurodevelopment and Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition in the Rat: Quantitative Understanding Within the Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormones (TH) are needed for proper brain development, deficiencies may lead to adverse neurological outcomes in humans and animal models. Environmental chemicals have been linked to TH disruption, yet the relationship between developmental exposures an...

  2. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Make Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe thyroid hormone (TH) deficiency during critical phases of brain development results in irreversible neurological and cognitive impairments. The mechanisms accounting for this are likely multifactorial, and are not fully understood. Here we pursue the possibility that one i...

  3. Thyroid Hormone Disruption Effects Lamination of the Neocortex but not the Cerebellum in a Model of Developmental Hypothyroidism and Hypothyroxinemia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Research on neurodevelopmental changes resulting from thyroid hormone (TH) disruption has important basic and clinical implications. We previously demonstrated, in a rodent model, that developmental hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia can cause ...

  4. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS OF THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION IN MICE BY BDE 47, A MAJOR POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER CONGENER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Polybromindated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of polyhalogenated aromatic compounds commercially used as fire retardants in consumer products. These compounds have been shown to decrease thyroid hormone concentrations in rodents after acute exposures. Based on t...

  5. The Thyroid Registry: Clinical and Hormonal Characteristics of Adult Indian Patients with Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bipin; Barua, Sumitav; Raghavendra, M S; Gotur, Jagdish; Khandelwal, Deepak; Vyas, Upal

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate treatment of hypothyroidism requires accurate diagnosis. This registry aimed to study the disease profile and treatment paradigm in hypothyroid patients in India. We registered 1500 newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve, adult hypothyroid males and nonpregnant females across 33 centers and collected relevant data from medical records. The first analysis report on baseline data is presented here. The mean age of the study population was 41.1 ± 14.01 years with a female to male ratio of 7:3. The most frequently reported symptoms and signs were fatigue (60.17%) and weight gain with poor appetite (36.22%). Menstrual abnormalities were reported in all women ( n = 730) who had not attained menopause. Grades 1 and 2 goiter (as per the WHO) were observed in 15.41% and 3.27% patients, respectively. Comorbidities were reported in 545 patients (36.36%), type 2 diabetes mellitus being the most prevalent (13.54%) followed by hypertension (11.34%). Total serum thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were assessed in 291 (19.47%) patients only. In majority of patients (81%), treatment was based on serum TSH levels alone. The dose of levothyroxine ranged from 12.5 to 375 mcg. Guidelines suggest a diagnosis of hypothyroidism based on TSH and T4 levels. However, most of the patients as observed in this registry received treatment with levothyroxine based on TSH levels alone, thus highlighting the need for awareness and scientific education among clinicians in India. The use of standard doses (100, 75, and 25 mcg) of levothyroxine may point toward empirical management practices.

  6. Thyroiditis de Quervain. Are there predictive factors for long-term hormone-replacement?

    PubMed

    Schenke, S; Klett, R; Braun, S; Zimny, M

    2013-01-01

    Subacute thyroiditis is a usually self-limiting disease of the thyroid. However, approximately 0.5-15% of the patients require permanent thyroxine substitution. Aim was to determine predictive factors for the necessity of long-term hormone-replacement (LTH). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 72 patients with subacute thyroiditis. Morphological and serological parameters as well as type of therapy were tested as predictive factors of consecutive hypothyroidism. Mean age was 49 ± 11 years, f/m-ratio was 4.5 : 1. Thyroid pain and signs of hyperthyroidism were leading symptoms. Initial subclinical or overt hyperthyroidism was found in 20% and 37%, respectively. Within six months after onset 15% and 1.3% of the patients developed subclinical or overt hypothyroidism, respectively. At latest follow-up 26% were classified as liable to LTH. At onset the thyroid was enlarged in 64%, and at latest follow-up in 8.3%, with a significant reduction of the thyroid volume after three months. At the endpoint the thyroid volume was less in patients in the LTH group compared with the non-LTH group (41.7% vs. 57.2% of sex-adjusted upper norm, p = 0.041). Characteristic ultrasonographic features occurred in 74% of the patients in both lobes. Serological and morphological parameters as well as type of therapy were not related with the need of LTH. In this study the proportion of patients who received LTH was 26%. At the endpoint these patients had a lower thyroid volume compared with euthyroid patients. No predictive factors for LTH were found.

  7. Influence of maternal thyroid hormones during gestation on fetal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Moog, Nora K.; Entringer, Sonja; Heim, Christine; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Kathmann, Norbert; Buss, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play an obligatory role in many fundamental processes underlying brain development and maturation. The developing embryo/fetus is dependent on maternal supply of TH. The fetal thyroid gland does not commence THs synthesis until mid gestation, and the adverse consequences of severe maternal TH deficiency on offspring neurodevelopment are well established. Recent evidence suggests that even more moderate forms of maternal thyroid dysfunction, particularly during early gestation, may have a long-lasting influence on child cognitive development and risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. Moreover, these observed alterations appear to be largely irreversible after birth. It is, therefore, important to gain a better understanding of the role of maternal thyroid dysfunction on offspring neurodevelopment in terms of the nature, magnitude, time-specificity, and context-specificity of its effects. With respect to the issue of context specificity, it is possible that maternal stress and stress-related biological processes during pregnancy may modulate maternal thyroid function. The possibility of an interaction between the thyroid and stress systems in the context of fetal brain development has, however, not been addressed to date. We begin this review with a brief overview of TH biology during pregnancy and a summary of the literature on its effect on the developing brain. Next, we consider and discuss whether and how processes related to maternal stress and stress biology may interact with and modify the effects of maternal thyroid function on offspring brain development. We synthesize several research areas and identify important knowledge gaps that may warrant further study. The scientific and public health relevance of this review relates to achieving a better understanding of the timing, mechanisms and contexts of thyroid programming of brain development, with implications for early identification of risk, primary prevention and intervention. PMID

  8. Hormonal and reproductive risk factors of papillary thyroid cancer: A population-based case-control study in France.

    PubMed

    Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Leux, Christophe; Neri, Monica; Tcheandjieu, Catherine; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Schvartz, Claire; Truong, Thérèse; Guénel, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    The three times higher incidence of thyroid cancer in women compared to men points to a role of female sex hormones in its etiology. However the effects of these factors are poorly understood. We analyzed the association between thyroid cancer and hormonal and reproductive factors among women enrolled in CATHY, a population-based case-control study conducted in France. The study included 430 cases of papillary thyroid cancer and 505 controls frequency-matched on age and area of residence. The odds ratios for thyroid cancer increased with age at menarche (p trend 0.05). Postmenopausal women were at increased risk, as compared to premenopausal women, particularly if menopause followed an ovariectomy, and for women with age at menopause <55years. In addition, use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy reduced the association with thyroid cancer by about one third, and breastfeeding by 27%. Overall, these findings provide evidence that the risk of thyroid cancer increases with later age at menarche and after menopause, and decreases with use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy. These findings confirm an implication of hormonal factors in papillary thyroid cancer risk, whose mechanisms need to be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of adrenaline and noradrenaline on hormone secretion and blood flow from the thyroid vein in sheep with exteriorized thyroids.

    PubMed

    Falconer, I R

    1967-02-01

    1. Emotional stimulus to the sheep has previously been shown to cause increased thyroid hormone secretion; the influence of adrenaline and noradrenaline in this process has been investigated.2. Sheep bearing exteriorized thyroid glands on carotid artery-jugular vein loops were used. Thyroid vein blood was collected through a cannula in the jugular vein within the loop, and blood flow was measured by a plethysmographic technique.3. (131)I (50 muc) was injected intramuscularly (I.M.) into the sheep, and 4-7 days later the concentration of total and protein bound (131)I in thyroid vein blood was measured in samples taken every 10 min for 4 hr. Intracarotid injections of 1 mug, I.V. injections of 5 mug, or I.V. infusions at 10 mug/min for 10 min, of adrenaline or noradrenaline were administered 1.5 hr after commencement of sampling. Blood flow from the thyroid was measured in similar experiments.4. No significant changes in thyroid hormone secretion could be attributed to adrenaline or noradrenaline, and it was concluded that circulating catecholamines do not influence the release of thyroid hormone observed after brief emotional stimulus in the sheep.

  10. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    PubMed Central

    Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an “unacceptable health risk” during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. PMID:26696010

  11. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Effect of an anti-inflammatory dose of prednisone on thyroid hormone monitoring in hypothyroid dogs.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah H; Frank, Linda A; Reynolds, Lisa M

    2011-04-01

    It is not uncommon for a hypothyroid dog to be receiving concurrent corticosteroids. As hypothyroid dogs receiving thyroid supplement need periodic monitoring, knowledge of whether prednisone alters thyroid hormone concentrations would be useful to determine whether testing can or should be done while the dog is receiving therapy and whether dose adjustments are appropriate. In this study, the effect of short-term anti-inflammatory prednisone was determined in dogs with naturally occurring hypothyroidism. Eight adult dogs were given prednisone (1.0 mg/kg, orally) daily for 7 days and then on alternate days for 14 days. Serum total thyroxine (T(4) ), free T(4) (fT(4) ), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured on days 7, 21 and 28 and compared with baseline data. Total T(4) concentrations were significantly decreased after 7 days of anti-inflammatory prednisone, but were not significantly altered from baseline on days 21 or 28. Free T(4) and TSH concentrations were not significantly altered from baseline at any point during the study. Two dogs had decreased total T(4) concentrations on day 7, which may have resulted in an alteration in thyroid supplementation. Results showed that administration of prednisone at a dosage of 1 mg/kg, orally, once daily for 7 days decreased total T(4) , while fT(4) was unchanged, suggesting that fT(4) may be less affected by daily prednisone administration. Anti-inflammatory doses of prednisone administered every other day did not interfere with thyroid hormone monitoring. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Inhibition of Thyroid Hormone Release from Cultured Amphibian Thyroid Glands by Methimazole, 6-Propylthiouracil, and Perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is the development of an in vitro thyroid gland culture system to test the effect of chemicals directly on the gland without influence of other parts of the HPT axis. . . This information can then be used to select chemicals for further evaluation in v...

  14. Gestational urinary bisphenol A and maternal and newborn thyroid hormone concentrations: The HOME Study

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Megan E., E-mail: megan_romano@brown.edu; Webster, Glenys M.; Vuong, Ann M.

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor used in consumer products, may perturb thyroid function. Prenatal BPA exposure may have sex-specific effects on thyroid hormones (THs). Our objectives were to investigate whether maternal urinary BPA concentrations during pregnancy were associated with THs in maternal or cord serum, and whether these associations differed by newborn sex or maternal iodine status. We measured urinary BPA concentrations at 16 and 26 weeks gestation among pregnant women in the HOME Study (2003–2006, Cincinnati, Ohio). Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free and total thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) were measured in maternal serum atmore » 16 weeks (n=181) and cord serum at delivery (n=249). Associations between BPA concentrations and maternal or cord serum TH levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Mean maternal urinary BPA was not associated with cord THs in all newborns, but a 10-fold increase in mean BPA was associated with lower cord TSH in girls (percent change=−36.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −58.4, −1.7%), but not boys (7.8%; 95% CI: −28.5, 62.7%; p-for-effect modification=0.09). We observed no significant associations between 16-week BPA and THs in maternal or cord serum, but 26-week maternal BPA was inversely associated with TSH in girls (−42.9%; 95% CI: −59.9, −18.5%), but not boys (7.6%; 95% CI: −17.3, 40.2%; p-for-effect modification=0.005) at birth. The inverse BPA–TSH relation among girls was stronger, but less precise, among iodine deficient versus sufficient mothers. Prenatal BPA exposure may reduce TSH among newborn girls, particularly when exposure occurs later in gestation. - Highlights: • Examined associations of BPA with thyroid hormones in pregnant women and newborns. • Assessed effect modification of BPA–thyroid hormone associations by newborn sex. • Greater BPA related to decreased thyroid stimulating hormone in girls' cord serum. • Results

  15. Thyroid hormone regulation of adult intestinal stem cells: Implications on intestinal development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guihong; Roediger, Julia; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are essential for organ homeostasis, tissue repair and regeneration. The formation of such stem cells often takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals when plasma thyroid hormone concentration is high. The life-long self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium has made mammalian intestine a valuable model to study the function and regulation and adult stem cells. On the other hand, much less is known about how the adult intestinal stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Here, we will review some recent progresses on this subject, focusing mainly on the formation of the adult intestine during Xenopus metamorphosis. We will discuss the role of thyroid hormone signaling pathway in the process and potential molecular conservations between amphibians and mammals as well as the implications in organ homeostasis and human diseases.

  16. Comparison of cortisol and thyroid hormones between tuberculosis-suspect and healthy elephants of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Brown, Janine L; Thapaliya, Sharada; Dhakal, Ishwari P; Mikota, Susan K; Gairhe, Kamal P; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    We compared cortisol and thyroid hormone (T3 and T4) concentrations between tuberculosis (TB)-suspected (n=10) and healthy (n=10) elephants of Nepal. Whole blood was collected from captive elephants throughout Nepal, and TB testing was performed using the ElephantTB STAT-PAK ® and DPP VetTB ® serological assays that detect antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis in elephant serum. Cortisol, T3 and T4 were quantified by competitive enzyme immunoassays, and the results showed no significant differences in hormone concentrations between TB-suspect and healthy elephants. These preliminary data suggest neither adrenal nor thyroid function is altered by TB disease status. However, more elephants, including those positively diagnosed for TB by trunk wash cultures, need to be evaluated over time to confirm results.

  17. Myopathy in hyperthyroidism as a consequence of rapid reduction of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianrui; Liu, Yuping; Zhang, Qianying; Tian, Haoming; Li, Jianwei; Li, Sheyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Myalgia and elevated creatine kinase (CK) are occasionally observed during the treatment of hyperthyroid patients. Relative hypothyroidism resulted from rapid thyroid hormone reduction had been promoted as a plausible cause of these myopathic changes, however rarely reported. Patient concerns: We hereby presented a 20-year-old female with Grave's disease, who developed myopathy and elevated CK during rapid correction of thyroid hormone. Diagnoses: Relative hypothyroidism-induced myopathy. Interventions: Antithyroid drug (ATD) dosage was reduced without levothyroxine replacement. Outcomes: The muscular symptoms were recovered with CK level returned to normal after adoption of the euthyroid status. Lessons: Differentiation of relative hypothyroidism from other causes of myopathy, especially with the effect of ATD, is important for clinical practice, although difficult in many cases. PMID:28746208

  18. Myopathy in hyperthyroidism as a consequence of rapid reduction of thyroid hormone: A case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianrui; Liu, Yuping; Zhang, Qianying; Tian, Haoming; Li, Jianwei; Li, Sheyu

    2017-07-01

    Myalgia and elevated creatine kinase (CK) are occasionally observed during the treatment of hyperthyroid patients. Relative hypothyroidism resulted from rapid thyroid hormone reduction had been promoted as a plausible cause of these myopathic changes, however rarely reported. We hereby presented a 20-year-old female with Grave's disease, who developed myopathy and elevated CK during rapid correction of thyroid hormone. Relative hypothyroidism-induced myopathy. Antithyroid drug (ATD) dosage was reduced without levothyroxine replacement. The muscular symptoms were recovered with CK level returned to normal after adoption of the euthyroid status. Differentiation of relative hypothyroidism from other causes of myopathy, especially with the effect of ATD, is important for clinical practice, although difficult in many cases.

  19. Effects of thyroid hormone manipulation on pre-nuptial molt, luteinizing hormone and testicular growth in male white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leuchophrys gambelii).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Jonathan H; Meddle, Simone L; Wingfield, John C; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2018-01-01

    Most seasonal species rely on the annual change in day length as the primary cue to appropriately time major spring events such as pre-nuptial molt and breeding. Thyroid hormones are thought to be involved in the regulation of both of these spring life history stages. Here we investigated the effects of chemical inhibition of thyroid hormone production using methimazole, subsequently coupled with either triiodothyronine (T3) or thyroxine (T4) replacement, on the photostimulation of pre-nuptial molt and breeding in Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leuchophrys gambelii). Suppression of thyroid hormones completely prevented pre-nuptial molt, while both T3 and T4 treatment restored normal patterns of molt in thyroid hormone-suppressed birds. Testicular recrudescence was blocked by methimazole, and restored by T4 but not T3, in contrast to previous findings demonstrating central action of T3 in the photostimulation of breeding. Methimazole and replacement treatments elevated plasma luteinizing hormone levels compared to controls. These data are partially consistent with existing theories on the role of thyroid hormones in the photostimulation of breeding, while highlighting the possibility of additional feedback pathways. Thus we suggest that regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonad axis that controls breeding may be more complex than previously considered. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CARDIAC STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ABNORMALITIES IN FEMALES WITH UNTREATED HYPOPITUITARISM DUE TO SHEEHAN SYNDROME: RESPONSE TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Ramzan, Mahroosa; Allai, Mohd Sultan; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Data on cardiac abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism are limited. We investigated echocardiographic abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism and their response to treatment. Twenty-three females with treatment-naïve hypopituitarism and 30 matched healthy controls were evaluated for cardiac structure and function. Echocardiographic evaluation was done at presentation and after achieving a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Fourteen (61%) patients had mitral regurgitation, and 11 (48%) had pericardial effusion as against none among controls. Indices of left ventricular (LV) size like LV end diastolic dimension (LVEDD; 44.5 ± 3.5 mm in cases vs. 47.6 ± 3.8 mm in controls, P = .004), and LV diastolic volume (LVEDV; 91.8 ± 18.0 mL versus 106.5 ± 20.4 mL, P = .009) were significantly lower in the SS group compared with controls. LV mass (LVM) was 70.8 ± 19.2 g in cases and 108.0 ± 33.2 g in controls (P = .02). Similarly, indices of LV systolic function like stroke volume (SV; 59.1 ± 12.0 mL in cases and 74.4 ± 15.8 mL in controls; P = .000), ejection fraction (EF; 64.3 ± 6.2 % in cases against 69.9 ± 9.2 % in controls; P = .03), and fractional shortening (FS; 34.9 ± 4.7% versus 40.1 ± 4.4%, P = .000) were significantly decreased in patients compared with controls. Cardiac abnormalities normalized with restoration of a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Pericardial effusion, mitral regurgitation, and diminished LVM are common in females with untreated hypopituitarism. ACTH = adrenocorticotrophic hormone BMI = body mass index DT = deceleration time EDV = end-diastolic volume EF = ejection fraction FS = fractional shortening GH = growth hormone IGF-1 = insulin growth factor-1 ITT = insulin tolerance test IVSd = interventricular septal diameter LH = luteinizing hormone LV = left ventricular LVEDD = LV end diastolic dimension LVEDV = LV end diastolic volume LVM = LV mass MRI = magnetic resonance imaging MVP = mitral value prolapse PPH

  1. Thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies as a predictor of thyrosuppressive drug therapy outcome in Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Aleksandar Z; Aleksić, Željka; Manić, Saška; Mitov, Vladimir; Jolić, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease is autoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by pathological stimulation of thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies. The decision on changing the therapy can be made on time by determining the prognostic factors of thyrosuppressive drug therapy outcome. The aim of the study was to determine the significance of thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies level on the prediction of therapy outcome. The study was prospective and involved 106 drug-treated patients with newly diagnosed Graves' disease. Thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies level was measured at the beginning of therapy, during therapy and 12 months after it had been introduced. No statistically significant difference in the level of thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies was found at the beginning of disease and 12 months after the introduction of thyrosuppressive drug therapy among the patients who had been in remission and those who had not. Regardless of the outcome, thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies level significantly decreased in all patients 12 months after the therapy had been introduced. The level of thyroid-stimulation hormone-receptor antibodies at the beginning of disease and 12 months after the introduction of therapy cannot predict the outcome of thyrosuppressive drug therapy.

  2. [A symptomatic parathyroid adenoma. Value of parathyroid hormone determination through selective catheterization of the thyroid veins].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Dutau, G; Manelfe, C; Bouissou, H; Rochiccioli, P

    1977-02-01

    A parathyroid adenoma is reported in a girl aged 12 years in whom hypercalcaemia was discovered by chance. Investigation of calcium metabolism suggested the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism and studies of the urinary cyclic AMP and determination of the plasma parathyroid hormone concentration further added to the evidence. The diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma was made after determination of the parathyroid hormone concentration at various sights during selective catheterization of the tyroid veins. This was confirmed at surgery. In this patient the place of catheterization of the inferior thyroid veins in the early diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is discussed.

  3. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of thyroid hormones and transforming growth factor-β1 on cystatin C concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kotajima, N; Yanagawa, Y; Aoki, T; Tsunekawa, K; Morimura, T; Ogiwara, T; Nara, M; Murakami, M

    2010-01-01

    Serum cystatin C concentrations are reported to increase in the hyperthyroid state. Serum concentrations of cystatin C and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in patients with thyroid dysfunction, and the effects of 3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T(3)) and TGF-β1 on cystatin C production in human hepatoblastoma (Hep G2) cells were studied. Serum concentrations of cystatin C and TGF-β1 were significantly higher in patients with Graves' disease compared with control subjects. Significantly positive correlations were observed between thyroid hormones and cystatin C, thyroid hormones and TGF-β1, and TGF-β1 and cystatin C in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Serum concentrations of cystatin C and TGF-β1 decreased after treatment for hyperthyroidism. Cystatin C mRNA levels and cystatin C secretion were increased by T(3) and TGF-β1 in cultured Hep G2 cells. These results suggest that serum cystatin C concentrations increase in patients with hyperthyroidism. The mechanisms for this may involve elevation of serum TGF-β1 levels and the stimulatory effects of T(3) and TGF-β1 on cystatin C production.

  5. Thyroid hormone disrupting activities associated with phthalate esters in water sources from Yangtze River Delta.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Zhang, Feng-Xian; Hu, Guan-Jiu; Hao, Ying-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Hong-Ling; Wei, Si; Wang, Xin-Ru; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hong-Xia

    2012-07-01

    Thyroid hormone disrupting compounds in water sources is a concern. Thyroid hormone (TH) agonist and antagonist activities of water sources from the Yangtze River, Huaihe River, Taihu Lake and ground water in the Yangtze River Delta region were evaluated by use of a TH reporter gene assay based on the green monkey kidney fibroblast (CV-1). While weak TH receptor (TR) agonist potency was observed in only one of 15 water sources, antagonist potency was present in most of the water sources. TR antagonist equivalents could be explained by the presence of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), with concentrations ranging from 2.8×10(1) to 1.6×10(3) μg DBP /L (ATR-EQ(50)s). None of the ground waters exhibited TH agonist potencies while all of the samples from Taihu Lake displayed notable TR antagonist potencies. To identify the responsible thyroid active compounds, instrumental analysis was conducted to measure a list of potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals, including organochlorine (OC) pesticides and phthalate esters. Combining the results of the instrumental analysis with those of the bioassay, DBP was determined to account for 17% to 144% of ATR-EQ(50)s in water sources. Furthermore, ATR-EQ(20-80) ranges for TR antagonist activities indicated that samples from locations WX-1 and WX-2 posed the greatest health concern and the associated uncertainty may warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Do Thyroxine and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Levels Reflect Urinary Iodine Concentrations?

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Pezzullo, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of environmental chemicals such as nitrates, thiocynates, and perchlorates, some therapeutics, and dietary goitrogens can lower thyroidal iodine uptake and result in hypothyroidism and goiter. Iodine sufficiency, essential for normal thyroid hormone synthesis, is critical during gestation to assure that sufficient thyroxine (T4) and iodine reach the developing fetus. Spot urinary iodide (UI) measurements are used globally to indicate and monitor iodine sufficiency of populations. In individuals, however, UI are not routinely measured; instead, normal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and T4 concentrations serve as surrogate indicators of iodine sufficiency as well as thyroidal health. Our objective was to examine the relationship between UI concentrations and serum T4 and TSH concentrations in individuals in an ‘‘iodine-sufficient population.’’ Using a cross-sectional sample of the US population (n = 7628) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; 1988–1994) database, we examined the relationship among UI, T4, and TSH in pregnant and nonpregnant women and in men (15–44 years). There was a lack of relationship between UI (or UI/Cr) concentrations and serum T4 or TSH concentrations. Therefore, TSH and T4 are not appropriate markers of UI concentrations in this population. Monitoring the status of iodine nutrition of individuals in the United States may be important because serum TSH and T4 concentrations do not indicate low iodine status. PMID:15795649

  7. The Role of Thyroid Hormones as Inductors of Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, I.; Alva-Sánchez, C.; Pacheco-Rosado, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are oxidizing agents amply implicated in tissue damage. ROS production is inevitably linked to ATP synthesis in most cells, and the rate of production is related to the rate of cell respiration. Multiple antioxidant mechanisms limit ROS dispersion and interaction with cell components, but, when the balance between ROS production and scavenging is lost, oxidative damage develops. Many traits of aging are related to oxidative damage by ROS, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thyroid hormones (THs) are a major factor controlling metabolic and respiratory rates in virtually all cell types in mammals. The general metabolic effect of THs is a relative acceleration of the basal metabolism that includes an increase of the rate of both catabolic and anabolic reactions. THs are related to oxidative stress not only by their stimulation of metabolism but also by their effects on antioxidant mechanisms. Thyroid dysfunction increases with age, so changes in THs levels in the elderly could be a factor affecting the development of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the relationship is not always clear. In this review, we analyze the participation of thyroid hormones on ROS production and oxidative stress, and the way the changes in thyroid status in aging are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24386502

  8. Possible implications of leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin in the regulation of energy homeostasis by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Alexander; Mourouzis, Iordanis; Kyriaki, Despoina; Pantos, Constantinos; Katsilambros, Nicholas; Cokkinos, Dennis V

    2007-08-01

    Thyroid hormone plays a critical role in energy homeostasis through mechanisms, which are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated possible alterations of important energy regulators such as leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin in relation to changes in thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormone (250 microg/kg) was administered in male Wistar rats for 2 weeks (THYR), while hypothyroidism (HYPO) was induced by propylthiouracil administration (0.05% in drinking water) for 3 weeks. Untreated animals served as controls (NORM). Leptin and adiponectin were measured in plasma by ELISA, while total ghrelin was measured with RIA. Body weight was significantly reduced both in THYR and HYPO rats, while food intake was significantly increased in THYR and decreased in HYPO. This response was associated with various changes in leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin in plasma. In fact, in THYR rats, leptin levels (mean +/- SEM) were 240 +/- 55 pg/ml as compared to 819 +/- 70 pg/ml in untreated rats (P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in ghrelin and adiponectin. In HYPO rats, leptin levels were 1400 +/- 200 pg/ml vs. 819 +/- 70 pg/ml in untreated rats (P < 0.05), while ghrelin and adiponectin were significantly increased in HYPO rats as compared to untreated rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, T(3) and T(4) levels were inversely correlated to leptin (P = 0.014), while ghrelin and adiponectin were inversely correlated to weight changes (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). In conclusion, leptin seems mainly to be involved in the thyroid hormone effects on energy homeostasis. Ghrelin and adiponectin may serve a compensatory physiological role in hypothyroidism.

  9. Mechanism of action of a nanomolar potent, allosteric antagonist of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    van Koppen, Chris J; de Gooyer, Marcel E; Karstens, Willem-Jan; Plate, Ralf; Conti, Paolo GM; van Achterberg, Tanja AE; van Amstel, Monique GA; Brands, Jolanda HGM; Wat, Jesse; Berg, Rob JW; Lane, J Robert D; Miltenburg, Andre MM; Timmers, C Marco

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which the thyroid is overactive, producing excessive amounts of thyroid hormones, caused by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSIs). Many GD patients also suffer from thyroid eye disease (Graves' ophthalmopathy or GO), as TSIs also activate TSH receptors in orbital tissue. We recently developed low molecular weight (LMW) TSH receptor antagonists as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of GD and GO. Here, we determined the molecular pharmacology of a prototypic, nanomolar potent LMW TSH receptor antagonist, Org 274179-0. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using CHO cells heterogeneously expressing human TSH receptors and rat FRTL-5 cells endogenously expressing rat TSH receptors, we determined the potency and efficacy of Org 274179-0 at antagonizing TSH- and TSI-induced TSH receptor signalling and its cross-reactivity at related follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone receptors. We analysed the allosteric mode of interaction of Org 274179-0 and determined whether it is an inverse agonist at five naturally occurring, constitutively active TSH receptor mutants. KEY RESULTS Nanomolar concentrations of Org 274179-0 completely inhibited TSH (and TSI)-mediated TSH receptor activation with little effect on the potency of TSH, in accordance with an allosteric mechanism of action. Conversely, increasing levels of TSH receptor stimulation only marginally reduced the antagonist potency of Org 274179-0. Org 274179-0 fully blocked the increased basal activity of all the constitutively active TSH receptor mutants tested with nanomolar potencies. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Nanomolar potent TSH receptor antagonists like Org 274179-0 have therapeutic potential for the treatment of GD and GO. PMID:22014107

  10. Light-Regulated Thyroid Hormone Signaling Is Required for Rod Photoreceptor Development in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Onkar; Horton, Amanda M; Shukla, Meenal; Rayborn, Mary E; Peachey, Neal S; Hollyfield, Joe G; Rao, Sujata

    2015-12-01

    Ambient light is both a stimulus for visual function and a regulator of photoreceptor physiology. However, it is not known if light can regulate any aspect of photoreceptor development. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ambient light is required for the development of mouse rod photoreceptors. Newborn mouse pups (C57BL/6) were reared in either cyclic light (LD) or constant dark (DD). Pups were collected at postnatal day (P)5, P10, P17, or P24. We performed retinal morphometric and cell death analysis at P5, P10, and P17. Rhodopsin expression was assessed using immunofluorescence, Western blot, and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Electroretinograms were performed at P17 and P24. Radioimmunoassay and ELISA were used to follow changes in thyroid hormone levels in the serum and vitreous. In the DD pups, the outer nuclear layer was significantly thinner at P10 and there were higher numbers of apoptotic cells at P5 compared to the LD pups. Rhodopsin expression was lower at P10 and P17 in DD pups. Electroretinogram a-waves were reduced in amplitude at P17 in the DD pups. The DD animals had lower levels of circulating thyroid hormones at P10. Light-mediated changes in thyroid hormones occur as early as P5, as we detected lower levels of total triiodothyronine in the vitreous from the DD animals. Drug-induced developmental hypothyroidism resulted in lower rhodopsin expression at P10. Our data demonstrate that light exposure during postnatal development is required for rod photoreceptor development and that this effect could be mediated by thyroid hormone signaling.

  11. Thyroid hormone stimulates progesterone release from human luteal cells by generating a proteinaceous factor.

    PubMed

    Datta, M; Roy, P; Banerjee, J; Bhattacharya, S

    1998-09-01

    Blood samples collected from 29 women (aged between 19 and 35 years) during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle (between days 18 and 23 of the cycle) showed that deficiency in thyroid hormone level is related to a decrease in progesterone (P4) secretion. To observe the effect of thyroid hormone on human ovarian luteal cells, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3; 125 ng/ml) was added to luteal cells in vitro. T3 significantly stimulated progesterone release (P < 0.01) from luteal cells and this could be blocked by cycloheximide, indicating a protein mediator for the T3 effect. The T3 stimulatory effect was inhibited by anti-T3 antibody suggesting specificity of T3 action. Addition of T3 caused a more than threefold increase in cellular protein synthesis which was inhibited by cycloheximide. Preparation of partially purified thyroid hormone-induced factor (TIF) (from peak II of Sephadex G 100 chromatography of T3-incubated cells), and its addition to luteal cell incubations caused a significant increase in P4 release (P < 0.05). Incubation with trypsin or treatment with heat destroyed the stimulatory effect of TIF on P4 release, indicating the proteinaceous nature of TIF. Purified thyroid hormone-induced protein. (TIP) from rat granulosa cells and fish ovarian follicles greatly stimulated P4 release from human luteal cells. These results suggest that T3 stimulation of P4 release from human luteal cells is not direct, but is mediated through a putative protein factor, which appears to be a protein conserved through evolution as far as its biological activity is concerned.

  12. Thyroid hormone and COUP-TF1 regulate kallikrein-binding protein (KBP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Yun; Nakatani, Teruyo; Kogai, Takahiko; Mody, Kaizeen; Brent, Gregory A

    2011-03-01

    Kallikrein-binding protein (KBP) is a component of the kallikrein-kinin system that mediates vasodilation and inhibits tumor growth by antagonizing vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis. We demonstrate that KBP gene expression is repressed by T(3) and modulated by the orphan nuclear receptor, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF1). In hypothyroid mice, KBP mRNA expression in the testis was increased 2.1-fold compared with euthyroid mice. We have identified two negative thyroid hormone response elements (nTREs) in the mouse KBP gene, nTRE1 located in the 5' flanking region (-53 to -29) and nTRE2, located in the first intron (104-132). We used functional assays, cofactor knockdown, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays to characterize nTRE1 and nTRE2 in hepatic (HepG2) and testes (GC-1spg) cell lines. Reporter expression directed by both elements was enhanced with addition of thyroid hormone receptor and repressed with the addition of T(3). COUP-TF1 enhanced basal expression of both elements but blunted unliganded thyroid hormone receptor enhancement and T(3) repression of nTRE1 but not nTRE2. Both nTREs bound nuclear corepressor and binding increased in response to T(3). Nuclear corepressor knockdown resulted in loss of T(3) repression of both nTRE1 and nTRE2. COUP-TF1, which usually represses T(3) induction of positive thyroid hormone response elements, reverses T(3) repression mediated by nTRE1 in the mouse KBP gene. Endogenous KBP expression is repressed by T(3) and two functional nTREs, both of which are required, have been characterized in the KBP gene. COUP-TF1 may be an important factor to modulate expression of genes that are repressed by T(3).

  13. Thyroid Hormone and COUP-TF1 Regulate Kallikrein-Binding Protein (KBP) Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Yun; Nakatani, Teruyo; Kogai, Takahiko; Mody, Kaizeen

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein-binding protein (KBP) is a component of the kallikrein-kinin system that mediates vasodilation and inhibits tumor growth by antagonizing vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis. We demonstrate that KBP gene expression is repressed by T3 and modulated by the orphan nuclear receptor, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF1). In hypothyroid mice, KBP mRNA expression in the testis was increased 2.1-fold compared with euthyroid mice. We have identified two negative thyroid hormone response elements (nTREs) in the mouse KBP gene, nTRE1 located in the 5′ flanking region (−53 to −29) and nTRE2, located in the first intron (104–132). We used functional assays, cofactor knockdown, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays to characterize nTRE1 and nTRE2 in hepatic (HepG2) and testes (GC-1spg) cell lines. Reporter expression directed by both elements was enhanced with addition of thyroid hormone receptor and repressed with the addition of T3. COUP-TF1 enhanced basal expression of both elements but blunted unliganded thyroid hormone receptor enhancement and T3 repression of nTRE1 but not nTRE2. Both nTREs bound nuclear corepressor and binding increased in response to T3. Nuclear corepressor knockdown resulted in loss of T3 repression of both nTRE1 and nTRE2. COUP-TF1, which usually represses T3 induction of positive thyroid hormone response elements, reverses T3 repression mediated by nTRE1 in the mouse KBP gene. Endogenous KBP expression is repressed by T3 and two functional nTREs, both of which are required, have been characterized in the KBP gene. COUP-TF1 may be an important factor to modulate expression of genes that are repressed by T3. PMID:21266512

  14. Evaluation of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone to test thyroid function in dogs suspected of having hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Felicitas S; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Nadja S; Favrot, Claude; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Reusch, Claudia E

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the use of recombinant human (rh) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in dogs with suspected hypothyroidism. 64 dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism. Dogs received rhTSH (75 microg/dog, IV) at a dose independent of their body weight. Blood samples were taken before and 6 hours after rhTSH administration for determination of total serum thyroxine (T(4)) concentration. Dogs were placed into 1 of 3 groups as follows: those with normal (ie, poststimulation values indicative of euthyroidism), unchanged (ie, poststimulation values indicative of hypothyroidism; no thyroid gland stimulation), or intermediate (ie, poststimulation values between unchanged and normal values) post-TSH T(4) concentrations. Serum canine TSH (cTSH) concentration was determined in prestimulation serum (ie, before TSH administration). 14, 35, and 15 dogs had unchanged, normal, and intermediate post-TSH T(4) concentrations, respectively. Basal T(4) and post-TSH T(4) concentrations were significantly different among groups. On the basis of basal serum T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone, 1 euthyroid (normal post-TSH T(4), low basal T(4), and high cTSH concentrations) and 1 hypothyroid dog (unchanged post-TSH T(4) concentration and low to with-in reference range T(4) and cTSH concentrations) would have been misinterpreted as hypothyroid and euthyroid, respectively. Nine of the 15 dogs with intermediate post-TSHT(4) concentrations had received medication known to affect thyroid function prior to the test, and 2 of them had severe nonthyroidal disease. The TSH-stimulation test with rhTSH is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess thyroid function in selected dogs in which a diagnosis of hypothyroidism cannot be based on basal T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone.

  15. Thyroid hormone-induced oxidative damage on lipids, glutathione and DNA in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Gredilla, R; Barja, G; López-Torres, M

    2001-10-01

    Oxygen radicals of mitochondrial origin are involved in oxidative damage. In order to analyze the possible relationship between metabolic rate, oxidative stress and oxidative damage, OF1 female mice were rendered hyper- and hypothyroid by chronic administration of 0.0012% L-thyroxine (T4) and 0.05% 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU), respectively, in their drinking water for 5 weeks. Hyperthyroidism significantly increased the sensitivity to lipid peroxidation in the heart, although the endogenous levels of lipid peroxidation were not altered. Thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress also resulted in higher levels of GSSG and GSSG/GSH ratio. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA was greater than that to genomic DNA. Hyperthyroidism decreased oxidative damage to genomic DNA. Hypothyroidism did not modify oxidative damage in the lipid fraction but significantly decreased GSSG and GSSG/GSH ratio and oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA. These results indicate that thyroid hormones modulate oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, and cellular redox potential in the mouse heart. A higher oxidative stress in the hyperthyroid group is presumably neutralized in the case of nuclear DNA by an increase in repair activity, thus protecting this key molecule. Treatment with PTU, a thyroid hormone inhibitor, reduced oxidative damage in the different cell compartments.

  16. Neuronal expression of a thyroid hormone receptor α mutation alters mouse behaviour.

    PubMed

    Richard, S; Aguilera, N; Thévenet, M; Dkhissi-Benyahya, O; Flamant, F

    2017-03-15

    In humans, alterations in thyroid hormone signalling are associated with mood and anxiety disorders, but the neural mechanisms underlying such association are poorly understood. The present study investigates the involvement of neuronal thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) in anxiety, using mouse genetics and Cre/loxP technology to specifically alter TRα signalling in neurons. We evaluated the behaviour of mice expressing a dominant negative, neuron-specific mutation of TRα (TRα AMI /Cre3 mice), using the elevated-plus maze, light-dark box and open-field tests. In a first experiment, mice were housed individually, and the behaviour of TRα AMI /Cre3 mice differed significantly from that of control littermates in these 3 tests, suggesting heightened anxiety. In a second experiment, designed to evaluate the robustness of the results with the same 3 tests, mice were housed in groups. In these conditions, the behaviour of TRα AMI /Cre3 mice differed from that of control littermates only in the light-dark box. Thus, TRα AMI /Cre3 mice appear to be more likely to develop anxiety under stressful housing conditions than control mice. These results suggest that in adult mice, thyroid hormone signalling in neurons, via TRα, is involved in the control of anxiety behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Influence of phthalates from Shaying river on children's intelligence and secretion of thyroid hormone].

    PubMed

    Li, Anqi; Tang, Chunyu; Hang, Hui; Cheng, Xuemin; Gao, Yalin; Cheng, Hongyang; Huang, Qi; Luo, Yixin; Xue, Yutang; Zuo, Qiting; Ba, Yue; Cui, Liuxin

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effect of phthalates exposure from drinking water on children's intelligence and secretion of thyroid hormone. Two villages in S County were selected randomly as polluted area and control area according to the distance from the Shaying river basin. Phthalates including DEP, DBP, DMP, DEHP were measured both in the river water and drinking water using HPLC method. Children aged 8 to 13 years old studying in the village primary school were recruited by cluster sampling (n = 154). The combined Reven Test was used to test children intelligence and ELISA method was used to determined thyroid hormone levels. The concentrations of phthalates (DEP, DBP) were exceeding standards of surface water quality in any of the three sections of the river. Compared to the control area, the concentration of DEP and DBP in drinking water were significant higher in the polluted area than that in control area (P < 0.05). Children from polluted area had significant higher FT4 concentration compared to children from control area (P < 0.05). Intelligence level in children from polluted area was lower than that from control area (P < 0.05). The drinking water has been polluted by Shaying river and thyroid hormones levels of children were affected in the polluted areas. It is necessary to verify if this change is related to the phthalates.

  18. Prevalence of serum thyroid hormone autoantibodies in dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nachreiner, Raymond F; Refsal, Kent R; Graham, Peter A; Bowman, Mark M

    2002-02-15

    To determine prevalence of thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAA) in serum of dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism. Cohort study. 287,948 serum samples from dogs with clinical signs consistent with hypothyroidism. Serum THAA were detected by use of a radiometric assay. Correlation and chi2 analyses were used to determine whether prevalence varied with breed, age, sex, or body weight. Only breeds for which > or = 50 samples had been submitted were used for analysis of breed prevalence. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies were detected in 18,135 (6.3%) samples. The 10 breeds with the highest prevalence of THAA were the Pointer, English Setter, English Pointer, Skye Terrier, German Wirehaired Pointer, Old English Sheepdog, Boxer, Maltese, Kuvasz, and Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen. Prevalence was significantly correlated with body weight and was highest in dogs between 2 and 4 years old. Females were significantly more likely to have THAA than were males. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies may falsely increase measured triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) concentrations in dogs; results suggest that T3 concentration may be falsely increased in approximately 57 of 1,000 dogs with hypothyroidism and that T4 concentration may be falsely increased in approximately 17 of 1,000 dogs with hypothyroidism. Results also suggested that dogs of certain breeds were significantly more or less likely to have THAA than were dogs in general.

  19. Aloe vera gel and thyroid hormone cream may improve wound healing in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Norouzian, Mohsen; Zarein-Dolab, Saeed; Dadpay, Masoomeh; Mohsenifar, Jaleh; Gazor, Roohollah

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of various treatment options in wound healing have been one of the most controversial issues in surgical science. The present study was carried out to examine and compare the effects of Aloe vera gel, thyroid hormone cream and silver sulfadiazine cream onsutured incisions in Wistar rats. In a randomized controlled trial, thirty-six Wistar male rats, 250 to 300 g, received surgical incisions followed by topical application of Aloe vera gel, thyroid hormone cream and silver sulfadiazine 1%. To assess the efficacy of each treatment technique, a histological approach was used to evaluate the mean number of fibroblasts, macrophages, neutrophils, blood vessel sections and thickness of the regenerating epithelium and dermis on days 4, 7 and 14. Re-epithelialization and angiogenesis were significantly improved in Aloe vera gel group compared with the other treatments while thyroid hormone cream had positive effects on day 4 (P≤0.05). Topical administration of Aloe vera gel is recommended as the treatment of choice for surgical incisions. PMID:23094205

  20. Milrinone and thyroid hormone stimulate myocardial membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity and share structural homologies.

    PubMed Central

    Mylotte, K M; Cody, V; Davis, P J; Davis, F B; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1985-01-01

    We have recently shown that thyroid hormone in physiological concentrations stimulates sarcolemma-enriched rabbit-myocardial-membrane Ca2+-ATPase in vitro. In this study, milrinone [2-methyl-5-cyano-(3,4'-bipyridin)-6(1H)-one], a cardiac inotropic agent, was thyromimetic in the same system. At clinically achievable concentrations (50-500 nM), milrinone significantly stimulated membrane Ca2+-ATPase in vitro. This action was antagonized by W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], an agent that also blocks thyroid hormone action on the Ca2+-ATPase, at concentrations as low as 5 microM. Progressive additions of milrinone to membranes incubated with a fixed concentration of thyroxine (0.10 nM) or triiodothyronine resulted in a progressive obliteration of the thyroid hormone effect on Ca2+-ATPase. Amrinone [5-amino-(3,4'-bipyridin)-6(1H)-one], the parent bipyridine of milrinone, had no effect on myocardial Ca2+-ATPase activity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of milrinone and amrinone revealed structural homologies between the phenolic ring of thyroxine and the substituted ring of milrinone, whereas amrinone did not share these homologies. The mechanism(s) of the inotropic actions of thyroxine and of milrinone is not clearly understood, but these observations implicate Ca2+-ATPase, a calcium pump-associated enzyme, as one mediator of the effects on the heart of these two compounds. PMID:2933747

  1. APPLICATION OF ORGANIC IODINE SPECIES ANALYTICS: DETERMINING THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT DANIO RERIO AND DEVELOPING XENOPUS LAEVIS USING LC/ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of normal thyroid function by xenobiotic chemicals is an important ecological issue. Theoretically, normal thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis and action can be disrupted at several sites in the synthetic and elimination pathways. Indeed, xenobiotic chemicals, which are k...

  2. The prevalence of affective disorder and in particular of a rapid cycling of bipolar disorder in patients with abnormal thyroid function tests.

    PubMed

    Oomen, H A; Schipperijn, A J; Drexhage, H A

    1996-08-01

    Cognitive and affective functioning is sensitive to changes in thyroid hormones. We have sought to determine: (1) the prevalence of thyroid function abnormalities in a psychiatric population on admission (as compared to the prevalence in a normal population), and (2) whether such thyroid function abnormalities are associated with the occurrence or development of cognitive and affective disorders. Serum was collected 2-3 weeks after hospitalization in 3 major clinics from 3756 psychiatric patients in 1987-1990, stored, and assayed in 1993 for the presence of antibodies against the TSH-receptor and thyroperoxidase (TPO-Ab) and for TSH levels. The psychiatric cohort was matched with a control population of healthy individuals living in the same area (n = 1877). The prevalence study was followed by a case-control study involving patients from one clinic that had routinely assigned a DSM-IIIR classification to its patients. Cases were those admissions with thyroid abnormalities and three subgroups of cases were randomly formed demonstrating either TSH less than 0.4 mU/l (n = 44) or over 4.0 mU/l (n = 44), or TPO-Ab positivity (n = 50). Cases were compared to random controls from the same psychiatric population, viz patients without thyroid abnormalities (n = 83). Comparison was with respect to their psychiatric follow-up diagnosis (the investigator was blinded to the thyroid test results). Prevalence study. The percentage of patients positive for TSH-receptor-Ab was 0.26 (9/3504), for TPO-Ab was 10.0 (331/3316) and outside the TSH range of 0.4-4.0 mU/l was 10.0 ((332/3316): 5.9% (198/3316) > 4.0 mU/l and 4.1% (134/3316) < 0.4 mU/l). Abnormal total thyroxine levels were found in only 9.8% of subjects with abnormal TSH, indicating the predominantly subclinical character of the thyroid alteration. In comparison, the healthy area controls over 55 years of age showed the same prevalence of positive TPO-antibodies and TSH under 0.4 mU/l, but a higher prevalence of TSH over 4

  3. Occurrence of thyroid hormone activities in drinking water from eastern China: contributions of phthalate esters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Hu, Xinxin; Zhang, Fengxian; Hu, Guanjiu; Hao, Yingqun; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongling; Wei, Si; Wang, Xinru; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2012-02-07

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the development of humans. However, some synthetic chemicals with thyroid disrupting potentials are detectable in drinking water. This study investigated the presence of thyroid active chemicals and their toxicity potential in drinking water from five cities in eastern China by use of an in vitro CV-1 cell-based reporter gene assay. Waters were examined from several phases of drinking water processing, including source water, finished water from waterworks, tap water, and boiled tap water. To identify the responsible compounds, concentrations and toxic equivalents of a list of phthalate esters were quantitatively determined. None of the extracts exhibited thyroid receptor (TR) agonist activity. Most of the water samples exhibited TR antagonistic activities. None of the boiled water displayed the TR antagonistic activity. Dibutyl phthalate accounted for 84.0-98.1% of the antagonist equivalents in water sources, while diisobutyl phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate also contributed. Approximately 90% of phthalate esters and TR antagonistic activities were removable by waterworks treatment processes, including filtration, coagulation, aerobic biodegradation, chlorination, and ozonation. Boiling water effectively removed phthalate esters from tap water. Thus, this process was recommended to local residents to reduce certain potential thyroid related risks through drinking water.

  4. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 12-18 months, 20% possibility of permanent hypothyroidism. Post partum thyroiditis Anti-thyroid antibodies, autoimmune disease Thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism. Thyroid function tests, thyroid antibody tests, radioactive iodine uptake (contraindicated if ...

  5. Thyroid remnant ablation success and disease outcome in stage III or IV differentiated thyroid carcinoma: recombinant human thyrotropin versus thyroid hormone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Casas, Juan A; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez Moreno, Maria A; Moreno Ortega, Estefanía; Marlowe, Robert J; Maza Muret, Francisco R; Albalá González, María D

    2016-06-01

    Most publications to date compare outcomes after post-surgical thyroid remnant ablation stimulated by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withholding/withdrawal (THW) in low-recurrence risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients. We sought to perform this comparison in high-risk patients. We retrospectively analyzed ~9-year single-center experience in 70 consecutive adults with initial UICC (Union for International Cancer Control) stage III/IV, M0 DTC undergoing rhTSH-aided (N.=54) or THW-aided (N.=16) high-activity ablation. Endpoints included ablation success and DTC outcome. Assessed ≥1 year post-ablation, ablation success comprised a) no visible scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake or pathological extra-thyroidal uptake; b) undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) without interfering autoantibodies; c) both criteria. DTC outcome, determined at the latest visit, comprised either 1) "no evidence of disease" (NED): undetectable Tg, negative Tg autoantibodies, negative most recent whole-body scan, no suspicious findings clinically, on neck ultrasonography, or on other imaging; 2) persistent disease: failure to attain NED; or 3) recurrence: loss of NED. After the first ablative activity, ablation success by scintigraphic plus biochemical criteria was 64.8% in rhTSH patients, 56.3% in THW patients (P=NS). After 3.5-year versus 6.2-year median follow-up (P<0.05), DTC outcomes were NED, 85.2%, persistent disease, 13.0%, recurrence, 1.9%, in the rhTSH group and NED, 87.5%, persistent or recurrent disease, 6.3% each, in the THW group (P=NS). In patients with initial stage III/IV, M0 DTC, rhTSH-aided and THW-assisted ablation were associated with comparable remnant eradication or DTC cure rates.

  6. Association between organophosphate pesticides exposure and thyroid hormones in floriculture workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lacasana, Marina, E-mail: marina.lacasana.easp@juntadeandalucia.e; CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica; Lopez-Flores, Inmaculada

    The ability of organophosphate pesticides to disturb thyroid gland function has been demonstrated by experimental studies on animal, but evidence of such effects on human remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the association between exposure to organophosphate compounds and serum levels of thyroid hormones in floriculture workers. A longitudinal study was conducted on 136 male subjects from the State of Mexico and Morelos, Mexico, occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides, during agricultural periods of high (rainy season) and low (dry season) levels of pesticide application. Using a structured questionnaire, a survey was carried out on sociodemographic characteristics,more » anthropometry, clinical history, alcohol and tobacco consumption, residential chemical exposure, and occupational history. Urine and blood samples were taken the day after pesticide application to determine urine dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels, serum levels of TSH, total T{sub 3}, total T{sub 4}, serum PON1 activity, and serum p,p'-DEE levels. The analysis of the association between DAP levels and thyroid hormonal profile was carried out using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Our results showed an increase in both TSH and T{sub 4} hormones in serum associated with a increase in total dimethylphosphate levels (SIGMADMP) in urine (p-trend < 0.001) and a decrease in total T{sub 3} serum levels with an increase of SIGMADMP levels in the urine (p-trend = 0.053). These results suggest that exposure to organophosphate pesticides may be responsible of increasing TSH and T{sub 4} serum hormone levels and decreasing T{sub 3} serum hormone levels, therefore supporting the hypothesis that organophosphate pesticides act as endocrine disruptors in humans.« less

  7. Over-the-Counter "Adrenal Support" Supplements Contain Thyroid and Steroid-Based Adrenal Hormones.

    PubMed

    Akturk, Halis Kaan; Chindris, Ana Maria; Hines, Jolaine M; Singh, Ravinder J; Bernet, Victor J

    2018-03-01

    To assess whether dietary supplements that are herbal and/or animal-derived products, marketed for enhancing metabolism or promoting energy, "adrenal fatigue," or "adrenal support," contain thyroid or steroid hormones. Twelve dietary adrenal support supplements were purchased. Pregnenolone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, cortisone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, synthetic glucocorticoids (betamethasone, dexamethasone, fludrocortisone, megestrol acetate, methylprednisolone, prednisolone, prednisone, budesonide, and triamcinolone acetonide) levels were measured twice in samples in a blinded fashion. This study was conducted between February 1, 2016, and November 1, 2016. Among steroids, pregnenolone was the most common hormone in the samples. Budesonide, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, cortisol, and cortisone were the others in order of prevalence. All the supplements revealed a detectable amount of triiodothyronine (T3) (63-394.9 ng/tablet), 42% contained pregnenolone (66.12-205.2 ng/tablet), 25% contained budesonide (119.5-610 ng/tablet), 17% contained androstenedione (1.27-7.25 ng/tablet), 8% contained 17-OH progesterone (30.09 ng/tablet), 8% contained cortisone (79.66 ng/tablet), and 8% contained cortisol (138.5 ng/tablet). Per label recommended doses daily exposure was up to 1322 ng for T3, 1231.2 ng for pregnenolone, 1276.4 ng for budesonide, 29 ng for androstenedione, 60.18 ng for 17-OH progesterone, 277 ng for cortisol, and 159.32 ng for cortisone. All the supplements studied contained a small amount of thyroid hormone and most contained at least 1 steroid hormone. This is the first study that measured thyroid and steroid hormones in over-the-counter dietary "adrenal support" supplements in the United States. These results may highlight potential risks of hidden ingredients in unregulated supplements. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hormonal causes of male sexual dysfunctions and their management (hyperprolactinemia, thyroid disorders, GH disorders, and DHEA).

    PubMed

    Maggi, Mario; Buvat, Jaques; Corona, Giovanni; Guay, André; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2013-03-01

    Besides hypogonadism, other endocrine disorders have been associated with male sexual dysfunction (MSD). To review the role of the pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), thyroid hormones, and adrenal androgens in MSD. A systematic search of published evidence was performed using Medline (1969 to September 2011). Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine-Levels of Evidence (March 2009) was applied when possible. The most important evidence regarding the role played by PRL, GH, thyroid, and adrenal hormone was reviewed and discussed. Only severe hyperprolactinemia (>35 ng/mL or 735 mU/L), often related to a pituitary tumor, has a negative impact on sexual function, impairing sexual desire, testosterone production, and, through the latter, erectile function due to a dual effect: mass effect and PRL-induced suppression on gonadotropin secretion. The latter is PRL-level dependent. Emerging evidence indicates that hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of premature ejaculation and might also be associated with erectile dysfunction (ED), whereas hypothyroidism mainly affects sexual desire and impairs the ejaculatory reflex. However, the real incidence of thyroid dysfunction in subjects with sexual problems needs to be evaluated. Prevalence of ED and decreased libido increase in acromegalic patients; however, it is still a matter of debate whether GH excess (acromegaly) may create effects due to a direct overproduction of GH/insulin-like growth factor 1 or because of the pituitary mass effects on gonadotropic cells, resulting in hypogonadism. Finally, although dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate have been implicated in a broad range of biological derangements, controlled trials have shown that DHEA administration is not useful for improving male sexual function. While the association between hyperprolactinemia and hypoactive sexual desire is well defined, more studies are needed to completely understand the role of other hormones in

  9. Thyroid hormone upregulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in the liver but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Sáez-López, Cristina; Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Selva, David M

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by adipose tissue is crucial in accounting for the lipolysis occurring in cancer cachexia of certain malignant tumors. The main aim of this study was to explore whether thyroid hormone could enhance zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in adipose tissue. In addition, the regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by thyroid hormone in the liver was investigated. We performed in vitro (HepG2 cells and primary human adipocytes) and in vivo (C57BL6/mice) experiments addressed to examine the effect of thyroid hormone on zinc-α2-glycoprotein production (mRNA and protein levels) in liver and visceral adipose tissue. We also measured the zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels in a cohort of patients before and after controlling their hyperthyroidism. Our results showed that thyroid hormone up-regulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the zinc-α2-glycoprotein proximal promoter contains functional thyroid hormone receptor binding sites that respond to thyroid hormone treatment in luciferase reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced lipolysis in HepG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Our in vivo experiments in mice confirmed the up-regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced by thyroid hormone in the liver, thus leading to a significant increase in zinc-α2-glycoprotein circulating levels. However, thyroid hormone did not regulate zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in either human or mouse adipocytes. Finally, in patients with hyperthyroidism a significant reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels was detected after treatment but was unrelated to body weight changes. We conclude that thyroid hormone up-regulates the production of zinc-α2-glycoprotein in the liver but not in the adipose tissue. The neutral effect of thyroid hormones on zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue could be the reason why zinc-α2-glycoprotein is not related to weight

  10. Thyroid Hormone Upregulates Zinc-α2-glycoprotein Production in the Liver but Not in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Sáez-López, Cristina; Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Selva, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by adipose tissue is crucial in accounting for the lipolysis occurring in cancer cachexia of certain malignant tumors. The main aim of this study was to explore whether thyroid hormone could enhance zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in adipose tissue. In addition, the regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by thyroid hormone in the liver was investigated. We performed in vitro (HepG2 cells and primary human adipocytes) and in vivo (C57BL6/mice) experiments addressed to examine the effect of thyroid hormone on zinc-α2-glycoprotein production (mRNA and protein levels) in liver and visceral adipose tissue. We also measured the zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels in a cohort of patients before and after controlling their hyperthyroidism. Our results showed that thyroid hormone up-regulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the zinc-α2-glycoprotein proximal promoter contains functional thyroid hormone receptor binding sites that respond to thyroid hormone treatment in luciferase reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced lipolysis in HepG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Our in vivo experiments in mice confirmed the up-regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced by thyroid hormone in the liver, thus leading to a significant increase in zinc-α2-glycoprotein circulating levels. However, thyroid hormone did not regulate zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in either human or mouse adipocytes. Finally, in patients with hyperthyroidism a significant reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels was detected after treatment but was unrelated to body weight changes. We conclude that thyroid hormone up-regulates the production of zinc-α2-glycoprotein in the liver but not in the adipose tissue. The neutral effect of thyroid hormones on zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue could be the reason why zinc-α2-glycoprotein is not related to weight

  11. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hongyan, E-mail: hongyan_dong@hc-sc.gc.ca; Yauk, Carole L.; Wade, Michael G.

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined withmore » chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TR{beta} binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA-protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TR{beta} revealed that one of these fragments bound TR{beta}. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TR{beta} antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1

  12. Effects of thyroid hormone status on metabolic pathways of arachidonic acid in mice and humans: A targeted metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Sa, Rina; Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhang, Shengjie; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Yin, Huiyong; Ying, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of cardiovascular diseases are frequently found in patients with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. However, it is unknown whether arachidonic acid metabolites, the potent mediators in cardiovascular system, are involved in cardiovascular disorders caused by hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. To answer this question, serum levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in human subjects with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and mice with hypothyroidism or thyroid hormone treatment were determined by a mass spectrometry-based method. Over ten arachidonic acid metabolites belonging to three catalytic pathways: cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450, were quantified simultaneously and displayed characteristic profiles under different thyroid hormone status. The level of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a cytochrome P450 metabolite, was positively correlated with thyroid hormone level and possibly contributed to the elevated blood pressured in hyperthyroidism. The increased prostanoid (PG) I2 and decreased PGE2 levels in hypothyroid patients might serve to alleviate atherosclerosis associated with dyslipidemia. The elevated level of thromboxane (TX) A2, as indicated by TXB2, in hyperthyroid patients and mice treated with thyroid hormone might bring about pulmonary hypertension frequently found in hyperthyroid patients. In conclusion, our prospective study revealed that arachidonic acid metabolites were differentially affected by thyroid hormone status. Certain metabolites may be involved in cardiovascular disorders associated with thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Receptor β (THRB) Is a Major Target Gene for MicroRNAs Deregulated in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC)

    PubMed Central

    Boguslawska, Joanna; Jendrzejewski, Jaroslaw; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Pachucki, Janusz; Wardyn, Kazimierz A.; Nauman, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    Context: Loss of the thyroid hormone receptor is common in tumors. In mouse models, a truncated THRB gene leads to thyroid cancer. Previously, we observed up-regulation of the expression of eight microRNAs (miRs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tumors. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether THRB might be inhibited by miRs up-regulated in PTC. Design: The potential binding of miR to the 3′-untranslated region of THRB was analyzed in silico. Direct inhibition by miRs binding to the cloned 3′-untranslated region of THRB was evaluated using luciferase assays. Inhibition of endogenous THRB and its target genes (DIO1 and APP) was examined in cell lines transfected by pre-miRs. The impact on thyroid hormone response element (TRE) was evaluated in promoter assays. Correlations between the expression of THRB and miRs was evaluated in 13 PTC tumor/normal tissue pairs. Results: THRB contains binding sites for the top seven miRs up-regulated in PTC (P = 0.0000002). Direct interaction with THRB was shown for miR-21 and miR-146a. We observed lower levels of THRB transcripts in cell lines transfected with miR-21, -146a, and -221 (down-regulation of 37–48%; P < 0.0001), but not with miR-181a. THRB protein was suppressed down to 10–28% by each of four miRs. Concomitant expression of DIO1 and APP was affected (down-regulation of 32–66%, P < 0.0034 and up-regulation of 48–57%, P < 0.0002, respectively). All four miRs affected TRE activity in promoter assays. Down-regulation of luciferase occurred after transfection with pTRE-TK-Luc construct and each of four miRs. The analysis of tumor/normal tissue pairs revealed down-regulation of THRB in 11 of 13 pairs (1.3- to 9.1-fold), and up-regulation of miR-21, -146a, -181a, and -221 in almost all pairs. Conclusions: MiRs up-regulated in PTC tumors directly inhibit the expression of THRB, an important tumor suppressor gene. PMID:21159845

  14. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  15. Association between organochlorine pesticide exposure and thyroid hormones in floriculture workers.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Muñoz, Julia; Lacasaña, Marina; López-Flores, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; González-Alzaga, Beatriz; Bassol, Susana; Cebrian, Mariano E; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that exposure to DDT may be related to changes in thyroid hormone levels in animals and humans, even though results across studies are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the association between exposure to p,p'-DDE (a stable metabolite of DDT) and serum levels of thyroid hormones in floriculture workers. A longitudinal study was conducted on 136 male subjects from the States of Mexico and Morelos, Mexico, who were occupationally exposed to pesticides, during agricultural periods of high (rainy season) and low (dry season) levels of pesticide application. Using a structured questionnaire, a survey was carried out on socio-demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical history, alcohol and tobacco consumption, residential chemical exposure, and occupational history. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine serum levels of TSH, total T3, total T4, and p,p'-DDE, and metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (OP), respectively. The analysis of the associations between p,p'-DDE levels and thyroid hormone profile adjusting by potential confounding variables including urinary OP metabolites was carried out using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Our results showed that the geometric means of p,p'-DDE levels were 6.17 ng/ml and 4.71 ng/ml in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. We observed positive associations between the serum levels of p,p'-DDE and those of total T3 (β=0.01, 95% CI: -0.009, 0.03), and total T4 (β=0.08, 95% CI:0.03, 0.14) and negative but no significant changes in TSH in male floricultural workers, supporting the hypothesis that acts as thyroid disruptor in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations between Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Flame Retardants, Phenolic Metabolites, and Thyroid Hormones during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Sarah; Anthopolos, Rebecca; Wolkin, Amy; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are chemical additives used as flame retardants in commercial products. PBDEs are bioaccumulative and persistent and have been linked to several adverse health outcomes. Objectives: This study leverages an ongoing pregnancy cohort to measure PBDEs and PBDE metabolites in serum collected from an understudied population of pregnant women late in their third trimester. A secondary objective was to determine whether the PBDEs or their metabolites were associated with maternal thyroid hormones. Methods: One hundred forty pregnant women > 34 weeks into their pregnancy were recruited into this study between 2008 and 2010. Blood samples were collected during a routine prenatal clinic visit. Serum was analyzed for a suite of PBDEs, three phenolic metabolites (i.e., containing an –OH moiety), and five thyroid hormones. Results: PBDEs were detected in all samples and ranged from 3.6 to 694 ng/g lipid. Two hydroxylated BDE congeners (4´-OH-BDE 49 and 6-OH-BDE 47) were detected in > 67% of the samples. BDEs 47, 99, and 100 were significantly and positively associated with free and total thyroxine (T4) levels and with total triiodothyronine levels above the normal range. Associations between T4 and PBDEs remained after controlling for smoking status, maternal age, race, gestational age, and parity. Conclusions: PBDEs and OH-BDEs are prevalent in this cohort, and levels are similar to those in the general population. Given their long half-lives, PBDEs may be affecting thyroid regulation throughout pregnancy. Further research is warranted to determine mechanisms through which PBDEs affect thyroid hormone levels in developing fetuses and newborn babies. PMID:21715241

  17. Thyroid hormone regulates vitellogenin by inducing estrogen receptor alpha in the goldfish liver.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik R; Habibi, Hamid R

    2016-11-15

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is an egg-yolk precursor protein that is synthesized in the liver of oviparous species and taken up from the circulation by the ovary. It is well known that Vtg is induced by circulating estrogens. However, other endocrine factors that regulate the expression of Vtg are less well characterized; factors that might play significant roles, especially in seasonal spawners such as the goldfish which require increased quantities of Vtg for the development of hundreds of follicles. In this regard, thyroid hormones have been shown to cycle with the reproductive season. Therefore, we hypothesized that the thyroid hormones might influence the synthesis of Vtg. Treatment of female goldfish with triiodothyronine (T3) resulted in increased Vtg, an observation that was absent in males. Furthermore, T3 failed to induce Vtg in cultured hepatocytes of either sex. Interestingly however, T3 consistently up-regulated the expression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). The T3 mediated upregulation of ERα requires the presence of both thyroid receptor (TR) α-1 and TRβ. When goldfish or cultured hepatocytes were treated with T3 followed by estradiol, there was a synergistic increase in Vtg, a response which is dependent on the presence of ERα. Therefore, by upregulating ERα, T3 serves to prime the liver to subsequent stimuli from estradiol. This cross-talk likely reveals an important physiologic mechanism by which thyroid hormones, whose circulating levels are high during early gonadal recrudescence, facilitate the production of large amounts of Vtg required for egg development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Thyroid hormone levels and incident chronic kidney disease in euthyroid individuals: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Won Kon; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with higher levels of serum creatinine and with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prospective association between thyroid hormones and kidney function in euthyroid individuals,however, is largely unexplored. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 104 633 South Korean men and women who were free of CKD and proteinuria at baseline and had normal thyroid hormone levels and no history of thyroid disease or cancer. At each annual or biennial follow-up visit, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxin (FT4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The study outcome was incident CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 based on the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 1032 participants developed incident CKD.There was a positive association between high-normal levels of TSH and increased risk of incident CKD. In fully-adjusted models including baseline eGFR, the hazard ratio comparing the highest vs the lowest quintiles of TSH was 1.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.55; P for linear trend=0.03]. In spline models, FT3 levels below 3 pg/ml were also associated with increased risk of incident CKD. There was no association between FT4 levels and CKD. In a large cohort of euthyroid men and women, high levels of TSH and low levels of FT3, even within the normal range, were modestly associated with an increased risk of incident CKD.

  19. Type 3 Deiodinase Role on Central Thyroid Hormone Action Affects the Leptin-Melanocortin System and Circadian Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhaofei; Martinez, M. Elena; St. Germain, Donald L.

    2017-01-01

    The role of thyroid hormones (THs) in the central regulation of energy balance is increasingly appreciated. Mice lacking the type 3 deiodinase (DIO3), which inactivates TH, have decreased circulating TH levels relative to control mice as a result of defects in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. However, we have shown that the TH status of the adult Dio3−/− brain is opposite that of the serum, exhibiting enhanced levels of TH action. Because the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, harbors important circuitries that regulate metabolism, we aimed to examine the energy balance phenotype of Dio3−/− mice and determine whether it is associated with hypothalamic abnormalities. Here we show that Dio3−/− mice of both sexes exhibit decreased adiposity, reduced brown and white adipocyte size, and enhanced fat loss in response to triiodothyronine (T3) treatment. They also exhibit increased TH action in the hypothalamus, with abnormal expression and T3 sensitivity of genes integral to the leptin-melanocortin system, including Agrp, Npy, Pomc, and Mc4r. The normal to elevated serum levels of leptin, and elevated and repressed expression of Agrp and Pomc, respectively, suggest a profile of leptin resistance. Interestingly, Dio3−/− mice also display elevated locomotor activity and increased energy expenditure. This occurs in association with expanded nighttime activity periods, suggesting a disrupted circadian rhythm. We conclude that DIO3-mediated regulation of TH action in the central nervous system influences multiple critical determinants of energy balance. Those influences may partially compensate each other, with the result likely contributing to the decreased adiposity observed in Dio3−/− mice. PMID:27911598

  20. Type 3 Deiodinase Role on Central Thyroid Hormone Action Affects the Leptin-Melanocortin System and Circadian Activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaofei; Martinez, M Elena; St Germain, Donald L; Hernandez, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    The role of thyroid hormones (THs) in the central regulation of energy balance is increasingly appreciated. Mice lacking the type 3 deiodinase (DIO3), which inactivates TH, have decreased circulating TH levels relative to control mice as a result of defects in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. However, we have shown that the TH status of the adult Dio3-/- brain is opposite that of the serum, exhibiting enhanced levels of TH action. Because the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, harbors important circuitries that regulate metabolism, we aimed to examine the energy balance phenotype of Dio3-/- mice and determine whether it is associated with hypothalamic abnormalities. Here we show that Dio3-/- mice of both sexes exhibit decreased adiposity, reduced brown and white adipocyte size, and enhanced fat loss in response to triiodothyronine (T3) treatment. They also exhibit increased TH action in the hypothalamus, with abnormal expression and T3 sensitivity of genes integral to the leptin-melanocortin system, including Agrp, Npy, Pomc, and Mc4r. The normal to elevated serum levels of leptin, and elevated and repressed expression of Agrp and Pomc, respectively, suggest a profile of leptin resistance. Interestingly, Dio3-/- mice also display elevated locomotor activity and increased energy expenditure. This occurs in association with expanded nighttime activity periods, suggesting a disrupted circadian rhythm. We conclude that DIO3-mediated regulation of TH action in the central nervous system influences multiple critical determinants of energy balance. Those influences may partially compensate each other, with the result likely contributing to the decreased adiposity observed in Dio3-/- mice. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  1. Insights into Enzyme Catalysis and Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Cerebral Ketimine Reductase/μ-Crystallin Under Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hallen, André; Cooper, Arthur J L; Jamie, Joanne F; Karuso, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Mammalian ketimine reductase is identical to μ-crystallin (CRYM)-a protein that is also an important thyroid hormone binding protein. This dual functionality implies a role for thyroid hormones in ketimine reductase regulation and also a reciprocal role for enzyme catalysis in thyroid hormone bioavailability. In this research we demonstrate potent sub-nanomolar inhibition of enzyme catalysis at neutral pH by the thyroid hormones L-thyroxine and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, whereas other thyroid hormone analogues were shown to be far weaker inhibitors. We also investigated (a) enzyme inhibition by the substrate analogues pyrrole-2-carboxylate, 4,5-dibromopyrrole-2-carboxylate and picolinate, and (b) enzyme catalysis at neutral pH of the cyclic ketimines S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine ketimine (owing to the complex nomenclature trivial names are used for the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines as per the original authors' descriptions) (AECK), Δ(1)-piperideine-2-carboxylate (P2C), Δ(1)-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (Pyr2C) and Δ(2)-thiazoline-2-carboxylate. Kinetic data obtained at neutral pH suggests that ketimine reductase/CRYM plays a major role as a P2C/Pyr2C reductase and that AECK is not a major substrate at this pH. Thus, ketimine reductase is a key enzyme in the pipecolate pathway, which is the main lysine degradation pathway in the brain. In silico docking of various ligands into the active site of the X-ray structure of the enzyme suggests an unusual catalytic mechanism involving an arginine residue as a proton donor. Given the critical importance of thyroid hormones in brain function this research further expands on our knowledge of the connection between amino acid metabolism and regulation of thyroid hormone levels.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Regulates the Expression of the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in the Embryonic and Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Lynette A.; Sathanoori, Malini; Kapoor, Richa; Rajadhyaksha, Neha; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Kottmann, Andreas H.; Tole, Shubha

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is important for development and plasticity in the immature and adult mammalian brain. Several thyroid hormone-responsive genes are regulated during specific developmental time windows, with relatively few influenced across the lifespan. We provide novel evidence that thyroid hormone regulates expression of the key developmental morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh), and its coreceptors patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo), in the early embryonic and adult forebrain. Maternal hypo- and hyperthyroidism bidirectionally influenced Shh mRNA in embryonic forebrain signaling centers at stages before fetal thyroid hormone synthesis. Further, Smo and Ptc expression were significantly decreased in the forebrain of embryos derived from hypothyroid dams. Adult-onset thyroid hormone perturbations also regulated expression of the Shh pathway bidirectionally, with a significant induction of Shh, Ptc, and Smo after hyperthyroidism and a decline in Smo expression in the hypothyroid brain. Short-term T3 administration resulted in a significant induction of cortical Shh mRNA expression and also enhanced reporter gene expression in Shh+/LacZ mice. Further, acute T3 treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a rapid and significant increase in Shh mRNA, suggesting direct effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays performed on adult neocortex indicated enhanced histone acetylation at the Shh promoter after acute T3 administration, providing further support that Shh is a thyroid hormone-responsive gene. Our results indicate that maternal and adult-onset perturbations of euthyroid status cause robust and region-specific changes in the Shh pathway in the embryonic and adult forebrain, implicating Shh as a possible mechanistic link for specific neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone. PMID:21363934

  3. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the embryonic and adult Mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Desouza, Lynette A; Sathanoori, Malini; Kapoor, Richa; Rajadhyaksha, Neha; Gonzalez, Luis E; Kottmann, Andreas H; Tole, Shubha; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2011-05-01

    Thyroid hormone is important for development and plasticity in the immature and adult mammalian brain. Several thyroid hormone-responsive genes are regulated during specific developmental time windows, with relatively few influenced across the lifespan. We provide novel evidence that thyroid hormone regulates expression of the key developmental morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh), and its coreceptors patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo), in the early embryonic and adult forebrain. Maternal hypo- and hyperthyroidism bidirectionally influenced Shh mRNA in embryonic forebrain signaling centers at stages before fetal thyroid hormone synthesis. Further, Smo and Ptc expression were significantly decreased in the forebrain of embryos derived from hypothyroid dams. Adult-onset thyroid hormone perturbations also regulated expression of the Shh pathway bidirectionally, with a significant induction of Shh, Ptc, and Smo after hyperthyroidism and a decline in Smo expression in the hypothyroid brain. Short-term T₃ administration resulted in a significant induction of cortical Shh mRNA expression and also enhanced reporter gene expression in Shh(+/LacZ) mice. Further, acute T₃ treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a rapid and significant increase in Shh mRNA, suggesting direct effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays performed on adult neocortex indicated enhanced histone acetylation at the Shh promoter after acute T₃ administration, providing further support that Shh is a thyroid hormone-responsive gene. Our results indicate that maternal and adult-onset perturbations of euthyroid status cause robust and region-specific changes in the Shh pathway in the embryonic and adult forebrain, implicating Shh as a possible mechanistic link for specific neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone.

  4. Thyroid and Cortisol hormones in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kuppili, Pooja Patnaik; Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh; Mehta, Manju; Vivekanandhan, S

    2017-08-01

    There is paucity of research in the putative role of hormonal biomarkers in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The current study aimed to analyze the clinical profile, socio-demographic status, co-morbidity, hormonal biomarkers namely Thyroid hormones and Cortisol in children with ADHD and compare them with healthy controls and to explore the association of the hormonal biomarkers with severity of ADHD. Thirty children with DSM-IV TR diagnosis of ADHD were assessed using semi structured proforma, Conners' Parent Rating Scale revised short (CPRS - R: S) , Mini international neuropsychiatric interview for children and adolescents and Childrens' Global Assessment Scale as well as serum levels of total Triiodothyronine (T3) ,total Thyroxine (T4) , Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Cortisol using chemiluminescent immunometric assay and compared with 30 age- and gender -matched controls. The typical profile of cases of ADHD was of a male with mean age of 9.47 years (S.D=2.43) belonging to Hyperactive subtype of ADHD. Serum T4 was significantly lower in cases compared to controls. No significant difference was found in serum T3, TSH and Cortisol levels. No significant correlation between the CPRS : R-S scores and the hormonal biomarkers. There is need for exploration of Serum T4 as putative biomarker for ADHD with replication in future studies. It may also be important to report the negative finding of Cortisol as a biomarker of ADHD in the context of effective utilization of resources for research with special relevance to resource deficit developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of light exposure on thyroid-stimulating hormone results using the Siemens Advia Centaur TSH-3Ultra assay.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane; Giles, Diane; Lancaster, Ian; Brownbill, Kathryn

    2017-09-01

    Background Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is used as the first-line test of thyroid function. Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics recommend that Siemens Centaur reagents must be protected from light in the assay information and on reagent packaging. We have compared the effect of light exposure on results using Siemens TSH-3Ultra and follicle-stimulating hormone reagents. The thyroid-stimulating hormone reagent includes fluoroscein thiocyanate whereas the follicle-stimulating hormone reagent does not. Methods Three levels of quality controls were analysed using SiemensTSH-3Ultra and follicle-stimulating hormone reagent packs that had been kept protected from light or exposed to light at 6-h intervals for 48 h and then at 96 h. Results Thyroid-stimulating hormone results were significantly lower after exposure of TSH-3Ultra reagent packs to light. Results were >15% lower at all three levels of quality control following 18 h of light exposure and continued to decrease until 96 h. There was no significant difference in follicle-stimulating hormone results whether reagents had been exposed to or protected from light. Conclusions Thyroid-stimulating hormone results but not follicle-stimulating hormone results are lowered after exposure of reagent packs to light. Laboratories must ensure that TSH-3Ultra reagents are not exposed to light and analyse quality control samples on every reagent pack to check that there has not been light exposure prior to delivery. The labelling on TSH-3Ultra reagent packs should reflect the significant effect of light exposure compared with the follicle-stimulating hormone reagent. We propose that the effect of light exposure on binding of fluoroscein thiocyanate to the solid phase antibody causes the falsely low results.

  6. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  7. Role of the Pineal Body Hormone in Thyroid Function; L'HORMONE EPIPHSAIRE INTERVIENT DANS LA DYNAMIQUE DU METABOLISME DE L'IODE

    SciTech Connect

    Milcou, S.M.; Costiner, E. et al.

    To evaluate the action of the pineal body hormone on thyroid function, hyperactivity of the epiphysis was experimentally induced by administering pineal body hormone four hours before the experiment and then every four hours during the experiment. Iodine tagging was achieved by the intraperltoneal injection of carrierless'' I/sup 131/. The animals, which had been divided into batches of 10, were sacrificed every 2 hours until 48 hours had elapsed following the radioactive tagging. Measurements on the radioactivity of the thyroid and of the blood were carried out in vitro. The values obtained were used in order to draw up simultaneousmore » radioactivity curves applicable to the total radioactivity and to that attributable to inorganic and organic iodine, respectively. The curves showing the variation in the radioactivity reveal a delayed action of the pineal gland hormone which is different according to whether the functional thyroid units have a large or small time constant. (auth)« less

  8. Maternal Urinary Triclosan Concentration in Relation to Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Hormone Levels: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ouyang, Fengxiu; Feng, Liping; Wang, Xia; Liu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jun

    2017-06-27

    Triclosan (TCS) is a synthetic antibacterial chemical widely used in personal care products. TCS exposure has been associated with decreased thyroid hormone levels in animals, but human studies are scarce and controversial. We evaluated the association between maternal TCS exposure and thyroid hormone levels of mothers and newborns. TCS was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) in urine samples collected during gestational weeks 38.8±1.1 from 398 pregnant women in a prospective birth cohort enrolled in 2012-2013 in Shanghai, China. Maternal serum levels of free thyroxine (FT 4 ), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) were obtained from medical records. Cord blood levels of free triiodothyronine (FT 3 ), FT 4 , TSH, and TPOAb were measured. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between maternal urinary TCS and thyroid hormone levels. TCS was detectable (≥0.1 ng/mL) in 98.24% of maternal urine samples with tertile of urinary TCS levels: low (>0.1-2.75 μg/g.Cr), medium (2.75–9.78 μg/g.Cr), and high (9.78–427.38 μg/g.Cr). With adjustment for potential confounders, cord blood log(FT 3 )pmol/L concentration was 0.11 lower in newborns of mothers with medium and high urinary TCS levels compared with those with low levels. At third trimester, the high TCS concentration was associated with 0.03 [95% confidence interval (CI) −0.08, −0.02] lower maternal serum log(FT 4 )pmol/L, whereas the medium TCS concentration was associated with 0.15 (95% CI: −0.28, −0.03) lower serum log(TSH)mIU/L with adjustment for covariates. Our results suggest significant inverse associations between maternal urinary TCS and cord blood FT 3 as well as maternal blood FT 4 concentrations at third trimester. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP500.

  9. Thyroid hormone is required for growth adaptation to pressure load in the ovine fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Ken A; Lipman, Michael H B; Scholz, Thomas D

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts broad effects on the adult heart, but little is known regarding the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of cardiac growth early in development and in response to pathophysiological conditions. To address this issue, we determined the effects of fetal thyroidectomy on cardiac growth and growth-related gene expression in control and pulmonary-artery-banded fetal sheep. Fetal thyroidectomy (THX) and/or placement of a restrictive pulmonary artery band (PAB) were performed at 126 ± 1 days of gestation (term, 145 days). Four groups of animals [n = 5-6 in each group; (i) control; (ii) fetal THX; (iii) fetal PAB; and (iv) fetal PAB + THX] were monitored for 1 week prior to being killed. Fetal heart rate was significantly lower in the two THX groups compared with the non-THX groups, while mean arterial blood pressure was similar among groups. Combined left and right ventricle free wall + septum weight, expressed per kilogram of fetal weight, was significantly increased in PAB (6.27 ± 0.85 g kg(-1)) compared with control animals (4.72 ± 0.12 g kg(-1)). Thyroidectomy significantly attenuated the increase in cardiac mass associated with PAB (4.94 ± 0.13 g kg(-1)), while THX alone had no detectable effect on heart mass (4.95 ± 0.27 g kg(-1)). The percentage of binucleated cardiomyocytes was significantly decreased in THX and PAB +THX groups (∼16%) compared with the non-THX groups (∼27%). No differences in levels of activated Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase or c-Jun N-terminal kinase were detected among the groups. Markers of cellular proliferation but not apoptosis or expression of growth-related genes were lower in the THX and THX+ PAB groups relative to thyroid-intact animals. These findings suggest that in the late-gestation fetal heart, thyroid hormone has important cellular growth functions in both physiological and pathophysiological states. Specifically, thyroid hormone is required for adaptive fetal cardiac growth in

  10. Septic shock non-thyroidal illness syndrome causes hypothyroidism and conditions for reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Castro, Isabel; Quisenberry, Leah; Calvo, Rosa-Maria; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2013-04-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is part of the neuroendocrine response to stress, but the significance of this syndrome remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NTIS on thyroid hormone (TH) levels and TH molecular targets, as well as the relationship between septic shock nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) activation and TH receptor β (THRB) gene expression at a multi-tissue level in a pig model. Prepubertal domestic pigs were given i.v. saline or LPS for 48 h. Serum and tissue TH was measured by chemiluminescence and RIA. Expression of THRs and cofactors was measured by real-time PCR, and deiodinase (DIO) activity was measured by enzyme assays. Tissue NF-kB nuclear binding activity was evaluated by EMSA. LPS-treated pigs had decreased TH levels in serum and most tissues. DIO1 expression in liver and kidney and DIO1 activity in kidney decreased after LPS. No changes in DIO2 activity were observed between groups. LPS induced an increase in hypothalamus, thyroid, and liver DIO3 activity. Among the other studied genes, monocarboxylate transporter 8 and THRB were the most commonly repressed in endotoxemic pigs. LPS-induced NF-kB activation was associated with a decrease in THRB gene expression only in frontal lobe, adrenal gland, and kidney cortex. We conclude that LPS-induced NTIS in pigs is characterized by hypothyroidism and tissue-specific reduced TH sensitivity. The role of NF-kB in regulating THRB expression during endotoxemia, if any, is restricted to a limited number of tissues.

  11. The axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a neotenic amphibian, expresses functional thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Marchand, Oriane; Duffraisse, Marilyne; de Luze, Amaury; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Maraninchi, Marie; Margotat, Alain; Demeneix, Barbara; Laudet, Vincent

    2004-02-01

    Neotenic amphibians such as the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) are often unable to undergo metamorphosis under natural conditions. It is thought that neoteny represents a deviation from the standard course of amphibian ontogeny, affecting the thyroid axis at different levels from the central nervous system to peripheral organs. Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) that bind the thyroid hormone (TH) T(3) have been described in axolotl. However, the full sequences of TR were needed to better characterize the TH response and to be able to assess their functional capacity at the molecular level. We report that each of the alpha and beta axolotl TRs bind both DNA and TH, and they activate transcription in response to TH in a mammalian cell-based transient transfection assay. Moreover, both TRs are expressed in axolotl tissues. Interestingly, each TR gene generates alternatively spliced isoforms, harboring partial or total deletions of the ligand-binding domain, which are expressed in vivo. Further, we found that in the axolotl, TH regulates the expression of stromelysin 3 and collagenase 3, which are TH target genes in Xenopus. Taken together, these results suggest that axolotl TRs are functional and that the molecular basis of neoteny in the axolotl is not linked to a major defect in TH response in peripheral tissues.

  12. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Antagonists: From Environmental Pollution to Novel Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Louise S

    2018-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are nuclear receptors which control transcription, and thereby have effects in all cells within the body. TRs are an important regulator in many basic physiological processes including development, growth, metabolism, and cardiac function. The hyperthyroid condition results from an over production of thyroid hormones resulting in a continual stimulation of thyroid receptors which is detrimental for the patient. Therapies for hyperthyroidism are available, but there is a need for new small molecules that act as TR antagonists to treat hyperthyroidism. Many compounds exhibit TR antagonism and are considered detrimental to health. Some drugs in the clinic (most importantly, amiodarone) and environmental pollution exhibit TR antagonist properties and thus have the potential to induce hypothyroidism in some people. This chapter provides an overview of novel small molecules that have been specifically designed or screened for their TR antagonist activity as novel treatments for hyperthyroidism. While novel compounds have been identified, to date none have been developed sufficiently to enter clinical trials. Furthermore, a discussion on other sources of TR antagonists is discussed in terms of side effects of current drugs in the clinic as well as environmental pollution. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Therapy for Older Adults with Subclinical Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stott, David J; Rodondi, Nicolas; Kearney, Patricia M; Ford, Ian; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Mooijaart, Simon P; Sattar, Naveed; Aubert, Carole E; Aujesky, Drahomir; Bauer, Douglas C; Baumgartner, Christine; Blum, Manuel R; Browne, John P; Byrne, Stephen; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Dekkers, Olaf M; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Du Puy, Robert S; Ellis, Graham; Feller, Martin; Floriani, Carmen; Hendry, Kirsty; Hurley, Caroline; Jukema, J Wouter; Kean, Sharon; Kelly, Maria; Krebs, Danielle; Langhorne, Peter; McCarthy, Gemma; McCarthy, Vera; McConnachie, Alex; McDade, Mairi; Messow, Martina; O'Flynn, Annemarie; O'Riordan, David; Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; Quinn, Terence J; Russell, Audrey; Sinnott, Carol; Smit, Jan W A; Van Dorland, H Anette; Walsh, Kieran A; Walsh, Elaine K; Watt, Torquil; Wilson, Robbie; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2017-06-29

    The use of levothyroxine to treat subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. We aimed to determine whether levothyroxine provided clinical benefits in older persons with this condition. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial involving 737 adults who were at least 65 years of age and who had persisting subclinical hypothyroidism (thyrotropin level, 4.60 to 19.99 mIU per liter; free thyroxine level within the reference range). A total of 368 patients were assigned to receive levothyroxine (at a starting dose of 50 μg daily, or 25 μg if the body weight was <50 kg or the patient had coronary heart disease), with dose adjustment according to the thyrotropin level; 369 patients were assigned to receive placebo with mock dose adjustment. The two primary outcomes were the change in the Hypothyroid Symptoms score and Tiredness score on a thyroid-related quality-of-life questionnaire at 1 year (range of each scale is 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more symptoms or tiredness, respectively; minimum clinically important difference, 9 points). The mean age of the patients was 74.4 years, and 396 patients (53.7%) were women. The mean (±SD) thyrotropin level was 6.40±2.01 mIU per liter at baseline; at 1 year, this level had decreased to 5.48 mIU per liter in the placebo group, as compared with 3.63 mIU per liter in the levothyroxine group (P<0.001), at a median dose of 50 μg. We found no differences in the mean change at 1 year in the Hypothyroid Symptoms score (0.2±15.3 in the placebo group and 0.2±14.4 in the levothyroxine group; between-group difference, 0.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.0 to 2.1) or the Tiredness score (3.2±17.7 and 3.8±18.4, respectively; between-group difference, 0.4; 95% CI, -2.1 to 2.9). No beneficial effects of levothyroxine were seen on secondary-outcome measures. There was no significant excess of serious adverse events prespecified as being of special interest. Levothyroxine provided no

  14. Radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation after recombinant human thyrotropin or thyroid hormone withdrawal in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Marlowe, Robert J; Abelleira, Erika; Faure, Eduardo N; Bueno, Fernanda; Schwarzstein, Diego; Lutfi, Rubén Julio; Niepomniszcze, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    To supplement limited relevant literature, we retrospectively compared ablation and disease outcomes in high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients undergoing radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation aided by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withdrawal/withholding (THW). Our cohort was 45 consecutive antithyroglobulin antibody- (TgAb-) negative, T3-T4/N0-N1-Nx/M0 adults ablated with high activities at three referral centers. Ablation success comprised negative (<1 μg/L) stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and TgAb, with absent or <0.1% scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake. "No evidence of disease" (NED) comprised negative unstimulated/stimulated Tg and no suspicious neck ultrasonography or pathological imaging or biopsy. "Persistent disease" was failure to achieve NED, "recurrence," loss of NED status. rhTSH patients (n = 18) were oftener ≥45 years old and higher stage (P = 0.01), but otherwise not different than THW patients (n = 27) at baseline. rhTSH patients were significantly oftener successfully ablated compared to THW patients (83% versus 67%, P < 0.02). After respective 3.3 yr and 4.5 yr mean follow-ups (P = 0.02), NED was achieved oftener (72% versus 59%) and persistent disease was less frequent in rhTSH patients (22% versus 33%) (both comparisons P = 0.03). rhTSH stimulation is associated with at least as good outcomes as is THW in ablation of high-risk DTC patients.

  15. Phenols and Parabens in relation to Reproductive and Thyroid Hormones in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Aker, Amira M; Watkins, Deborah J; Johns, Lauren E; Ferguson, Kelly K; Soldin, Offie P; Del Toro, Liza V Anzalota; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cordero, José F; Meeker, John D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phenols and parabens are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Evidence from animal studies and limited human data suggest they may be endocrine disruptors. In the current study, we examined associations of phenols and parabens with reproductive and thyroid hormones in 106 pregnant women recruited for the prospective cohort, “Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT)”. Methods Urinary exposure biomarkers (bisphenol A, triclosan, benzophenone-3, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, butyl, methyl and propyl paraben) and serum hormone levels (estradiol, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone) were measured at up to two time points during pregnancy (16–20 weeks and 24–28 weeks). We used linear mixed models to assess relationships between exposure biomarkers and hormone levels across pregnancy, controlling for urinary specific gravity, maternal age, BMI and education. In sensitivity analyses, we evaluated cross-sectional relationships between exposure and hormone levels stratified by study visit using linear regression. Results An IQR increase in methyl paraben was associated with a 7.70% increase (95% CI 1.50, 13.90) in SHBG. Furthermore, an IQR increase in butyl paraben as associated with an 8.46% decrease (95% CI 16.92, 0.00) in estradiol, as well as a 9.34% decrease (95% CI −18.31, −0.38) in estradiol/progesterone. Conversely, an IQR increase in butyl paraben was associated with a 5.64% increase (95% CI 1.26, 10.02) in FT4. Progesterone was consistently negatively associated with phenols, but none reached statistical significance. After stratification, methyl and propyl paraben were suggestively negatively associated with estradiol at the first time point (16–20 weeks), and suggestively positively associated with estradiol at the second time point (24–28 weeks). Conclusions Within this ongoing birth cohort, certain

  16. Phenols and parabens in relation to reproductive and thyroid hormones in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Aker, Amira M; Watkins, Deborah J; Johns, Lauren E; Ferguson, Kelly K; Soldin, Offie P; Anzalota Del Toro, Liza V; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cordero, José F; Meeker, John D

    2016-11-01

    Phenols and parabens are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Evidence from animal studies and limited human data suggest they may be endocrine disruptors. In the current study, we examined associations of phenols and parabens with reproductive and thyroid hormones in 106 pregnant women recruited for the prospective cohort, "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT)". Urinary exposure biomarkers (bisphenol A, triclosan, benzophenone-3, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, butyl, methyl and propyl paraben) and serum hormone levels (estradiol, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone) were measured at up to two time points during pregnancy (16-20 weeks and 24-28 weeks). We used linear mixed models to assess relationships between exposure biomarkers and hormone levels across pregnancy, controlling for urinary specific gravity, maternal age, BMI and education. In sensitivity analyses, we evaluated cross-sectional relationships between exposure and hormone levels stratified by study visit using linear regression. An IQR increase in methyl paraben was associated with a 7.70% increase (95% CI 1.50, 13.90) in SHBG. Furthermore, an IQR increase in butyl paraben as associated with an 8.46% decrease (95% CI 16.92, 0.00) in estradiol, as well as a 9.34% decrease (95% CI -18.31,-0.38) in estradiol/progesterone. Conversely, an IQR increase in butyl paraben was associated with a 5.64% increase (95% CI 1.26, 10.02) in FT4. Progesterone was consistently negatively associated with phenols, but none reached statistical significance. After stratification, methyl and propyl paraben were suggestively negatively associated with estradiol at the first time point (16-20 weeks), and suggestively positively associated with estradiol at the second time point (24-28 weeks). Within this ongoing birth cohort, certain phenols and parabens were associated with altered

  17. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  18. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  19. Hyperthyroidism due to inappropriate secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Hermus, A; Ross, H; van Liessum, P; Naber, A; Smals, A; Kloppenborg, P

    1991-06-01

    The case histories of three patients with hyperthyroidism due to overproduction of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary gland are described. In the first patient treatment with the T3-metabolite 3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid (TRIAC) led to complete clinical and biochemical normalization. In the second patient treatment with the dopaminergic agonist bromocriptine led to a temporal amelioration of hyperthyroidism. In the third patient, who was the only one with a proven pituitary adenoma, hypersecretion of TSH could be controlled by administration of the somatostatin analogue octreotide. It is emphasized that patients with this disorder should preferably not be treated with thyrostatic drugs, radioactive iodine or thyroid surgery. The success rate of these treatment modalities is lower than normal, they may lead to an increase of goiter size, and they potentially may promote growth or development of a TSH-producing adenoma. Treatment should be aimed at diminishing TSH hypersecretion.

  20. Thyroid hormone increases fibroblast growth factor receptor expression and disrupts cell mechanics in the developing organ of corti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones regulate growth and development. However, the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone regulates cell structural development are not fully understood. The mammalian cochlea is an intriguing system to examine these mechanisms, as cellular structure plays a key role in tissue development, and thyroid hormone is required for the maturation of the cochlea in the first postnatal week. Results In hypothyroid conditions, we found disruptions in sensory outer hair cell morphology and fewer microtubules in non-sensory supporting pillar cells. To test the functional consequences of these cytoskeletal defects on cell mechanics, we combined atomic force microscopy with live cell imaging. Hypothyroidism stiffened outer hair cells and supporting pillar cells, but pillar cells ultimately showed reduced cell stiffness, in part from a lack of microtubules. Analyses of changes in transcription and protein phosphorylation suggest that hypothyroidism prolonged expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors, and decreased phosphorylated Cofilin. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that thyroid hormones may be involved in coordinating the processes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and suggest that manipulating thyroid hormone sensitivity might provide insight into the relationship between cytoskeletal formation and developing cell mechanical properties. PMID:23394545

  1. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-11-10

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity.

  2. Thyrotropin-induced hyperthyroidism caused by selective pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone. A new syndrome of "inappropriate secretion of TSH".

    PubMed Central

    Gershengorn, M C; Weintraub, B D

    1975-01-01

    An 18-yr-old woman with clinical and laboratory features of hyperthyroidism had persistently elevated serum levels of immunoreative thyrotropin (TSH). During 11 yr of follow-up there had been no evidence of a pituitary tumor. After thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), there was a marked increase in TSH and secondarily in triiodothyronine (T3), the latter observation confirming the biologic activity of the TSH. Exogenous T3 raised serum T3 and several measurements of peripheral thyroid hormone effect, while decreasing serum TSH, thyroxine (T4), and thyroidal radioiodine uptake. After T3, the TRH-stimulated TSH response was decreased but was still inappropriate for the elevated serum T3 levels. Dexamethasone reduced serum TSH but did not inhibit TRH stimulation of TSH. Propylthiouracil reduced serum T4 and T3 and raised TSH. This patient represents a new syndrome of TSH-induced hyperthyroidism, differing from previous reports in the absence of an obvious pituitary tumor and in the responsiveness of the TSH to TRH stimulation and thyroid hormone suppression. This syndrome appears to be caused by a selective, partial resistance of the pituitary to the action of thyroid hormone. This case is also compared with previous reports in the literature of patients with elevated serum levels of immunoreactive TSH in the presence of elevated total and free thyroid hormones. A classification of these cases, termed "inappropriate secretion of TSH," is proposed. PMID:1159077

  3. Prenatal Exposures to Multiple Thyroid Hormone Disruptors: Effects on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Molehin, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for normal human fetal development and play a major role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Delivery of TH to target tissues is dependent on processes including TH synthesis, transport, and metabolism. Thyroid hormone endocrine disruptors (TH-EDCs) are chemical substances that interfere with these processes, potentially leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objectives. This review focuses on the effects of prenatal exposures to combinations of TH-EDCs on fetal and neonatal glucose and lipid metabolism and also discusses the various mechanisms by which TH-EDCs interfere with other hormonal pathways. Methods. We conducted a comprehensive narrative review on the effects of TH-EDCs with particular emphasis on exposure during pregnancy. Discussion. TH imbalance has been linked to many metabolic processes and the effects of TH imbalance are particularly pronounced in early fetal development due to fetal dependence on maternal TH for proper growth and development. The pervasive presence of EDCs in the environment results in ubiquitous exposure to either single or mixtures of EDCs with deleterious effects on metabolism. Conclusions. Further evaluation of combined effects of TH-EDCs on fetal metabolic endpoints could improve advice provided to expectant mothers. PMID:26989557

  4. Thyroid hormones and skeletal muscle — new insights and potential implications

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Domenico; Simonides, Warner S.; Dentice, Monica; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone signalling regulates crucial biological functions, including energy expenditure, thermogenesis, development and growth. The skeletal muscle is a major target of thyroid hormone signalling. The type two (DIO2) and three (DIO3) iodothyronine deiodinases have been identified in skeletal muscle. DIO2 expression is tightly regulated and catalyzes outer ring monodeiodination of the secreted prohormone tetraiodothyronine (T4) to generate the active hormone triiodothyronine (T3). T3 may remain in the myocyte to signal through nuclear receptors or exit the cell to mix with the extracellular pool. By contrast, DIO3 inactivates T3 through removal of an inner ring iodine. Regulation of the expression and activity of deiodinases constitutes a cell-autonomous, pre-receptor mechanism for controlling the intracellular concentration of T3. This local control of T3 activity is crucial during the various phases of myogenesis. Here, we review the roles of T3 in skeletal muscle development and homeostasis, with a focus on the emerging local deiodinase-mediated control of T3 signalling. Moreover, we discuss these novel findings in the context of both muscle homeostasis and pathology, and examine how they can be therapeutically harnessed to improve satellite cell-mediated muscle repair in patients with skeletal muscle disorders, muscle atrophy or injury. PMID:24322650

  5. Prognostic Value of Thyroid Hormone Levels in Patients Evaluated for Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Van Thiel, David H.; Udani, Mahendra; Schade, Robert R.; Sanghvi, Agit; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The thyroid hormones T4, T3, rT3 and TSH were assayed in 134 adult patients evaluated and accepted as potential liver transplant candidates at the University of Pittsburgh from March, 1981 to December, 1983. The subsequent course of these patients was evaluated with respect to the levels of these hormones obtained at the time of acceptance for transplantation. T4 levels were increased significantly while their T3 levels were reduced (both p < 0.01) in those who survived and were discharged home as compared to either those who died waiting to be transplanted or died following the procedure. As a result, the ratio of T3/T4 was reduced markedly (p < 0.01) in those who were transplanted and survived as compared to those not transplanted or dying following transplantation. Importantly, the rT3 levels clearly separated (p < 0.01) those who would die prior to transplantation from those who would survive to be transplanted. Finally, the ratio rT3/T3 even more clearly separates those who will die prior to transplantation (p < 0.01) from the other two groups. These data suggest that thyroid hormone levels, particularly rT3 levels, might be useful in setting priorities for which patients referred for a transplantation evaluation should be accepted into the program and in determining who among accepted patients should be operated upon in preference to others also accepted and waiting to be transplanted. PMID:2993148

  6. Evidence of the Presence of Thyroid Hormones in Achatina fulica Snails.

    PubMed

    Lustrino, Danilo; Silva, Alba C M; Araujo, Iracema G; Tunholi, Victor M; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius M; Castro, Rosane N; Carvalho, Denise P; Pinheiro, Jairo; Marassi, Michelle P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify thyroid hormones and to examine their putative site of synthesis in Achatina fulica snails. For this purpose, radioimmunoassays were performed for T3 and T4 before and after long starvation with or without hemolymph deproteinization. Sodium/iodide symporter activity in vivo was analyzed through 125I administration with and without KClO4 pretreatment. Only T4 was detected, and its concentration decreased due to starvation or deproteinization. However, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis also showed the presence of T2 and T3 apart from T4, but rT3 was not detected in the A. fulica hemolymph. The sodium/iodide symporter activity was greater in cerebral ganglia than digestive gland, but KClO4 treatment did not inhibit iodide uptake in any of the tissues analyzed. Altogether, our data confirm for the first time the presence of thyroid hormones in A. fulica snails and suggest their participation in the metabolism control in this species, although the putative site of hormone biosynthesis remains to be elucidated.

  7. Relation with HOMA-IR and thyroid hormones in obese Turkish women with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Topsakal, S; Yerlikaya, E; Akin, F; Kaptanoglu, B; Erürker, T

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and thyroid function in obese pre- and postmenopausal women with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). 141 obese women were divided into two groups, HOMA-IR<2.7 and HOMA-IR>2.7, to evaluate relation with HOMA-IR and fatness, hormone and blood parameters. They were then divided into four groups as pre- and postmenopausal with or without MetS. Various fatness, hormone and blood parameters were examined. Statistically significant difference was found in weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fat%, fasting insulin, TSH, FT3, FT4, FSH, Anti-microsomal antibody (ANTIM) and triglycerides levels in HOMA-IR<2.7 and HOMA-IR>2.7 obese Turkish women. This study showed that age, weight, BMI, waist circumference, fat%, fasting insulin, FT3, ANTIM, FSH, LH, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, HOMA-IR, systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were related in preand post menopausal status in obese women with or without MetS. Obesity may influence the levels of thyroid hormones and increases the risk of MetS in women. Postmenopausal status with MetS is associated with an increased TSH, FT3 and FT4 levels and HOMA-IR in obese women. Strong relation was observed with MetS and TSH and FT3 levels.

  8. Differences in Brain Glucose Metabolism During Preparation for 131I Ablation in Thyroid Cancer Patients: Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal Versus Recombinant Human Thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeonseok S; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong-An; Park, Jong-Sik; Oh, Jin Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    In preparation for 131 I ablation, temporary withdrawal of thyroid hormone is commonly used in patients with thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy. The current study aimed to investigate brain glucose metabolism and its relationships with mood or cognitive function in these patients using 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET). A total of 40 consecutive adult patients with thyroid carcinoma who had undergone total thyroidectomy were recruited for this cross-sectional study. At the time of assessment, 20 patients were hypothyroid after two weeks of thyroid hormone withdrawal, while 20 received thyroid hormone replacement therapy and were euthyroid. All participants underwent brain 18 F-FDG-PET scans and completed mood questionnaires and cognitive tests. Multivariate spatial covariance analysis and univariate voxel-wise analysis were applied for the image data. The hypothyroid patients were more anxious and depressed than the euthyroid participants. The multivariate covariance analysis showed increases in glucose metabolism primarily in the bilateral insula and surrounding areas and concomitant decreases in the parieto-occipital regions in the hypothyroid group. The level of thyrotropin was positively associated with the individual expression of the covariance pattern. The decreased 18 F-FDG uptake in the right cuneus cluster from the univariate analysis was correlated with the increased thyrotropin level and greater depressive symptoms in the hypothyroid group. These results suggest that temporary hypothyroidism, even for a short period, may induce impairment in glucose metabolism and related affective symptoms.

  9. Relationship Among Pulmonary Hypertension, Autoimmunity, Thyroid Hormones and Dyspnea in Patients With Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zuhur, Sayid Shafi; Baykiz, Derya; Kara, Sonat Pinar; Sahin, Ertan; Kuzu, Idris; Elbuken, Gulsah

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported conflicting results regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in patients with hyperthyroidism. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between PHT and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3, fT4 and dyspnea during daily activities in a large population of patients with hyperthyroidism. A total of 129 consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism, 37 with hypothyroidism and 38 euthyroid controls were enrolled in this study. The modified medical research council scale was used for the assessment of dyspnea in daily activities. All the patients and euthyroid controls underwent transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of PHT. Mild PHT was present in 35%, 36%, 13.5% and 5% of the patients with Graves׳ disease, toxic multinodular goiter, hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls, respectively. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was higher in hyperthyroid patients with PHT than in those without PHT. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between modified medical research council scale and pulmonary artery systolic pressure as well as PVR in patients with hyperthyroidism. No association was found between PHT and serum TSH receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3 and fT4 levels. Mild PHT is present in a significant proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism, regardless of etiology. PVR appears to be the main cause of PHT in patients with hyperthyroidism, and neither autoimmunity nor thyroid hormones are associated with PHT in these patients. Mild dyspnea during daily activities in patients with hyperthyroidism may be related to PHT; however, severe dyspnea requires further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PRESENCE AND BIOSYNTHESIS OF THYROID HORMONES IN A TUNICATE, CIONA INTESTINALIS (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, L.J.; Salvatore, G.; Rametta, G.

    1962-09-10

    A tunicate, Ciona intestinalis L., binds very actively I/sup 131/-ions. The labeled iodine is preferentially located (75%) in the external layer of the tunic. The iodine metabolism is there chiefly oriented toward the biosynthesis of iodothyronines (thyroid hormones). The presence of free thyroxine and 3,5,3'- triiodothyronine in the tissues of Ciona has been established. Biogenesis of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and thyroxine proceeds chiefly in the tunic, in which three fractions of iodoproteins were characterized. Two of these, one soluble in various media, the other bound to insoluble structure, contain 3,5,3'- triiodothyronine, thyroxine and their precursors, 3-monoiodo- and 3,5- diiodotyrosine. The four iodinatedmore » amino acids are freed from these proteins by action of pancreatic proteinases and papain. An insoluble residue of iodinated scleroprotein, not hydrolyzed by proteinases, does not take part to endocrine activity; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine only are found in the products of its alkaline hydrolysis. The mechanism of hormonogenesis seems identical in all chordata (urochordata, cephalochordata, and vertebrates). As thyroid hormones are found in these and not in invertebrates lower than urochordata, their appearance in this subphylum can be considered as a fundamental step of biochemical evolution of the thyroid function. Biosynthesis of iodothyronines is characteristic of chordata. It proceeds in all of these, including protochordata, by the same mechanism, but under conditions submitted to the evolution of the secretory tissue through a series of steps, the last of which is the thyroid follicle of vertebrates. (auth)« less

  11. Analysis of thyroid hormone receptor {beta}A mRNA expression in Xenopus laevis tadpoles as a means to detect agonism and antagonism of thyroid hormone action

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, Robert; Lutz, Ilka; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha

    2006-04-01

    Amphibian metamorphosis represents a unique biological model to study thyroid hormone (TH) action in vivo. In this study, we examined the utility of thyroid hormone receptors {alpha} (TR{alpha}) and {beta}A (TR{beta}A) mRNA expression patterns in Xenopus laevis tadpoles as molecular markers indicating modulation of TH action. During spontaneous metamorphosis, only moderate changes were evident for TR{alpha} gene expression whereas a marked up-regulation of TR{beta}A mRNA occurred in hind limbs (prometamorphosis), head (late prometamorphosis), and tail tissue (metamorphic climax). Treatment of premetamorphic tadpoles with 1 nM 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) caused a rapid induction of TR{beta}A mRNA in head and tail tissue withinmore » 6 to 12 h which was maintained for at least 72 h after initiation of T3 treatment. Developmental stage had a strong influence on the responsiveness of tadpole tissues to induce TR{beta}A mRNA during 24 h treatment with thyroxine (0, 1, 5, 10 nM T4) or T3 (0, 1, 5, 10 nM). Premetamorphic tadpoles were highly sensitive in their response to T4 and T3 treatments, whereas sensitivity to TH was decreased in early prometamorphic tadpoles and strongly diminished in late prometamorphic tadpoles. To examine the utility of TR{beta}A gene expression analysis for detection of agonistic and antagonistic effects on T3 action, mRNA expression was assessed in premetamorphic tadpoles after 48 h of treatment with the synthetic agonist GC-1 (0, 10, 50, 250 nM), the synthetic antagonist NH-3 (0, 40, 200, 1000 nM), and binary combinations of NH-3 (0, 40, 200, 1000 nM) and T3 (1 nM). All tested concentrations of GC-1 as well as the highest concentration of NH-3 caused an up-regulation of TR{beta}A expression. Co-treatment with NH-3 and T3 revealed strong antagonistic effects by NH-3 on T3-induced TR{beta}A mRNA up-regulation. Results of this study suggest that TR{beta}A mRNA expression analysis could serve as a sensitive molecular testing approach to study

  12. Treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput with radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer: comparison of thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation methods.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Casas, Juan Antonio; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez, María Angeles; Marlowe, Robert J; Latre Romero, José M; Martínez-Paredes, María

    2011-09-01

    We sought to empirically compare treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput for recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH)-aided thyroid remnant ablation with thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW)-aided ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). We retrospectively reviewed charts of all eligible (near) totally thyroidectomized patients with DTC undergoing ablation and 1-year ablation success evaluation at our tertiary referral centre from January 2003 to February 2009 (N=274). M1 disease caused exclusion unless discovered by a postablation scan or present when rhTSH was the only tolerable stimulation method. We extracted data on the length-of-stay, defined as the time between treatment room admission and discharge, and patient throughput, defined as patients ablated per treatment room per week. The treatment room discharge criterion was a whole-body dose rate of less than 60 μSv/h at 50 cm. The treatment groups (rhTSH, n=187; THW, n=87) had mostly statistically similar characteristics, but differed in primary tumour status distribution. In addition, at ablation, the rhTSH patients had a greater prevalence of prior diagnostic scintigraphy, higher mean serum TSH, and shorter interval since surgery, and received a 5.6% larger mean ablation activity. On average, rhTSH patients had a significantly lower peak whole-body dose rate (57.1 vs. 83.4 μSv/h at 50 cm; P<0.0001) and a significantly shorter treatment room stay than did the THW patients (1.41 vs. 2.02 days; P<0.001). rhTSH use allowed significantly more patients to be ablated per room per week (2.7 vs. 1.2; P<0.001). Relative to THW, rhTSH use to aid ablation reduced mean treatment room length-of-stay by almost one-third and more than doubled the average weekly patient throughput, both of which were significant differences.

  13. Impact of Drinking Water Fluoride on Human Thyroid Hormones: A Case- Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kheradpisheh, Zohreh; Mirzaei, Masoud; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Mokhtari, Mehdi; Azizi, Reyhane; Fallahzadeh, Hossein; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan

    2018-02-08

    The elevated fluoride from drinking water impacts on T 3 , T 4 and TSH hormones. The aim was study impacts of drinking water fluoride on T 3 , T 4 and TSH hormones inYGA (Yazd Greater Area). In this case- control study 198 cases and 213 controls were selected. Fluoride was determined by the SPADNS Colorimetric Method. T 3 , T 4 and TSH hormones tested in the Yazd central laboratory by RIA (Radio Immuno Assay) method. The average amount of TSH and T 3 hormones based on the levels of fluoride in two concentration levels 0-0.29 and 0.3-0.5 (mg/L) was statistically significant (P = 0.001 for controls and P = 0.001 for cases). In multivariate regression logistic analysis, independent variable associated with Hypothyroidism were: gender (odds ratio: 2.5, CI 95%: 1.6-3.9), family history of thyroid disease (odds ratio: 2.7, CI 95%: 1.6-4.6), exercise (odds ratio: 5.34, CI 95%: 3.2-9), Diabetes (odds ratio: 3.7, CI 95%: 1.7-8), Hypertension (odds ratio: 3.2, CI 95%: 1.3-8.2), water consumption (odds ratio: 4, CI 95%: 1.2-14). It was found that fluoride has impacts on TSH, T 3 hormones even in the standard concentration of less than 0.5 mg/L. Application of standard household water purification devices was recommended for hypothyroidism.

  14. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of