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Sample records for abnormal vascular reactivity

  1. Plasma concentrations of endothelin in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Predel, H.G.; Meyer-Lehnert, H.; Baecker, A.; Stelkens, H.; Kramer, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    We measured circulating concentrations of endothelin in healthy subjects and in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity. Endothelin concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay after extraction of plasma using Sep-Pak C-18 cartridges in healthy subjects, in patients with diabetes mellitus type I, in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension and in non-dialyzed patients with stable chronic renal failure. Plasma concentrations were similar in healthy controls, in diabetics and in hypertensive patients averaging 5.0{plus minus}0.6 pg/ml, 4.7{plus minus}0.2 pg/ml and 6.5{plus minus}1.0 pg/ml, respectively. In contrast, plasma concentrations of endothelin were markedly elevated in patients with chronic renal failure averaging 16.6{plus minus}2.9 pg/ml. No correlations were observed between serum creatinine concentrations ranging from 124 to 850 {mu}mol/l or blood pressure and plasma concentrations of endothelin. Bicycle ergometric exercise in six healthy subjects and an acute modest i.v. saline load of 1,000 ml of 0.45% NaCl administered within 60 min in six patients with mild essential hypertension did not affect plasma concentrations of endothelin.

  2. NO contributes to abnormal vascular calcium regulation and reactivity induced by peritonitis-associated septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiu-Jen; Li, Shaio-Yun; Shih, Chih-Chin; Liao, Mei-Huei; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2010-05-01

    Calcium plays an important role in determining vascular smooth muscle tone. Norepinephrine (NE)-induced vascular contraction contains two components: 1) Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum as the fast phase and 2) Ca2+ influx via a voltage-dependent calcium channel as the slow phase. This study used functional isometric tension recording to evaluate mediators contributing to abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling and reactivity in isolated thoracic aortas from septic rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and thoracic aortas were removed at 18 h after CLP. Our results showed that rats that received CLP for 18 h manifested severe hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to NE in vivo. This vascular hyporeactivity to NE was also observed in the aorta obtained from CLP-induced sepsis rat. Both the fast and slow phases of NE-induced contraction were reduced in aortas from sepsis rats. To clarify what possible mediators contribute to the abnormal Ca2+ handling in aortas from sepsis animals, inhibitors of Ca2+ channel and release were used. Inhibition by 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, ryanodine, and cyclopiazonic acid of the NE-induced contraction in Ca2+-free solution was greater in the aorta from sepsis rats and inhibitions of cyclopiazonic acid and ryanodine, but not of 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, were attenuated by NOS inhibitor N[omega]-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. In addition, the attenuation of NE-induced contraction by nifedipine in the aorta was also greater in the CLP group. Our results suggest that abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling associated with vascular hyporeactivity in the CLP-induced sepsis is caused by a major decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum function and a minor impairment of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels on membrane to Ca2+ handling, at least, in the aorta, and this could be attributed to an overproduction of NO in sepsis. PMID:19749606

  3. Rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulant, abrogates diabetes-evoked hypertension by rectifying abnormalities in vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Abo-Warda, Shaymaa M; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In addition to insulin sensitization, rosiglitazone exhibits favourable circulatory effects. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that rosiglitazone protects against hypertension and vascular derangements caused by diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single bolus injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p.). After 2 weeks, rats were started on a treatment regimen of 5 mg/kg rosiglitazone daily for a period of 6 weeks. The control group consisted of rats treated with vehicle (distilled water) for the same period of time. After 6 weeks treatment, blood pressure (BP) was recorded and serum levels of glucose, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were determined. In in vitro experiments, concentration-response curves were constructed to phenylephrine (PE), KCl and acetylcholine (ACh) in thoracic aorta rings. In addition, ACh-induced nitric oxide (NO) generation and KCl-induced intracellular Ca accumulation were determined in the aorta. Compared with values in control rats, both diastolic and systolic BP were increased in diabetic rats. Rosiglitazone treatment of diabetic rats abolished the increase in diastolic BP and significantly reduced the increased systolic BP without affecting the development of hyperglycaemia. The possibility that changes in vascular reactivity and/or lipid profile contributed to the effects of rosiglitazone on BP in diabetic rats was investigated. In aortic rings from diabetic rats, contractile responses to KCl were increased, whereas the relaxant responses to ACh were decreased. In rings from diabetic rosiglitazone-treated rats, the exaggerated response to KCl and the impaired response to ACh were abolished. Furthermore, rosiglitazone abrogated impaired ACh-stimulated NO generation in aortas isolated from diabetic rats. Diabetes in rats was accompanied by elevated levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-C and AGE. Rosiglitazone treatment

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not mediate the abnormal vascular reactivity observed in a rat model of acute Pseudomonas pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fox, G A; Paterson, N A; McCormack, D G

    1996-06-01

    Abnormal systemic and pulmonary vascular reactivity has been demonstrated in numerous models of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the attenuated hypoxic pulmonary pressor response observed in these animals probably is responsible for the ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching and consequent arterial hypoxemia. We hypothesized that excess release of endogenous vasodilators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in pneumonia was responsible for the diminished hypoxic pressor response. Using the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP (8-37), we examined the role of CGRP in the attenuated hypoxic pulmonary response in a rat model of acute Pseudomonas pneumonia. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented for chronic hemodynamic monitoring and subsequently randomized to either Pneumonia (n = 8), induced by the instillation of 0.2 ml broth containing 2 x 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa into the right lower lobe, or Sham (n = 8) procedure. Hemodynamic measurements and the hypoxic (FiO2 = 0.08) pulmonary pressor response were recorded at baseline, 48 h after the pneumonia or sham procedure and after the administration of 250 micrograms CGRP (8-37) (post-CGRP(8-37)). The regional distribution of pulmonary blood flow was determined by the injection of radioactive microspheres. Forty-eight hours after the instillation of Pseudomonas, Pneumonia animals had significantly increased cardiac output (CO) as compared with Sham (193 +/- 7 vs. 154 +/- 7 ml/min, p < 0.05), slightly decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP 109 +/- 4 vs. 118 +/- 3 mm Hg, p = NS), and reduced total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR 0.57 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.05 mm Hg.min.ml-1, p < 0.05). Pneumonia animals were further characterized by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) as compared with Sham (24 +/- 2 vs. 20 +/- 1 mm Hg, p < 0.05) animals, and an increased alveolar-arterial (A-a) oxygen gradient (31 +/- 3 vs. 20 +/- 4 mm Hg, p < 0.05). The administration of CGRP

  5. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  6. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Measures of vascular structure and function, including increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and elevated arterial stiffness predict hard CV events in adulthood. Newer data suggest that abnormalities in target organ damage are occurring in adolescents and young adults with high blood pressure. In this review, we discuss the techniques for measuring vascular dysfunction in young people and the evidence linking blood pressure levels to this type of target organ damage. PMID:26275663

  7. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of unusual portal vascular abnormalities in two cats.

    PubMed

    McConnell, J F; Sparkes, A H; Ladlow, J; Doust, R; Davies, S

    2006-06-01

    Two cases of ascites secondary to portal vascular abnormalities associated with portal hypertension are described. In the first case a five-month-old cat was presented with recurrent ascites and investigations showed that the underlying cause was a hepatic arteriovenous fistula. Ultrasonography showed direct communication of the coeliac artery and right branch of the portal vein. There was also hepatofugal flow in the main portal vein consistent with portal hypertension. The ultrasonographic features were similar to those seen in dogs with hepatic arteriovenous fistulae. In the second case, ascites, portal hypertension and an intraluminal mass in the main portal vein was diagnosed in a 16-year-old cat that had been presented with hyperthyroidism and hepatomegaly. Acquired portosystemic collaterals involving the left renal vein were present. Additional diagnostic investigations were not permitted. Ultrasonography was useful in both cases to document portal hypertension and the underlying cause. PMID:16761986

  8. Hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, and vascular malformations represent the signaling abnormalities of pathogenic angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arbiser, J L; Bonner, M Y; Berrios, R L

    2009-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a major factor in the development of benign, inflammatory, and malignant processes of the skin. Endothelial cells are the effector cells of angiogenesis, and understanding their response to growth factors and inhibitors is critical to understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of skin disease. Hemangiomas, benign tumors of endothelial cells, represent the most common tumor of childhood. In our previous studies, we have found that tumor vasculature in human solid tumors expresses similarities in signaling to that of hemangiomas, making the knowledge of signaling in hemangiomas widely applicable. These similarities include expression of reactive oxygen, NFkB and akt in tumor vasculature. Furthermore, we have studied malignant vascular tumors, including hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma and have shown distinct signaling abnormalities in these tumors. The incidence of these tumors is expected to rise due to environmental insults, such as radiation and lumpectomy for breast cancer, dietary and industrial carcinogens (hepatic angiosarcoma), and chronic ultraviolet exposure and potential Agent Orange exposure. I hypothesize that hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, and vascular malformations represent the extremes of signaling abnormalities seen in pathogenic angiogenesis. PMID:19925405

  9. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  10. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth Mc; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-03-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  11. Perivascular adipose tissue, vascular reactivity and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oriowo, Mabayoje A

    2015-01-01

    Most blood vessels are surrounded by a variable amount of adventitial adipose tissue, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), which was originally thought to provide mechanical support for the vessel. It is now known that PVAT secretes a number of bioactive substances including vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor, interleukin-6, plasminogen activator substance, resistin and angiotensinogen. Several studies have shown that PVAT significantly modulated vascular smooth muscle contractions induced by a variety of agonists and electrical stimulation by releasing adipocyte-derived relaxing (ADRF) and contracting factors. The identity of ADRF is not yet known. However, several vasodilators have been suggested including adiponectin, angiotensin 1-7, hydrogen sulfide and methyl palmitate. The anticontractile effect of PVAT is mediated through the activation of potassium channels since it is abrogated by inhibiting potassium channels. Hypertension is characterized by a reduction in the size and amount of PVAT and this is associated with the attenuated anticontractile effect of PVAT in hypertension. However, since a reduction in size and amount of PVAT and the attenuated anticontractile effect of PVAT were already evident in prehypertensive rats with no evidence of impaired release of ADRF, there is the possibility that the anticontractile effect of PVAT was not directly related to an altered function of the adipocytes per se. Hypertension is characterized by low-grade inflammation and infiltration of macrophages. One of the adipokines secreted by macrophages is TNF-α. It has been shown that exogenously administered TNF-α enhanced agonist-induced contraction of a variety of vascular smooth muscle preparations and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Other procontractile factors released by the PVAT include angiotensin II and superoxide. It is therefore possible that the loss could be due

  12. Fetal and postnatal ovine mesenteric vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Nielsen, Lori C.; Caty, Michael G.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal circulation and mesenteric arterial (MA) reactivity may play a role in preparing the fetus for enteral nutrition. We hypothesized that MA vasoreactivity changes with gestation and vasodilator pathways predominate in the postnatal period. METHODS Small distal MA rings (0.5-mm diameter) were isolated from fetal (116-d, 128-d, 134-d, and 141-d gestation, term ~ 147 d) and postnatal lambs. Vasoreactivity was evaluated using vasoconstrictors (norepinephrine (NE) after pretreatment with propranolol and endothelin-1(ET-1)) and vasodilators (NO donors A23187 and s-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP)). Protein and mRNA assays for receptors and enzymes (endothelin receptor A, alpha-adrenergic receptor 1A (ADRA1A), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5)) were performed in mesenteric arteries. RESULTS MA constriction to NE and ET-1 peaked at 134 d. Relaxation to A23187 and SNAP was maximal after birth. Basal eNOS activity was low at 134 d. ADRA1A mRNA and protein increasedsignificantlyat134danddecreasedpostnatally.sGC and PDE5 protein increased from 134 to 141 d. CONCLUSION Mesenteric vasoconstriction predominates in late-preterm gestation (134 d; the postconceptional age with the highest incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)) followed by a conversion to vasodilatory influences near the time of full-term birth. Perturbations in this ontogenic mechanism, including preterm birth, may be a risk factor for NEC. PMID:26672733

  13. On the disparity in osmolarity-induced vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Michelle Hunt, C.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Neal Garrison, R.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional Peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDS) are vasoactive. This study was conducted to identify vasoactive components of PDS and to quantitatively describe such vasoactivity. Anesthetized nonheparinized rats were continuously monitored for hemodynamics, while the microvasculature of the jejunum was studied with in vivo intravital microscopy. In separate experiments, vascular reactivity of rat endothelium-intact and –denuded aortic rings (2mm) was studied ex vivo in a standard tissue bath. In both studies, suffusion of the vessels was performed with filter-sterilized isotonic and hypertonic solutions containing glucose or mannitol as osmotic agents. PDS served as a control (Delflex® 2.25%). Hypertonic glucose and mannitol solutions produced a significant vascular reactivity in aortic rings, and instantaneous and sustained vascular relaxation at all levels of the intestinal microvasculature. Similarly, lactate dissolved in a low pH isotonic physiologic salt solution produced significant force generation in aortic rings. While isotonic glucose and mannitol solutions had no vasoactivity in aortic rings, isotonic glucose produced a selective, insidious and time-dependent vasodilation in the intestinal premucosal arterioles (18±0.2% of baseline), which was not observed in the larger inflow arterioles (100 μm). This isotonic glucose-mediated vascular relaxation can be attenuated by ∼50% with combined adenosine A2a, A2b receptor antagonists, and completely abolished by adenosine A1 receptor inhibition. By using two different experimental techniques, this study demonstrates that hyperosmolality and lactate are the major vasoactive components of clinical peritoneal dialysis solutions. The pattern and magnitude of such reactivity is dependent on vessel size and on the solutes' metabolic activity. Low pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solutions is not a vasoactive component by itself; but renders lactate vasoactive. Energy-dependent transport of glucose into

  14. Brachial artery reactivity and vascular reactive hyperemia for preoperative anaesthesia risk assessment – an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive measures of vascular reactivity have emerged to refine cardiovascular risk. However, limited data exists investigating vascular reactivity as a preoperative diagnostic tool for anesthesiologists. In this study, we compare the utility of two non-invasive techniques, Brachial Artery Reactivity Testing (BART) and Digital Thermal Monitoring (DTM), as surrogates for measuring vascular reactivity. Methods Following IRB approval, 26 patients scheduled for major thoracic surgery (e.g. esophagectomy and pneumonectomy) were studied prospectively. BART [Flow mediated dilation (FMD) and Peak flow velocity (PFV)] and DTM [Temperature rebound (TR%)] were performed preoperatively at baseline using 5 minute blood pressure cuff occlusion of the upper arm. Statistical summaries were provided for the comparison of BART and DTM with select patient characteristics, and correlations were used to investigate the strength of the relationship between BART and DTM measurements. Results Patients preoperatively diagnosed with hyperlipidemia were associated with lower FMD% values {Median (Range): 14.8 (2.3, 38.1) vs. 6.2 (0.0, 14.3); p = 0.006}. There were no significant associations between BART and DTM techniques in relation to cardiovascular risk factors or postoperative complications. Conclusion Our study suggests that impaired vascular reactivity as measured by BART is associated with the incidence of hyperlipidemia. Also, using a novel technique such as DTM may provide a simpler and more accessible point of care testing for vascular reactivity in a perioperative setting. Both non-invasive techniques assessing vascular function warrant further refinement to better assist preoperative optimization strategies aimed at improving perioperative vascular function. PMID:24971042

  15. Hostility, testosterone, and vascular reactivity to stress: effects of sex.

    PubMed

    Girdler, S S; Jammer, L D; Shapiro, D

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the association of personality with cardiovascular stress reactivity (CVR) in men and women. Also, the degree to which testosterone and estradiol reactivity were related to personality and CVR measures was examined. Twenty-six men and 44 women completed the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory before speech, Stroop, and math stress. Testosterone (men) and estradiol (subset of women) were sampled once after an initial rest period and again after the last stressor. Cardiovascular reactivity, including cardiac output and total peripheral resistance (TPR), was assessed during stressors. For men, testosterone increased significantly with stress, and testosterone reactivity to stressors was significantly correlated with hostility. However, stepwise multiple regression revealed that hostility was the only independent predictor of CVR to speech, math, and Stroop stress in men, accounting for 13%-32% of the variance in TPR. Baseline systolic blood pressure explained 22% of the variance in TPR reactivity to speech preparation. No evidence was obtained to suggest that hostility, depressive mood, or anxiety predicted CVR in women, and estradiol did not show stress-sensitive effects. These data provide evidence that increased vascular reactivity may be one mechanism linking hostility to increased cardiovascular mortality in men and support the notion that hostility may have different implications for CVR in women. PMID:16250731

  16. Potassium channels and vascular reactivity in genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Furspan, P B; Webb, R C

    1990-06-01

    In hypertension, membrane potassium permeability and vascular reactivity are increased. This study characterizes a potassium-selective channel and contractions to barium, a potassium channel inhibitor, in vascular smooth muscle (tail artery) from spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Smooth muscle cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion, and potassium channel activity was characterized by using patch-clamp technique (inside-out configuration). Isometric contractile activity was evaluated in helically cut arterial strips by using standard muscle bath methodology. In membrane patches, a voltage-gated, calcium-insensitive, potassium-selective channel of large conductance (200 picosiemens) was observed. The channel did not conduct sodium or rubidium. Barium (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) produced a dose-dependent blockade of channel activity. These channel characteristics did not differ in SHRSP and WKY rat cells. After treatment with 35 mM KCl, barium (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) caused greater contractions in SHRSP arteries compared with arteries in WKY rats. The contractions to barium were markedly attenuated in calcium-free solution, and nifedipine and verapamil abolished contractions induced by barium in depolarizing solution. We conclude that increased vascular reactivity to barium in SHRSP arteries is not due to an alteration in the biophysical properties of the potassium channel studied. PMID:2351424

  17. Abnormal Vascular Function and Hypertension in Mice Deficient in Estrogen Receptor β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Bian, Zhao; Lu, Ping; Karas, Richard H.; Bao, Lin; Cox, Daniel; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Shaul, Philip W.; Thorén, Peter; Smithies, Oliver; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Mendelsohn, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Blood vessels express estrogen receptors, but their role in cardiovascular physiology is not well understood. We show that vascular smooth muscle cells and blood vessels from estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-deficient mice exhibit multiple functional abnormalities. In wild-type mouse blood vessels, estrogen attenuates vasoconstriction by an ERβ-mediated increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. In contrast, estrogen augments vasoconstriction in blood vessels from ERβ-deficient mice. Vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from ERβ-deficient mice show multiple abnormalities of ion channel function. Furthermore, ERβ-deficient mice develop sustained systolic and diastolic hypertension as they age. These data support an essential role for ERβ in the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure.

  18. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization. PMID:26645582

  19. Novel application of a multiscale entropy index as a sensitive tool for detecting subtle vascular abnormalities in the aged and diabetic.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Lo, Men-Tzung; Chen, Guan-Hong; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Jian-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown the successful use of pressure-induced reactive hyperemia as a tool for the assessment of endothelial function, its sensitivity remains questionable. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and sensitivity of a novel multiscale entropy index (MEI) in detecting subtle vascular abnormalities in healthy and diabetic subjects. Basic anthropometric and hemodynamic parameters, serum lipid profiles, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were recorded. Arterial pulse wave signals were acquired from the wrist with an air pressure sensing system (APSS), followed by MEI and dilatation index (DI) analyses. MEI succeeded in detecting significant differences among the four groups of subjects: healthy young individuals, healthy middle-aged or elderly individuals, well-controlled diabetic individuals, and poorly controlled diabetic individuals. A reduction in multiscale entropy reflected age- and diabetes-related vascular changes and may serve as a more sensitive indicator of subtle vascular abnormalities compared with DI in the setting of diabetes. PMID:23509600

  20. Novel Application of a Multiscale Entropy Index as a Sensitive Tool for Detecting Subtle Vascular Abnormalities in the Aged and Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Lo, Men-Tzung; Chen, Guan-Hong; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Jian-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown the successful use of pressure-induced reactive hyperemia as a tool for the assessment of endothelial function, its sensitivity remains questionable. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and sensitivity of a novel multiscale entropy index (MEI) in detecting subtle vascular abnormalities in healthy and diabetic subjects. Basic anthropometric and hemodynamic parameters, serum lipid profiles, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were recorded. Arterial pulse wave signals were acquired from the wrist with an air pressure sensing system (APSS), followed by MEI and dilatation index (DI) analyses. MEI succeeded in detecting significant differences among the four groups of subjects: healthy young individuals, healthy middle-aged or elderly individuals, well-controlled diabetic individuals, and poorly controlled diabetic individuals. A reduction in multiscale entropy reflected age- and diabetes-related vascular changes and may serve as a more sensitive indicator of subtle vascular abnormalities compared with DI in the setting of diabetes. PMID:23509600

  1. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  2. Vascular Reactivity is Impaired and Associated With Walking Ability in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E; Wolosker, Nelson; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano

    2015-08-01

    We verified whether vascular reactivity is impaired and whether there is any association between vascular reactivity, walking ability, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) severity in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). We studied 63 patients and 17 age- and sex-matched volunteers without PAD. Vascular reactivity was evaluated in the brachial artery during reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) and after a sublingual single dose of nitroglycerin (nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation [NID]). Walking ability was verified by a 6-minute walk test. Vascular reactivity and walking ability were significantly worse in patients with IC compared with control participants. The ankle-brachial index correlated with FMD, NID, as well as total and pain-free distances. The NID and walking ability progressively decreased as PAD severity increased. Walking ability correlated with NID but not with FMD. In patients with IC, vascular reactivity is impaired and is related to the severity of PAD and to walking ability. PMID:25100750

  3. Comprehensive automatic assessment of retinal vascular abnormalities for computer-assisted retinopathy grading.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vinayak; Agurto, Carla; VanNess, Richard; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important signs of systemic disease that presents on the retina is vascular abnormalities such as in hypertensive retinopathy. Manual analysis of fundus images by human readers is qualitative and lacks in accuracy, consistency and repeatability. Present semi-automatic methods for vascular evaluation are reported to increase accuracy and reduce reader variability, but require extensive reader interaction; thus limiting the software-aided efficiency. Automation thus holds a twofold promise. First, decrease variability while increasing accuracy, and second, increasing the efficiency. In this paper we propose fully automated software as a second reader system for comprehensive assessment of retinal vasculature; which aids the readers in the quantitative characterization of vessel abnormalities in fundus images. This system provides the reader with objective measures of vascular morphology such as tortuosity, branching angles, as well as highlights of areas with abnormalities such as artery-venous nicking, copper and silver wiring, and retinal emboli; in order for the reader to make a final screening decision. To test the efficacy of our system, we evaluated the change in performance of a newly certified retinal reader when grading a set of 40 color fundus images with and without the assistance of the software. The results demonstrated an improvement in reader's performance with the software assistance, in terms of accuracy of detection of vessel abnormalities, determination of retinopathy, and reading time. This system enables the reader in making computer-assisted vasculature assessment with high accuracy and consistency, at a reduced reading time. PMID:25571442

  4. Nomegestrol acetate and vascular reactivity: nonhuman primate experiments.

    PubMed

    Paris, J M; Williams, K J; Hermsmeyer, K R; Delansorne, R

    2000-01-01

    Prevention of coronary artery disease has been recognized as a major benefit of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in postmenopausal women. However, endometrial hyperplasia induced by unopposed ERT has raised important safety concerns. Progesterone or synthetic progestins have been used in combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to prevent endometrial cancer risk. Therefore, a major concern has been to ensure that the vascular beneficial effects of estrogens are not opposed when combined with progestins. Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) is an orally active progestin widely prescribed for HRT. Its vascular effects were evaluated in two models of coronary vascular reactivity in primates: 1) the paradoxical vasoconstriction to acetylcholine (Ach) coronary infusion after 5 months of mildly atherogenic diet in ovariectomized (OVX) Cynomolgus monkeys and 2) the pharmacologically evoked coronary vasospasm in the OVX Rhesus monkey. In the first model, after 3 months of continuous oral administration in the diet at 0.1 mg/kg/day, E2 prevented the paradoxical response to Ach, alone as well as combined with 0.25 mg/kg/day NOMAC, whereas NOMAC counteracted the endometrial stimulation. In the second model, after one artificial cycle consisting of 28 days of E2 subcutaneous (s.c.) implant and of daily oral gavage with 1 mg/kg/day of NOMAC for the last 14 days, no vasospasm (0 of 11 tested animals) occurred when the complete challenge protocol, including serotonin and the thromboxane agonist U46619, was administered to OVX Rhesus monkeys. In the balanced crossover design, identical artificial cycles with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) at the same dose resulted in 7 vasospasms in 12 animals. In parallel, effective progestative activity was demonstrated by a secretory pattern in endometrial sections obtained at the end of the cycle. In these two nonhuman primate cardiovascular models, NOMAC did not have the negating effects observed with MPA. PMID:11108868

  5. Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of vascular abnormalities in the living human eye.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yali; Bailey, Steven T; Hwang, Thomas S; McClintic, Scott M; Gao, Simon S; Pennesi, Mark E; Flaxel, Christina J; Lauer, Andreas K; Wilson, David J; Hornegger, Joachim; Fujimoto, James G; Huang, David

    2015-05-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are important causes of vision loss. A detailed evaluation of the vascular abnormalities facilitates diagnosis and treatment in these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography using the highly efficient split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography algorithm offers an alternative to conventional dye-based retinal angiography. OCT angiography has several advantages, including 3D visualization of retinal and choroidal circulations (including the choriocapillaris) and avoidance of dye injection-related complications. Results from six illustrative cases are reported. In diabetic retinopathy, OCT angiography can detect neovascularization and quantify ischemia. In age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization can be observed without the obscuration of details caused by dye leakage in conventional angiography. Choriocapillaris dysfunction can be detected in the nonneovascular form of the disease, furthering our understanding of pathogenesis. In choroideremia, OCT's ability to show choroidal and retinal vascular dysfunction separately may be valuable in predicting progression and assessing treatment response. OCT angiography shows promise as a noninvasive alternative to dye-based angiography for highly detailed, in vivo, 3D, quantitative evaluation of retinal vascular abnormalities. PMID:25897021

  6. Possible involvement of PPARγ-associated eNOS signaling activation in rosuvastatin-mediated prevention of nicotine-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sonam; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-02-01

    Nicotine exposure via cigarette smoking and tobacco chewing is associated with vascular complications. The present study investigated the effect of rosuvastatin in nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, scanning electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining of thoracic aorta were performed to assess the vascular endothelial integrity. Moreover, oxidative stress was assessed by estimating aortic superoxide anion generation and serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The nicotine administration produced VED by markedly reducing acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, increasing oxidative stress, and inducing lipid alteration. However, treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) markedly attenuated nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities, oxidative stress, and lipid alteration. Interestingly, the co-administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist, GW9662 (1 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) submaximally, significantly prevented rosuvastatin-induced improvement in vascular endothelial integrity, endothelium-dependent relaxation, and nitrite/nitrate concentration in rats administered nicotine. However, GW9662 co-administration did not affect rosuvastatin-associated vascular anti-oxidant and lipid-lowering effects. The incubation of aortic ring, isolated from rosuvastatin-treated nicotine-administered rats, with L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), significantly attenuated rosuvastatin-induced improvement in acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Rosuvastatin prevents nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities by activating

  7. Cerebral vascular reactivity on return from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuj, Kathryn; Greaves, Danielle; Shoemaker, Kevin; Blaber, Andrew; Hughson, Richard L.

    Returning from spaceflight, astronauts experience a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance and syncope. Longer duration space flight may result in greater adaptations to microgravity which could increase the post-flight incidence of syncope. CCISS (Cardiovascular and Cerebovascular Control on return from the International Space Station) is an ongoing project designed to help determine adaptations that occur during spaceflight which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. One component of this project involves looking at cerebral vascular responses before and after long duration spaceflight. As a known vasodilator, carbon dioxide (CO2) has been frequently used to assess changes in cerebral vascular reactivity. In this experiment, end tidal PCO2 was manipulated through changes in respired air. Two breaths of a 10% CO2 gas mixture were administered at 1-min intervals resulting in an increase in end tidal PCO2 . Throughout the testing, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was determined using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The cerebral resistance index (RI) was calculated from the Doppler wave form using the equation; RI=(CBFVsystolic-CBFVdiastolic)/CBFVsystolic. Changes in this index have been shown to reflect changes in cerebral vascular resistance. Peak responses to the CO2 stimulus were determined and compared to baseline measures taken at the beginning of the testing. Cerebral blood flow velocity increased and RI decreased with the two breaths of CO2. Preliminary data show a 36.0% increase in CBFV and a 9.0% decrease in RI pre-flight. Post flight, the response to CO2 appears to change showing a potentially blunted decrease in resistance (6.8%) and a smaller increase in CBFV (22.8%). Long term spaceflight may result in cerebrovascular changes which could decrease the vasodilatory capacity of cerebral resistance vessels. Further investigations in the CCISS project will reveal the interactive role of CO2 and arterial blood pressure on maintenance of brain

  8. Cerebral angiography, blood flow and vascular reactivity in progressive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunxia; Shen, Qiang; Huang, Shiliang; Li, Wei; Muir, Eric R.; Long, Justin; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hypertension alters cerebral vascular morphology, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular reactivity, increasing susceptibility to neurological disorders. This study evaluated: i) the lumen diameters of major cerebral and downstream arteries using magnetic resonance angiography, and ii) basal CBF, and iii) cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia of multiple brain regions using arterial-spin-labeling technique in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at different stages. Comparisons were made with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In 10-week SHR, lumen diameter started to reduce, basal CBF, and hypercapnic CBF response were higher from elevated arterial blood pressure, but there was no evidence of stenosis, compared to age-matched WKY. In 20-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced, CBF returned toward normal from vasoconstriction, hypercapnic CBF response reversed and became smaller, but without apparent stenosis. In 40-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced and basal CBF further decreased, resulting in larger differences compared to WKY. There was significant stenosis in main supplying cerebral vessels. Hypercapnic CBF response further decreased, with some animals showing negative hypercapnic CBF responses in some brain regions, indicative of compromised cerebrovascular reserve. The territory with negative hypercapnia CBF responses corresponded with the severity of stenosis in arteries that supplied those territories. We also found enlargement of downstream vessels and formation of collateral vessels as compensatory responses to vasoconstriction upstream vessels. The middle cerebral and azygos arteries were amongst the most susceptible to hypertension-induced changes. Multimodal MRI provides clinically relevant data that might be useful to characterize disease pathogenesis, stage disease progression, and monitor treatment effects in hypertension. PMID:25731987

  9. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-10-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell-pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  10. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  11. Decreased MicroRNA Is Involved in the Vascular Remodeling Abnormalities in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Kalisha D.; Chen, Xianming; Moorthi, Ranjani N.; Gattone, Vincent H.; Allen, Matthew R.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with CKD have abnormal vascular remodeling that is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control mRNA expression intracellularly and are secreted into the circulation; three miRNAs (miR-125b, miR-145 and miR-155) are known to alter vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and differentiation. We measured these vascular miRNAs in blood from 90 patients with CKD and found decreased circulating levels with progressive loss of eGFR by multivariate analyses. Expression of these vascular miRNAs miR-125b, miR-145, and miR-155 was decreased in the thoracic aorta in CKD rats compared to normal rats, with concordant changes in target genes of RUNX2, angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R), and myocardin. Furthermore, the expression of miR-155 was negatively correlated with the quantity of calcification in the aorta, a process known to be preceded by vascular de-differentiation in these animals. We then examined the mechanisms of miRNA regulation in primary VSMC and found decreased expression of miR-125b, 145, and 155 in VSMC from rats with CKD compared to normal littermates but no alteration in DROSHA or DICER, indicating that the low levels of expression is not due to altered intracellular processing. Finally, overexpression of miR-155 in VSMC from CKD rats inhibited AT1R expression and decreased cellular proliferation supporting a direct effect of miR-155 on VSMC. In conclusion, we have found ex vivo and in vitro evidence for decreased expression of these vascular miRNA in CKD, suggesting that alterations in miRNAs may lead to the synthetic state of VSMC found in CKD. The decreased levels in the circulation may reflect decreased vascular release but more studies are needed to confirm this relationship. PMID:23717629

  12. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA. PMID:24048981

  13. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neonatal Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Abnormal lung development in the perinatal period can result in severe neonatal complications, including persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) of the newborn and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a substantive role in the development of PH associated with these diseases. ROS impair the normal pulmonary artery (PA) relaxation in response to vasodilators, and ROS are also implicated in pulmonary arterial remodeling, both of which can increase the severity of PH. Recent Advances: PA ROS levels are elevated when endogenous ROS-generating enzymes are activated and/or when endogenous ROS scavengers are inactivated. Animal models have provided valuable insights into ROS generators and scavengers that are dysregulated in different forms of neonatal PH, thus identifying potential therapeutic targets. Critical Issues: General antioxidant therapy has proved ineffective in reversing PH, suggesting that it is necessary to target specific signaling pathways for successful therapy. Future Directions: Development of novel selective pharmacologic inhibitors along with nonantioxidant therapies may improve the treatment outcomes of patients with PH, while further investigation of the underlying mechanisms may enable earlier detection of the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1926–1942. PMID:24350610

  14. Smooth muscle calcium and endothelium-derived relaxing factor in the abnormal vascular responses of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Conger, J D; Robinette, J B; Schrier, R W

    1988-01-01

    Abnormal renovascular reactivity, characterized by paradoxical vasoconstriction to a reduction in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) in the autoregulatory range, increased sensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS), and loss of vasodilatation to acetylcholine have all been demonstrated in ischemic acute renal failure (ARF). To determine if ischemic injury alters vascular contractility by increasing smooth muscle cell calcium or calcium influx, the renal blood flow (RBF) response to reductions in RPP within the autoregulatory range and to RNS were tested before and after a 90-min intrarenal infusion of verapamil or diltiazem in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Both calcium entry blockers, verapamil and diltiazem, blocked the aberrant vasoconstrictor response to a reduction in RPP and RNS (both P less than 0.001). In a second series of experiments the potential role of an ischemia-induced endothelial injury and of the absence of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) production were examined to explain the lack of vasodilatation to acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, bradykinin (a second EDRF-dependent vasodilator), or prostacyclin, an EDRF-independent vasodilator, was infused intrarenally for 90 min, and RBF responses to a reduction in RPP and RNS were tested in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Neither acetylcholine nor bradykinin caused vasodilatation or altered the slope of the relationship between RBF and RPP. By contrast, prostacyclin increased RBF (P less than 0.001), but did not change the vascular response to changes in RPP. It was concluded that the abnormal pressor sensitivity to a reduction in RPP and RNS was due to changes in renovascular smooth muscle cell calcium activity that could be blocked by calcium entry blockers. A lack of response to EDRF-dependent vasodilators, as a result of ischemic endothelial injury, may contribute to the increased pressor sensitivity of the renal vessels. PMID:3261301

  15. Effect of Pitavastatin on Vascular Reactivity in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Ozaki, Michiko Regina

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitavastatin is the newest statin available in Brazil and likely the one with fewer side effects. Thus, pitavastatin was evaluated in hypercholesterolemic rabbits in relation to its action on vascular reactivity. Objective To assess the lowest dose of pitavastatin necessary to reduce plasma lipids, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation, as well as endothelial function in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Methods Thirty rabbits divided into six groups (n = 5): G1 - standard chow diet; G2 - hypercholesterolemic diet for 30 days; G3 - hypercholesterolemic diet and after the 16th day, diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.1 mg); G4 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.25 mg); G5 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.5 mg); G6 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (1.0 mg). After 30 days, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, creatine kinase (CK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured and LDL was calculated. In-depth anesthesia was performed with sodium thiopental and aortic segments were removed to study endothelial function, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation. The significance level for statistical tests was 5%. Results Total cholesterol and LDL were significantly elevated in relation to G1. HDL was significantly reduced in G4, G5 and G6 when compared to G2. Triglycerides, CK, AST, ALT, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation showed no statistical difference between G2 and G3-G6. Significantly endothelial dysfunction reversion was observed in G5 and G6 when compared to G2. Conclusion Pitavastatin starting at a 0.5 mg dose was effective in reverting endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. PMID:25014056

  16. Retinal Vascular Abnormalities in NEMO-Deficient Mice: An Animal Model for Incontinentia Pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Stephen F.; McLeod, D. Scott; Otsuji, T.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) have a mutation in the nuclear factor-kappa-β essential modulator (NEMO) gene, and mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO exhibit skin pathology remarkably similar to the human disease. This study characterizes the retinal vascular abnormalities of NEMO-deficient mice, and compares this phenotype to known features of human IP. Nineteen heterozygous NEMO-deficient female mice, ages ranging from post-natal day 8 (P-8) through 6.5 months of life, were studied. Eyes were sectioned and stained either whole or as retinal flat mounts after incubation for enzyme histochemical demonstration of ADPase, which labels the vasculature. With maturation, retinal arteriolar abnormalities became evident at 3 months of age. Global assessment of the retinal vasculature with ADPase staining showed increased arteriolar tortuosity. Microscopic examination of sections of ADPase-incubated retinas revealed arteriolar luminal narrowing due to endothelial cell hypertrophy and increased basement membrane deposition. Venous morphology was normal. This study characterized the histological retinal phenotype of heterozygous NEMO-deficient female mice. Most striking were retinal arteriolar abnormalities, including luminal narrowing, endothelial cell hypertrophy, and basement membrane thickening. Retinal flat mounts revealed arteriolar tortuosity without evidence of vaso-occlusion or neovascularization. PMID:19068214

  17. Focal 123I-FP-CIT SPECT Abnormality in Midbrain Vascular Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Solla, Paolo; Cannas, Antonino; Arca, Roberta; Fonti, Davide; Orofino, Gianni; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are considered among possible causes of acute/subacute parkinsonism, representing up to 22% of secondary movement disorders. In cases of suspected vascular parkinsonism (VP), dopamine transporter SPECT has been highly recommended to exclude nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration. We report the case of a hemiparkinsonism related to a left midbrain infarct with focal lateralized putaminal abnormalities at 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. The asymmetric uptake at dopamine transporter SPECT was different to findings commonly observed in typical PD pattern, because the ipsilateral striatum, in opposite to idiopathic PD, showed normal tracer binding. However, this selective parkinsonism after infarction of the midbrain was responsive to levodopa. In conclusion, we retain that there is a need of more functional imaging studies in VP addressed to a more consistent classification of its different clinical forms and to a better understanding of the adequate pharmacological management. PMID:26550502

  18. An unusual case of vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Vergis, A; Maletius, W; Messner, K

    1995-10-01

    An unusual case of a vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst is reported. The patient was a 31-year-old active sportsman who presented with intermittent pain over the lateral aspect of the left knee joint line, occurring only during activities involving twisting motions such as playing soccer. He did not experience local tenderness or swelling, clicking, locking, or giving way. The magnetic resonance imaging, which was done after a diagnostic arthroscopy with normal intra-articular findings, showed a cyst formation of approximately 4-mm diameter adjacent to the lateral meniscus periphery, but no meniscal tissue degeneration. Exactly at the preoperatively marked site of most intensive pain sensation during twisting motions, surgical exposure showed a venous-aneurysm-like tumor, which was removed. The operation resulted in complete relief of symptoms and undisturbed sporting activities including soccer. PMID:8534307

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition by gemigliptin prevents abnormal vascular remodeling via NF-E2-related factor 2 activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Park, Sungmi; Oh, Chang Joo; Leem, Jaechan; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors exert a potent anti-hyperglycemic effect and reduce cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetic patients. Several studies have shown that DPP-4 inhibitors including sitagliptin have beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and cardiac infarction involving reactive oxygen species. Here, we show that gemigliptin can directly attenuate the abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via enhanced NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activity. Gemigliptin dramatically prevented ligation injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia in mouse carotid arteries. Likewise, the proliferation of primary VSMCs was significantly attenuated by gemigliptin in a dose-dependent manner consistent with a decrease in phospho-Rb, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest. We found that gemigliptin enhanced Nrf2 activity not only by mRNA expression, but also by increasing Keap1 proteosomal degradation by p62, leading to the induction of Nrf2 target genes such as HO-1 and NQO1. The anti-proliferative role of gemigliptin disappeared with DPP-4 siRNA knockdown, indicating that the endogenous DPP-4 in VSMCs contributed to the effect of gemigliptin. In addition, gemigliptin diminished TNF-α-mediated cell adhesion molecules such as MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and reduced MMP2 activity in VSMCs. Taken together, our data indicate that gemigliptin exerts a preventative effect on the proliferation and migration of VSMCs via Nrf2. PMID:26187356

  20. Para-cresyl sulfate acutely impairs vascular reactivity and induces vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gross, Priscilla; Massy, Ziad A; Henaut, Lucie; Boudot, Cédric; Cagnard, Joanna; March, Cécilia; Kamel, Saïd; Drueke, Tilman B; Six, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by vascular remodeling and the retention of uremic toxins, several of which are independently associated with the high cardiovascular mortality rate in CKD patients. Whether the association between these uremic toxins and cardiovascular mortality is due to induction of vascular dysfunction and resulting vascular remodeling remains to be determined. This study evaluates the effects of para-cresyl sulfate (PCS), a newly identified uremic toxin, on vascular function and remodeling. PCS acutely induced oxidative stress in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, with a maximal effect at 0.15 mM, corresponding to the mean "uremic" concentration found in dialysis patients. PCS significantly increased within 30 min phenylephrine-induced contraction of mouse thoracic aorta, through direct activation of rho-kinase, independently of oxidative stress induction, as demonstrated by the capacity of rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 to abolish this effect. After exposure of the aorta to PCS for 48 h, we observed inward eutrophic remodeling, a hallmark of uremic vasculopathy characterized by a reduction of the area of both lumen and media, with unchanged media/lumen ratio. In conclusion, elevated PCS concentrations such as those observed in CKD patients, by promoting both vascular dysfunction and vascular remodeling, may contribute to the development of hypertension and to cardiovascular mortality in CKD. PMID:25899466

  1. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  2. Abnormalities associated with progressive aortic vascular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Omar Z.; Boyd, Rochelle; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Increased stiffness of large arteries in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has significant clinical implications. This study investigates the temporal development of thoracic aortic dysfunction in a rodent model of CKD, the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rat. Animals aged 12 and 18 weeks were studied alongside age-matched Lewis controls (total n = 94). LPK rodents had elevated systolic blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and progressively higher plasma creatinine and urea. Relative to Lewis controls, LPK exhibited reduced maximum aortic vasoconstriction (Rmax) to noradrenaline at 12 and 18 weeks, and to K+ (12 weeks). Sensitivity to noradrenaline was greater in 18-week-old LPK vs. age matched Lewis (effective concentration 50%: 24 × 10−9 ± 78 × 10−10 vs. 19 × 10−8 ± 49 × 10−9, P < 0.05). Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxation was diminished in LPK, declining with age (12 vs. 18 weeks Rmax: 80 ± 8% vs. 57 ± 9% and 92 ± 6% vs. 70 ± 9%, P < 0.05, respectively) in parallel with the decline in renal function. L-Arginine restored endothelial function in LPK, and L-NAME blunted acetylcholine relaxation in all groups. Impaired nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was recovered with L-Arginine plus L-NAME in 12, but not 18-week-old LPK. Aortic calcification was increased in LPK rats, as was collagen I/III, fibronectin and NADPH-oxidase subunit p47 (phox) mRNAs. Overall, our observations indicate that the vascular abnormalities associated with CKD are progressive in nature, being characterized by impaired vascular contraction and relaxation responses, concurrent with the development of endothelial dysfunction, which is likely driven by evolving deficits in NO signaling. PMID:26042042

  3. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  4. Visualization of tumor vascular reactivity in response to respiratory challenges by optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon Sup; Lee, Songhyun; Lee, Kiri; Eom, Tae Joong; Kim, Jae G.

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported the potential of using vascular reactivity during respiratory challenges as a marker to predict the response of breast tumor to chemotherapy in a rat model by using a continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy. However, it cannot visualize how the vascular reactivity from tumor vessel can predict the tumor response to its treatment. In this study, we utilized a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system to visualize vascular reactivity of both tumor and normal vasculature during respiratory challenges in a mouse model. We adapted intensity based Doppler variance algorithm to draw angiogram from the ear of mouse (8-week-old Balb/c nu/nu). Animals were anesthetized using 1.5% isoflurane, and the body temperature was maintained by a heating pad. Inhalational gas was switched from air (10min) to 100% oxygen (10min), and a pulse oximeter was used to monitor arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate. OCT angiograms were acquired 5 min after the onset of each gas. The vasoconstriction effect of hyperoxic gas on vasculature was shown by subtracting an en-face image acquired during 100% oxygen from the image acquired during air inhalation. The quantitative change in the vessel diameter was measured from the en-face OCT images of the individual blood vessels. The percentage of blood vessel diameter reduction varied from 1% to 12% depending on arterial, capillary, or venous blood vessel. The vascular reactivity change during breast tumor progression and post chemotherapy will be monitored by OCT angiography.

  5. Tributyltin contributes in reducing the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine in isolated aortic rings from female rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Samya Mere L; Ximenes, Carolina F; de Batista, Priscila R; Simões, Fabiana V; Coser, Pedro Henrique P; Sena, Gabriela C; Podratz, Priscila L; de Souza, Leticia N G; Vassallo, Dalton V; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2014-03-21

    Organotin compounds such as tributyltin (TBT) are used as antifouling paints by shipping companies. TBT inhibits the aromatase responsible for the transformation of testosterone into estrogen. Our hypothesis is that TBT modulates the vascular reactivity of female rats. Female Wistar rats were treated daily (Control; CONT) or TBT (100 ng/kg) for 15 days. Rings from thoracic aortas were incubated with phenylephrine (PHE, 10(-10)-10(-4) M) in the presence and absence of endothelium, and in the presence of N(G)-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME), tetraethylammonium (TEA) and apocynin. TBT decreased plasma levels of estrogen and the vascular response to PHE. In the TBT group, the vascular reactivity was increased in the absence of endothelium, L-NAME and TEA. The decrease in PHE reactivity during incubation with apocynin was more evident in the TBT group. The sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was reduced in the TBT group. TBT increased collagen, reduced α1-smooth muscle actin. Female rats treated with TBT for 15 days showed morphology alteration of the aorta and decreased their vascular reactivity, probably due to mechanisms dependent on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, K(+) channels and an increase in oxidative stress. PMID:24468273

  6. Short-term treatment with VEGF receptor inhibitors induces retinopathy of prematurity-like abnormal vascular growth in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayuki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mori, Asami; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-02-01

    Retinal arterial tortuosity and venous dilation are hallmarks of plus disease, which is a severe form of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this study, we examined whether short-term interruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signals leads to the formation of severe ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels. Neonatal rats were treated subcutaneously with the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, KRN633 (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or axitinib (10 mg/kg), on postnatal day (P) 7 and P8. The retinal vasculatures were examined on P9, P14, or P21 in retinal whole-mounts stained with an endothelial cell marker. Prevention of vascular growth and regression of some preformed capillaries were observed on P9 in retinas of rats treated with KRN633. However, on P14 and P21, density of capillaries, tortuosity index of arterioles, and diameter of veins significantly increased in KRN633-treated rats, compared to vehicle (0.5% methylcellulose)-treated animals. Similar observations were made with axitinib-treated rats. Expressions of VEGF and VEGFR-2 were enhanced on P14 in KRN633-treated rat retinas. The second round of KRN633 treatment on P11 and P12 completely blocked abnormal retinal vascular growth on P14, but thereafter induced ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels by P21. These results suggest that an interruption of normal retinal vascular development in neonatal rats as a result of short-term VEGFR inhibition causes severe ROP-like abnormal retinal vascular growth in a VEGF-dependent manner. Rats treated postnatally with VEGFR inhibitors could serve as an animal model for studying the mechanisms underlying the development of plus disease. PMID:26500193

  7. Renal effects and vascular reactivity induced by Tityus serrulatus venom.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Alves, Renata; do Nascimento, Nilberto Robson Falcão; Barbosa, Paulo Sérgio Ferreira; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; Lessa, Lucília Maria Abreu; de Sousa, Clauber Mota; Martins, René Duarte; Sousa, Daniel Freire; de Queiroz, Maria Goretti Rodrigues; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2005-09-01

    Tityus serrulatus, popularly known as yellow scorpion, is one of the most studied scorpion species in South America and its venom has supplied some highly active molecules. The effects of T. serrulatus venom upon the renal physiology in human showed increased renal parameters, urea and creatinine. However, in perfused rat kidney the effects were not tested until now. Isolated kidneys from Wistar rats, weighing 240-280 g, were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 6% (g weight) of previously dialysed bovine serum albumin. The effects of T. serrulatus venom were studied on the perfusion pressure (PP), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary flow (UF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sodium tubular transport (%TNa+), potassium tubular transport (%TK+) and chloride tubular transport (%TCl-). Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV; 10 microg/mL) was added to the system 30 min after the beginning of each experiment (n=6). This 30 min period was used as an internal control. The mesenteric bed was perfused with Krebs solution kept warm at 37 degrees C by a constant flow (4 mL/min), while the variable perfusion pressure was measured by means of a pressure transducer. The direct vascular effects of TsV (10 microg/mL/min; n=6), infused at a constant rate (0.1 mL/min), were examined and compared to the infusion of the vehicle alone at the same rate. TsV increased PP (PP30'=127.8+/-0.69 vs PP60'=154.2+/-14 mmHg*, *p<0.05) and RVR (RVR30'=6.29+/-0.25 vs RVR60'=8.03+/-0.82 mmHg/mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05), decreased GFR (GFR30'=0.58+/-0.02 vs GFR60'=0.46+/-0.01mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05) and UF (UF30'=0.135+/-0.001 vs UF60'=0.114+/-0.003mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05). Tubular transport was not affected during the whole experimental period (120 min). On the other hand, the infusion of TsV (10 microg/mL/min) increased the basal perfusion pressure of isolated arteriolar mesenteric bed (basal pressure: 74.17+/-3.42 vs TsV 151.8+/-17.82 mmHg*, *p<0.05). TsV affects renal haemodynamics

  8. Diabetic retinopathy: retina-specific methods for maintenance of diabetic rodents and evaluation of vascular histopathology and molecular abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Alexander; Liu, Haitao; Lee, Chieh Allen; Du, Yunpeng; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of visual impairment, which continues to increase in prevalence as more and more people develop diabetes. Despite the importance of vision, the retina is one of the smallest tissues in the body, and specialized techniques to study the retinopathy have been developed. This chapter will summarize several methods used to (i) induce diabetes, (ii) maintain the diabetic animals throughout the months required for the development of typical vascular histopathology, (iii) evaluate vascular histopathology of diabetic retinopathy, and (iv) quantitate abnormalities implicated in the development of the retinopathy. PMID:26331759

  9. Vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors in aorta and renal vasculature of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Sabio, J M; Rodriguez-Maresca, M; Luna, J D; García del Río, C; Vargas, F

    1994-10-01

    Vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors in relation to altered thyroid function was studied in two preparations: aortic strips and the isolated perfused kidney. To assess whether the possible alterations in vascular reactivity were restricted to a specific agonist or whether they involved the contractile system, receptor-mediated and nonspecific smooth muscle stimulants were used. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats. Aortic strips from hypothyroid rats were less sensitive to phenylephrine and KCl when the data were expressed in absolute values or as percentages of the maximum responses. Sensitivity and reactivity in strips from hyperthyroid rats were similar to those observed in control strips. Renal vasculature obtained from hypothyroid rats also showed a markedly reduced sensitivity to phenylephrine, with normal maximal responses. The response to vasopressin at 3-10(-11) mol/l was also decreased, as was the reactivity to barium chloride. In contrast, renal vasculature of hyperthyroid rats showed markedly enhanced reactivity to all agonists: the concentration-response curves were characterized by a similar threshold and a greater maximal response. These results demonstrate that hypothyroidism is accompanied by a marked decrease in sensitivity to vasoconstrictors in large arteries as well as in resistance vessels. This decrease may be secondary to a generalized alteration in the contractile system of vascular smooth muscle cells and may play a role in the decreased blood pressure in these animals. In contrast, isolated perfused kidneys of hyperthyroid rats showed increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors, which may play a role in the maintenance of elevated blood pressure in these animals. PMID:7831389

  10. Severe vitamin D deficiency in patients with Kawasaki disease: a potential role in the risk to develop heart vascular abnormalities?

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    Twenty-five-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-vitamin D) is crucial in the regulation of immunologic processes, but-although its deficiency has been reported in patients with different rheumatological disorders-no data are available for Kawasaki disease (KD). The goals of this study were to assess the serum levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D in children with KD and evaluate the relationship with the eventual occurrence of KD-related vascular abnormalities. We evaluated serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels in 79 children with KD (21 females, 58 males, median age 4.9 years, range 1.4-7.5 years) in comparison with healthy sex-/age-matched controls. A significantly higher percentage of KD patients (98.7 %) were shown to have reduced 25(OH)-vitamin D levels (<30 ng/mL) in comparison with controls (78.6 %, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, KD patients had severely low levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D than controls (9.17 ± 4.94 vs 23.3 ± 10.6 ng/mL, p < 0.0001), especially the subgroup who developed coronary artery abnormalities (4.92 ± 1.36 vs 9.41 ± 4.95 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). In addition, serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels correlated not only with erythrosedimentation rate (p < 0.0001), C-reactive protein (p < 0.0001), hemoglobin level at KD diagnosis (p < 0.0001) but also with both coronary artery aneurysms (p = 0.005) and non-aneurysmatic cardiovascular lesions (p < 0.05). Low serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D might have a contributive role in the development of coronary artery complications observed in children with KD. PMID:25994612

  11. Esculetin attenuates alterations in Ang II and acetylcholine mediated vascular reactivity associated with hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Anuradha; Bagal, Shreyas; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin (6, 7- dihydroxycoumarin) was found to be protective against hepatic and renal damage associated with Streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 1 diabetes, because of its radical scavenging property. However, there are no reports regarding its effect on vascular dysfunction under hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of esculetin on vascular dysfunction under these conditions. Non-genetic model of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia were developed by high fat diet (HFD) feeding and HFD + Streptozotocin (STZ, 35 mg/kg, I.P) treatment in Wistar rats, respectively. Esculetin was administered at 50 and 100 mg/kg/day (P.O, 2 weeks) doses and biochemical, vascular reactivity and immunohistochemical experiments were performed to assess the effect of esculetin on vascular dysfunctions. Esculetin treatment significantly attenuates metabolic perturbations, alleviates insulin levels in hyperinsulinemic condition. Thoracic aorta of hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic rats showed hyper-responsiveness to Ang II mediated contraction and impaired acetylcholine mediated relaxation, and esculetin attenuates alterations in vascular reactivity to Ang II and acetylcholine challenges. In addition, immunohistochemical evaluations revealed that esculetin prevents increase in AT1R, AT2R, Keap1, TGF-β, and decrease in ACE2 expression in aorta of hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic rats. PMID:25887801

  12. Vascular corrosion casting: analyzing wall shear stress in the portal vein and vascular abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Casteleyn, Christophe; van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Segers, Patrick; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Vascular corrosion casting is an established method of anatomical preparation that has recently been revived and has proven to be an excellent tool for detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological examination of normal and pathological microcirculation. In addition, the geometry provided by vascular casts can be further used to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) in a vascular bed using computational techniques. In the first part of this study, the microvascular morphological changes associated with portal hypertension (PHT) and cirrhosis in vascular casts are described. The second part of this study consists of a quantitative analysis of the WSS in the portal vein in casts of different animal models of PHT and cirrhosis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Microvascular changes in the splanchnic, hepatic and pulmonary territory of portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice are described in detail with stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, our results are the first to report the vascular changes in the common bile duct ligation cirrhotic model. Calculating WSS using CFD methods is a feasible technique in PHT and cirrhosis, enabling the differentiation between different animal models. First, a dimensional analysis was performed, followed by a CFD calculation describing the spatial and temporal WSS distributions in the portal vein. WSS was significantly different between sham/cirrhotic/pure PHT animals with the highest values in the latter. Up till now, no techniques have been developed to quantify WSS in the portal vein in laboratory animals. This study showed for the first time that vascular casting has an important role not only in the morphological evaluation of animal models of PHT and cirrhosis, but also in defining the biological response of the portal vein wall to hemodynamic changes. CFD in 3D geometries can be used to describe the spatial and temporal variations in WSS in the portal vein and to better understand

  13. Impaired systemic vascular reactivity & raised high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Parul; Talwar, Anjana; Chandran, Dinu; Guleria, Randeep; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Guresh; Trivedi, Anjali; Deepak, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by slowly progressive airflow limitaion, chronic lung inflammation and associated systemic manifestations. The objective of this preliminary study was to investigate the levels of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs CRP) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as markers of systemic inflammation and assessment of systemic vascular reactivity that may play an important role in development of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. Methods: Systemic vascular reactivity was assessed non-invasively by measuring peripheral pulse waveform changes during reactive hyperemia (RH) in 16 COPD patients and 14 controls by photoplethysmography technique (PPG). Parameters measured were pulse wave amplitude (PWA), slope and pulse transit time (PTT). Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and hs CRP were measured as markers of inflammation. Results: PWA during the 1st, 2nd and 3rd minutes post release of occlusion were significantly higher than the baseline means in controls, whereas in the patient group there was no significant change in the PWA during any of the observed time periods following release of occlusion, in comparison to the baseline means. Similar results were observed in slope values for patients and controls. Maximum percentage change in PWA during RH with reference to baseline was significantly lower in patients as compared to controls (26.78±20.19 vs 57.20±19.80%, P<0.001). Maximum percentage change in slope during RH with reference to baseline was significantly lower in patients as compared to controls (19.77±10.73 vs 39.25±13.49%, P<0.001). A vascular tone response as represented by PTT was also impaired in the 3rd minute of RH as compared to baseline mean values in COPD patients only. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed raised hs CRP levels and impaired systemic vascular reactivity in COPD patients. Whether these may increase the risk of cardiovascular

  14. Do iodinated nano-emulsions designed for preclinical vascular imaging alter the vascular reactivity in rat aorta?

    PubMed

    Anton, Nicolas; Atzenhoffer, Marina; Daubeuf, François; Li, Xiang; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Delmotte, Barbara; Vandamme, Thierry F; Chataigneau, Thierry

    2013-09-15

    This study proposes a new methodology to evaluate the putative consequences of the long-lasting circulation in the blood pool of nanoparticulate systems widely used in nanomedicine, Indeed, the blood pool contrast agent for micro-computed tomography, i.e. iodinated nano-emulsions, have recently been developed, for their great potential in medical applications such as advanced diagnosis, image-guided surgery, personalized medicine or theragnostics. Stealth nanoparticles exhibit a low recognition by the reticuloendothelial system, resulting in a prolonged circulation in the bloodstream and long-lasting contact with the endothelium. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to determine whether this prolonged interaction could induce an alteration of the vascular reactivity in rat aorta. The Iodinated nano-emulsions were intravenously injected in anesthetized rats. After 1h of contrast agent circulation in the blood pool, the thoracic aorta was removed for the study of vascular reactivity. These animals were compared with control (untreated) rats and a third group of rats receiving an injection of phosphate buffered saline (i.e. dispersing phase of the nano-emulsions). Phenylephrine-induced concentration-dependent contractions of the isolated rat thoracic aorta were not modified whatever the group. Sodium nitroprusside (a nitric oxide (NO) donor)-induced relaxations of endothelium-denuded aorta were also unaltered in response to the different administrations. In contrast, in comparison with control animals, endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxations to acetylcholine were significantly impaired in thoracic aorta from PBS-treated rats, but not in animals receiving the iodinated nano-emulsion. In addition, neither isoprenaline-induced nor levcromakalim-induced relaxations were modified in the aorta from the three groups of animals. These findings indicate that even with a long-lasting residence time of the iodinated nano-emulsion in the blood flow, these iodinated

  15. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the vascular responses to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kvietys, Peter R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and potentially life-threatening condition that involves the participation of a variety of chemical mediators, signaling pathways, and cell types. The microcirculation, which is critical for the initiation and perpetuation of an inflammatory response, exhibits several characteristic functional and structural changes in response to inflammation. These include vasomotor dysfunction (impaired vessel dilation and constriction), the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, endothelial barrier dysfunction (increased vascular permeability), blood vessel proliferation (angiogenesis), and enhanced thrombus formation. These diverse responses of the microvasculature largely reflect the endothelial cell dysfunction that accompanies inflammation and the central role of these cells in modulating processes as varied as blood flow regulation, angiogenesis, and thrombogenesis. The importance of endothelial cells in inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction is also predicated on the ability of these cells to produce and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inflammation seems to upset the balance between nitric oxide and superoxide within (and surrounding) endothelial cells, which is necessary for normal vessel function. This review is focused on defining the molecular targets in the vessel wall that interact with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide to produce the characteristic functional and structural changes that occur in response to inflammation. This analysis of the literature is consistent with the view that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contribute significantly to the diverse vascular responses in inflammation and supports efforts that are directed at targeting these highly reactive species to maintain normal vascular health in pathological conditions that are associated with acute or chronic inflammation. PMID:22154653

  16. Passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β reduces cerebral amyloid angiopathy and improves vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bales, Kelly R; O'Neill, Sharon M; Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Pan, Feng; Caouette, David; Pi, YeQing; Wood, Kathleen M; Volfson, Dmitri; Cirrito, John R; Han, Byung-Hee; Johnson, Andrew W; Zipfel, Gregory J; Samad, Tarek A

    2016-02-01

    Prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy is often observed in the brains of elderly individuals and is almost universally found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is characterized by accumulation of the shorter amyloid-β isoform(s) (predominantly amyloid-β40) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles and is likely a contributory factor to vascular dysfunction leading to stroke and dementia in the elderly. We used transgenic mice with prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy to investigate the ability of ponezumab, an anti-amyloid-β40 selective antibody, to attenuate amyloid-β accrual in cerebral vessels and to acutely restore vascular reactivity. Chronic administration of ponezumab to transgenic mice led to a significant reduction in amyloid and amyloid-β accumulation both in leptomeningeal and brain vessels when measured by intravital multiphoton imaging and immunohistochemistry. By enriching for cerebral vascular elements, we also measured a significant reduction in the levels of soluble amyloid-β biochemically. We hypothesized that the reduction in vascular amyloid-β40 after ponezumab administration may reflect the ability of ponezumab to mobilize an interstitial fluid pool of amyloid-β40 in brain. Acutely, ponezumab triggered a significant and transient increase in interstitial fluid amyloid-β40 levels in old plaque-bearing transgenic mice but not in young animals. We also measured a beneficial effect on vascular reactivity following acute administration of ponezumab, even in vessels where there was a severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy burden. Taken together, the beneficial effects ponezumab administration has on reducing the rate of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposition and restoring cerebral vascular health favours a mechanism that involves rapid removal and/or neutralization of amyloid-β species that may otherwise be detrimental to normal vessel function. PMID:26493635

  17. Abnormal deposition of collagen/elastic vascular fibres and prognostic significance in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; de Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular remodelling has recently been shown to be a promising pathogenetic indicator in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). Aim To validate the importance of the collagen/elastic system in vascular remodelling and to study the relationships between the collagen/elastic system, survival and the major histological patterns of IIPs. Methods Collagen/elastic system fibres were studied in 25 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia/diffuse alveolar damage, 22 with non‐specific interstitial pneumonia/non‐specific interstitial pneumonia and 55 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia. The Picrosirius polarisation method and Weigert's resorcin–fuchsin histochemistry and morphometric analysis were used to evaluate the amount of vascular collagen/elastic system fibres and their association with the histological pattern of IIPs. The association between vascular remodelling and the degree of parenchymal fibrosis in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) was also considered. Results The vascular measurement of collagen/elastic fibres was significantly higher in UIP than in the lungs of controls, and in those with diffuse alveolar damage and those with non‐specific interstitial pneumonia. In addition, the increment of collagen/elastic fibres in UIP varied according to the degree and activity of the parenchymal fibrosis. The most important predictors of survival in UIP were vascular remodelling classification and vascular collagen deposition. Conclusion A progressive vascular fibroelastosis occurs in IIP histological patterns, probably indicating evolutionarily adapted responses to parenchymal injury. The vascular remodelling classification and the increase in vascular collagen were related to survival in IIP and possibly play a role in its pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to determine whether this relationship is causal or consequential. PMID:17251318

  18. Stimulation of reactive oxygen, but not reactive nitrogen species, in vascular endothelial cells exposed to low levels of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Barchowsky, A; Klei, L R; Dudek, E J; Swartz, H M; James, P E

    1999-12-01

    Elevated levels of arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic, in drinking water correlates with increased vascular disease and vessel remodeling. Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite caused oxidant-dependent increases in nuclear transcription factor levels in cultured porcine vascular endothelial cells. The current studies characterized the reactive species generated in these cells exposed to levels of arsenite that initiate cell signaling. These exposures did not deplete 5'-triphosphate, nor did they affect basal or bradykinin-stimulated intracellular free Ca2+ levels, indicating that they were not lethal. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, including spin trapping with carboxy-PTIO (cPTIO), demonstrated that 5 microM or less of arsenite did not increase *NO levels over a 30-min period relative to *NO release stimulated by bradykinin. However, these same levels of arsenite rapidly increased both oxygen consumption and superoxide formation, as measured by EPR oximetry and spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), respectively. Pretreatment of the cells with DPI, apocynin, or superoxide dismutase abolished arsenite-stimulated DMPO-OH adduct formation. Finally arsenite increased extracellular accumulation of H2O2, measured as oxidation of homovanillic acid, with the same time and dose dependence, as seen for superoxide formation. These data suggest that superoxide and H2O2 are the predominant reactive species produced by endothelial cells after arsenite exposures that stimulate cell signaling and activate transcription factors. PMID:10641735

  19. Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH synthesis gene Gclm modulate vascular reactivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Weldy, Chad S.; Luttrell, Ian P.; White, Collin C.; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Kim, Francis; Chitaley, Kanchan; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the development of vascular disease and in the promotion of endothelial dysfunction via the reduction in bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide thiol antioxidant that is utilized by glutathione peroxidase (GPx) to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and phospholipid hydroperoxides. Relatively frequent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the 5’ promoters of the GSH synthesis genes GCLC and GCLM are associated with impaired vasomotor function as measured by decreased acetylcholine-stimulated coronary artery dilation and with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Although the influence of genetic knockdown of GPx on vascular function has been investigated in mice, no work to date has been published on the role of genetic knock down of GSH synthesis genes on vascular reactivity. We therefore investigated the effects of targeted disruption of Gclm in mice and the subsequent depletion of GSH on vascular reactivity, NO• production, aortic nitrotyrosine protein modification, and whole genome transcriptional responses as measured by DNA microarray. Gclm−/+ and Gclm−/− mice had 72% and 12%, respectively, of WT aortic GSH content. Gclm−/+ mice had a significant impairment in acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation in aortic rings as well as increased aortic nitrotyrosine protein modification. Surprisingly, Gclm−/− aortas showed enhanced relaxation compared to Gclm−/+ aortas, as well as increased NO• production. Although aortic rings from Gclm−/− mice had enhanced ACh-relaxation, they have a significantly increased sensitivity to phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction. Alternatively, the PE response of Gclm−/+ aortas was nearly identical to that of their WT littermates. In order to examine the role of NO• or other potential endothelium derived factors in differentially regulating vasomotor activity, we incubated aortic rings with the NO

  20. Perceived racism and vascular reactivity in black college women: moderating effects of seeking social support.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rodney

    2006-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored the association of perceived racism and seeking social support to vascular reactivity in a college sample of 110 Black women. Perceived racism and seeking social support were assessed via self-report, and vascular reactivity was measured before and during a standardized speaking task. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that perceived racism was positively related to changes in systolic blood pressure. These analyses also indicated that seeking social support moderated the relationship between perceived racism and systolic blood pressure changes. This interaction effect persisted after controlling for several potential confounders. Follow-up regression analyses showed that perceived racism was positively associated with reactivity among participants who were low in seeking social support. A significant relationship was not observed between perceived racism and systolic blood pressure changes among participants who were high in seeking social support. Perceived racism and seeking social support were not significantly associated with changes in diastolic blood pressure. These findings highlight the importance of examining psychosocial factors that may mitigate the hypothesized relationship between perceived racism and reactivity. PMID:16448294

  1. Abnormalities in hyperpolarized (129)Xe magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in two patients with pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dahhan, Talal; Kaushik, Shiv S; He, Mu; Mammarappallil, Joseph G; Tapson, Victor F; McAdams, Holman P; Sporn, Thomas A; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Rajagopal, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) is usually based on hemodynamic and/or clinical criteria. Noninvasive imaging of the heart and proximal vasculature can also provide useful information. An alternate approach to such criteria in the diagnosis of PVD is to image the vascular abnormalities in the lungs themselves. Hyperpolarized (HP) (129)Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a novel technique for assessing abnormalities in ventilation and gas exchange in the lungs. We applied this technique to two patients for whom there was clinical suspicion of PVD. Two patients who had significant hypoxemia and dyspnea with no significant abnormalities on computed tomography imaging or ventilation-perfusion scan and only mild or borderline pulmonary arterial hypertension at catheterization were evaluated. They underwent HP (129)Xe imaging and subsequently had tissue diagnosis obtained from lung pathology. In both patients, HP (129)Xe imaging demonstrated normal ventilation but markedly decreased gas transfer to red blood cells with focal defects on imaging, a pattern distinct from those previously described for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or obstructive lung disease. Pathology on both patients later demonstrated severe PVD. These findings suggest that HP (129)Xe MRI may be useful in the diagnosis of PVD and monitoring response to therapy. Further studies are required to determine its sensitivity and specificity in these settings. PMID:27162620

  2. Altering dietary lysine: arginine ratio has little effect on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The effect of dietary protein type on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity, with specific focus on the lysine to arginine (Lys:Arg) ratio, has been studied sporadically. Objective: Determine effect of dietary Lys:Arg ratio on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reacti...

  3. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. PMID:25926456

  4. Effect of magnesium pyridoxal 5-phosphate glutamate on vascular reactivity in experimental hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, M T; Khayyal, M A; Sharaf, H M; el-Sherbeeny, M; Okpanyi, S N; Schneider, W

    1998-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is known to affect the responsiveness of various blood vessels to endogenous and to exogenous vasoactive agents. Of particular interest is the increased responsiveness to vasoconstrictors, e.g., 5-hydroxy tryptamine and noradrenaline, and the decreased reactivity towards vasodilators, e.g., acetylcholine. This, together with the development of arteriosclerosis, could play an important role in the progression of many vascular complications, such as hypertension and coronary heart disease. Magnesium pyridoxal 5-phosphate glutamate (MPPG) has been shown to effectively reduce serum lipids in animals and in man, and to retard the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in experimental animals. It was therefore considered of interest to investigate the reactivity of both the aorta and the renal artery to different vasoactive substances in hypercholesterolemic rabbits under the influence of MPPG as well as the effect of such substances on the blood pressure of the anesthetized animals. The rabbits were fed a high cholesterol diet for 2 months, followed by MPPG for 1 month, while keeping the rabbits on the same diet. One batch of animals was used for blood pressure recording and testing drug effects, and another was used for testing the responsiveness of their aortae and renal arteries to the different mediators. In hypercholesterolemic rabbits, treatment with MPPG tended to normalize the increased responsiveness of the blood pressure to the vasoconstrictors: noradrenaline and angiotensin and the diminished sensitivity to histamine and acetylcholine. For the isolated arteries, however, MPPG did not significantly affect the responses to noradrenaline nor potassium chloride, but tended to normalize responses to clonidine and acetylcholine. It could be concluded from the present findings that the high cholesterol diet induces changes in vascular reactivity which are possibly related to endothelial and/or receptor sensitivity changes. Treatment with MPPG

  5. Blood radicals: reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, transition metal ions, and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Darley-Usmar, V; Halliwell, B

    1996-05-01

    Free radicals, such as superoxide, hydroxyl and nitric oxide, and other "reactive species", such as hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite, are formed in vivo. Some of these molecules, e.g. superoxide and nitric oxide, can be physiologically useful, but they can also cause damage under certain circumstances. Excess production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), their production in inappropriate relative amounts (especially superoxide and NO) or deficiencies in antioxidant defences may result in pathological stress to cells and tissues. This oxidative stress can have multiple effects. It can induce defence systems, and render tissues more resistant to subsequent insult. If oxidative stress is excessive or if defence and repair responses are inadequate, cell injury can be caused by such mechanisms as oxidative damage to essential proteins, lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage and base modification, and rises in the concentration of intracellular "free" Ca(2+). Considerable evidence supports the view that oxidative damage involving both ROS and RNS is an important contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. Peroxynitrite (derived by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide) and transition metal ions (perhaps released by injury to the vessel wall) may contribute to lipid peroxidation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:8860419

  6. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction. PMID:26806799

  7. Reactive oxygen species: physiological roles in the regulation of vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Vara, D; Pula, G

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now appreciated to play several important roles in a number of biological processes and regulate cell physiology and function. ROS are a heterogeneous chemical class that includes radicals, such as superoxide ion (O2(•-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) and nitric oxide (NO(•)), and non-radicals, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and peroxynitrite (NO3 (-)). In the cardiovascular system, besides playing a critical role in the development and progression of vasculopathies and other important pathologies such as congestive heart failure, atherosclerosis and thrombosis, ROS also regulate physiological processes. Evidence from a wealth of cardiovascular research studies suggests that ROS act as second messengers and play an essential role in vascular homeostasis by influencing discrete signal transduction pathways in various systems and cell types. They are produced throughout the vascular system, regulate differentiation and contractility of vascular smooth muscle cells, control vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migration, mediate platelet activation and haemostasis, and significantly contribute to the immune response. Our understanding of ROS chemistry and cell biology has evolved to the point of realizing that different ROS have distinct and important roles in cardiovascular physiology. This review will outline sources, functions and molecular mechanisms of action of different ROS in the cardiovascular system and will describe their emerging role in healthy cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis. PMID:24894168

  8. Impact of the bioresorbable vascular scaffold surface area on on-treatment platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gross, Lisa; Sibbing, Dirk; Eickhoff, Madeleine; Baquet, Moritz; Orban, Martin; Krieg, Anne; Grujic, Katarina; Theiss, Hans D; Brunner, Stefan; Teupser, Daniel; Holdt, Lesca; Massberg, Steffen; Mehilli, Julinda

    2016-07-01

    While promising data with the novel bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) are accumulating, signals of scaffold thrombosis (ST) were noted in recent reports. We aimed to assess the relationship between the total surface area (TSA) of implanted everolimus-eluting BVSs and the on-treatment adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet reactivity in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). 202 consecutive patients undergoing BVS implantation and platelet function testing were included. For investigating the impact of the scaffold surface on platelet reactivity, patients were stratified into two groups regarding the median BVS TSA. The on-treatment ADP-induced platelet reactivity was determined with the Multiplate analyzer and 30-day follow-up was available in 98% of patients. ADP-induced platelet aggregation values (median, [IQR]) did not differ between the two study groups (12.0 [9.0-19.0] U for patients with TSA > 1.39 cm(2) and 13.0 [9.0-19.5] U for patients with TSA ≤ 1.39 cm(2); p = 0.69). No correlation was observed between the BVS TSA and levels of platelet reactivity (Spearman rank correlation = -0.10, p = 0.16). At 30 days after PCI, two early STs (1%) were documented. Thus, in patients on a dual antiplatelet treatment regimen following BVS implantation, the extent of blood-to-BVS contact surface does not negatively affect levels of on-treatment platelet reactivity. PMID:26940818

  9. Abnormal thallium kinetics in postoperative coarctation of the aorta: evidence for diffuse hypertension-induced vascular pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, B.P.; Shurvell, B.L.; Mildenberger, R.R.; Houle, S.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1986-03-01

    After operative correction of congenital coarctation of the aorta, patients continue to have excess cardiovascular mortality, including manifestations of ischemic heart disease. Previous morphologic studies support the concept of direct hypertensive vascular injury in these patients. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion were present in an asymptomatic group of patients with coarctation repair, 18 men and 9 women with a mean age of 26 years (range 19 to 41) were studied between 2 and 25 years after operative correction. Stress electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging by a circumferential profile technique were used. These patients were compared with a normal group, statistically defined as having a less than 1% prevalence of significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The postoperative coarctation group demonstrated a reduction in global thallium redistribution in each view analyzed. As compared with findings in the control subjects, thallium washout in the anterior view (41.9 versus 48.6%, p = 0.02) and left anterior oblique projection (40.5 versus 48.2%, p = 0.007) was significantly diminished. Although the postoperative coarctation group had a lower thallium redistribution rate in the lateral view (41.4 versus 46.3%, p = 0.09) this difference did not reach statistical significance because of the intrinsic variability of this projection. Plots of the median percent thallium washout revealed independence from circumferential profile angle, indicating global abnormalities in perfusion. No correlation between clinical variables and thallium kinetics could be established, suggesting marked individual variability in the development of this vascular lesion. The observation of abnormal thallium kinetics in patients with coarctation repair may have consequences for long-term follow-up and therapy.

  10. HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation. PMID:24854267

  11. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration

    PubMed Central

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium–dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose–response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium–dependent, BK–induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium–dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  12. Tumor vascular reactivity as a marker to predict tumor response to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Songhyun; Seong, Myeongsu; Jeong, Hyeryun; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers for females. To monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy of breast cancer, medical imaging systems such as X-ray mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography have been used. Currently, it can take up to 3 to 6 weeks to see the tumor response from chemotherapy by monitoring tumor volume changes. In this study, we used near infrared spectroscopy to see if we can predict breast cancer treatment efficacy earlier than tumor volume changes by monitoring tumor vascular reactivity during inhalational gas interventions. The results show the amplitude of oxy-hemoglobin changes (vascular reactivity) during hyperoxic gas inhalation is well correlated with tumor growth, and responded 1 day earlier than tumor volume changes after chemotherapy. In addition, we fitted oxyhemoglobin concentration increase during hyperoxic gas intervention using a double exponential fitting model. From these, we found the change of amplitude 1 value is well matched with tumor growth and regression. Especially, it predicts the chemotherapeutic response of breast tumor better than the amplitude of oxyhemoglobin concentration change during hyperoxic gas intervention. These results may imply that near infrared spectroscopy with respiratory challenges can be useful in early detection of tumor and also in prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy.

  13. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    PubMed

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  14. Abnormalities of pulmonary vascular dynamics and inflammation in early progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, D.E.; Davis, J.A.; Clements, P.J.; Chopra, S.K.; Theofilopoulos, A.N.; Chia, D.

    1981-11-01

    Abnormalities of pulmonary function were studied in 10 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) and 3 control subjects. All underwent 81M krypton lung scanning and total body gallium scanning. Immune complexes were measured by Raji cell radioimmunoassay and polyethylene glycol (PEG) assay. Perfusion scans were abnormal in 7 of 9 patients, and 5 of 9 showed a decrease in pulmonary perfusion after cold challenge. Increased gallium uptake was noted in the lungs of 6 of 9 patients. Krypton scans were normal in the control group. Elevated immune complexes were noted in 8 of 10 patients by the Raji assay and in 5 of 10 with the PEG assay. Efforts to separate patients with PSS into subgroups may lead to a better understanding of and advances in therapy for PSS.

  15. Effects of insulin resistance and testosterone on the participation of cyclooxygenase isoforms in vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Harish; Lau, Sally; Jiang, Jihong; McNeill, John H

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone plays an important role in mediating hypertension and altered vascular reactivity associated with insulin resistance. In addition to other pathways, testosterone-dependent changes in aortic cyclooxygenase (COX-2) mRNA levels affect blood pressure following insulin resistance. However their effects on vascular tone are unclear. We studied the changes in contraction response to phenylephrine (PE) in the aorta and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) from intact and gonadectomized fructose-fed rats. Constriction response to PE was studied in tissues incubated with the COX-1 and COX-2-selective antagonists, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively, and indomethacin, in addition to assessing its role in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Finally changes in COX-2 protein expression and plasma thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a downstream vasoconstrictor metabolite of COX-2, were measured. In fructose-fed rats, castration prevented the increase in blood pressure but not insulin resistance. The involvement of COX-2 in mediating the alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction was higher in intact rat aorta compared to COX-1, which was prevented by castration. However, in the SMA, COX-2 participation was dependent on testosterone alone. Fructose-induced attenuation of endothelial relaxation was restored by indomethacin, which suggests a pro-vasoconstrictor role for COX. Both diet and testosterone did not alter vascular COX-2 expression thus suggesting the involvement of downstream testosterone-dependent pathways. This is supported by increased plasma TXA2 in the castrated rats compared to intact rats. Isoform-specific actions of COX are tissue-selective in states of insulin resistance and involve potential testosterone-dependent downstream targets. Further studies are needed to investigate the role of androgens and insulin resistance in vascular arachidonic acid metabolism.

  16. DIVERSITY OF VASCULAR REACTIVITY AND THE TREATMENT RESPONSE IN DIABETIC, HYPERTENSIVE, HYPERLIPIDEMIC, AND HEALTHY RATS SUBJECTED TO HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Liu, Liang-Ming; Li, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The current diagnosis and treatment guidelines for severe trauma and shock are all for healthy population. Few studies focused on the pathophysiological features and treatments in metabolic diseases after severe trauma and shock. Vascular reactivity is significantly decreased after severe trauma and shock. Improving the vascular reactivity with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and phorbol-12 myristate-13-acetate (PMA) is beneficial to trauma and shock. Whether the cardiovascular function and treatment responses have the own features in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic patients after traumatic hemorrhagic shock is not known. Using hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic and healthy rats, we compared the change patterns in cardiovascular function including vascular reactivity, tissue perfusion, and the hemodynamics after hemorrhagic shock and their responses to AVP, PMA, and common antishock agents including dopamine and norepinephrine. A same degree of hemorrhagic shock (40% hemorrhage or mean arterial pressure maintained at 40 mm Hg for 2 h) resulted in a more obvious decrease in vascular reactivity, hemodynamics, tissue perfusion, and mitochondrial function of liver and kidney in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats, and a more rapidly natural death than in healthy rats. The effectiveness of AVP and PMA in these diseased rats was lower than in healthy rats. The effective dosage of common antishock agents including norepinephrine, dopamine, and AVP in healthy rats was wider than that in these diseased rats. Among the antishock agents used in the current study, AVP had the best effect in improving animal survival and vascular reactivity both in healthy and in diseased rats. These findings suggest that hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats have a worse vascular reactivity and organ function than the healthy rats after traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which result in the worse treatment responses and effects to vasoactive agents. Lower dose

  17. Optical tomographic imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    Our group has recently established that joints affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) can be distinguished from healthy joints through measurements of the scattering coefficient. We showed that a high scattering coefficient in the center of the joint is indicative of a joint with RA. While these results were encouraging, data to date still suffers from low sensitivity and specificity. Possibly higher specificities and sensitivities can be achieved if dynamic measurements of hemodynamic and metabolic processes in the synovium are considered. Using our dual-wavelength imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging studies involving healthy human volunteers and patients affected by RA. These case studies seem to confirm our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  18. Early changes in vascular reactivity in response to 56Fe irradiation in ApoE-/- mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. Roger; Yu, Tao; Gupta, Kiran; Babitz, Stephen K.; Black, Leland L.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that radiation from a number of terrestrial sources increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The accelerated heavy ions in the galacto-cosmic radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on in space, however, interact very differently with tissues than most types of terrestrial radiation, so the health consequences of exposure on deep-space missions are not clear. We demonstrated earlier that 56Fe, an important component of cosmic radiation, accelerates atherosclerotic plaque development. In the present study, we examined an earlier, pro-atherogenic event that might be predictive of later atherosclerotic disease. Decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a prominent manifestation of vascular dysfunction that is thought to predispose humans to the development of structural vascular changes that precede the development of atherosclerotic plaques. To test the effect of heavy-ion radiation on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we used the same ApoE-/- mouse model in which we previously demonstrated the pro-atherogenic effect of 56Fe on plaque development. Ten week old male ApoE mice (an age at which there is little atherosclerotic plaque in the descending aorta) were exposed to 2.6 Gy 56Fe. The mice were then fed a normal diet and housed under standard conditions. At 4-5 weeks post-irradiation, aortic rings were isolated and endothelial-dependent relaxation was measured. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in irradiated mice compared to age-matched, un-irradiated mice. This decrease in vascular reactivity following 56Fe irradiation occurred eight weeks prior to the development of statistically significant exacerbation of aortic plaque formation and may contribute to the formation of later atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. Alteration of vascular reactivity in heart failure: role of phosphodiesterases 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, F; Belacel-Ouari, M; Manoury, B; Zhai, K; Domergue-Dupont, V; Mateo, P; Joubert, F; Fischmeister, R; Leblais, V

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study examined the role of the main vascular cAMP-hydrolysing phosphodiesterases (cAMP-PDE) in the regulation of basal vascular tone and relaxation of rat aorta mediated by β-adrenoceptors, following heart failure (HF). Experimental Approach Twenty-two weeks after proximal aortic stenosis, to induce HF, or SHAM surgery in rats, we evaluated the expression, activity and function of cAMP-PDE in the descending thoracic aorta. Key Results HF rat aortas exhibited signs of endothelial dysfunction, with alterations of the NO pathway, and alteration of PDE3 and PDE4 subtype expression, without changing total aortic cAMP-hydrolytic activity and PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 activities. Vascular reactivity experiments using PDE inhibitors showed that PDE3 and PDE4 controlled the level of PGF2α-stimulated contraction in SHAM aorta. PDE3 function was partially inhibited by endothelial NO, whereas PDE4 function required a functional endothelium and was under the negative control of PDE3. In HF, PDE3 function was preserved, but its regulation by endothelial NO was altered. PDE4 function was abolished and restored by PDE3 inhibition. In PGF2α-precontracted arteries, β-adrenoceptor stimulation-induced relaxation in SHAM aorta, which was abolished in the absence of functional endothelium, as well as in HF aortas, but restored after PDE3 inhibition in all unresponsive arteries. Conclusions and Implications Our study underlines the key role of the endothelium in controlling the contribution of smooth muscle PDE to contractile function. In HF, endothelial dysfunction had a major effect on PDE3 function and PDE3 inhibition restored a functional relaxation to β-adrenoceptor stimulation. PMID:25048877

  20. Vascular stents with submicrometer-scale surface patterning realized via titanium deep reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gott, Shannon C.; Jabola, Benjamin A.; Rao, Masaru P.

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report progress towards realization of vascular stents that will eventually provide opportunity for evaluating cellular response to rationally-designed, submicrometer-scale surface patterning in physiologically-relevant contexts, i.e. those that provide exposure to the complex multicellular milieu, flow-induced shear, and tissue-device interactions present in vivo. Specifically, using our novel titanium deep reactive ion etching technique (Ti DRIE), we discuss recent advances that have enabled: (a) fabrication of precisely-defined, grating-based surface patterns on planar Ti foils with minimum feature sizes as small as 0.15 μm (b) creation of cylindrical stents from micromachined planar Ti foils; and (c) integration of these processes to produce the first submicrometer-scale surface-patterned Ti stents that are compatible with conventional balloon catheter deployment techniques. We also discuss results from elastoplastic finite element simulations and preliminary mechanical testing of these devices to assess their mechanical performance. These efforts represent key steps towards our long-term goal of developing a new paradigm in stenting, where rationally-designed surface patterning provides a physical means for facilitating healing, and thus, improving outcomes in vascular intervention applications.

  1. Ventilatory, hemodynamic, sympathetic nervous system, and vascular reactivity changes after recurrent nocturnal sustained hypoxia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, Geoffrey S.; Tamisier, Renaud; Curley, Matthew; Weiss, J. Woodrow

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent and intermittent nocturnal hypoxia is characteristic of several diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea. The contribution of hypoxia to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these disease states is unclear, however. To investigate the impact of recurrent nocturnal hypoxia on hemodynamics, sympathetic activity, and vascular tone we evaluated 10 normal volunteers before and after 14 nights of nocturnal sustained hypoxia (mean oxygen saturation 84.2%, 9 h/night). Over the exposure, subjects exhibited ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia as evidenced by an increase in resting ventilation (arterial Pco2 41.8 ± 1.5 vs. 37.5 ± 1.3 mmHg, mean ± SD; P < 0.05) and in the isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (slope 0.49 ± 0.1 vs. 1.32 ± 0.2 l/min per 1% fall in saturation; P < 0.05). Subjects exhibited a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (86.7 ± 6.1 vs. 90.5 ± 7.6 mmHg; P < 0.001), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (20.8 ± 2.8 vs. 28.2 ± 3.3 bursts/min; P < 0.01), and forearm vascular resistance (39.6 ± 3.5 vs. 47.5 ± 4.8 mmHg·ml−1·100 g tissue·min; P < 0.05). Forearm blood flow during acute isocapnic hypoxia was increased after exposure but during selective brachial intra-arterial vascular infusion of the alpha-blocker phentolamine it was unchanged after exposure. Finally, there was a decrease in reactive hyperemia to 15 min of forearm ischemia after the hypoxic exposure. Recurrent nocturnal hypoxia thus increases sympathetic activity and alters peripheral vascular tone. These changes may contribute to the increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk associated with clinical diseases that are associated with chronic recurrent hypoxia. PMID:18539753

  2. [Vascular reactivity and receptor expression of endogenous vasoconstrictor in rats with alcoholic cardiomyopathy and insulation stress].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Tsorin, I B; Varkov, A I; Stolyaruk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Kolik, L G; Sukhanova, I F; Kryzhanovskii, S A

    2015-01-01

    On the model of alcohol cardiomyopathy studied the effect of chronic ethanol consumption and the insulation stress on the reactivity of isolated rat aorta and the expression of the endogenous vasoconstrictor receptors in the aorta. Pushing alcoholization outbred rats was carried out for 24-28 weeks, using as the sole source of liquid 10% ethanol solution. In assessing the results of the study took into account the age of the animals. It is found that the reactivity of isolated aortic rings dissected from the body of old (40-45 weeks) nonstressed rats in response to endothelin-1 (ET1), noradrenaline (NA), arginine vasopressin (AVP) or angiotensin II (ATII) is not different from such reactivity for young animals. However, with the increase in life expectancy increases the sensitivity of vessels to vasoconstrictor action of serotonin (5HT). Prolonged stress insulation and the consumption of high doses of ethanol the stress lead to increased ET1- and NA-induced contraction of the aortic rings and a significant decrease in contractile response of the aorta to the impact ATII and AVP. Stress and alco- hol in combination with stress causing reduction mRNA ETA-R, AT1A-R. and V1A-R and increased mRNA α₁-AR in rat aorta. It is found that in the vessels of stressed and alcoholized animals reduced level of expression of cytosolic glucocorticoid receptors (GR), which is a transcription factor for genes ETA-R, AT1A-R V1A-R. It is propoused that the development of vascular hyporesponsiveness of stressed and alcoholized rats to action ATII and AVP is the result of reducing the expression of their receptors on the GR-dependent mechanism. It is shown that under the influence of ethanol vessels become hyporeactivity selectively with respect to the action of 5HT. The mechanism of this process is unclear. Importantly, the changes in the contractile properties vessels recovered from the rat at 1 month after the abolition of the reception of ethanol (step abstinence) were similar to

  3. Simvastatin prevents vascular complications in the chronic reactive oxygen species murine model of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Bagnato, Gian Luca; Pizzino, Gabriele; Roberts, William Neal; Irrera, Natasha; Minutoli, Letteria; Russo, Giuseppina; Squadrito, Francesco; Saitta, Antonino; Bagnato, Gian Filippo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-05-01

    Aims Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by vasculopathy and organ fibrosis. Although microvascular alterations are very well characterized, structural and functional abnormalities of large vessels are not well defined. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of simvastatin administration on aortic and small renal arteries thickening, and on myofibroblasts differentiation in a murine model of SSc. Methods and results SSc was induced in BALB/c mice by daily subcutaneous injections of hypochlorous acid (HOCl, 100 μl) for 6 weeks. Mice (n = 23) were randomized to receive: HOCl (n = 10); HOCl plus simvastatin (40 mg/kg; n = 8); or vehicle (n = 5). Simvastatin administration started 30 min after HOCl injection, and up to week 6. Aortic and small renal arteries intima-media thickness was evaluated by histological analysis. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and CD31 in aortic tissues was performed to evaluate myofibroblast differentiation and endothelial markers.In HOCl-treated mice, intima-media thickening with reduced lumen diameter was observed in the aorta and in small renal arteries and simvastatin administration prevented this increase. Aortic and renal myofibroblasts count, as expressed by α-SMA + density, was lower in the group of mice treated with simvastatin compared to HOCl-treated mice. Simvastatin prevented the reduction in VEGFR2 and CD31 expression induced by HOCl. Conclusions The administration of simvastatin regulates collagen deposition in the aortic tissues and in the small renal arteries by modulating myofibroblasts differentiation and vascular markers. Further studies are needed to better address the effect of statins in the macrovascular component of SSc. PMID:26846205

  4. Cases of limb-body wall complex: Early amnion rupture, vascular disruption, or abnormal splitting of the embryo?

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Frank; Pinar, Halit; Kostadinov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of limb-body wall complex (LBWC), also known as body stalk anomaly, a rare form of body wall defect incompatible with life. The first case was identified during a level II ultrasound examination performed at 7 wk gestational age. The delivery was by breech extraction at 39 wk and 4 days. The second case was delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 35 wk and 5 days. Karyotype analysis was normal in both fetuses. The phenotype of LBWC is variable, but commonly identified features include: exencephaly, limb defects, and either facial clefts or thoraco-abdominoschisis. The exact etiology remains uncertain, as the disorder has been regarded as sporadic with low recurrence. Vascular disruption during early embryogenesis, early amnion rupture, abnormal splitting of the embryo, and failure of amnion fusion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of LBWC. A role for possible gene mutation and maternal use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs has also been suggested. Detailed ultrasonography along with biochemical screening may allow for early detection.

  5. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox), p67(phox), and p22(phox) and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2 (∙-) production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  6. Comparison of cerebral vascular reactivity measures obtained using breath-holding and CO2 inhalation.

    PubMed

    Tancredi, Felipe B; Hoge, Richard D

    2013-07-01

    Stimulation of cerebral vasculature using hypercapnia has been widely used to study cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR), which can be expressed as the quantitative change in cerebral blood flow (CBF) per mm Hg change in end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2). We investigate whether different respiratory manipulations, with arterial spin labeling used to measure CBF, lead to consistent measures of CVR. The approaches included: (1) an automated system delivering variable concentrations of inspired CO2 for prospective targeting of PETCO2, (2) administration of a fixed concentration of CO2 leading to subject-dependent changes in PETCO2, (3) a breath-hold (BH) paradigm with physiologic modeling of CO2 accumulation, and (4) a maneuver combining breath-hold and hyperventilation. When CVR was expressed as the percent change in CBF per mm Hg change in PETCO2, methods 1 to 3 gave consistent results. The CVR values using method 4 were significantly lower. When CVR was expressed in terms of the absolute change in CBF (mL/100 g per minute per mm Hg), greater discrepancies became apparent: methods 2 and 3 gave lower absolute CVR values compared with method 1, and the value obtained with method 4 was dramatically lower. Our findings indicate that care must be taken to ensure that CVR is measured over the linear range of the CBF-CO2 dose-response curve, avoiding hypocapnic conditions. PMID:23571282

  7. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙−) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙− production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  8. Tissue reactivity and degradation patterns of absorbable vascular ligating clips implanted in peritoneum and rectus fascia.

    PubMed

    Chegini, N; Metz, S A; Masterson, B J

    1990-07-01

    Absorbable vascular ligating clips are finding increasing use in intraabdominal surgery. We report the results of a light and scanning electron microscope investigation of the tissue reactivity and clip degradation patterns of two such materials, Absolok (polydioxanone) and Lactomer (copolymer of glycolic and lactic acid), implanted in the fascia and peritoneum of rabbits for intervals of 2 to 70 days. Cellular response to the clips, defined as the number of inflammatory cells/10(4) microns 2, was maximum at day 4 postimplantation, then gradually declined as the duration of implantation increased. This pattern, seen with both types of clips, was similar to that seen with polydioxanone (PDS) suture, but significantly greater than that associated with polypropylene (Prolene) suture. Although cellular response to the clips was greater in peritoneum than in fascia, especially on two occasions associated with adhesion formation, this was not statistically significant. Based on our morphological observations, the signs of clip degradation which were indicated by the appearance of surface crazing and cracks occurred earlier in peritoneum than in fascia. PMID:2118910

  9. Paclitaxel induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression through reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Sun; Oh, Jin Mi; Jin, Dong Hoon; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug paclitaxel is known to block cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through stabilization of microtubules. The development of paclitaxel resistance in tumors is one of the most significant obstacles to successful therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) are important regulators of neovascularization. HIF-1 regulates VEGF expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigated whether paclitaxel treatment affects VEGF expression for the development of paclitaxel resistance. Paclitaxel treatment induced dose-dependent cell death and increased VEGF expression. Paclitaxel also induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and stabilized HIF-1alpha, which stimulated luciferase activity of HIF-1alpha response element on VEGF gene. As paclitaxel treatment produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), VEGF expression was increased by H2O2 treatment and reduced by various ROS scavengers such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and diphenylene iodonium. Paclitaxel-induced cell death was aggravated by incubation with those ROS scavengers. Collectively, this suggests that paclitaxel-induced VEGF expression could be mediated by paclitaxel-induced ROS production through nuclear factor-kappaB activation and HIF-1alpha stabilization, which could affect resistance induction to antitumor therapeutics during cancer treatment. PMID:18322419

  10. Inhibition by singlet molecular oxygen of the vascular reactivity in rabbit mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Mizukawa, Hisae; Okabe, Eiichiro

    1997-01-01

    The effects of reactive oxygen intermediates derived from photoactivated rose bengal on the vascular reactivity have been evaluated in rabbit mesenteric artery ring preparations. The artery rings were exposed to xanthene dye rose bengal (50 nM) illuminated (6,000 lux) at 560 nm for 30 min. Spin trapping studies with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TEMP) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) with electron spin resonance spectrometry were also conducted in solution (and not within tissues) to determine quantitatively the reactive oxygen species generated from photoactivated rose bengal. Contraction of the ring preparations induced by noradrenaline (10−8 to 10−4 M) was attenuated by previous exposure to photolysed rose bengal; the observation that the pD2 decreased without a significant reduction in maximum tension generation is consistent with the view that receptor dysfunction may be involved in the effect of photolysed rose bengal. Prior exposure to photolysed rose bengal of the ring preparations inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by acetylcholine (10−6 M) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10−7 M), but not the endothelium-independent relaxation evoked by nitroglycerin (10−6 M). A variety of scavengers, superoxide dismutase (33 units ml−1), catalase (32 units ml−1) and 1,3-dimethyl-2-thiourea (DMTU, 10 mM), which should eliminate the superoxide anion radical, H2O2 and the hydroxyl radical, had no effect on the attenuated responses to noradrenaline and acetylcholine induced by photolysed rose bengal. In contrast, the inhibition of the observed effect of photolysed rose bengal was obtained with addition of histidine (25 mM), a singlet molecular oxygen quencher. It was found that photolysis of rose bengal from a 1 : 2 : 2 : 1 quartet, characteristic of the hydroxyl radical-DMPO spin adduct, which was effectively blunted by DMTU, superoxide dismutase and catalase whereas histidine was ineffective. The

  11. Renovascular effects of neuropeptide-Y in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney: non-uniform pattern of vascular reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, M S; Fretschner, M; Nobiling, R; Persson, P B; Steinhausen, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The renovascular effects of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) were examined in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney. 2. Systemic infusion of low non-pressor doses of NPY (0.2 micrograms kg-1 up to 5.0 micrograms kg-1) produced a non-uniform pattern of vascular reactivity. In general, a significant constriction of the proximal and distal arcuate artery was seen at all doses. No constriction was seen at the interlobular artery or the larger part of the afferent arteriole. These segments initially dilated during the lower dose infusions. The very distal part of the afferent arteriole adjacent to the glomerulus and the proximal efferent arteriole responded in a similar way to the arcuate arteries. 3. NPY, locally applied into the tissue bath at concentrations of 1 nmol l-1 up to 25 nmol l-1, produced non-uniform vascular reactions similar to those of intravenously infused NPY. At the considerably higher local dosage of 1.14 mumol l-1, all vascular segments revealed vasoconstriction. 4. NPY application did not attenuate effects of acetylcholine. This observation suggests that the mechanism of NPY-induced vasoconstriction does not rely upon antagonism of endothelium-derived vasodilatation. 5. The pattern of vascular reactivity to NPY was substantially different from that known for the vasoconstrictors noradrenaline and angiotensin II in our preparation. PMID:1822552

  12. Feasibility of US-CT image fusion to identify the sources of abnormal vascularization in posterior sacroiliac joints of ankylosing spondylitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenlong; Zhu, Jiaan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Niansong; Xue, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) can be used to evaluate the inflammatory activity of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, but to precisely locate the abnormal vascularization observed on color Doppler US (CDUS) was difficult. To address this issue, we performed US and computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging of SIJs with 84 inpatients and 30 controls, and then assessed the sources of abnormal vascularization in the posterior SIJs of AS patients based on the fused images. Several possible factors impacting the fusion process were considered including the lesion classes of SIJ, the skinfold thickness of the sacral region and the cross-sectional levels of the first, second and third posterior sacral foramina. Our data showed high image fusion success rates at the 3 levels in the AS group (97.0%, 87.5% and 79.8%, respectively) and the control group (96.7%, 86.7%, and 86.7%, respectively).The skinfold thickness was identified as the main factor affecting the success rates. The successfully fused images revealed significant differences in the distribution of abnormal vascularization between 3 levels, as detected via CDUS (P = 0.011), which suggested that inflammation occurred in distinct tissues at different levels of the SIJ (intraligamentous inflammation in Regions 1 and 2; intracapsular inflammation in Region 3). PMID:26669847

  13. C-reactive protein: interaction with the vascular endothelium and possible role in human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio; Croce, Giuseppe; Cofini, Vincenza; De Berardinis, Giovanni; Grassi, Davide; Casale, Raffaele; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2007-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the first acute phase protein that has been described in the literature. It is phylogenetically ancient and - with serum amyloid P - belongs to proteins named as "pentraxin". After being considered a marker of acute inflammation for several decades and fruitfully used in clinical practice, CRP has been recently considered as a potential contributor to inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis as well as a marker of cardiovascular risk. With regard to the first topic, inflammation is now believed to represent the underlying mechanism leading to the formation of human atheroma and favouring both the destabilization of vulnerable plaques and the formation of occlusive thrombi. In this regard, numerous studies indicated that modest changes in circulating CRP levels, as detected by highly sensitive methods, can be extremely useful in predicting cardiovascular and perhaps cerebrovascular diseases in apparently healthy individuals as well as in patients affected by atherosclerosis. Subjects manifesting with identical low density cholesterol and/or blood pressure levels have different rates of cardiovascular accidents on the basis of different circulating CRP concentrations. In addition, women with identical cardiovascular risk profiles developed more type 2 diabetes in the presence of higher circulating CRP levels and thereby are expected to display divergent cardiovascular prognosis. Therefore, even slight changes in circulating CRP concentrations - assuming that blood is collected appropriately and CRP is measured with correct methods - could help clinicians in defining individual cardiovascular risk. In this review, we have firstly described the current understanding of the structure of CRP, its function, and interaction with the vascular endothelial cell. Then, we have discussed how to measure circulating CRP and the more recent findings on the suggested role of circulating CRP as a novel cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:17584094

  14. Changes in cerebral vascular reactivity and structure following prolonged exposure to high altitude in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Glen E; Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Dominelli, Paolo B; Heran, Manraj K S; Donnelly, Joseph; duManoir, Gregory R; Ainslie, Philip N; Rauscher, Alexander; Sheel, A William

    2015-12-01

    Although high-altitude exposure can lead to neurocognitive impairment, even upon return to sea level, it remains unclear the extent to which brain volume and regional cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) are altered following high-altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously determine the effect of 3 weeks at 5050 m on: (1) structural brain alterations; and (2) regional CVR after returning to sea level for 1 week. Healthy human volunteers (n = 6) underwent baseline and follow-up structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at rest and during a CVR protocol (end-tidal PCO2 reduced by -10, -5 and increased by +5, +10, and +15 mmHg from baseline). CVR maps (% mmHg(-1)) were generated using BOLD MRI and brain volumes were estimated. Following return to sea level, whole-brain volume and gray matter volume was reduced by 0.4 ± 0.3% (P < 0.01) and 2.6 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001), respectively; white matter was unchanged. Global gray matter CVR and white matter CVR were unchanged following return to sea level, but CVR was selectively increased (P < 0.05) in the brainstem (+30 ± 12%), hippocampus (+12 ± 3%), and thalamus (+10 ± 3%). These changes were the result of improvement and/or reversal of negative CVR to positive CVR in these regions. Three weeks of high-altitude exposure is reflected in loss of gray matter volume and improvements in negative CVR. PMID:26660556

  15. Reciprocal Effects of Oxidative Stress on Heme Oxygenase Expression and Activity Contributes to Reno-Vascular Abnormalities in EC-SOD Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Tomoko; Puri, Nitin; Sodhi, Komal; Bellner, Lars; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi; Rezzani, Rita; Oury, Tim D.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) system is one of the key regulators of cellular redox homeostasis which responds to oxidative stress (ROS) via HO-1 induction. However, recent reports have suggested an inhibitory effect of ROS on HO activity. In light of these conflicting reports, this study was designed to evaluate effects of chronic oxidative stress on HO system and its role in contributing towards patho-physiological abnormalities observed in extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD, SOD3) KO animals. Experiments were performed in WT and EC-SOD(−/−) mice treated with and without HO inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). EC-SOD(−/−) mice exhibited oxidative stress, renal histopathological abnormalities, elevated blood pressure, impaired endothelial function, reduced p-eNOS, p-AKT and increased HO-1 expression; although, HO activity was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated along with attenuation of serum adiponectin and vascular epoxide levels (P < 0.05). CoPP, in EC-SOD(−/−) mice, enhanced HO activity (P < 0.05) and reversed aforementioned pathophysiological abnormalities along with restoration of vascular EET, p-eNOS, p-AKT and serum adiponectin levels in these animals. Taken together our results implicate a causative role of insufficient activation of heme-HO-adiponectin system in pathophysiological abnormalities observed in animal models of chronic oxidative stress such as EC-SOD(−/−) mice. PMID:22292113

  16. Transgenic mice over-expressing ET-1 in the endothelial cells develop systemic hypertension with altered vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leung, Justin Wai-Chung; Wong, Wing Tak; Koon, Hon Wai; Mo, Fong Ming; Tam, Sidney; Huang, Yu; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Chung, Stephen Sum Man; Chung, Sookja Kim

    2011-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor involved in the regulation of vascular tone and implicated in hypertension. However, the role of small blood vessels endothelial ET-1 in hypertension remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect of chronic over-expression of endothelial ET-1 on arterial blood pressure and vascular reactivity using transgenic mice approach. Transgenic mice (TET-1) with endothelial ET-1 over-expression showed increased in ET-1 level in the endothelial cells of small pulmonary blood vessels. Although TET-1 mice appeared normal, they developed mild hypertension which was normalized by the ET(A) receptor (BQ123) but not by ET(B) receptor (BQ788) antagonist. Tail-cuff measurements showed a significant elevation of systolic and mean blood pressure in conscious TET-1 mice. The mice also exhibited left ventricular hypertrophy and left axis deviation in electrocardiogram, suggesting an increased peripheral resistance. The ionic concentrations in the urine and serum were normal in 8-week old TET-1 mice, indicating that the systemic hypertension was independent of renal function, although, higher serum urea levels suggested the occurrence of kidney dysfunction. The vascular reactivity of the aorta and the mesenteric artery was altered in the TET-1 mice indicating that chronic endothelial ET-1 up-regulation leads to vascular tone imbalance in both conduit and resistance arteries. These findings provide evidence for the role of spatial expression of ET-1 in the endothelium contributing to mild hypertension was mediated by ET(A) receptors. The results also suggest that chronic endothelial ET-1 over-expression affects both cardiac and vascular functions, which, at least in part, causes blood pressure elevation. PMID:22096514

  17. Overproduction of nitric oxide inhibits vascular reactivity in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Ru; Wu, Jin-Sheng; He, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Jiu; Gao, De-Ming

    1997-01-01

    .4 ± 1.8 nmol/L vs 21.8 ± 1.4 nmol/L, P > 0.05). However, the maximal concentrations of KCl and phenylephrine for inducing contractions were still significantly lower in the portal hypertensive rings (1.08 ± 0.1 g and 1.43 ± 0.14 g) than in the control rings (1.21 ± 0.11 g and 1.72 ± 0.11 g respectively, both P < 0.05). Thus, addition of the NO synthase inhibitor L-NNA could partially restore contractile responses to KCl and phenylephrine in portal hypertensive rings. CONCLUSION: NO overproduction inhibits the vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors, and it might be one of the main causes of vasodilatation and hyperdynamic circulatory status in portal hypertension. PMID:27053869

  18. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  19. Vascular Reactivity Profile of Novel KCa 3.1-Selective Positive-Gating Modulators in the Coronary Vascular Bed.

    PubMed

    Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Valero, Marta Sofía; Pinilla, Estéfano; Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis; Coleman, Nichole; Laría, Celia; Calvín-Tienza, Víctor; García-Otín, Ángel-Luis; Fernández-Fernández, José M; Murillo, M Divina; Gálvez, José A; Díaz-de-Villegas, María D; Badorrey, Ramón; Simonsen, Ulf; Rivera, Luis; Wulff, Heike; Köhler, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Opening of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KC a 3.1) produces membrane hyperpolarization in the vascular endothelium. Here, we studied the ability of two new KC a 3.1-selective positive-gating modulators, SKA-111 and SKA-121, to (1) evoke porcine endothelial cell KC a 3.1 membrane hyperpolarization, (2) induce endothelium-dependent and, particularly, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type relaxation in porcine coronary arteries (PCA) and (3) influence coronary artery tone in isolated rat hearts. In whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on endothelial cells of PCA (PCAEC), KC a currents evoked by bradykinin (BK) were potentiated ≈7-fold by either SKA-111 or SKA-121 (both at 1 μM) and were blocked by a KC a 3.1 blocker, TRAM-34. In membrane potential measurements, SKA-111 and SKA-121 augmented bradykinin-induced hyperpolarization. Isometric tension measurements in large- and small-calibre PCA showed that SKA-111 and SKA-121 potentiated endothelium-dependent relaxation with intact NO synthesis and EDH-type relaxation to BK by ≈2-fold. Potentiation of the BK response was prevented by KC a 3.1 inhibition. In Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, SKA-111 potentiated coronary vasodilation elicited by BK. In conclusion, our data show that positive-gating modulation of KC a 3.1 channels improves BK-induced membrane hyperpolarization and endothelium-dependent relaxation in small and large PCA as well as in the coronary circulation of rats. Positive-gating modulators of KC a 3.1 could be therapeutically useful to improve coronary blood flow and counteract impaired coronary endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26821335

  20. Effects of exercise training on stress-induced vascular reactivity alterations: role of nitric oxide and prostanoids

    PubMed Central

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Silva, Samuel T.; Boer, Patrícia A.; Cordellini, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise may modify biologic stress responses. Objective: To investigate the impact of exercise training on vascular alterations induced by acute stress, focusing on nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways. Method: Wistar rats were separated into: sedentary, trained (60-min swimming, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, carrying a 5% body-weight load), stressed (2 h-immobilization), and trained/stressed. Response curves for noradrenaline, in the absence and presence of L-NAME or indomethacin, were obtained in intact and denuded aortas (n=7-10). Results: None of the procedures altered the denuded aorta reactivity. Intact aortas from stressed, trained, and trained/stressed rats showed similar reduction in noradrenaline maximal responses (sedentary 3.54±0.15, stressed 2.80±0.10*, trained 2.82±0.11*, trained/stressed 2.97± 0.21*, *P<0.05 relate to sedentary). Endothelium removal and L-NAME abolished this hyporeactivity in all experimental groups, except in trained/stressed rats that showed a partial aorta reactivity recovery in L-NAME presence (L-NAME: sedentary 5.23±0,26#, stressed 5.55±0.38#, trained 5.28±0.30#, trained/stressed 4.42±0.41, #P<0.05 related to trained/stressed). Indomethacin determined a decrease in sensitivity (EC50) in intact aortas of trained rats without abolishing the aortal hyporeactivity in trained, stressed, and trained/stressed rats. Conclusions: Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial vasodilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Stress-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial nitric oxide. Beside the involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway, the vascular response of trained/stressed rats involved an additional mechanism yet to be elucidated. These findings advance on the understanding of the vascular processes after exercise and stress alone and in combination. PMID:26083604

  1. High Glucose-enhanced Acetylcholine Stimulated CGMP Masks Impaired Vascular Reactivity in Tail Arteries from Short-Term Hyperglycemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamaty, Marwan; Guzmán, Cristina B.; Walsh , Mary F.; Bode, Ann M.; Levy, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    had lower levels of GISH (P < 0.0001) and higher levels of GSSG (P < 0.0001) indicating oxidative stress. Conclusions: Our data indicate that endothelium dependent relaxation is altered early in the diabetic state and that increased NO responses may compensate for augmented oxidative stress but the lack of effect of short-term exposure of normal vessels to HG suggests that short-term hyperglycemia per se does not cause abnormal vascular responses. PMID:11469392

  2. Plasma Nitrite Response and Arterial Reactivity Differentiate Vascular Health and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jason D; Miller, Elizabeth M; Schwark, Earl; Robbins, Jennifer. L.; Duscha, Brian D; Annex, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    NO is crucial for endothelial function and vascular health. Plasma nitrite (NO2-) is the main oxidation product of NO and has been shown to reflect changes in eNOS activity. We hypothesized that plasma NO2- response to physical exercise stress along with physiological endothelial function would be reduced with increasing severity of vascular disease. Subject groups were; a) risk factors but no vascular disease (RF); b) Type 2 diabetes with no vascular disease (DM); c) diagnosed peripheral arterial disease (PAD); and d) DM+PAD. Venous blood was drawn at rest and 10min following maximal exercise. Plasma samples were analyzed by reductive chemiluminescence. Brachial diameters were imaged prior to, during and following 5min of forearm occlusion (BAFMD). There were no differences in resting plasma NO2- or BA diameters between groups. The PAD groups had lower age adjusted BAFMD responses (p≤0.05). Within group analysis revealed an increase in NO2- in the RF group (+39.3%), no change in the DM (−15.51%), and a decrease in the PAD (−44.20%) and PAD+DM (−39.95%). This was maintained after adjusting for age and VO2peak (p≤0.05). ΔNO2- and BAFMD were the strongest independent predictors of VO2peak.in multivariate linear regression. These findings suggest ΔNO2- discriminates severity of cardiovascular disease risk, is related to endothelial function and predicts exercise capacity. PMID:19371597

  3. Peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to aerobic training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lemos, José R; Alves, Cleber R; de Souza, Sílvia B C; Marsiglia, Julia D C; Silva, Michelle S M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Vieira, Erica L M; Krieger, José E; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Guilherme B; de Oliveira, Edilamar M; Bolani, Wladimir; Dias, Rodrigo G; Trombetta, Ivani C

    2016-02-01

    Besides neuronal plasticity, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also important in vascular function. The BDNF has been associated with angiogenesis through its specific receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB). Additionally, Val66Met polymorphism decreases activity-induced BDNF. Since BDNF and TrkB are expressed in vascular endothelial cells and aerobic exercise training can increase serum BDNF, this study aimed to test the hypotheses: 1) Serum BDNF levels modulate peripheral blood flow; 2) The Val66Met BDNF polymorphism impairs exercise training-induced vasodilation. We genotyped 304 healthy male volunteers (Val66Val, n = 221; Val66Met, n = 83) who underwent intense aerobic exercise training on a running track three times/wk for 4 mo. We evaluated pre- and post-exercise training serum BDNF and proBDNF concentration, heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MBP), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). In the pre-exercise training, BDNF, proBDNF, BDNF/proBDNF ratio, FBF, and FVR were similar between genotypes. After exercise training, functional capacity (V̇o2 peak) increased and HR decreased similarly in both groups. Val66Val, but not Val66Met, increased BDNF (interaction, P = 0.04) and BDNF/proBDNF ratio (interaction, P < 0.001). Interestingly, FBF (interaction, P = 0.04) and the FVR (interaction, P = 0.01) responses during handgrip exercise (HG) improved in Val66Val compared with Val66Met, even with similar responses of HR and MBP. There were association between BDNF/proBDNF ratio and FBF (r = 0.64, P < 0.001) and FVR (r = -0.58, P < 0.001) during HG exercise. These results show that peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to exercise training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and such responsiveness is associated with serum BDNF concentrations in healthy subjects. PMID:26603150

  4. Blood supply and vascular reactivity of the spinal cord under normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Feuerstein, Jeanne S; Theodore, Nicholas; Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2011-09-01

    The authors present a review of spinal cord blood supply, discussing the anatomy of the vascular system and physiological aspects of blood flow regulation in normal and injured spinal cords. Unique anatomical functional properties of vessels and blood supply determine the susceptibility of the spinal cord to damage, especially ischemia. Spinal cord injury (SCI), for example, complicating thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair is associated with ischemic trauma. The rate of this devastating complication has been decreased significantly by instituting physiological methods of protection. Traumatic SCI causes complex changes in spinal cord blood flow, which are closely related to the severity of injury. Manipulating physiological parameters such as mean arterial blood pressure and intrathecal pressure may be beneficial for patients with an SCI. Studying the physiopathological processes of the spinal cord under vascular compromise remains challenging because of its central role in almost all of the body's hemodynamic and neurofunctional processes. PMID:21663407

  5. Investigation of long chain omega-3 PUFAs on arterial blood pressure, vascular reactivity and survival in angiotensin II-infused Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bürgin-Maunder, Corinna S; Nataatmadja, Maria; Vella, Rebecca K; Fenning, Andrew S; Brooks, Peter R; Russell, Fraser D

    2016-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory vascular disease. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in an angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model of AAA. This study investigated the effects of LC n-3 PUFAs on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in fourteen angiotensin II-infused ApoE(-/-) male mice. Blood pressure was obtained using a non-invasive tail cuff method and whole blood was collected by cardiac puncture. Vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta was assessed using wire myography and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was determined by immunohistochemistry. A high LC n-3 PUFA diet increased the omega-3 index and reduced the n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio. At day 10 post-infusion with angiotensin II, there was no difference in systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure in mice fed the high or low n-3 PUFA diets. The high LC n-3 PUFA diet resulted in a non-significant trend for delay in time to death from abdominal aortic rupture. Vascular reactivity and eNOS activation remained unchanged in mice fed the high compared to the low LC n-3 PUFA diet. This study argues against direct improvement in vascular reactivity in ApoE(-/-) mice that were supplemented with n-3 PUFA for 8 weeks prior to infusion with angiotensin II. PMID:26638987

  6. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  7. Effect of verapamil on intimal thickening and vascular reactivity in the collared carotid artery of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Ustünes, L.; Yasa, M.; Kerry, Z.; Ozdemir, N.; Berkan, T.; Erhan, Y.; Ozer, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Intimal thickening is a common site for atherosclerosis. Therefore, we investigated whether the calcium entry blocker verapamil (10 mg kg-1 body weight day-1, s.c.) can retard intimal thickening and changes in vascular reactivity induced by a non-occlusive, silicone collar positioned around the left carotid artery of rabbits. The contralateral carotid artery was sham-operated and served as a control. 2. Verapamil and placebo (saline 0.1 ml kg-1, day-1, s.c.) treatments were initiated 7 days before placing the collar and lasted 3 weeks. Thereafter, segments were cut from collared and sham-treated arteries for histology and isometric tension recording. 3. The intima/media (I/M ratio increased after 14 days of collar treatment, but intimal thickening was not inhibited by verapamil (I/M ratio placebo 0.31 +/- 0.07, verapamil 0.32 +/- 0.09). 4. The collar decreased the capacity to develop force, as indicated by the response to a supramaximal concentration of KCl, decreased the sensitivity (pD2) to acetylcholine (ACh) and phenylephrine (Phe), but increased the sensitivity to 5-hydroxytryamine (5-HT). 5. Although verapamil did not affect intimal thickening, it normalized the hypersensitivity to 5-HT in collared arteries. 6. The contraction to the supramaximal concentration of KCl was not affected by verapamil. Verapamil decreased the Emax of ACh, but this was only seen in collar-treated arteries. Verapamil also decreased the sensitivity to ACh and Phe, in both sham- and collar-treated arteries. 7. We conclude that verapamil, without preventing thickening of the intima, can modify collar-induced changes in vascular reactivity. PMID:8842432

  8. Aerobic training prevents oxidative profile and improves nitric oxide and vascular reactivity in rats with cardiometabolic alteration.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Renata F; Gaique, Thaiane G; Bento-Bernardes, Thais; Motta, Nádia A V; Brito, Fernanda C F; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Castro-Pinheiro, Camila; Oliveira, Karen J; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death worldwide; therefore it is important to understand the natural history of the pathophysiologic process and develop strategies to halt its progression. Thus this study investigated the protective effect of aerobic training on pathophysiological mechanisms involved in subclinical cardiometabolic alterations in a model with constant exposure to a prejudicial agent. Male Wistar rats were divided into a control group (C), which received drinking water, fructose group (F), which was fed 10% fructose in drinking water for 10 wk, and control training (CT) and fructose training groups (FT), in which moderate aerobic training was added in the last 8 wk of the study. Insulin, triacylglycerol, and isoprostane were higher and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was lower in the F group. There was no difference in thoracic aorta histology, but a decreased vascularization was seen in the F group, avoided by training in left ventricle. Regarding vascular function, the F group exhibited increased vasoconstrictory reactivity to phenylephrine. The F group presented impaired vasodilation to acetylcholine. Regarding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the F group presented a lower expression, and phosphorylated eNOS was higher in the trained groups than in their respective control groups. This same pattern was observed for nitric oxide bioavailability, antioxidant protein expression in aorta, left ventricle, and muscle (catalase, SOD, and glutathione peroxidase), serum SOD activity, and muscle mass. These results suggest that exercise training enhanced the antioxidant pathway and, as a consequence, the eNOS pathway, preventing an impairment in vascular vasodilatory capacity. PMID:27255525

  9. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability. PMID:20954712

  10. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Signaling During Disease: Regulation by Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Michelle E.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The endothelium is immunoregulatory in that inhibiting the function of vascular adhesion molecules blocks leukocyte recruitment and thus tissue inflammation. The function of endothelial cells during leukocyte recruitment is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants. In inflammatory sites and lymph nodes, the endothelium is stimulated to express adhesion molecules that mediate leukocyte binding. Upon leukocyte binding, these adhesion molecules activate endothelial cell signal transduction that then alters endothelial cell shape for the opening of passageways through which leukocytes can migrate. If the stimulation of this opening is blocked, inflammation is blocked. In this review, we focus on the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Expression of VCAM-1 is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory diseases by several mediators, including ROS. Then, VCAM-1 on the endothelium functions as both a scaffold for leukocyte migration and a trigger of endothelial signaling through NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. These ROS induce signals for the opening of intercellular passageways through which leukocytes migrate. In several inflammatory diseases, inflammation is blocked by inhibition of leukocyte binding to VCAM-1 or by inhibition of VCAM-1 signal transduction. VCAM-1 signal transduction and VCAM-1-dependent inflammation are blocked by antioxidants. Thus, VCAM-1 signaling is a target for intervention by pharmacological agents and by antioxidants during inflammatory diseases. This review discusses ROS and antioxidant functions during activation of VCAM-1 expression and VCAM-1 signaling in inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1607–1638. PMID:21050132

  11. Insulin sensitizing and cardioprotective effects of Esculetin and Telmisartan combination by attenuating Ang II mediated vascular reactivity and cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kadakol, Almesh; Pandey, Anuradha; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Malek, Vajir; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-10-15

    The combination of the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with other synthetic and natural molecules has been reported to have better safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in prevention of diabetes and its associated complications than their monotherapy. Driven by the aforementioned facts, this study was conceived to evaluate the potential additive effect of combination of Telmisartan and Esculetin in prevention of insulin resistance and associated cardiac fibrosis. Recently, we have reported that Esculetin prevented cardiovascular dysfunction associated with insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance was developed by high fat diet (HFD) feeding to Wistar rats. Telmisartan and Esculetin were administered at 10 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/kg/day doses (P.O, 2 weeks), respectively either alone or in combination. Plasma biochemical analyses, vascular reactivity and immunohistochemical experiments were performed to assess the beneficial effect of Telmisartan, Esculetin and their combination on insulin resistance and associated cardiac fibrosis. The study results showed that, co-administered Telmisartan and Esculetin ameliorated the pathological features like metabolic perturbation, morphometric alterations, vascular hyper responsiveness, extracellular matrix accumulation and the expression of fibronectin and TGF-β more effectively than monotherapy in HFD fed rats. Hence, the study urges us to conclude that the solution to IR and associated cardiovascular dysfunction may lie in the Telmisartan and Esculetin combination therapy. PMID:26409041

  12. Estrogen has opposing effects on vascular reactivity in obese, insulin-resistant male Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks-Asplund, Esther M.; Shoukas, Artin A.; Kim, Soon-Yul; Burke, Sean A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that estradiol treatment would improve vascular dysfunction commonly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. A sham operation or 17beta-estradiol pellet implantation was performed in male lean and obese Zucker rats. Maximal vasoconstriction (VC) to phenylephrine (PE) and potassium chloride was exaggerated in control obese rats compared with lean rats, but estradiol significantly attenuated VC in the obese rats. Estradiol reduced the PE EC50 in all groups. This effect was cyclooxygenase independent, because preincubation with indomethacin reduced VC response to PE similarly in a subset of control and estrogen-treated lean rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation (VD) to sodium nitroprusside was similar among groups, but endothelium-dependent VD to ACh was significantly impaired in obese compared with lean rats. Estradiol improved VD in lean and obese rats by decreasing EC50 but impaired function by decreasing maximal VD. The shift in EC50 corresponded to an upregulation in nitric oxide synthase III protein expression in the aorta of the estrogen-treated obese rats. In summary, estrogen treatment improves vascular function in male insulin-resistant, obese rats, partially via an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase III protein expression. These effects are counteracted by adverse factors, such as hyperlipidemia and, potentially, a release of an endothelium-derived contractile agent.

  13. Influence of oestrous cycle and pregnancy on the reactivity of the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Dalle Lucca, J J; Adeagbo, A S; Alsip, N L

    2000-04-01

    In isolated, perfused mesenteric vascular beds from female rats, it was assessed whether the constrictor response to cirazoline, an alpha(1)-adrenergic agonist, or acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation was altered by oestrous cycle or pregnancy and the ability of nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to modulate these responses. Mesenteries, removed from female rats on each oestrous cycle day and gestation day 16, were perfused with physiological salt solution. Tone was induced with cirazoline (1 micromol/l), and concentration-response curves to ACh generated. Responsiveness to ACh was tested in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), ibuprofen (IBU) and tetrabutylammonium (TBA), to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclo-oxygenase and K(+) channels respectively. Cirazoline-induced tone was smaller in pro-oestrous and pregnant groups, but the increase in tone to L-NA was larger in pregnant compared with oestrous and dioestrous groups. Control responses to ACh were not different, but L-NA attenuated the response in virgin groups only. IBU did not affect the ACh response, but TBA attenuated it in all groups. When TBA was introduced first, ACh-induced dilatation was significantly reduced and not altered by L-NA addition. These results suggest that in the mesenteric vascular bed from cycling and pregnant rats, EDHF is the major mediator of ACh-induced dilatation and NOS may be up-regulated in pregnant and pro-oestrous rats. PMID:10739850

  14. Vascular Reactivity: Evaluation of an acute suprasystolic occlusion with impedance plethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M. C.; Bonaudo, M.; Conde, A.; Palavecino, L.

    2007-11-01

    In the clinical set, the evaluation of endothelium- dependent vasodilator response of large vessels is carried out using ultrasound equipment for vascular flow determinations and during administration of vasoactive drugs. This work proposes to use a substantially cheaper technique and a sustained cuff arterial occlusion in order to cause vasodilation. Impedance plethysmography is used to detect the arterial pulse wave over radial artery while the forearm is occluded by above the recording site. From these plethysmographic waves, three indexes and their changes -between control and maximal response post-occlusion- were calculated. 33 complete records obtained from healthy low-risk volunteers were analyzed. Between control and post-occlusion maximal response, "average percentual change of pulse wave amplitude" were (35±13)%, "stiffness index" did not show significant differences (6,38±0,98 vs 6,38±0,94 and "reflection index" was significant lower (58±15 vs 35±16)%. These results indicate that: 1- cuff occlusion maneuver was effective to cause endothelium-dependent vasodilation, 2-changes of pulse wave amplitude and reflection index could be used as markers of athero-arteriosclerotic damage in the vascular bed, even in sub-clinical conditions.

  15. Peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma-mediated leafy flower symptoms and abnormal vascular bundles development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Te; Huang, Hsin-Mei; Hong, Syuan-Fei; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Yang, Chiao-Yin; Lin, Yen-Yu; Lin, Chan-Pin; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2015-01-01

    The peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma causes virescence symptoms such as phyllody (leafy flower) in infected peanuts. However, the obligate nature of phytoplasma limits the study of host-pathogen interactions, and the detailed anatomy of PnWB-infected plants has yet to be reported. Here, we demonstrate that 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining can be used to track PnWB infection. The DAPI-stained phytoplasma cells were observed in phloem/internal phloem tissues, and changes in vascular bundle morphology, including increasing pith rays and thinner cell walls in the xylem, were found. We also discerned the cell types comprising PnWB in infected sieve tube members. These results suggest that the presence of PnWB in phloem tissue facilitates the transmission of phytoplasma via sap-feeding insect vectors. In addition, PnWB in sieve tube members and changes in vascular bundle morphology might strongly promote the ability of phytoplasmas to assimilate nutrients. These data will help further an understanding of the obligate life cycle and host-pathogen interactions of phytoplasma. PMID:26492318

  16. Long-lasting intestinal bleeding in an old patient with multiple mucosal vascular abnormalities and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia: 3-year pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Coppola, A; De Stefano, V; Tufano, A; Nardone, G; Amoriello, A; Cerbone, A M; Di Minno, G

    2002-09-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was admitted because of persistent melaena. Endoscopic examination showed multiple angiodysplastic lesions, with active bleeding in small and large bowel. Electro-coagulation of some lesions, octreotide, conjugated oestrogens and selective embolization of jejunal vessels did not change transfusion requirements. After 8 month-transfusions, ethinylestradiol + norethisterone in association with octreotide was started, leading to no transfusion over the following 9 months. Bleeding recurred after withdrawing octreotide and substituting ethinylestradiol + norgestrel for the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone combination. Re-introduction of octreotide did not improve bleeding; however, a reduction of transfusion requirement was observed when the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone pill was re-administered. The association of octreotide and of an oestrogen-progesterone combination was helpful in the difficult management of recurrent bleeding in this patient with diffuse gastrointestinal vascular abnormalities and a severe condition predisposing to bleeding. PMID:12270009

  17. Wholemount imaging reveals abnormalities of the aqueous outflow pathway and corneal vascularity in Foxc1 and Bmp4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Kidson, Susan H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the FOXC1/Foxc1 gene in humans and mice and Bmp4 in mice are associated with congenital anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and the development of the aqueous outflow structures throughout the limbus. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of anterior segment abnormalities in mouse models of ASD using a 3-D imaging approach. Holistic imaging information combined with quantitative measurements were carried out on PECAM-1 stained individual components of the aqueous outflow vessels and corneal vasculature of Foxc1(+/-) on the C57BL/6Jx129 and ICR backgrounds, Bmp4(+/-) ICR mice, and wildtype mice from each background. In both wildtype and heterozygotes, singular, bifurcated and plexus forms of Schlemm's canal were noted. Of note, missing portions of the canal were seen in the heterozygous groups but not in wildtype animals. In general, we found the number of collector channels to be reduced in both heterozygotes. Lastly, we found a significant increase in the complexity of the corneal arcades and their penetration into the cornea in heterozygotes as compared with wild types. In conclusion, our 3-D imaging studies have revealed a more complex arrangement of both the aqueous vessels and corneal arcades in Foxc1(+/-) and Bmp4(+/-) heterozygotes, and further advance our understanding of how such abnormalities could impact on IOP and the aetiology of glaucoma. PMID:27068508

  18. Modification, crosslinking and reactive electrospinning of a thermoplastic medical polyurethane for vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Theron, J P; Knoetze, J H; Sanderson, R D; Hunter, R; Mequanint, K; Franz, T; Zilla, P; Bezuidenhout, D

    2010-07-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes are used in a variety of medical devices and experimental tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite advances in polymer composition to improve their stability, the correct balance between chemical and mechanical properties is not always achieved. A model compound (MC) simulating the structure of a widely used medical polyurethane (Pellethane) was synthesized and reacted with aliphatic and olefinic acyl chlorides to study the reaction site and conditions. After adopting the conditions to the olefinic modification of Pellethane, processing into flat sheets, and crosslinking by thermal initiation or ultraviolet radiation, mechanical properties were determined. The modified polyurethane was additionally electrospun under ultraviolet light to produce a crosslinked tubular vascular graft prototype. Model compound studies showed reaction at the carbamide nitrogen, and the modification of Pellethane with pentenoyl chloride could be accurately controlled to up to 20% (correlation: rho=0.99). Successful crosslinking was confirmed by insolubility of the materials. Initiator concentrations were optimized and the crosslink densities shown to increase with increasing modification. Crosslinking of Pellethane containing an increasing number of pentenoyl groups resulted in decreases (up to 42%, p<0.01) in the hysteresis and 44% in creep (p<0.05), and in a significant improvement in degradation resistance in vitro. Modified Pellethane was successfully electrospun into tubular grafts and crosslinked using UV irradiation during and after spinning to render them insoluble. Prototype grafts had sufficient burst pressure (>550 mm Hg), and compliances of 12.1+/-0.8 and 6.2+/-0.3%/100 mm Hg for uncrosslinked and crosslinked samples, respectively. It is concluded that the viscoelastic properties of a standard thermoplastic polyurethane can be improved by modification and subsequent crosslinking, and that the modified material may be electrospun and initiated to yield

  19. The effect of ageing on fMRI: Correction for the confounding effects of vascular reactivity evaluated by joint fMRI and MEG in 335 adults

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N. A.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Davis, Simon W.; Shafto, Meredith A.; Taylor, Jason R.; Williams, Nitin; Cam‐CAN; Rowe, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research one is typically interested in neural activity. However, the blood‐oxygenation level‐dependent (BOLD) signal is a composite of both neural and vascular activity. As factors such as age or medication may alter vascular function, it is essential to account for changes in neurovascular coupling when investigating neurocognitive functioning with fMRI. The resting‐state fluctuation amplitude (RSFA) in the fMRI signal (rsfMRI) has been proposed as an index of vascular reactivity. The RSFA compares favourably with other techniques such as breath‐hold and hypercapnia, but the latter are more difficult to perform in some populations, such as older adults. The RSFA is therefore a candidate for use in adjusting for age‐related changes in vascular reactivity in fMRI studies. The use of RSFA is predicated on its sensitivity to vascular rather than neural factors; however, the extent to which each of these factors contributes to RSFA remains to be characterized. The present work addressed these issues by comparing RSFA (i.e., rsfMRI variability) to proxy measures of (i) cardiovascular function in terms of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) and (ii) neural activity in terms of resting state magnetoencephalography (rsMEG). We derived summary scores of RSFA, a sensorimotor task BOLD activation, cardiovascular function and rsMEG variability for 335 healthy older adults in the population‐based Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience cohort (Cam‐CAN; www.cam-can.com). Mediation analysis revealed that the effects of ageing on RSFA were significantly mediated by vascular factors, but importantly not by the variability in neuronal activity. Furthermore, the converse effects of ageing on the rsMEG variability were not mediated by vascular factors. We then examined the effect of RSFA scaling of task‐based BOLD in the sensorimotor task. The scaling analysis revealed that much of the effects

  20. Nitrosylated Hemoglobin Levels in Human Venous Erythrocytes Correlate with Vascular Endothelial Function Measured by Digital Reactive Hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Lobysheva, Irina I.; Biller, Pauline; Gallez, Bernard; Beauloye, Christophe; Balligand, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO)–dependent endothelial function is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that erythrocyte levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin (HbNO-heme) may reflect vascular endothelial function in vivo. We developed a modified subtraction method using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to identify the 5-coordinate α-HbNO (HbNO) concentration in human erythrocytes and examined its correlation with endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Changes in digital pulse amplitude were measured by PAT during reactive hyperemia following brachial arterial occlusion in a group of healthy volunteers (50 subjects). Erythrocyte HbNO levels were measured at baseline and at the peak of hyperemia. We digitally subtracted an individual model EPR signal of erythrocyte free radicals from the whole EPR spectrum to unmask and quantitate the HbNO EPR signals. Results Mean erythrocyte HbNO concentration at baseline was 219+/−12 nmol/L (n = 50). HbNO levels and reactive hyperemia (RH) indexes were higher in female (free of contraceptive pills) than male subjects. We observed a dynamic increase of HbNO levels in erythrocytes isolated at 1–2 min of post-occlusion hyperemia (120+/−8% of basal levels); post-occlusion HbNO levels were correlated with basal levels. Both basal and post-occlusion HbNO levels were significantly correlated with reactive hyperemia (RH) indexes (r = 0.58; P<0.0001 for basal HbNO). Conclusion The study demonstrates quantitative measurements of 5-coordinate α-HbNO in human venous erythrocytes, its dynamic physiologic regulation and correlation with endothelial function measured by tonometry during hyperemia. This opens the way to further understanding of in vivo determinants of NO bioavailability in human circulation. PMID:24130774

  1. A chronic scheme of cranial window preparation to study pial vascular reactivity in murine cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Peng Kai; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The acute implantation of a cranial window for studying cerebroarteriolar reactivity in living animals involves a highly surgically-invasive craniotomy procedure at the time of experimentation, which limits its application in severely ill animals such as in the experimental murine model of cerebral malaria (ECM). To overcome this problem, a chronic window implantation scheme was designed and implemented. Methods A partial craniotomy is first performed by creating a skull bone flap in the healthy mice, which are then left to recover for 1–2 weeks, followed by infection to induce ECM. Uninfected animals are utilized as control. When cranial superfusion is needed, the bone flap is retracted and window implantation completed by assembling a perfusion chamber for compound delivery to the exposed brain surface. The presurgical step is intended to minimize surgical trauma on the day of experimentation. Results Chronic preparations in uninfected mice exhibited remarkably improved stability over acute ones by significantly reducing periarteriolar tissue damage and enhancing cerebroarteriolar dilator responses. The chronic scheme was successfully implemented in ECM mice which unveiled novel preliminary insights on impaired cerebroarteriolar reactivity and eNOS dysfunction. Conclusion The chronic scheme presents an innovative approach for advancing our mechanistic understanding on cerebrovascular dysfunction in ECM. PMID:23279271

  2. Vascular reactivity in the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat. Effect of antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Soltis, E E; Bohr, D F

    1987-05-01

    This study investigated vascular responsiveness in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and the effect of antihypertensive treatment on this responsiveness. Weanling (4-week-old) male and female SHRSP and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) received either the antihypertensive combination treatment of hydralazine plus hydrochlorothiazide in drinking water or tap water alone (controls) for 15 weeks. Whereas the antihypertensive combination prevented the development of hypertension in treated SHRSP (SHRSP-T), blood pressure remained unchanged in treated WKY (WKY-T). Femoral arterial smooth muscle responsiveness to KCl, norepinephrine, and calcium (in the presence of either 40 mM KCl or 1 microM norepinephrine) was not altered in SHRSP when compared with WKY. A significant increase in the sensitivity of femoral arteries to KCl and calcium (in the presence of 40 mM KCl) was seen, however, in SHRSP-T and WKY-T. An increased sensitivity to norepinephrine and calcium (in the presence of 1 microM norepinephrine) was seen only in SHRSP-T. Isoproterenol-induced relaxation was significantly attenuated in both SHRSP and SHRSP-T. Relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside and calcium (membrane stabilization) was not different between the four groups. These results show that femoral arterial smooth muscle responsiveness to vasoconstrictor stimuli is not altered in SHRSP but that beta-adrenergic-mediated relaxation is attenuated. Antihypertensive treatment resulted in an enhanced responsiveness to these vasoconstrictor stimuli but had no effect on the relaxation properties of femoral arterial smooth muscle. PMID:3570424

  3. Lead-induced hypertension is not associated with altered vascular reactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R E; Smith, J R; Ding, Y; Oveisi, F; Vaziri, N D; Gonick, H C

    1997-09-01

    In confirmation of a previous study (Am J Hypertens 1993;6:723), mean arterial blood pressure (MBP), as determined by tail cuff plethysmography, was found to be significantly elevated in Sprague-Dawley rats after 3 months of feeding 0.48 mmol/L (100 ppm) lead acetate/day (144 +/- 3.3 [SEM], in lead-treated [L] v 107 +/- 3.3 mm Hg in controls [C], P < .001). Thoracic aorta was excised from L and C animals (n = 6). Segments were suspended in tissue baths with Krebs' bicarbonate solution, then tested sequentially for vasoreactivity to 68 mmol/L K+, followed by graded concentrations of phenylephrine (PE), 0.01 to 0.3 micromol/L, acetylcholine (Ach), 0.001 to 3 micromol/L, nitroprusside (SNP), 0.0001 to 0.1 micromol/L, norepinephrine (NE), 0.001 to 300 micromol/L. There were no differences between L and C animals with respect to either vasoconstrictors (PE and NE) or vasodilators (Ach and SNP). The tissue levels of cGMP measured with and without phosphodiesterase inhibition, and in the absence and presence of either Ach or SNP, were comparable in the two groups. We conclude that the intrinsic vascular responsiveness is unchanged in lead-treated animals. The elevation of MBP is due to the presence of circulating factor(s) and hemodynamic changes. PMID:9324105

  4. Potassium channel antagonists and vascular reactivity in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kolias, T J; Chai, S; Webb, R C

    1993-06-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize differences in contractile responsiveness to several potassium channel antagonists in vascular smooth muscle from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and Wistar-Kyoto normotensive rats (WKY). Helically-cut strips of carotid arteries (endothelium removed) from SHRSP and WKY were mounted in muscle baths for measurement of isometric force generation. Contractile responses to tetraethylammonium (10(-4) to 3 x 10(-2) mol/L) and barium (3 x 10(-5) mol/L), blockers of the voltage-dependent and large conductance, calcium activated potassium channels, were greater in carotid arteries from SHRSP than in those from WKY. In contrast, contractile responses to the voltage-dependent potassium channel blockers 3,4-diamino-pyridine (10(-6) to 3 x 10(-3) mol/L) and sparteine (10(-6) to 3 x 10(-2) mol/L) in arteries from SHRSP did not differ from WKY values. Carotid arteries from SHRSP and WKY did not contract to apamin (10(-9) to 10(-6) mol/L), an antagonist of the small conductance, calcium activated potassium channel. Furthermore, relaxation responses to diazoxide (3 x 10(-4) mol/L), an activator of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and subsequent contractions to the ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker glyburide (10(-8) to 3 x 10(-6) mol/L) in arteries from SHRSP did not differ from WKY values. Carotid artery segments from SHRSP were more sensitive to the contractile effects of elevated potassium than those from WKY. We conclude that altered activity of the large conductance, calcium activated potassium channel may play a role in the increased responsiveness observed in arteries from SHRSP. PMID:8343237

  5. Central role of endogenous Toll-like receptor-2 activation in regulating inflammation, reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent neointimal formation after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Tetsuro . E-mail: Tetsuro_Shishido@URMC.Rochester.edu; Nozaki, Naoki; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yo; Abe, Jun-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2006-07-14

    Background: It is now evident that inflammation after vascular injury has significant impact on the restenosis after revascularization procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass grafting. However, the mechanisms that regulate inflammation and repair after vascular injury are incompletely understood. Here, we report that vascular injury-mediated cytokine expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as subsequent neointimal formation requires Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway in vivo. Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by cuff-placement around the femoral artery in non-transgenic littermates (NLC) and TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2KO) mice. After cuff-placement in NLC mice, expression of TLR-2 was significantly increased in both smooth muscle medial layer and adventitia. Interestingly, we found that inflammatory genes expression such as tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were markedly decreased in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. In addition, ROS production after vascular injury was attenuated in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. Since we observed the significant role of endogenous TLR-2 activation in regulating inflammatory responses and ROS production after vascular injury, we determined whether inhibition of endogenous TLR-2 activation can inhibit neointimal proliferation after vascular injury. Neointimal hyperplasia was markedly suppressed in TLR-2KO mice compared with WT mice at both 2 and 4 weeks after vascular injury. Conclusions: These findings suggested that endogenous TLR-2 activation might play a central role in the regulation of vascular inflammation as well as subsequent neointimal formation in injured vessels.

  6. Effects of Chronic Swimming Training and Oestrogen Therapy on Coronary Vascular Reactivity and Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, Erick R. G.; Endlich, Patrick W.; Santos, Roger L.; Moysés, Margareth R.; Bissoli, Nazaré S.; Gouvêa, Sônia A.; Silva, Josiane F.; Lemos, Virginia S.; Abreu, Glaucia R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of swimming training (SW) and oestrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on coronary vascular reactivity and the expression of antioxidant enzymes in ovariectomized rats. Animals were randomly assigned to one of five groups: sham (SH), ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized with E2 (OE2), ovariectomized with exercise (OSW), and ovariectomized with E2 plus exercise (OE2+SW). The SW protocol (5×/week, 60 min/day) and/or ERT were conducted for 8 weeks; the vasodilator response to bradykinin was analysed (Langendorff Method), and the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1 and 2, catalase) and eNOS and iNOS were evaluated by Western blotting. SW and ERT improved the vasodilator response to the highest dose of bradykinin (1000 ng). However, in the OSW group, this response was improved at 100, 300 and 1000 ng when compared to OVX (p<0,05). The SOD-1 expression was increased in all treated/trained groups compared to the OVX group (p<0,05), and catalase expression increased in the OSW group only. In the trained group, eNOS increased vs. OE2, and iNOS decreased vs. SHAM (p<0,05). SW may represent an alternative to ERT by improving coronary vasodilation, most likely by increasing antioxidant enzyme and eNOS expression and augmenting NO bioavailability. PMID:23755145

  7. Determination of Vascular Reactivity of Middle Cerebral Arteries from Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury Animal Models Using Pressure Myography.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohammad A; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Stroke and other neurovascular derangements are main causes of global death. They, along with spinal cord injuries, are responsible for being the principal cause of disability due to neurological and cognitive problems. These problems then lead to a burden on scarce financial resources and societal care facilities as well as have a profound effect on patients' families. The mechanism of action in these debilitating diseases is complex and unclear. An important component of these problems arises from derangement of blood vessels, such as blockage due to clotting/embolism, endothelial dysfunction, and overreactivity to contractile agents, as well as alteration in endothelial permeability. Moreover, the cerebro-vasculature (large vessels and arterioles) is involved in regulating blood flow by facilitating auto-regulatory processes. Moreover, the anterior (middle cerebral artery and the surrounding region) and posterior (basilar artery and its immediate locality) regions of the brain play a significant role in triggering the pathological progression of ischemic stroke particularly due to inflammatory activity and oxidative stress. Interestingly, modifiable and non-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are responsible for driving ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and spinal cord injury. There are different stroke animal models to examine the pathophysiology of middle cerebral and basilar arteries. In this context, arterial myography offers an opportunity to determine the etiology of vascular dysfunction in these diseases. Herein, we describe the technique of pressure myography to examine the reactivity of cerebral vessels to contractile and vasodilator agents and a prelude to stroke and spinal cord injury. PMID:27604741

  8. 2 minute non-invasive screening for cardio-vascular diseases: relative limitation of C-Reactive Protein compared with more sensitive L-Homocystine as cardio-vascular risk factors; safe and effective treatment using the selective drug uptake enhancement method.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2003-01-01

    Contrary to the present practice of measurement of cardio-vascular risk factors or inflammatory risk factors such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP) from a blood sample from the vein of one arm, by using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Resonance Phenomena between 2 identical substances, one can non-invasively detect the approximate location on the body of abnormally increased risk factors in just 2 minutes, by detecting the resonance with L-Homocystine, even when blood CRP failed to detect any abnormality. This is performed by projecting a 0.5 to approximately 5mW red spectral laser beam with 560-670nm wavelength, to at least 6 standard parts of the body, when one of the control risk markers placed next to the laser beam also exists in the part of the body tested. It is generally believed that CRP is increased in the presence of acute myocardial infarct, chronic rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, metabolic abnormalities such as often detected in diabetes, inflammation and underlying infection of the cardio-vascular system, and in some cancers. However, in our study, when the clinical significance of CRP and L-Homocystine was compared, we found that CRP often was not increased when there was extensive infection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis as well as asymptomatic infection by Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus Type I, Human Herpes Virus Type 6, Borrelia Burgdorferi, or Chlamydia Trachomatis in the heart (and other parts of the body), particularly when there was liver cell dysfunction such as an increase in ALT. In contrast, L-Homocystine was often increased in the presence of localized infections of the heart and other parts of the body. For screening of Cardio-Vascular diseases by this method, 0.5mg of L-Homocystine as a control marker was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, compared with most effective amount of CRP, 0.5ng, for detecting early Cardio-Vascular problems due to various localized infections. About 0.5ng of cardiac Troponin T and cardiac

  9. Increased Lung Expression of Anti-Angiogenic Factors in Down Syndrome: Potential Role in Abnormal Lung Vascular Growth and the Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Galambos, Csaba; Minic, Angela D.; Bush, Douglas; Nguyen, Dominique; Dodson, Blair; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Infants with Down syndrome (DS) or Trisomy 21, are at high risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but mechanisms that increase susceptibility are poorly understood. Laboratory studies have shown that early disruption of angiogenesis during development impairs vascular and alveolar growth and causes PAH. Human chromosome 21 encodes known anti-angiogenic factors, including collagen18a1 (endostatin, ES), ß-amyloid peptide (BAP) and Down Syndrome Critical Region 1 (DSCR-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that fetal lungs from subjects with DS are characterized by early over-expression of anti-angiogenic factors and have abnormal lung vascular growth in utero. Methods Human fetal lung tissue from DS and non-DS subjects were obtained from a biorepository. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to assay 84 angiogenesis-associated genes and individual qRT-PCR was performed for ES, amyloid protein precursor (APP) and DSCR1. Western blot analysis (WBA) was used to assay lung ES, APP and DSCR-1 protein contents. Lung vessel density and wall thickness were determined by morphometric analysis. Results The angiogenesis array identified up-regulation of three anti-angiogenic genes: COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3 (tumstatin) and TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 3) in DS lungs. Single qRT-PCR and WBA showed striking elevations of ES and APP mRNA (p = 0.022 and p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.040 and p = 0.002; respectively). Vessel density was reduced (p = 0.041) and vessel wall thickness was increased in DS lung tissue (p = 0.033) when compared to non-DS subjects. Conclusions We conclude that lung anti-angiogenic factors, including COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3, TIMP3 and APP are over-expressed and fetal lung vessel growth is decreased in subjects with DS. We speculate that increased fetal lung anti-angiogenic factor expression due to trisomy 21 impairs lung vascular growth and signaling, which impairs alveolarization and

  10. Modification of the liver fatty acids by Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (Malvaceae) infusion, its possible effect on vascular reactivity in a metabolic syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Israel; Zúñiga Muñoz, Alejandra; Beltrán-Rodríguez, Ulises; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Guarner Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (HSL)-fed infusion on the fatty acid (FA) profile in liver of metabolic syndrome (MS) rats and its possible effect on vascular reactivity. Body mass, intra-abdominal fat, triglycerides, insulin, blood pressure, saturated, monounsaturated FA, NEFAs, Δ(9)-, Δ(6)-desaturases and vasoconstriction were increased, while vasorelaxation, polyunsaturated FA, endothelial nitric oxide and [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] ratio decreased in MS versus Control, but HSL infusion modified it and increased Δ(5)-desaturase. The results suggest that the alteration in FA liver metabolism in the MS contributes to impaired vascular reactivity, but treatment with of HSL infusion can improve this condition. PMID:23734849

  11. Blood flow and vascular reactivity during attacks of classic migraine--limitations of the Xe-133 intraarterial technique

    SciTech Connect

    Skyhoj Olsen, T.; Lassen, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The present study reports cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in 11 patients during attacks of classic migraine (CM)--migraine with aura. In 6 and 7 patients, respectively, cerebral vascular reactivity to increased blood pressure and to hypocapnia was also investigated during the CM attacks. The Xenon-133 intraarterial injection technique was used to measure CBF. In this study, based in part on previously published data, methodological limitations, in particular caused by scattered radiation (Compton scatter), are critically analysed. Based on this analysis and the results of the CBF studies it is concluded: During CM attacks CBF appears to decrease focally in the posterior part of the brain to a level around 20 ml/100 g/min which is consistent with a mild degree of ischemia. Changes of CBF in focal low flow areas are difficult to evaluate accurately with the Xe-133 technique. In most cases true CBF may change 50% or more in the low flow areas without giving rise to significantly measurable changes of CBF. This analysis suggests that the autoregulation response cannot be evaluated in the low flow areas with the technique used while the observations are compatible with the concept that a vasoconstrictive state, unresponsive to hypocapnia, prevails in the low flow areas during CM attacks. The gradual increase in size of the low flow area seen in several cases may be interpreted in two different ways. A spreading process may actually exist. However, due to Compton scatter, a gradual decrease of CBF in a territory that does not increase in size will also appear as a gradually spreading low flow area when studied with the Xe-133 intracarotid technique.

  12. Role of the α-adrenergic system in femoral vascular reactivity in neonatal llamas and sheep: a comparative study between highland and lowland species

    PubMed Central

    Moraga, Fernando A.; Reyes, Roberto V.; Herrera, Emilio A.; Riquelme, Raquel A.; Ebensperger, Germán; Pulgar, Víctor M.; Parer, Julian T.; Giussani, Dino A.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative approach at the whole animal, isolated vessels, and molecular levels, we tested the hypothesis that the llama, a species that undergoes pregnancy under the influence of the chronic hypoxia of high altitude, delivers offspring with an increased α-adrenergic peripheral vascular reactivity compared with neonates from lowland species. We studied the femoral vascular response to acute hypoxia in vivo, the reactivity of femoral vessels ex vivo, and the expression of femoral α1-adrenergic receptor subtypes using RT-PCR in vitro. The increase in femoral resistance during hypoxia was 3.6 times greater in newborn llamas than newborn sheep (P < 0.05). The sensitivity of the contractile response to noradrenaline (pD2 = 5.18 ± 0.06 vs. 4.84 ± 0.05, P < 0.05) and the maximal response (Rmax = 101.3 ± 1.4 vs. 52.4 ± 1.4% K+max, P < 0.05) and sensitivity (pD2 = 5.47 ± 0.03 vs. 4.57 ± 0.05, P < 0.05) to phenylephrine were higher in femoral vessels from newborn llamas than newborn sheep. Competitive inhibition with prazosin of noradrenaline-induced contraction followed by Schild analysis showed higher affinity in the llama than the sheep (pA2 = 10.08 ± 0.093 vs. 8.98 ± 0.263, respectively, P < 0.05), consistent with greater α1B-adrenergic receptor transcript expression observed in small femoral arteries from neonatal llama. The llama newborn demonstrates significantly greater α-adrenergic peripheral vascular reactivity compared with neonates from lowland species that could be partially explained by preferential expression of α1B-adrenergic receptor subtype. PMID:21795632

  13. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  14. Association of SNPs on Chromosome 9p21.3 with Platelet Reactivity: A Potential Mechanism for Increased Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Musunuru, Kiran; Post, Wendy S.; Herzog, William; Shen, Haiqing; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Gibson, Quince; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Clearfield, Elizabeth; Johnson, Andrew D.; Tofler, Geoffrey; Yang, Qiong; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Becker, Diane M.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Becker, Lewis C.; Faraday, Nauder; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified a locus on chromosome 9p21.3 to be strongly associated with myocardial infarction/coronary artery disease (MI/CAD) and ischemic stroke. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying these associations, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this region would be associated with platelet reactivity across multiple populations. Methods and Results Subjects in the initial population included 1,402 asymptomatic Amish adults in whom we measured platelet reactivity (n=788) and/or coronary artery calcification (CAC) (n=939). Platelet reactivity on agonist stimulation was measured by impedence aggregometry, and CAC by electron beam computed tomography. Twenty-nine SNPs at the 9p21.3 locus were genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K array. Twelve correlated SNPs in the locus were significantly associated with platelet reactivity (all p ≤ 0.001). The SNP most strongly associated with platelet reactivity, rs10965219 (p = 0.0002) was also associated with CAC (p = 0.002), along with 9 other SNPs (all p < 0.004). Association of rs10965219 with platelet reactivity persisted after adjustment for CAC, a measure of underlying atherosclerotic burden known to affect platelet reactivity. We then tested rs10965219 for association with platelet function in 2,364 subjects from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and 1,169 subjects from the GeneSTAR Study. The rs10965219 G allele (frequency ~ 51% across all three populations) was significantly associated with higher platelet reactivity in FHS (p = 0.001) and trended toward higher reactivity in GeneSTAR (p = 0.087); the combined p-value for meta-analysis was 0.0002. Conclusions These results suggest that risk alleles at 9p21.3 locus may have pleiotropic effects on MI/CAD and stroke risk, possibly through their influence on platelet reactivity. PMID:20858905

  15. Expansion Duroplasty Improves Intraspinal Pressure, Spinal Cord Perfusion Pressure, and Vascular Pressure Reactivity Index in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C.; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone. PMID:25705999

  16. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Lima, V.V.; Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P.; Webb, R.C.; Tostes, R.C.; Giachini, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca2+/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction. PMID:25140811

  17. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain.

    PubMed

    Lima, V V; Lobato, N S; Filgueira, F P; Webb, R C; Tostes, R C; Giachini, F R

    2014-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2 ± 2 vs 7.9 ± 1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4 ± 2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3 ± 2 vs 7.5 ± 2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1 ± 2 vs 7.4 ± 2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca(2+)/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction. PMID:25140811

  18. Endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptors regulate deoxycorticosterone/salt-mediated cardiac remodeling and vascular reactivity but not blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Amanda J; Morgan, James; Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Miller, Alyson A; Sobey, Christopher G; Young, Morag J

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have identified novel pathological roles for mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in specific cell types in cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which MR promotes inflammation and fibrosis involve multiple cell-specific events. To identify the role of MR in endothelial cells (EC-MR), the current study explored the vascular responses to aldosterone in wild-type (WT) and EC-null mice (EC-MRKO). Nitric oxide function was impaired in the thoracic aorta and mesenteric arteries of aldosterone-treated WT mice. Although endothelial nitric oxide function was equivalently impaired in the mesenteric arteries of aldosterone-treated EC-MRKO mice, endothelial function was unaffected in the aorta, suggesting a differential role for EC-MR depending on the vascular bed. Second, the contribution of EC-MR to cardiovascular inflammation, fibrosis, and hypertension was determined in WT and EC-MRKO treated with deoxycorticosterone/salt for 8 days or 8 weeks. At 8 days, loss of EC-MR prevented macrophage infiltration and the expression of proinflammatory genes in the myocardium. Increased cardiac fibrosis was not detected in either genotype at this time, mRNA levels of profibrotic genes were significantly lower in EC-MRKO mice versus WT. At 8 weeks, deoxycorticosterone/salt treatment increased macrophage recruitment and proinflammatory gene expression in WT but not in EC-MRKO. Collagen deposition and connective tissue growth factor expression were significantly reduced in EC-MRKO versus WT. Interestingly, systolic blood pressure was equivalently elevated in deoxycorticosterone/salt treated WT and EC-MRKO. Our data demonstrate that (1) EC-MR signaling contributes to vascular nitric oxide function in large conduit arteries but not in resistance vessels and (2) an independent role for EC-MR in the inflammatory and profibrotic response to deoxycorticosterone/salt. PMID:24566081

  19. Mast cells contribute to altered vascular reactivity and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cerium oxide nanoparticle instillation

    PubMed Central

    WINGARD, CHRISTOPHER J.; WALTERS, DIANNE M.; CATHEY, BROOK L.; HILDERBRAND, SUSANA C.; KATWA, PRANITA; LIN, SIJIE; KE, PU CHUN; PODILA, RAMAKRISHNA; RAO, APPARAO; LUST, ROBERT M.; BROWN, JARED M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) represents an important nanomaterial with wide ranging applications. However, little is known regarding how CeO2 exposure may influence pulmonary or systemic inflammation. Furthermore, how mast cells would influence inflammatory responses to a nanoparticle exposure is unknown. We thus compared pulmonary and cardiovascular responses between C57BL/6 and B6.Cg-KitW-sh mast cell deficient mice following CeO2 nanoparticle instillation. C57BL/6 mice instilled with CeO2 exhibited mild pulmonary inflammation. However, B6.Cg-KitW-sh mice did not display a similar degree of inflammation following CeO2 instillation. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice instilled with CeO2 exhibited altered aortic vascular responses to adenosine and an increase in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury which was absent in B6.Cg-KitW-sh mice. In vitro CeO2 exposure resulted in increased production of PGD2, TNF-α, IL-6 and osteopontin by cultured mast cells. These findings demonstrate that CeO2 nanoparticles activate mast cells contributing to pulmonary inflammation, impairment of vascular relaxation and exacerbation of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:21043986

  20. [Follow-up of cutaneous paradoxical vascular reactions in atopic patients during and after eczema manifestations].

    PubMed

    Heyer, G; Berg, P; Hornstein, O P

    1995-01-01

    In atopic eczema patients the well-known abnormal cutaneous reactivity of the blood vessels (white dermographism, delayed blanch after acetylcholine, paradoxical blanching after nicotinic acid application and diminished erythema after histamine injection) were observed during acute eczematous episodes and later in an exzema-free state in comparison with controls. In this follow-up study the use of different stimuli allowed us to demonstrate abnormal cutaneous vascular reactions in the patients depending on the severity of their atopic eczema. Severely affected patients showed persistence of the paradoxical vascular reactions even in an eczema-free cutaneous state. PMID:7875967

  1. KV7 channels contribute to paracrine, but not metabolic or ischemic, regulation of coronary vascular reactivity in swine.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Fu, Lijuan; Noblet, Jillian N; Casalini, Eli D; Sassoon, Daniel; Berwick, Zachary C; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tune, Johnathan D; Dick, Gregory M

    2016-03-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and voltage-dependent K(+) (KV) channels play key roles in regulating coronary blood flow in response to metabolic, ischemic, and paracrine stimuli. The KV channels responsible have not been identified, but KV7 channels are possible candidates. Existing data regarding KV7 channel function in the coronary circulation (limited to ex vivo assessments) are mixed. Thus we examined the hypothesis that KV7 channels are present in cells of the coronary vascular wall and regulate vasodilation in swine. We performed a variety of molecular, biochemical, and functional (in vivo and ex vivo) studies. Coronary arteries expressed KCNQ genes (quantitative PCR) and KV7.4 protein (Western blot). Immunostaining demonstrated KV7.4 expression in conduit and resistance vessels, perhaps most prominently in the endothelial and adventitial layers. Flupirtine, a KV7 opener, relaxed coronary artery rings, and this was attenuated by linopirdine, a KV7 blocker. Endothelial denudation inhibited the flupirtine-induced and linopirdine-sensitive relaxation of coronary artery rings. Moreover, linopirdine diminished bradykinin-induced endothelial-dependent relaxation of coronary artery rings. There was no effect of intracoronary flupirtine or linopirdine on coronary blood flow at the resting heart rate in vivo. Linopirdine had no effect on coronary vasodilation in vivo elicited by ischemia, H2O2, or tachycardia. However, bradykinin increased coronary blood flow in vivo, and this was attenuated by linopirdine. These data indicate that KV7 channels are expressed in some coronary cell type(s) and influence endothelial function. Other physiological functions of coronary vascular KV7 channels remain unclear, but they do appear to contribute to endothelium-dependent responses to paracrine stimuli. PMID:26825518

  2. Mice That Lack Thrombospondin 2 Display Connective Tissue Abnormalities That Are Associated with Disordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis, an Increased Vascular Density, and a Bleeding Diathesis

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakides, Themis R.; Zhu, Yu-Hong; Smith, Lynne T.; Bain, Steven D.; Yang, Zhantao; Lin, Ming T.; Danielson, Keith G.; Iozzo, Renato V.; LaMarca, Mary; McKinney, Cindy E.; Ginns, Edward I.; Bornstein, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) 2, and its close relative TSP1, are extracellular proteins whose functions are complex, poorly understood, and controversial. In an attempt to determine the function of TSP2, we disrupted the Thbs2 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells, and generated TSP2-null mice by blastocyst injection and appropriate breeding of mutant animals. Thbs2−/− mice were produced with the expected Mendelian frequency, appeared overtly normal, and were fertile. However, on closer examination, these mice displayed a wide variety of abnormalities. Collagen fiber patterns in skin were disordered, and abnormally large fibrils with irregular contours were observed by electron microscopy in both skin and tendon. As a functional correlate of these findings, the skin was fragile and had reduced tensile strength, and the tail was unusually flexible. Mutant skin fibroblasts were defective in attachment to a substratum. An increase in total density and in cortical thickness of long bones was documented by histology and quantitative computer tomography. Mutant mice also manifested an abnormal bleeding time, and histologic surveys of mouse tissues, stained with an antibody to von Willebrand factor, showed a significant increase in blood vessels. The basis for the unusual phenotype of the TSP2-null mouse could derive from the structural role that TSP2 might play in collagen fibrillogenesis in skin and tendon. However, it seems likely that some of the diverse manifestations of this genetic disorder result from the ability of TSP2 to modulate the cell surface properties of mesenchymal cells, and thus, to affect cell functions such as adhesion and migration. PMID:9442117

  3. Red yeast rice improves lipid pattern, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and vascular remodeling parameters in moderately hypercholesterolemic Italian subjects.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Derosa, Giuseppe; Parini, Angelo; Maffioli, Pamela; D'Addato, Sergio; Reggi, Alessandra; Giovannini, Marina; Borghi, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Despite a recent health claim by the European Agency on Food Safety, the effect of high doses of dietary monacolin supplements from red yeast rice on cholesterolemia has not been tested in Italian subjects. Our aim via a crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was to test if a short-term treatment with 10 mg monacolins could improve lipid pattern, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and vascular remodeling biomarkers in a small cohort of Mediterranean subjects. Thus, 25 healthy, mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects were enrolled, and after 4 weeks of a stabilization diet, subjects were randomized to the sequence placebo-washout-monacolins or monacolins-washout-placebo, with each period being 4 weeks long. At each study step, a complete lipid pattern, safety parameters, hs-CRP, and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 levels were measured. When compared to the placebo group, monacolins-treated patients experienced a more favorable percent change in total cholesterol (-12.45%, 95% CI -16.19 to -8.71), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-21.99%, 95% CI -26.63 to -17.36), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-14.67%, 95% CI -19.22 to -10.11), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (-28.05%, 95% CI -35.18 to -20.93), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (-27.19%, 95% CI -36.21 to -18.15), and hs-CRP (-23.77%, 95% CI -30.54 to -17.01). No significant differences were observed in regards to triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and safety parameters. On the basis of our data, we demonstrate that a 10-mg monacolin nutraceutical appears to safely reduce cholesterolemia, hs-CRP, and markers of vascular remodeling in Italian subjects. These results have to be confirmed in larger patient samples and longer studies. PMID:23890351

  4. Chronic supplementation of paeonol combined with danshensu for the improvement of vascular reactivity in the cerebral basilar artery of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Li, Ya-Ling; Li, Zi-Lin; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuan-Xuan; Qiu, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Qian; Wang, Si-Wang

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading causes of death in the world is cerebrovascular disease. Numerous Chinese traditional medicines, such as Cortex Moutan (root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrew) and Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge), protect against cerebrovascular diseases and exhibit anti-atherosclerotic effects. Traditional medicines have been routinely used for a long time in China. In addition, these two herbs are prescribed together in clinical practice. Therefore, the pharmacodynamic interactions between the active constituents of these two herbs, which are paeonol (Pae) and danshensu (DSS), should be particularly studied. The study of Pae and DSS can provide substantial foundations in understanding their mechanisms and empirical evidence to support clinical practice. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of the pharmacodynamic interaction between Pae and DSS on cerebrovascular malfunctioning in diabetes. Experimental diabetes was induced in rats, which was then treated with Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS for eight weeks. Afterward, cerebral arteries from all groups were isolated and equilibrated in an organ bath with Krebs buffer and ring tension. Effects of Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS were observed on vessel relaxation with or without endothelium as well as on the basal tonus of vessels from normal and diabetic rats. Indexes about oxidative stress were also determined. We report that the cerebral arteries from diabetic rats show decreased vascular reactivity to acetylcholine (ACh) which was corrected in Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS treated groups. Furthermore, phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction response decreased in the treated groups. Phenylephrine and CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstrictions are partially inhibited in the three treated groups under Ca2+-free medium. Pre-incubated with tetraethylammonium, a non-selective K+ channel blocker, the antagonized relaxation responses increased in DSS and Pae + DSS treated diabetic

  5. Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss and Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus Associated with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Based Review and Analysis of Relationship between Intracranial Vascular Abnormalities and Inner Ear Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cassandro, Ettore; Cassandro, Claudia; Sequino, Giuliano; Scarpa, Alfonso; Petrolo, Claudio; Chiarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    While pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are not rarely associated, the finding of a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in this clinical picture is unusual. Starting from a case of CHL and PT, diagnosed to be due to a DAVF, we analyzed relationship between intracranial vascular abnormalities and inner ear fluids. DAVF was treated with endovascular embolization. Following this, there was a dramatic recovery of PT and of CHL, confirming their cause-effect link with DAVF. We critically evaluated the papers reporting this association. This is the first case of CHL associated with PT and DAVF. We describe the most significant experiences and theories reported in literature, with a personal analysis about the possible relationship between vascular intracranial system and labyrinthine fluids. In conclusion, we believe that this association may be a challenge for otolaryngologists. So we suggest to consider the possibility of a DAVF or other AVMs when PT is associated with CHL, without alterations of tympanic membrane and middle ear tests. PMID:26693371

  6. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  7. Hyperbaric oxygenation modulates vascular reactivity to angiotensin-(1-7) in diabetic rats: potential role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Kibel, Aleksandar; Novak, Sanja; Cosic, Anita; Mihaljevic, Zrinka; Falck, John R; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a facilitating effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO₂) on aortic ring responses to angiotensin-(1-7) in healthy rats was reported, with epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) possibly playing an important role. The aim of this study was to assess whether HBO₂ exerts similar effects in diabetic rats and to further explore the role of specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in changes induced by HBO₂. Aortic relaxation to angiotensin-(1-7) was significantly higher in HBO₂ diabetic rats compared to control diabetic rats, while HBO₂ had no effect on angiotensin II contraction. N-methylsulphonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl/hexanamide inhibited the facilitation of angiotensin-(1-7) responses in HBO₂ rats, suggesting an important role of EETs in this modulation. mRNA expression of CYP2J3 and protein expression of CYP2C11 were significantly upregulated in HBO₂ diabetic rats, whereas CYP4A1, CYP4A2 and CYP4A3 mRNA and CYP2J3 protein expression was similar between groups. Mean arterial pressure, ferric reducing ability of plasma and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances levels and serum angiotensin-(1-7) concentrations were not significantly changed. PMID:25326234

  8. Atorvastatin reduces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) via inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Bing; Yuan, Jiayi; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jingjie; An, Yu; Tie, Lu; Pan, Yan; Li, Xuejun

    2012-02-01

    The high metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) is closely correlated with the elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and resultant tumor angiogenesis. However, no effective strategies against VEGF expression have been available in NSCLCs therapy. This study demonstrated that elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels derived from both mitochondria and NADPH oxidase were required for VEGF expression in NSCLC cells. Atorvastatin administration could significantly inhibit VEGF expression both in vitro and in vivo via inhibition of ROS production. Atorvastatin inhibited ROS generation partly through suppression of Rac1/NADPH oxidase activity. Specifically, atorvastatin could upregulate the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase, which are responsible for elimination of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. Thus, inhibition of ROS production by concomitant suppression of Rac1/NADPH oxidase activity and upregulation of the activity of GPx and catalase contributes critically to atorvastatin-reduced VEGF expression in NSCLCs. Atorvastatin may be a potential alternative against VEGF expression and angiogenesis in NSCLCs therapy. PMID:22153388

  9. Resveratrol regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species homeostasis through Sirt3 signaling pathway in human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X; Chen, M; Zeng, X; Yang, J; Deng, H; Yi, L; Mi, M-t

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) homeostasis plays an essential role in preventing oxidative injury in endothelial cells, an initial step in atherogenesis. Resveratrol (RSV) possesses a variety of cardioprotective activities, however, little is known regarding the effects of RSV on mtROS homeostasis in endothelial cells. Sirt3 is a mitochondrial deacetylase, which plays a key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics and is closely associated with oxidative stress. The goal of the study is to investigate whether RSV could attenuate oxidative injury in endothelial cells via mtROS homeostasis regulation through Sirt3 signaling pathway. We found that pretreatment with RSV suppressed tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by increasing cell viability, inhibiting cell apoptosis, repressing collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreasing mtROS generation. Moreover, the enzymatic activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) as well as deacetylation of SOD2 were increased by RSV pretreatment, suggesting RSV notably enhanced mtROS scavenging in t-BHP-induced endothelial cells. Meanwhile, RSV remarkably reduced mtROS generation by promoting Sirt3 enrichment within the mitochondria and subsequent upregulation of forkhead box O3A (FoxO3A)-mediated mitochondria-encoded gene expression of ATP6, CO1, Cytb, ND2 and ND5, thereby leading to increased complex I activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, RSV activated the expressions of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and Sirt3, as well as estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα)-dependent Sirt3 mRNA transcription, which were abolished in the presence of AMPK inhibitor and AMPK, PGC-1α or Sirt3 siRNA transfection, indicating the effects of RSV on mt

  10. Blood flow responses to mild-intensity exercise in ectopic vs. orthotopic prostate tumors; dependence upon host tissue hemodynamics and vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Emmanuel; Becker, Veronika G C; McCullough, Danielle J; Stabley, John N; Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Sieman, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Given the critical role of tumor O2 delivery in patient prognosis and the rise in preclinical exercise oncology studies, we investigated tumor and host tissue blood flow at rest and during exercise as well as vascular reactivity using a rat prostate cancer model grown in two transplantation sites. In male COP/CrCrl rats, blood flow (via radiolabeled microspheres) to prostate tumors [R3327-MatLyLu cells injected in the left flank (ectopic) or ventral prostate (orthotopic)] and host tissue was measured at rest and during a bout of mild-intensity exercise. α-Adrenergic vasoconstriction to norepinephrine (NE: 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was determined in arterioles perforating the tumors and host tissue. To determine host tissue exercise hyperemia in healthy tissue, a sham-operated group was included. Blood flow was lower at rest and during exercise in ectopic tumors and host tissue (subcutaneous adipose) vs. the orthotopic tumor and host tissue (prostate). During exercise, blood flow to the ectopic tumor significantly decreased by 25 ± 5% (SE), whereas flow to the orthotopic tumor increased by 181 ± 30%. Maximal vasoconstriction to NE was not different between arterioles from either tumor location. However, there was a significantly higher peak vasoconstriction to NE in subcutaneous adipose arterioles (92 ± 7%) vs. prostate arterioles (55 ± 7%). Establishment of the tumor did not alter host tissue blood flow from either location at rest or during exercise. These data demonstrate that blood flow in tumors is dependent on host tissue hemodynamics and that the location of the tumor may critically affect how exercise impacts the tumor microenvironment and treatment outcomes. PMID:27125846

  11. Binding of EBP50 to Nox organizing subunit p47phox is pivotal to cellular reactive species generation and altered vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Al Ghouleh, Imad; Meijles, Daniel N; Mutchler, Stephanie; Zhang, Qiangmin; Sahoo, Sanghamitra; Gorelova, Anastasia; Henrich Amaral, Jefferson; Rodríguez, Andrés I; Mamonova, Tatyana; Song, Gyun Jee; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A; Cifuentes-Pagano, M Eugenia; Pagano, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous reports implicating NADPH oxidases (Nox) in the pathogenesis of many diseases, precise regulation of this family of professional reactive oxygen species (ROS) producers remains unclear. A unique member of this family, Nox1 oxidase, functions as either a canonical or hybrid system using Nox organizing subunit 1 (NoxO1) or p47(phox), respectively, the latter of which is functional in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this manuscript, we identify critical requirement of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50; aka NHERF1) for Nox1 activation and downstream responses. Superoxide (O2 (•-)) production induced by angiotensin II (AngII) was absent in mouse EBP50 KO VSMC vs. WT. Moreover, ex vivo incubation of aortas with AngII showed a significant increase in O2 (•-) in WT but not EBP50 or Nox1 nulls. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was attenuated in femoral arteries from EBP50 KO vs. WT. In silico analyses confirmed by confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, FRET, and gain-/loss-of-function mutagenesis revealed binding of EBP50, via its PDZ domains, to a specific motif in p47(phox) Functional studies revealed AngII-induced hypertrophy was absent in EBP50 KOs, and in VSMC overexpressing EBP50, Nox1 gene silencing abolished VSMC hypertrophy. Finally, ex vivo measurement of lumen diameter in mouse resistance arteries exhibited attenuated AngII-induced vasoconstriction in EBP50 KO vs. WT. Taken together, our data identify EBP50 as a previously unidentified regulator of Nox1 and support that it promotes Nox1 activity by binding p47(phox) This interaction is pivotal for agonist-induced smooth muscle ROS, hypertrophy, and vasoconstriction and has implications for ROS-mediated physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:27540115

  12. Chronic Treatment with Ang-(1-7) Reverses Abnormal Reactivity in the Corpus Cavernosum and Normalizes Diabetes-Induced Changes in the Protein Levels of ACE, ACE2, ROCK1, ROCK2 and Omega-Hydroxylase in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Mariam H. M.; Makki, Batoul; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z.; Benter, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] may have beneficial effects in diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMIED) but its molecular actions in the diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC) are not known. We characterized the effects of diabetes and/or chronic in vivo administration of Ang-(1-7) on vascular reactivity in the rat corpus cavernosum (CC) and on protein expression levels of potential downstream effectors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, Rho kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2), and omega-hydroxylase, the cytochrome-P450 enzyme that metabolizes arachidonic acid to form the vasoconstrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Streptozotocin-treated rats were chronicically administered Ang-(1-7) with or without A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, during weeks 4 to 6 of diabetes. Ang-(1-7) reversed diabetes-induced abnormal reactivity to vasoactive agents (endothelin-1, phenylepherine, and carbachol) in the CC without correcting hyperglycemia. Six weeks of diabetes led to elevated ACE, ROCK1, ROCK 2, and omega-hydroxylase and a concomitant decrease in ACE2 protein expression levels that were normalized by Ang-(1-7) treatment but not upon coadministration of A779. These data are supportive of the notion that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7) in DMIED involve counterregulation of diabetes-induced changes in ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases, and omega-hydroxylase proteins in the diabetic CC via a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:25309930

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Alkali-Metal-Mediated Magnesiations of an N-Heterocyclic Carbene: Normal, Abnormal, and "Paranormal" Reactivity in a Single Tritopic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Antonio J; Fuentes, M Ángeles; Hernán-Gómez, Alberto; Hevia, Eva; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E; O'Hara, Charles T

    2015-11-16

    Herein the sodium alkylmagnesium amide [Na4Mg2(TMP)6(nBu)2] (TMP=2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide), a template base as its deprotonating action is dictated primarily by its 12 atom ring structure, is studied with the common N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) IPr [1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene]. Remarkably, magnesiation of IPr occurs at the para-position of an aryl substituent, sodiation occurs at the abnormal C4 position, and a dative bond occurs between normal C2 and sodium, all within a 20 atom ring structure accommodating two IPr(2-). Studies with different K/Mg and Na/Mg bimetallic bases led to two other magnesiated NHC structures containing two or three IPr(-) monoanions bound to Mg through abnormal C4 sites. Synergistic in that magnesiation can only work through alkali-metal mediation, these reactions add magnesium to the small cartel of metals capable of directly metalating a NHC. PMID:26417985

  15. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  16. In vitro assessment of mouse fetal abdominal aortic vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Mark R.; Greenwood, Susan L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Wareing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 3–8% of human pregnancies. Mouse models have provided important etiological data on FGR; they permit the assessment of treatment strategies on the physiological function of both mother and her developing offspring. Our study aimed to 1) develop a method to assess vascular function in fetal mice and 2) as a proof of principle ascertain whether a high dose of sildenafil citrate (SC; Viagra) administered to the pregnant dam affected fetal vascular reactivity. We developed a wire myography methodology for evaluation of fetal vascular function in vitro using the placenta-specific insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) knockout mouse (P0; a model of FGR). Vascular function was determined in abdominal aortas isolated from P0 and wild-type (WT) fetuses at embryonic day (E) 18.5 of gestation. A subset of dams received SC 0.8 mg/ml via drinking water from E12.5; data were compared with water-only controls. Using wire myography, we found that fetal aortic rings exhibited significant agonist-induced contraction, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Sex-specific alterations in reactivity were noted in both strains. Maternal treatment with SC significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of fetal aortic rings. Mouse fetal abdominal aortas reproducibly respond to vasoactive agents. Study of these vessels in mouse genetic models of pregnancy complications may 1) help to delineate early signs of abnormal vascular reactivity and 2) inform whether treatments given to the mother during pregnancy may impact upon fetal vascular function. PMID:25056105

  17. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  18. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  19. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  20. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  1. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  2. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  3. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  4. Expression and cell distribution of the intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, and endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) in reactive human lymph nodes and in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Pomponi, D.; Pigott, R.; Gearing, A. J.; Baiocchini, A.; Baroni, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The immunocytochemical expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), endothelial cell adhesion molecule (EndoCAM CD31), and HLA-DR antigens was investigated in sections of 24 reactive lymph nodes and in 15 cases of Hodgkin's disease. ICAM-1 was detected in sinus macrophages, follicular dendritic reticulum cells (FDRCs), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDRCs), epithelioid macrophages, Hodgkin's cells (HCs), and vascular endothelium. ICAM-1 expression was often associated with that of HLA-DR antigens. VCAM-1 was detected in FDRCs, in fibroblast reticulum cells (FRCs), in macrophages, and in rare blood vessels. EndoCAM (CD31) was constitutively expressed in all types of endothelial cells, sinus macrophages, and in epithelioid granulomas. ELAM-1 was selectively expressed by activated endothelial cells of high endothelium venules (HEVs). When expression of the inducible adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was comparatively evaluated in HEVs, it was found that ICAM-1 + HEVs were present in all reactive and HD nodes, whereas ELAM-1 and/or VCAM-1 were expressed only in those pathologic conditions characterized by high levels of interleukin-1/tumor necrosis factor (IL-1/TNF) production, such as granulomatosis and Hodgkin's disease. In Hodgkin's disease, the expression of ELAM-1/VCAM-1 was more pronounced in cases of nodular sclerosis and was associated with a significantly higher content of perivascular neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1605306

  5. Sperm parameter abnormalities, low seminal fructose and reactive oxygen species overproduction do not discriminate patients with unilateral or bilateral post-infectious inflammatory prostato-vesiculo-epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; La Vignera, S; Castiglione, R; Calogero, A E

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that patients with prostato-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE) have the worst sperm output compared to patients with prostato-vesiculitis or prostatitis alone. The present study was undertaken to closely examine whether unilateral or bilateral PVE had a different impact on sperm parameters, seminal fructose levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. To accomplish this, 78 patients with persistent post-infectious inflammatory PVE, clearly identified by scrotal and transrectal ultrasonography, and 30 patients with asymptomatic post-infectious inflammatory prostatitis (control group) underwent semen analysis (including seminal leukocyte concentration and number of spermiophagies), seminal fructose measurement and sperm ROS production from 45 and 90% Percoll fractions. Fifty patients turned out to have PVE bilaterally, whereas the remaining 28 had unilateral PVE. Patients with bilateral PVE had sperm concentration and total sperm number significantly lower than those found in patients with unilateral PVE. The other sperm parameters, the physicochemical properties (hyperviscosity, the presence of nonspecific agglutination, delayed liquefaction), seminal fructose levels and ROS production in both 45 and 90% Percoll fractions turned out similar between the two groups. Patients with bilateral or unilateral PVE had sperm parameters, seminal fructose levels and ROS production significantly worst than those found in patients with prostatitis alone. In conclusion, although patients with bilateral PVE had a decreased number of spermatozoa, the other sperm parameters and seminal fructose levels did not reflect the extension of PVE. Therefore, the diagnosis of unilateral or bilateral involvement of this complicated form of male accessory gland infection relies on scrotal and transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:16553029

  6. Dealing with vascular conundrums with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Angthong, Wirana; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a robust imaging modality for evaluation of vascular diseases. Technological advances have made MR imaging widely available for accurate and time-efficient vascular assessment. In this article the clinical usefulness of MR imaging techniques and their application are reviewed, using examples of vascular abnormalities commonly encountered in clinical practice, including abdominal, pelvic, and thoracic vessels. Common pitfalls and problem solving in interpretation of vascular findings in body MR imaging are also discussed. PMID:24889175

  7. The effect of altered sodium balance upon renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and norepinephrine in the dog. Mechanism of variation in angiotensin responses.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Cannon, P J

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism whereby the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II (AII) is influenced by sodium balance or disease is unclear. To explore this question, the renal vascular responses (RVR) to intrarenal injections of subpressor doses of AII and norepinephrine were studied in dogs with an electromagnetic flowmeter. Acute and chronic sodium depletion increased plasma renin activity (PRA) and blunted the RVR to AII, while acute sodium repletion and chronic sodium excess plus desoxycorticosterone acetate decreased PRA and enhanced the RVR to AII. The magnitude of the RVR to AII was inversely related to PRA. The RVR to norepinephrine was unaffected by sodium balance and was not related to PRA. Inhibition of the conversion of angiotensin I to AII by SQ 20,881 during sodium depletion lowered mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), increased renal blood flow (RBF), and enhanced the RVR to AII but not to norepinephrine. Administration of bradykinin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs also lowered the MABP and increased RBF but had no effect on the RVR to AII. SQ 20,881 had no effect on MABP, RBF, or the RVR to AII in the dogs with chronic sodium excess and desoxycorticosterone acetate. Administration of indomethacin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs lowered RBF but did not influence the RVR to AII. The results indicate that the RVR to AII is selectively influenced by sodium balance and that the magnitude of the response is inversely related to the availability of endogenous AII. The data did not suggest that the variations in the RVR to AII were because of direct effects of sodium on vascular contraction, changes in the number of vascular AII receptors, or the renal prostaglandins. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vasoconstrictor effect of AII in the renal vasculature is primarily dependent upon the degree to which the AII vascular receptors are occupied by endogenous hormone. PMID:641142

  8. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  9. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  10. Vinpocetine suppresses pathological vascular remodeling by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A; Yan, Chen

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  11. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  12. Should we consider gestational diabetes a vascular risk factor?

    PubMed

    Bo, S; Valpreda, S; Menato, G; Bardelli, C; Botto, C; Gambino, R; Rabbia, C; Durazzo, M; Cassader, M; Massobrio, M; Pagano, G

    2007-10-01

    Few and contrasting data have reported vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased serum levels of endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory markers in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM). We aimed at evaluating 6.5 years after delivery: intimal medial thickness (IMT), and C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels in 82 non-pregnant pGDM and 113 control women without pGDM. A subgroup of 21 women, taken from the pGDM group, showing current normal BMI, and no metabolic abnormalities, was separately analysed. All the subjects were free of medication and non-smokers. Women with pGDM, independently by their current BMI and presence of metabolic abnormalities, showed significantly higher E-selectin, ICAM-1 and IMT values than controls. IMT proved to be significantly associated with pGDM in a regression model, after adjustments for BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, and glucose values (beta=0.046; 95% CI 0.028-0.064). In all pGDM women, E-selectin, ICAM-1, IL-6 and hs-CRP values were significantly associated with IMT in the same model. Post-GDM women, despite being currently free from metabolic abnormalities, showed higher values of markers of endothelial dysfunction and IMT than controls, consistent with an increased future cardiovascular risk. PMID:17055515

  13. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  14. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  15. Consumption of a high-fat meal containing cheese compared with a vegan alternative lowers postprandial C-reactive protein in overweight and obese individuals with metabolic abnormalities: a randomised controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Elieke; Van Loan, Marta D; Rivera, Nancy; Rogers, Tara S; Gertz, Erik R; German, J Bruce; Zivkovic, Angela M; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2016-01-01

    Dietary recommendations suggest decreased consumption of SFA to minimise CVD risk; however, not all foods rich in SFA are equivalent. To evaluate the effects of SFA in a dairy food matrix, as Cheddar cheese, v. SFA from a vegan-alternative test meal on postprandial inflammatory markers, a randomised controlled cross-over trial was conducted in twenty overweight or obese adults with metabolic abnormalities. Individuals consumed two isoenergetic high-fat mixed meals separated by a 1- to 2-week washout period. Serum was collected at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 6 h postprandially and analysed for inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, TNFα, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)), acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), cellular adhesion molecules and blood lipids, glucose and insulin. Following both high-fat test meals, postprandial TAG concentrations rose steadily (P < 0·05) without a decrease by 6 h. The incremental AUC (iAUC) for CRP was significantly lower (P < 0·05) in response to the cheese compared with the vegan-alternative test meal. A treatment effect was not observed for any other inflammatory markers; however, for both test meals, multiple markers significantly changed from baseline over the 6 h postprandial period (IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNFα, MCP-1, SAA). Saturated fat in the form of a cheese matrix reduced the iAUC for CRP compared with a vegan-alternative test meal during the postprandial 6 h period. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under NCT01803633. PMID:27313852

  16. Vascular and cognitive functions associated with cardiovascular disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronald A.; Poppas, Athena; Forman, Daniel E.; Hoth, Karin F.; Haley, Andreana P.; Gunstad, John; Jefferson, Angela L.; Tate, David F.; Paul, Robert H.; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Ono, Mokato; Jerskey, Beth A.; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between systemic vascular function, neurocognitive performance, and structural brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among geriatric outpatients with treated, stable cardiovascular disease and no history of neurological illness (n = 88, ages 56–85 years). Vascular function was assessed by cardiac ejection fraction and output, sequential systolic and diastolic blood pressures, flow mediated brachial artery reactivity (BAR), and carotid intima media thickness (IMT). White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI were quantified and examined relative to cognitive and vascular function. Principal component analysis revealed two primary vascular components: one associated with cardiac function, the other with atherosclerotic burden/endothelial dysfunction. Both factors were significantly associated with cognitive function and WMH volume. Reduced systolic variability and increased IMT were most strongly related to reduced attention, executive function, and information-processing speed. These findings suggest the possibility that systemic vascular indices may provide proxy measures of cerebrovascular dysfunction and reinforce the importance of achieving greater understanding of interaction between systemic vascular disease and brain dysfunction among elderly people with cardiovascular disease. PMID:18608677

  17. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  18. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24518820

  19. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. PMID:26178373

  20. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  1. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  2. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  3. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  4. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  5. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  6. Endothelial GRK2 regulates vascular homeostasis through the control of free radical oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Michele; Sorriento, Daniela; Franco, Antonietta; Fusco, Anna; Giudice, Carmine Del; Annunziata, Roberto; Cipolletta, Ersilia; Monti, Maria Gaia; Dorn, Gerald W; Trimarco, Bruno; Iaccarino, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of endothelial GRK2 was investigated in mice with selective deletion of the kinase in the endothelium (Tie2-CRE/GRK2fl/fl). Approach and Results Aortas from Tie2-CRE/GRK2fl/fl presented functional and structural alterations as compared to control GRK2fl/fl mice. In particular, vasoconstriction was blunted to different agonists, and collagen and elastic rearrangement and macrophage infiltration were observed. In primary cultured endothelial cells deficient for GRK2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased, leading to expression of cytokines. Chronic treatment with a ROS scavenger in mice corrected the vascular phenotype by recovering vasoconstriction, structural abnormalities and reducing macrophage infiltration. Conclusions These results demonstrate that GRK2 removal compromises vascular phenotype and integrity by increasing endothelial ROS production. PMID:23950144

  7. Vascular risk levels affect the predictive value of platelet reactivity for the occurrence of MACE in patients on clopidogrel. Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    PubMed

    Reny, Jean-Luc; Fontana, Pierre; Hochholzer, Willibald; Neumann, Franz Josef; Ten Berg, Jurriën; Janssen, Paul W; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Marcucci, Rossella; Gori, Anna-Maria; Cuisset, Thomas; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Berdagué, Philippe; Gurbel, Paul A; Yong, Gerald; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Aradi, Dániel; Beigel, Roy; Campo, Gianluca; Combescure, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Prior studies have shown an association between high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (PR) and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). However, large intervention trials on PR-tailored treatments have been neutral. The role and usefulness of PR with regard to levels of cardiovascular risk are unclear. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data on MACE outcomes (acute coronary syndromes (ACS), ischaemic strokes, and vascular deaths) in relation to PR and its interaction with cardiovascular risk levels. PR was determined using ADP-induced light transmission aggregometry with a primary concentration of 20 µM ADP. Thirteen prospective studies totaled 6,478 clopidogrel-treated patients who experienced 421 MACE (6.5 %) during a median follow-up of 12 months. The strength of the association between the risk of MACE and PR increased significantly (p=0.04) with the number of risk factors present (age> 75 years, ACS at inclusion, diabetes, and hypertension). No association was detected in patients with no risk factor (p=0.48). In patients presenting one risk factor, only high-PR was associated with an increased risk of MACE (HR 3.2, p=0.001). In patients presenting ≥ 2 risk factors, the increase of risk started from medium-PR (medium-PR: HR=2.9, p=0.0004; high-PR: HR=3.7, p=0.0003). PR allowed the reclassification of 44 % of the total population to a different risk level for the outcome of MACE, mostly in intermediate or high risk patients. In conclusion, the magnitude of the association between PR and MACE risk is strongly dependent on the level of cardiovascular risk faced by patients on clopidogrel. PMID:26607655

  8. Characterization of vascular tree architecture using the Tokunaga taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarreta-Valverde, Miguel A.; Zoghbi, Jihan M.; Pereira, Fabricio; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiovascular disease is usually assisted by resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) imaging. The identification of abnormal vascular architecture from angiographic three-dimensional images is therefore crucial to the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Automated detection and quantification of vascular structure and architecture thus holds significant clinical value. In this work, we employ a Lindenmayer system to represent vascular trees from angiographic images and describe a quantitative measure based on the Tokunaga taxonomy to differentiate vascular architectures. Synthetic vessel architectures with varying bifurcation patterns were compared and results showed that this architectural measure is proportional to the level of branching. In real MRA images, this measure was able to differentiate between normal and abnormal intracerebral vasculature containing an aneurysm. Hence, this methodology not only allows for compact representation of vascular architectures but also provides a quantitative metric of bifurcation complexity, which has the potential to characterize different types of vascular abnormalities.

  9. Abnormalities of endothelial function in patients with predialysis renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, J; Landray, M; McGlynn, F; Jones, H; Wheeler, D; Townend, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic renal failure.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between predialysis renal failure and endothelial function.
DESIGN—Two groups were studied: 80 patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure and 26 healthy controls, with similar age and sex distributions. Two indices of endothelial function were assessed: high resolution ultrasonography to measure flow mediated endothelium dependent dilatation of the brachial artery following reactive hyperaemia, and plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor. Endothelium independent dilatation was also assessed following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The patients were divided into those with and without overt atherosclerotic vascular disease.
RESULTS—Although patients with chronic renal failure had significantly impaired endothelium dependent dilatation compared with controls (median (interquartile range), 2.6% (0.7% to 4.8%) v 6.5% (4.8% to 8.3%); p < 0.001) and increased von Willebrand factor (254 (207 to 294) v 106 (87 to 138) iu/dl; p < 0.001), there was no difference between renal failure patients with and without atherosclerotic vascular disease. Within the chronic renal failure group, endothelium dependent dilatation and von Willebrand factor were similar in patients in the upper and lower quartiles of glomerular filtration rate (2.7% (0.7% to 6.7%) v 2.8% (1.1% to 5.0%); and 255 (205 to 291) v 254 (209 to 292) iu/dl, respectively). Endothelium independent dilatation did not differ between the renal failure or control groups and was also similar in patients with renal failure irrespective of the degree of renal failure or the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Endothelial function is abnormal in chronic renal failure, even in patients with mild renal insufficiency and those without

  10. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  11. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  12. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  13. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  14. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin, Superoxide and Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    (6R)-5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an endogenously produced pterin that is found widely distributed in mammalian tissues. BH4 works as a cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. In the vasculature a deficit of BH4 is implicated in the mechanisms of several diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetic vascular disease, and vascular complications from cigarette smoking and environmental pollution. These ill-effects are connected to the ability of BH4 to regulate reactive oxygen species levels in the endothelium. The possibility of using BH4 as a therapeutical agent in cardiovascular medicine is becoming more compelling and many biochemical and physiological aspects involved in this application are currently under investigation. This review summarizes our current understanding of BH4 reactivity and some aspects of cellular production and regulation. PMID:19628033

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola; Somers, Virend A

    2001-01-01

    There is emerging evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to vascular disease, including hypertension. This relationship may be independent of co-morbidity, such as obesity. Even apparently healthy OSA patients have evidence of subtle functional vascular abnormalities that are known to occur in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Untreated OSA may possibly contribute to the initiation and/or progression of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertension, heart failure, cardiac ischemia and stroke. This brief commentary will examine the evidence and mechanisms linking OSA to vascular disease. PMID:11737928

  17. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  18. Oxidative stress induces loss of pericyte coverage and vascular instability in PGC-1α-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Quintans, Nieves; Sánchez-Ramos, Cristina; Prieto, Ignacio; Tierrez, Alberto; Arza, Elvira; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Monsalve, María

    2016-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) is a regulator of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis that is known to be inactivated in diabetic subjects. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of PGC-1α inactivation to the development of oxygen-induced retinopathy. We analyzed retinal vascular development in PGC-1α(-/-) mice. Retinal vasculature of PGC-1α(-/-) mice showed reduced pericyte coverage, a de-structured vascular plexus, and low perfusion. Exposure of PGC-1α(-/-) mice to hyperoxia during retinal vascular development exacerbated these vascular abnormalities, with extensive retinal hemorrhaging and highly unstructured areas as compared with wild-type mice. Structural analysis demonstrated a reduction in membrane-bound VE-cadherin, which was suggestive of defective intercellular junctions. Interestingly, PGC-1α(-/-) retinas showed a constitutive activation of the VEGF-A signaling pathway. This phenotype could be partially reversed by antioxidant administration, indicating that elevated production of ROS in the absence of PGC-1α could be a relevant factor in the alteration of the VEGF-A signaling pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that PGC-1α control of ROS homeostasis plays an important role in the regulation of de novo angiogenesis and is required for vascular stability. PMID:26951478

  19. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  20. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  1. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  2. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  3. A review on the vascular features of the hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, H; Chee, R

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant and the sporadic forms of hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES) are multi-system disorders. Although HIES patients may present with cold abscesses, the vascular features of HIES are not well recognized. The objective of this review is to characterize the nature and spectrum of vascular abnormalities in HIES patients. Vascular abnormalities in HIES patients were reviewed with Medline and Google Scholar-based searches. In brief, the searches combined terms related to HIES with the terms related to vasculature. Furthermore, reference lists from the original studies and review papers identified were screened. There were vascular abnormalities in 25 patients with HIES. These abnormalities were identified as aneurysms (coronary, aortic, carotid and cerebral), pseudoaneurysms, congenital patent ductus venosus, superior vena cava syndrome, vasculitides, vascular ectasia, thrombosis and others. They may be congenital or acquired, in the veins and arteries, affecting both sexes. These abnormalities can be seen in all subtypes of HIES. They could be also fatal in children and adults. Limited pathological investigations revealed the presence of vasculitis. Three of the patients were found to have overlap diseases. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities in HIES are documented and discussed in detail for the first time. They highlight a previously under-recognized and potentially devastating complication of these disorders. These vascular abnormalities constitute one of the major clinical characteristics in HIES. The presence of hypereosinophilia, vasculitis and defective angiogenesis in HIES may contribute to the formation of vascular abnormalities in HIES. PMID:19912258

  4. Vascular Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Regulation in Afferent Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by loss of afferent autonomic neural fiber signaling and consequent profound impairment of arterial baroreflex function and blood pressure regulation. Whether vascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to defective vasomotor control in this form of afferent autonomic failure is not known. METHODS We assessed blood pressure response to orthostatic stress and vascular endothelial function with brachial artery reactivity testing in 34 FD subjects with afferent autonomic failure and 34 healthy control subjects. RESULTS Forty-four percent of the afferent autonomic failure subjects had uncontrolled hypertension at supine rest (median systolic blood pressure = 148mm Hg, interquartile range (IQR) = 144–155mm Hg; median diastolic blood pressure = 83mm Hg, IQR = 78–105mm Hg), and 88% had abnormal response to orthostatic stress (median decrease in systolic blood pressure after upright tilt = 48mm Hg, IQR = 29–61mm Hg). Flow-mediated brachial artery reactivity did not differ in subjects with afferent autonomic failure vs. healthy control subjects (median = 6.00%, IQR = 1.86–11.77%; vs. median = 6.27%, IQR = 4.65–9.34%; P = 0.75). In afferent autonomic failure subjects, brachial artery reactivity was not associated with resting blood pressure or the magnitude of orthostatic hypotension but was decreased in association with reduced glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Brachial artery reactivity was preserved in subjects with afferent autonomic failure despite the presence of marked blood pressure dysregulation. Comorbid renal dysfunction was associated with reduced brachial artery reactivity. PMID:25128693

  5. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  6. The AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Petrocelli, Francesco; Seitun, Sara

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this communication is to describe our preliminary experience with the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4 (AVP 4) in peripheral vascular embolization. The AVP 4 was used for peripheral vascular embolization in five patients with renal pseudoaneurysm (n = 2), postsurgical peritoneal bleeding (n = 1), posttraumatic gluteal hemorrhage (n = 1), and intercostal pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). Occlusion time was recorded. Patients were followed up clinically and by imaging for 1 month after the procedure. All treated vessels or vascular abnormalities were successfully occluded within 3 min for low-flow circulation and over 8 min for high-flow circulation. At 1-month follow-up, all patients were symptom-free. All deployed devices remained in the original locations and desirable configurations. In conclusion, the AVP 4 seems to be safe and effective for occluding peripheral vessels and vascular abnormalities. Because of its compatibility with 0.038-in. catheters, it can be deployed through a diagnostic catheter following angiography without exchanging a sheath or guiding catheter. Compared with the previous generation of vascular plugs, the AVP 4 allows for faster procedure times and decreased exposure to radiation.

  7. Congenital anomalies and vascular birthmarks of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Laor, T; Burrows, P E

    1998-08-01

    MR imaging is an invaluable tool for the evaluation of congenital abnormalities and vascular birthmarks of the extremities in children. These abnormalities of the immature musculoskeletal system are often underestimated by radiography. MR imaging is useful for diagnosis, assisting in therapy, showing response to treatment, and determining prognosis. Localized and generalized abnormalities of the lower extremities and issues pertinent to their MR imaging are illustrated in this article. PMID:9654582

  8. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  9. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  10. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  12. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  13. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  14. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  15. Cardiac and vascular changes with kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A.; Macphee, I.; Kaski, J. C.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular event rates are high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), increasing with deteriorating kidney function, highest in CKD patients on dialysis, and improve with kidney transplantation (KTx). The cardiovascular events in CKD patients such as myocardial infarction and heart failure are related to abnormalities of vascular and cardiac structure and function. Many studies have investigated the structural and functional abnormalities of the heart and blood vessels in CKD, and the changes that occur with KTx, but the evidence is often sparse and occasionally contradictory. We have reviewed the available evidence and identified areas where more research is required to improve the understanding and mechanisms of these changes. There is enough evidence demonstrating improvement of left ventricular hypertrophy, except in children, and sufficient evidence of improvement of left ventricular function, with KTx. There is reasonable evidence of improvement in vascular function and stiffness. However, the evidence for improvement of vascular structure and atherosclerosis is insufficient. Further studies are necessary to establish the changes in vascular structure, and to understand the mechanisms of vascular and cardiac changes, following KTx. PMID:26937071

  16. Exercise and Vascular Function – How Much is too Much?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Matthew J.; Gutterman, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a powerful therapy for preventing the onset and slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased shear stress during exercise improves vascular homeostasis by both decreasing reactive oxygen species and increasing nitric oxide bioavailability in the endothelium. While these observations are well accepted as they apply to individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, less is known about how exercise, especially intense exercise, affects vascular function in healthy individuals. This review highlights examples of how vascular function can paradoxically be impaired in otherwise healthy individuals by extreme levels of exercise, with a focus on the causative role that reactive oxygen species play in this impairment. PMID:24873760

  17. Vascular involvement in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Debendra; Brown, Monica; Postlethwaite, Arnold E

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an acquired multiorgan connective tissue disease with variable mortality and morbidity dictated by clinical subset type. The etiology of the basic disease and pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmunity, fibrosis, and fibroproliferative vasculopathy are unknown and debated. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities and the options currently available to treat the vascular manifestations of SSc are discussed. Also discussed is how the hallmark pathologies (ie, how autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis of the disease) might be effected and interconnected with modulatory input from lysophospholipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid. PMID:22096374

  18. Metabolic rate and vascular function are reduced in women with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olive, Jennifer L; Ballard, Kevin D; Miller, James J; Milliner, Beth A

    2008-06-01

    Metabolic and vascular abnormalities have been found in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Family history is often associated with increased risk of the development of T2D. We sought to determine if young, sedentary, insulin-sensitive individuals with a family history of T2D (FH+) have a reduced resting energy expenditure (REE) and vascular endothelial function compared with individuals who have no family history of T2D (FH-). The REE was determined in 18 FH+ individuals and 15 FH- individuals using indirect open-circuit calorimetry. Vascular endothelial function was measured via flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were also measured to look at vascular inflammation. Body composition was measured via bioelectrical impedance analysis to determine fat-free mass and fat mass for each individual. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model assessment equation and fasting insulin and glucose concentrations. Subjects (n = 42) were approximately 26 years old and had normal fasting serum insulin or glucose concentrations. The REE normalized for body weight (kilocalories per day per kilogram body weight) was significantly reduced in the FH+ women compared with FH- women (P < .001) but not in the men. The FMD was significantly reduced (34.3%) in the FH+ group compared with the FH- in women (P = .002). However, no between-group difference in FMD was present in male subjects (P = .376). Young, healthy, insulin-sensitive women with a family history of T2D have reduced whole-body metabolic rate and vascular endothelial function compared with those with no family history of disease. These differences in whole-body metabolic rate and vascular endothelial function were not present in male subjects. PMID:18502267

  19. Mechanotransduction in Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Beth L.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of biochemical signals provides spatial and temporal cues that carefully orchestrate the complex process of vertebrate embryonic development. The embryonic vasculature develops not only in the context of these biochemical cues, but also in the context of the biomechanical forces imparted by blood flow. In the mature vasculature, different blood flow regimes induce distinct genetic programs, and significant progress has been made toward understanding how these forces are perceived by endothelial cells and transduced into biochemical signals. However, it cannot be assumed that paradigms that govern the mature vasculature are pertinent to the developing embryonic vasculature. The embryonic vasculature can respond to the mechanical forces of blood flow, and these responses are critical in vascular remodeling, certain aspects of sprouting angiogenesis, and maintenance of arterial-venous identity. Here, we review data regarding mechanistic aspects of endothelial cell mechanotransduction, with a focus on the response to shear stress, and elaborate upon the multifarious effects of shear stress on the embryonic vasculature. In addition, we discuss emerging predictive vascular growth models and highlight the prospect of combining signaling pathway information with computational modeling. We assert that correlation of precise measurements of hemodynamic parameters with effects on endothelial cell gene expression and cell behavior is required for fully understanding how blood flow-induced loading governs normal vascular development and shapes congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:22744845

  20. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  1. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  2. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  3. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  4. Vascular Dysfunction in Diabetes and Glaucoma: A Complex Relationship Reviewed.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Austin L; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Lee, Eric; Schaab, Tara J; Huck, Andrew; Amireskandari, Annahita

    2015-08-01

    Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and visual field loss. Intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and systemic vascular irregularities have all been identified as contributing factors for glaucoma onset and progression. Focal and systemic vascular abnormalities have also been well documented in diabetic patients. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and OAG remains enigmatic in the literature. As the pathogenesis of both diabetes mellitus and OAG involves compromised vascular regulation, this review was undertaken to further investigate their precise relationship. A literature review of published population-based studies was performed, with a focus on studies regarding blood flow abnormalities. Although current studies support the role of vascular contributions to both diseases, the association between glaucoma and diabetes yields contrasting results. PMID:25264988

  5. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  6. Effects of vascularization on cancer nanochemotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapy requires anticancer agents capable of efficient and uniform systemic delivery. One promising route to their development is nanotechnology. Here, a previous model for cancer chemotherapy based on a nanosized drug carrier (Paiva et al., 2011) is extended by including tissue vasculature and a three-dimensional growth. We study through computer simulations the therapy against tumors demanding either large or small nutrient supplies growing under different levels of tissue vascularization. Our results indicate that highly vascularized tumors demand more aggressive therapies (larger injected doses administrated at short intervals) than poorly vascularized ones. Furthermore, nanoparticle endocytic rate by tumor cells, not its selectivity, is the major factor that determines the therapeutic success. Finally, our finds indicate that therapies combining cytotoxic agents with antiangiogenic drugs that reduce the abnormal tumor vasculature, instead of angiogenic drugs that normalize it, can lead to successful treatments using feasible endocytic rates and administration intervals.

  7. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  8. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  9. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  10. Depressive behavior and vascular dysfunction: a link between clinical depression and vascular disease?

    PubMed Central

    d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Isingrini, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    As chronic stress and depression have become recognized as significant risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in patients with no prior history of vasculopathy, we interrogated this relationship utilizing an established mouse model of chronic stress/depressive symptoms from behavioral research. Male mice were exposed to 8 wk of unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS; e.g., wet bedding, predator sound/smell, random disruption of light/dark cycle), with indexes of depressive behavior (coat status, grooming, and mobility) becoming exacerbated vs. controls. In vascular rings, constrictor (phenylephrine) and endothelium-independent dilator (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not different between groups, although endothelium-dependent dilation (methacholine) was attenuated with UCMS. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition was without effect in UCMS but nearly abolished reactivity in controls, while cyclooxygenase inhibition blunted dilation in both. Combined blockade abolished reactivity in controls, although a significant dilation remained in UCMS that was abolished by catalase. Arterial NO production was attenuated by UCMS, although H2O2 production was increased. UCMS mice demonstrated an increased, although variable, insulin resistance and inflammation. However, while UCMS-induced vascular impairments were consistent, the predictive power of aggregate plasma levels of insulin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive peptide were limited. However, when separated into tertiles with regard to vascular outcomes, insulin resistance and hypertension were predictive of the most severe vascular impairments. Taken together, these data suggest that aggregate insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypertension in UCMS mice are not robust predictors of vascular dysfunction, suggesting that unidentified mechanisms may be superior predictors of poor vascular outcomes in this model. PMID:20167667

  11. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  12. Bioactive Factors in Uteroplacental and Systemic Circulation Link Placental Ischemia to Generalized Vascular Dysfunction in Hypertensive Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dania A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension, and could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unclear. Predisposing demographic, genetic and environmental risk factors could cause localized abnormalities in uteroplacental cytoactive factors such as integrins, matrix metalloproteinases, cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules leading to decreased vascular remodeling, uteroplacental vasoconstriction, trophoblast cells apoptosis, and abnormal development of the placenta. Defective placentation and decreased trophoblast invasion of the myometrium cause reduction in uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia, an important event in preeclampsia. RUPP could stimulate the release of circulating bioactive factors such as the anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin that cause imbalance with the pro-angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor, or cause the release of inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-induced factor-1 and AT1 angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies. The circulating bioactive factors target endothelial cells causing generalized endotheliosis, endothelial dysfunction, decreased vasodilators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin and increased vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1 and thromboxane A2, leading to increased vasoconstriction. The bioactive factors also stimulate the mechanisms of VSM contraction including Ca2+, protein kinase C, and Rho-kinase and induce extracellular matrix remodeling leading to further vasoconstriction and hypertension. While therapeutic options are currently limited, understanding the underlying mechanisms could help design new interventions for management of preeclampsia. PMID:25916268

  13. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  14. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  15. Amaurosis fugax associated with congenital vascular defect

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, John W; Thomas, Edward R; Rundell, William K

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old female with no significant past medical history presented with loss of vision in the lower half of her left eye that lasted <5 minutes. No abnormalities were found on ocular or physical exam. Computed tomography angiography and carotid ultrasound were performed, which confirmed the diagnosis as amaurosis fugax with two abnormalities leading to the transient retinal vessel occlusion. First, it was found that the patient has a congenital vascular anomaly, which consisted most notably of a right-sided aortic arch. This vascular anomaly also consisted of abnormal branching of the left subclavian and common carotid arteries, predisposing the patient to turbulent blood flow and increased risk of the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque at the origin of the common carotid artery. This is an abnormal location for a plaque leading to amaurosis fugax compared to the most common location at the carotid bifurcation. Endarterectomy was not performed because of the difficult location of the plaque and tortuosity of the vessel. Rather, medical intervention with antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy was initiated to lower the risk of future retinal or cerebral thromboembolic events. PMID:27445507

  16. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  17. The role of immune activation in contributing to vascular dysfunction and the pathophysiology of hypertension during preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    LaMarca, Babbette

    2012-01-01

    Summary Alterations in vascular function contributes to hypertension as well as multi-organ dysfunction in women with preeclampsia (1,4, 11–14). Preterm preeclampsia remains a leading cause of maternal death and perinatal morbidity and most recently it has been recognized that women whom endure preeclampsia are at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease later in life. The pathophysiologic processes that underlie preeclampsia has been proposed to occur in two stages: stage 1, reduced placental perfusion, and stage 2, the maternal clinical syndrome (1,4). Placental ischemia/hypoxia is believed to result in the release of a variety of placental factors that have profound effects on blood flow and arterial pressure regulation (Figure 1) (1, 4, 10, 11). These factors include a host of molecules such as the soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sFlt-1), the angiotensin II type-1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA), and cytokines such as TNF-α and Interleukin 6 which in turn generate widespread dysfunction of the maternal vascular endothelium (1–11). This dysfunction results in formation of factors such as endothelin, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and augmented vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II (1–11). In addition, preeclampsia is also associated with decreased formation of vasodilators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin (1–11). These alterations in vascular function not only lead to hypertension but multi-organ dysfunction, especially in women with early onset preeclampsia (1,4, 11–14). Therefore, identifying the connection between placental ischemia and maternal cardiovascular abnormalities is an important area of investigation (1,10,11,21). In addition, the quantitative importance of the various endothelial and humoral factors that mediate vascular dysfunction and hypertension during preeclampsia remains to be elucidated. PMID:20502423

  18. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  19. Chemerin Regulates Crosstalk Between Adipocytes and Vascular Cells Through Nox.

    PubMed

    Neves, Karla Bianca; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Rios, Francisco Jose; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Lobato, Nubia Souza; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Tostes, Rita C; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-09-01

    Adipocytes produce adipokines, including chemerin, a chemoattractant that mediates effects through its ChemR23 receptor. Chemerin has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in pathological conditions, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Molecular mechanisms underlying this are elusive. Here we assessed whether chemerin through redox-sensitive signaling influences molecular processes associated with vascular growth, apoptosis, and inflammation. Human microvascular endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated with chemerin (50 ng/mL). Chemerin increased generation of reactive oxygen species and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, effects that were inhibited by ML171, GKT137831 (Nox inhibitors), and N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger). Chemerin increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators in vascular cells and increased monocyte-to-endothelial cell attachment. In human vascular smooth muscle cells, chemerin induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and stimulated proliferation (increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression [proliferation marker] and BrdU incorporation [proliferation assay]). Chemerin decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B activation and increased TUNEL-positive human vascular smooth muscle cells. In human microvascular endothelial cells, chemerin reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide production. Adipocyte-conditioned medium from obese/diabetic mice (db/db), which have elevated chemerin levels, increased reactive oxygen species generation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas adipocyte-conditioned medium from control mice had no effect. Chemerin actions were blocked by CCX 832, a ChemR23 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that chemerin, through Nox activation and redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling, exerts proapoptotic, proinflammatory, and

  20. Vulvar vascular tumors: a clinicopathologic study of 85 patients.

    PubMed

    Papalas, John A; Sangueza, Omar P; Puri, Puja K; Robboy, Stanley J; Selim, Maria A

    2013-02-01

    The subepidermal hormonally sensitive tissue of the vulva is anatomically unique and may give rise to a wide variety of vascular tumors. As a consequence, classifying vulvar vascular lesions has been challenging due both to the wide variety of lesions that may be encountered and the heterogeneity in reporting across several disciplines. The purpose of this study is to present an institutional experience of vulvar vascular lesions. Overall, 85 patients were identified over a 26-year period. Vascular lesions belonging to the following classes included (n, %total) benign vascular tumors (32, 38%), dilatations of preexisting vessels (31, 36%), hyperplasia/reactive (7, 8%), tumors with significant vascular component (11, 13%), malformations (3, 4%), and malignant vascular tumors (1, 1%). Two reaction patterns based on vulvar lymphatic pathology were identified: one is a stromal dominant pattern and the other is a vascular dominant pattern. Vulvar vascular malformations and true vascular malignancies, although rare, may have associated high morbidity. To accurately classify vulvar lymphatic lesions, the pathologist must carefully consider the patient's clinical history taking into account features such as preexisting lymphedema. PMID:23348141

  1. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  2. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  4. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H.; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  5. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  6. Poldip2 sustains vascular structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Sutliff, Roy L.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Amanso, Angélica M.; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Dikalova, Anna E.; Hansen, Laura; Datla, Srinivasa Raju; Long, James S.; El-Ali, Alexander M.; Joseph, Giji; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Taylor, W. Robert; Hart, C. Michael; Griendling, Kathy K.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on previous evidence that polymerase delta interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) increases NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), we hypothesized that in vivo knockdown of Poldip2 would inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and alter vascular function. Approach and Results Because homozygous Poldip2 deletion is lethal, Poldip2+/− mice were employed. Poldip2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced by about 50% in Poldip2+/− aorta, with no change in p22phox, Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4 mRNAs. NADPH oxidase activity was also inhibited in Poldip2+/− tissue. Isolated aortas from Poldip2+/− mice demonstrated impaired phenylephrine and potassium chloride-induced contractions, increased stiffness and reduced compliance, associated with disruption of elastic lamellae and excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Collagen I secretion was elevated in cultured VSMC from Poldip2+/− mice and restored by H2O2 supplementation, suggesting that this novel function of Poldip2 is mediated by reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, Poldip2+/− mice were protected against aortic dilatation in a model of experimental aneurysm, an effect consistent with increased collagen secretion. Conclusions Poldip2 knockdown reduces H2O2 production in vivo, leading to increases in extracellular matrix, greater vascular stiffness and impaired agonist-mediated contraction. Thus, unaltered expression of Poldip2 is necessary for vascular integrity and function. PMID:23825363

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  9. [Microscopic anatomy of abnormal structure in root tuber of Pueraria lobata].

    PubMed

    Duan, Hai-yan; Cheng, Ming-en; Peng, Hua-sheng; Zhang, He-ting; Zhao, Yu-jiao

    2015-11-01

    Puerariae Lobatae Radix, also known as Gegen, is a root derived from Pueraria lobata. Based on field investigation and the developmental anatomy of root tuber, we have elucidated the relationship between the growth of root tuber and the anomalous structure. The results of analysis showed that the root system of P. lobata was developed from seed and adventitious root and there existed root tuber, adventitious root and conductive root according to morphology and function. The root tuber was developed from adventitious root, its secondary structure conformed to the secondary structure of dicotyledon's root. With the development of root, the secondary phloem of root tuber appeared abnormal vascular tissue, which was distributed like ring in the outside of secondary vascular tissue. The root tuber might have 4-6 concentric circular permutation abnormal vascular tissuelobate, and was formed by the internal development of abnormal vascular tissue. The xylem and phloem of abnormal vascular tissue were the main body of the root tuber. The results reveal the abnormal anatomical structure development of P. lobata, also provides the theoretical basis for reasonable harvest medicinal parts and promoting sustainable utilization of resources of P. lobata. PMID:27097408

  10. Orthopedic issues in vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Samantha A; Sorger, Joel

    2014-08-01

    Vascular malformations impact the musculoskeletal system depending on the tissue involved (skin, subcutis, muscle, cartilage, or bone), the extent of involvement, and the type of anomalous vessels (arteries, capillaries, veins, or lymphatics). These malformations can cause a multitude of musculoskeletal problems for the patient and their Orthopedic Surgeon to manage. Leg-length discrepancy, intra-articular involvement, muscular lesions, and primary or secondary scoliosis are just to name a few. All of these problems can cause pain, deformity, and a range of functional limitations. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment plans both have a role in the care of these patients. Patients with vascular malformations may also suffer from life-threatening cardiovascular and hematologic abnormalities. For those patients who undergo surgery, thromboembolic risk is elevated, wound breakdown and infection are much more common, and bleeding risk continues well into the postoperative course. Because of the complex nature of these disorders, the clinician must have a full understanding of the types of lesions, their natural history, appropriate diagnostic studies, associated medical problems, indications for treatment, and all the treatment options. For severe malformations, especially syndromes such as CLOVES and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, interdisciplinary team management is essential for the best outcomes. PMID:25241103

  11. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  12. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  13. Estrogen-induced DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells is mediated by ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Felty, Quentin

    2006-01-01

    Background Since estrogen is known to increase vascular endothelial cell growth, elevated estrogen exposure from hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives has the potential to contribute in the development of abnormal proliferative vascular lesions and subsequent thickening of the vasculature. How estrogen may support or promote vascular lesions is not clear. We have examined in this study whether estrogen exposure to vascular endothelial cells increase the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and estrogen-induced ROS is involved in the growth of endothelial cells. Methods The effect of estrogen on the production of intracellular oxidants and the role of estrogen-induced ROS on cell growth was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ROS were measured by monitoring the oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin by spectrofluorometry. Endothelial cell growth was measured by a colorimetric immunoassay based on BrdU incorporation into DNA. Results Physiological concentrations of estrogen (367 fmol and 3.67 pmol) triggered a rapid 2-fold increase in intracellular oxidants in endothelial cells. E2-induced ROS formation was inhibited to basal levels by cotreatment with the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone (2 μM) and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol (50 μM). Inhibitors of NAD(P)H oxidase, apocynin and DPI, did not block E2-induced ROS formation. Furthermore, the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, did not prevent the increase in E2-induced ROS. These findings indicate both mitochondria and xanthine oxidase are the source of ROS in estrogen treated vascular endothelial cells. E2 treated cells showed a 2-fold induction of BrdU incorporation at 18 h which was not observed in cells exposed to vehicle alone. Cotreatment with ebselen (20 μM) and NAC (1 mM) inhibited E2-induced BrdU incorporation without affecting the basal levels of DNA synthesis. The observed inhibitory effect of NAC and ebselen on E2-induced DNA synthesis was also shown to be dose dependent

  14. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  15. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  16. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  17. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  18. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  19. Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

  20. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities among children born with conotruncal cardiac defects

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Edward J.; Chak, Jacqueline S.; Iovannisci, David M.; Schultz, Kathleen; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conotruncal heart defects comprise 25%-30% of non-syndromic congenital heart defects. This study describes the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and microdeletion 22q11 associated with conotruncal heart malformations. METHODS From a population base of 974,579 infants/fetuses delivered, 622 Californian infants/fetuses were ascertained with a defect of aortico-pulmonary septation. Infants whose primary cardiac defect was tetralogy of Fallot (n=296) or D-transposition of the great vessels (n=189) were screened for microdeletions of 22q11. RESULTS Fourteen (2.3%) of the 622 infants/fetuses had chromosomal abnormalities. Thirty infants, 10% of those whose primary defect was tetralogy of Fallot, had chromosome 22q11 microdeletions. Right aortic arch, abnormal branching patterns of the major arteries arising from the thoracic aorta, and pulmonary artery abnormalities were observed more frequently in these children. CONCLUSIONS We found an unusual number of infants with an extra sex chromosome and a conotruncal defect. Infants with tetralogy of Fallot due to 22q11 microdeletion showed more associated vascular anomalies than infants with tetralogy but no 22q11 microdeletion. Although these associated vascular anomalies provide clues as to which infants with tetralogy of Fallot are more likely to carry the microdeletion, the overall risk of 10% among all infants with tetralogy of Fallot warrants chromosome analysis and FISH testing routinely. PMID:19067405

  2. Vascular aging: Chronic oxidative stress and impairment of redox signaling—consequences for vascular homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachschmid, Markus M.; Schildknecht, Stefan; Matsui, Reiko; Zee, Rebecca; Haeussler, Dagmar; Cohen, Richard A.; Pimental, David; van der Loo, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic morphological and molecular alterations such as vessel wall thickening and reduction of nitric oxide occur in the aging vasculature leading to the gradual loss of vascular homeostasis. Consequently, the risk of developing acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases increases with age. Current research of the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial function demonstrates a duality of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in contributing to vascular homeostasis or leading to detrimental effects when formed in excess. Furthermore, changes in function and redox status of vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to age-related vascular remodeling. The age-dependent increase in free radical formation causes deterioration of the nitric oxide signaling cascade, alters and activates prostaglandin metabolism, and promotes novel oxidative posttranslational protein modifications that interfere with vascular and cell signaling pathways. As a result, vascular dysfunction manifests. Compensatory mechanisms are initially activated to cope with age-induced oxidative stress, but become futile, which results in irreversible oxidative modifications of biological macromolecules. These findings support the ‘free radical theory of aging’ but also show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are essential signaling molecules, regulating vascular homeostasis. PMID:22380696

  3. Cardiovascular malformations and other cardiovascular abnormalities in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, A E; Birch, P H; Korf, B R; Tenconi, R; Niimura, M; Poyhonen, M; Armfield Uhas, K; Sigorini, M; Virdis, R; Romano, C; Bonioli, E; Wolkenstein, P; Pivnick, E K; Lawrence, M; Friedman, J M

    2000-11-13

    Although it is well recognized that a peripheral vasculopathy may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), it is unclear whether cardiovascular abnormalities are more common. We reviewed the frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, in particular, cardiovascular malformations (CVMs), among 2322 patients with definite NF1 in the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation International Database from 1991-98. Cardiovascular malformations were reported in 54/2322 (2.3%) of the NF1 patients, only 4 of whom had Watson syndrome or NF1-Noonan syndrome. There was a predominance of Class II "flow" defects [Clark, 1995: Moss and Adams' Heart Disease in Infants, Children, and Adolescents Including the Fetus and Young Adult. p 60-70] (43/54, 80%) among the NF1 patients with CVMs. Pulmonic stenosis, that was present in 25 NF1 patients, and aortic coarctation, that occurred in 5, constitute much larger proportions of all CVMs than expected. Of interest was the paucity of Class I conotruncal defects (2 patients with tetralogy of Fallot), and the absence of atrioventricular canal, anomalous pulmonary venous return, complex single ventricle and laterality defects. Besides the 54 patients with CVMs, there were 27 patients with other cardiac abnormalities (16 with murmur, 5 with mitral valve prolapse, 1 with intracardiac tumor, and 5 with electrocardiogram abnormalities). No patient in this study had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There were 16 patients who had a peripheral vascular abnormality without an intracardiac CVM, plus an additional 4 patients among those with a CVM who also had a peripheral vascular abnormality. PMID:11078559

  4. Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis for vascular homeostasis: role in neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal increases in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the intimal region after a vascular injury is a key event in developing neointimal hyperplasia. To maintain vascular function, proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs is tightly controlled during vascular remodeling. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) system, a key component of the oxidative stress response that acts in maintaining homeostasis, plays an important role in neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury; however, the role of Nrf2/Keap1 in VSMC apoptosis has not been clarified. Here we report that 14 days after arterial injury in mice, TUNEL-positive VSMCs are detected in both the neointimal and medial layers. These layers contain cells expressing high levels of Nrf2 but low Keap1 expression. In VSMCs, Keap1 depletion induces features of apoptosis, such as positive TUNEL staining and annexin V binding. These changes are associated with an increased expression of nuclear Nrf2. Simultaneous Nrf2 depletion inhibits Keap1 depletion-induced apoptosis. At 14 days after the vascular injury, Nrf2-deficient mice demonstrated fewer TUNEL-positive cells and increased neointimal formation in the neointimal and medial areas. The results suggest that the Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates VSMC apoptosis during neointimal formation, thereby inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury. PMID:27198574

  5. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  6. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  7. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Islet Vascularization Are Necessary in Developing, but Not Adult, Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Brissova, Marcela; Shostak, Alena; Pan, Fong Cheng; Poffenberger, Greg; Cai, Qing; Hundemer, Gregory L.; Kantz, Jeannelle; Thompson, Courtney S.; Dai, Chunhua; McGuinness, Owen P.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are highly vascularized mini-organs, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is a critical factor in the development of islet vascularization. To investigate the role of VEGF-A and endothelial cells (ECs) in adult islets, we used complementary genetic approaches to temporally inactivate VEGF-A in developing mouse pancreatic and islet progenitor cells or in adult β-cells. Inactivation of VEGF-A early in development dramatically reduced pancreatic and islet vascularization, leading to reduced β-cell proliferation in both developing and adult islets and, ultimately, reduced β-cell mass and impaired glucose clearance. When VEGF-A was inactivated in adult β-cells, islet vascularization was reduced twofold. Surprisingly, even after 3 months of reduced islet vascularization, islet architecture and β-cell gene expression, mass, and function were preserved with only a minimal abnormality in glucose clearance. These data show that normal pancreatic VEGF-A expression is critical for the recruitment of ECs and the subsequent stimulation of endocrine cell proliferation during islet development. In contrast, although VEGF-A is required for maintaining the specialized vasculature observed in normal adult islets, adult β-cells can adapt and survive long-term reductions in islet vascularity. These results indicate that VEGF-A and islet vascularization have a lesser role in adult islet function and β-cell mass. PMID:23884891

  9. CSF biomarkers in neurodegenerative and vascular dementias.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Franc; Schmitz, Matthias; Ferrer, Isidro; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and prionopathies, together with vascular encephalopathies, are cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Identification of reliable biomarkers in biological fluids, particularly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is of extreme importance in optimizing the precise early clinical diagnosis of distinct entities and predicting the outcome in particular settings. In addition, the study of CSF biomarkers is useful to identify and monitor the underlying pathological processes developing in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Evidence suggests that levels of key CSF molecules correlate, in some circumstances, with prediction, disease progression, and severity of cognitive decline. Correlation of CSF markers and underlying pathological molecular substrates in brain is an exciting field for further study. However, while some dementias such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have accurate CSF biomarkers, other disease types such as dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia lack reliable biomarkers for their specific clinical diagnosis. PMID:27016008

  10. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 and vascular aging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen

    2015-12-01

    VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) play critical roles in arterial remodelling with aging, hypertension and atherosclerosis. VSMCs exist in diverse phenotypes and exhibit phenotypic plasticity, e.g. changing from a quiescent/contractile phenotype to an active myofibroblast-like, often called 'synthetic', phenotype. Synthetic VSMCs are able to proliferate, migrate and secrete ECM (extracellular matrix) proteinases and ECM proteins. In addition, they produce pro-inflammatory molecules, providing an inflammatory microenvironment for leucocyte penetration, accumulation and activation. The aging VSMCs have also shown changes in cellular phenotype, responsiveness to contracting and relaxing mediators, replicating potential, matrix synthesis, inflammatory mediators and intracellular signalling. VSMC dysfunction plays a key role in age-associated vascular remodelling. Cyclic nucleotide PDEs (phosphodiesterases), by catalysing cyclic nucleotide hydrolysis, play a critical role in regulating the amplitude, duration and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signalling. Abnormal alterations of PDEs and subsequent changes in cyclic nucleotide homoeostasis have been implicated in a number of different diseases. In the study published in the latest issue of Clinical Science, Bautista Niño and colleagues have shown that, in cultured senescent human VSMCs, PDE1A and PDE1C mRNA levels are significantly up-regulated and inhibition of PDE1 activity with vinpocetine reduced cellular senescent makers in senescent VSMCs. Moreover, in the premature aging mice with genomic instability (Ercc1(d/-)), impaired aortic ring relaxation in response to SNP (sodium nitroprusside), an NO (nitric oxide) donor, was also largely improved by vinpocetine. More interestingly, using data from human GWAS (genome-wide association studies), it has been found that PDE1A single nucleotide polymorphisms is significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure and carotid intima-media thickening, two

  11. Glucocorticoid excess induces superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells and elicits vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Takahiko; Akaike, Masashi; Mitsui, Takao; Ohshima, Yasushi; Shintani, Yasumi; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2003-01-10

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess often elicits serious adverse effects on the vascular system, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, and effective prophylaxis for these complications is limited. We sought to reveal the mechanism underlying GC-induced vascular complications. Responses in forearm blood flow to reactive hyperemia in 20 GC-treated patients were significantly decreased to 43+/-8.9% (mean+/-SEM) from the values obtained before GC therapy (130+/-14%). An administration of vitamin C almost normalized blood flow responses. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), production of hydrogen peroxide was increased up to 166.5+/-3.3% of control values by 10(-7) mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (P<0.01). Concomitant with DEX-induced hydrogen peroxide production, intracellular amounts of peroxynitrite significantly increased and those of nitric oxide (NO) decreased, respectively (P<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody showed that peroxynitrite formation was increased in DEX-treated HUVECs. Using inhibitors against metabolic pathways for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we identified that the major production sources of ROS by DEX treatment were mitochondrial electron transport chain, NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that GC excess causes overproduction of ROS and thereby perturbs NO availability in the vascular endothelium, leading to vascular complications in patients with GC excess. PMID:12522124

  12. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  13. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  14. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  15. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  16. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  17. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  18. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  19. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  20. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  1. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  2. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  3. Vascular sphingolipids in physiological and pathological adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Xiang; Su, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Yao-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Xie, Xiao-Ping; Chang, Yao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are compounds containing a long-chain fatty alcohol amine called sphingosine which exists in cellular membranes, cytoplasm, nucleus, interstitial fluid, blood and lymphatic circulation. SLs act as essential constituents of membranes of eukaryotic cells, so the seesaw of SLs will lead to structural alteration of membranes instigating cellular functional change. SLs also act as crucial signaling molecules taking effect intracellularly or extracellularly which regulates activity of downstream molecules determining cellular adaptation to numerous stimulus. This review aims to highlight the contribution of SLs to physiological and pathophysiological remodeling of vasculature. We will first provide a short overview on metabolism, trafficking and compartmentalization of SLs. Then the regulation of SLs on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, vascular tone modulation, endothelial barrier integrity, apoptosis and autophagy are summarized. Finally, we will discuss how the SLs are modulated contributing to vascular development, angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in pathological situations as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aging. The compellingly regulative actions of SLs bring about copious therapeutic targets for potential pharmacological intervention on the diseases involving vascular maladaptation. PMID:27100498

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  6. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  7. Circulating and Vascular Bioactive Factors during Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tanbe, Alain F.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with significant vascular remodeling in the uterine and systemic circulation in order to meet the metabolic demands of the mother and developing fetus. The pregnancy-associated vascular changes are largely due to alterations in the amount/activity of vascular mediators released from the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle and extracellular matrix. The endothelium releases vasodilator substances such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and hyperpolarizing factor as well as vasoconstrictor factors such as endothelin, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2. Vascular smooth muscle contraction is mediated by intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and [Ca2+]i sensitization pathways such as protein kinase C, Rho-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Extracellular matrix and vascular remodeling are regulated by matrix metalloproteases. Hypertension in pregnancy and preeclampsia are major complications and life threatening conditions to both the mother and fetus, precipitated by various genetic, dietary and environmental factors. The initiating mechanism of preeclampsia and hypertension in pregnancy is unclear; however, most studies have implicated inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the uterine artery, leading to reduction in the uteroplacental perfusion pressure and placental ischemia/hypoxia. This placental hypoxic state is thought to induce the release of several circulating bioactive factors such as growth factor inhibitors, anti-angiogenic proteins, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and vascular receptor antibodies. Increases in the plasma levels and vascular content of these factors during pregnancy could cause an imbalance in the vascular mediators released from the endothelium, smooth muscle and extracellular matrix, and lead to severe vasoconstriction and hypertension. This review will discuss the interactions between the various circulating bioactive factors and the vascular

  8. Apoptosis and calcification of vascular endothelial cell under hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuaifa; Chen, Zhujun; Liu, Meng; Peng, Jian; Wu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is found that increase in Hcy level in blood can directly or indirectly cause vascular endothelial cell injury and induce vascular calcification. However, the mechanism of vascular endothelial cell injury and vascular calcification has not been studied thoroughly. This paper carried out experiment for research aiming at discussing the effect and action mechanism of Hhcy on endothelial cells and vascular calcification. Firstly, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and then intervened by Hcy of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mmol/L) and at different action time (3, 6, 12, 24 h). Then apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen were detected by flow cytometry. At the same time, the model for the culture of rat vascular calcification was set up and induced into Hhcy so as to detect the total plasma Hcy level and judge vascular calcification degree. The results showed that with the increase in Hcy concentration and extension of action period, the apoptosis rate and generation of reactive oxygen of HUVECs all significantly increased, and the differences were all statistically significant (P < 0.01). In animal calcification model, mass of black particle deposition was seen after Von Kossa staining of rat vessels in calcification group. Compared with the control group, the vascular calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin content in calcification group all increased (P < 0.01). The content of plasma lipid conjugated olefine from highest to lowest wasas follows: calcification plus homoetheionin, homoetheionin, and calcification group. There was no significant difference between the calcification group and control group. All these findings suggested that Hcy could induce the apoptosis of endothelial cells and its effect degree depended on its concentration and action period; Hhcy could promote the calcification of blood vessels, and its mechanism might relate with the strengthening of

  9. ALDOSTERONE DYSREGULATION WITH AGING PREDICTS RENAL-VASCULAR FUNCTION AND CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Underwood, Patricia C.; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N.; Williams, Gordon H.; Adler, Gail K.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Aging and abnormal aldosterone regulation are both associated with vascular disease. We hypothesized that aldosterone dysregulation influences the age-related risk of renal- and cardio-vascular disease. We conducted an analysis of 562 subjects who underwent detailed investigations under conditions of liberal and restricted dietary sodium intake (1,124 visits) in a Clinical Research Center. Aldosterone regulation was characterized by the ratio of maximal suppression-to-stimulation (supine serum aldosterone on a liberal sodium diet divided by the same measure on a restricted sodium diet). We previously demonstrated that higher levels of this Sodium-modulated Aldosterone Suppression-Stimulation Index (SASSI) indicate greater aldosterone dysregulation. Renal plasma flow (RPF) was determined via p-aminohippurate clearance to assess basal renal hemodynamics, and the renal-vascular responses to dietary sodium manipulation and angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Framingham Risk Score. In univariate linear regression, older age (β= -4.60, p<0.0001) and higher SASSI (β= -58.63, p=0.001) predicted lower RPF and a blunted RPF response to sodium loading and AngII infusion. We observed a continuous, independent, multivariate-adjusted interaction between age and SASSI, where the inverse relationship between SASSI and RPF was most apparent with older age (p<0.05). Higher SASSI and lower RPF independently predicted higher Framingham Risk Score (p<0.0001) and together displayed an additive effect. Aldosterone regulation and age may interact to mediate renal-vascular disease. Our findings suggest that the combination of aldosterone dysregulation and renal-vascular dysfunction could additively increase the risk of future cardiovascular outcomes; therefore, aldosterone dysregulation may represent a modifiable mechanism of age-related vascular disease. PMID:24664291

  10. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  11. Pulmonary vascular reactivity: effect of PAF and PAF antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, C R; Voelkel, N F; Chang, S W

    1992-11-01

    We investigated the effects of two different platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, SRI 63-441 and WEB 2086, on PAF-, angiotensin II-, and hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictions in isolated rat lungs perfused with a physiological salt solution. Bolus injection of PAF (0.5 micrograms) increased pulmonary arterial and microvascular pressures and caused lung edema. Both SRI 63-441, a PAF-analogue antagonist, and WEB 2086, a thienotriazolodiazepine structurally unrelated to PAF, completely blocked PAF-induced vasoconstriction and lung edema at 10(-5) M. At a lower concentration (10(-6) M), WEB 2086 was more effective than SRI 63-441. WEB 2086 also blocked the pulmonary vasodilation induced by low-dose PAF (15 ng) in blood-perfused lungs preconstricted with hypoxia. SRI 63-441 and CV 3988 (another PAF analogue antagonist), but not WEB 2086, caused acute pulmonary vasoconstriction at 10(-5) M and severe lung edema at a higher concentration (10(-4) M). PAF-induced but not SRI- or CV-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and edema were inhibited by WEB 2086. In addition, SRI 63-441 potentiated angiotensin II- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictions. This effect of SRI 63-441 is not due to PAF receptor blockade because 1) addition of PAF (1.6 nM) to the perfusate likewise potentiated angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and 2) WEB 2086 did not cause a similar response. We conclude that both SRI 63-441 and WEB 2086 are effective inhibitors of PAF actions in the rat pulmonary circulation. However, antagonists with structures analogous to PAF (SRI 63-441 and CV 3988) can have significant pulmonary vasoactive side effects. PMID:1474049

  12. Congenital and Acquired Abnormalities of the Corpus Callosum: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide spectrum of lesions in the corpus callosum, both congenital and acquired: developmental abnormalities, phakomatoses, neurometabolic disorders, demyelinating diseases, infection and inflammation, vascular lesions, neoplasms, traumatic and iatrogenic injury, and others. Cases include fetuses, children, and adults with rich iconography from the authors' own archive. PMID:24027754

  13. Aging and vascular endothelial function in humans

    PubMed Central

    SEALS, Douglas R.; JABLONSKI, Kristen L.; DONATO, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is the major risk factor for the development of CVD (cardiovascular diseases). This is attributable, in part, to the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by reduced peripheral artery EDD (endothelium-dependent dilation) in response to chemical [typically ACh (acetylcholine)] or mechanical (intravascular shear) stimuli. Reduced bioavailability of the endothelium-synthesized dilating molecule NO (nitric oxide) as a result of oxidative stress is the key mechanism mediating reduced EDD with aging. Vascular oxidative stress increases with age as a consequence of greater production of reactive oxygen species (e.g. superoxide) without a compensatory increase in antioxidant defences. Sources of increased superoxide production include up-regulation of the oxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of the normally NO-producing enzyme, eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) (due to reduced availability of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin) and increased mitochondrial synthesis during oxidative phosphorylation. Increased bioactivity of the potent endothelial-derived constricting factor ET-1 (endothelin-1), reduced endothelial production of/responsiveness to dilatory prostaglandins, the development of vascular inflammation, formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), an increased rate of endothelial apoptosis and reduced expression of oestrogen receptor α (in postmenopausal females) also probably contribute to impaired EDD with aging. Several lifestyle and biological factors modulate vascular endothelial function with aging, including regular aerobic exercise, dietary factors (e.g. processed compared with non-processed foods), body weight/fatness, vitamin D status, menopause/oestrogen deficiency and a number of conventional and non-conventional risk factors for CVD. Given the number of older adults now and in the future, more information is needed on effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of vascular endothelial aging. PMID

  14. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  15. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  16. Maternal Serum Analytes as Predictors of Fetal Growth Restriction with Different Degrees of Placental Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Matthew J; Rochelson, Burton; Vohra, Nidhi

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal levels of maternal serum analytes have been associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia secondary to placental vascular dysfunction. Accurately identifying the FGR fetuses at highest risk for adverse outcomes remains challenging. Placental function can be assessed by Doppler analysis of the maternal and fetal circulation. Although the combination of multiple abnormal maternal serum analytes and abnormal Doppler findings is strongly associated with adverse outcomes, the predictive value remains too low to be used as a screening test in a low-risk population. Stratification of cases based on the severity of Doppler abnormalities may improve predictive models. PMID:27235917

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Link with Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yan, Bryan P.; Chan, Yin W. F.; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrhythmias represent a significant problem globally, leading to cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. There is increasing evidence to suggest that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is elevated in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, can lead to arrhythmogenesis. Method: A literature review was undertaken to screen for articles that investigated the effects of ROS on cardiac ion channel function, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Results: Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress is observed in heart failure, leading to increased production of ROS. Mitochondrial ROS, which is elevated in diabetes and hypertension, can stimulate its own production in a positive feedback loop, termed ROS-induced ROS release. Together with activation of mitochondrial inner membrane anion channels, it leads to mitochondrial depolarization. Abnormal function of these organelles can then activate downstream signaling pathways, ultimately culminating in altered function or expression of cardiac ion channels responsible for generating the cardiac action potential (AP). Vascular and cardiac endothelial cells become dysfunctional, leading to altered paracrine signaling to influence the electrophysiology of adjacent cardiomyocytes. All of these changes can in turn produce abnormalities in AP repolarization or conduction, thereby increasing likelihood of triggered activity and reentry. Conclusion: ROS plays a significant role in producing arrhythmic substrate. Therapeutic strategies targeting upstream events include production of a strong reducing environment or the use of pharmacological agents that target organelle-specific proteins and ion channels. These may relieve oxidative stress and in turn prevent arrhythmic complications in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure. PMID:27536244

  18. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  19. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  20. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  1. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  2. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  3. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  4. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  5. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  6. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  7. Vascular inflammation and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R; Recinos, Adrian; Eledrisi, Mohsen S

    2002-08-01

    It is now well established that vascular inflammation is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. In otherwise healthy patients, chronic elevations of circulating interleukin-6 or its biomarkers are predictors for increased risk in the development and progression of ischemic heart disease. Although multifactorial in etiology, vascular inflammation produces atherosclerosis by the continuous recruitment of circulating monocytes into the vessel wall and by contributing to an oxidant-rich inflammatory milieu that induces phenotypic changes in resident (noninflammatory) cells. In addition, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has important modulatory activities in the atherogenic process. Recent work has shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) has significant proinflammatory actions in the vascular wall, inducing the production of reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules. These latter effects on gene expression are mediated, at least in part, through the cytoplasmic nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factor. Through these actions, Ang II augments vascular inflammation, induces endothelial dysfunction, and, in so doing, enhances the atherogenic process. Our recent studies have defined a molecular mechanism for a biological positive-feedback loop that explains how vascular inflammation can be self-sustaining through upregulation of the vessel wall Ang II tone. Ang II produced locally by the inflamed vessel induces the synthesis and secretion of interleukin-6, a cytokine that induces synthesis of angiotensinogen in the liver through a janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 pathway. Enhanced angiotensinogen production, in turn, supplies more substrate to the activated vascular RAS, where locally produced Ang II synergizes with oxidized lipid to perpetuate atherosclerotic vascular inflammation. These observations suggest that one mechanism by which RAS antagonists prevent atherosclerosis

  8. Pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, D; Rachamalla, H R; Rafalowski, A; Ilkhani, R; Bharathan, T; Anandarao, N

    1997-08-01

    The role of pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was investigated. In addition, the value of elevating the limb to improve the sensitivity of detection of PVD by the pulse oximeter was also determined. Pulse oximetry reading in the toes were obtained in 40 young, healthy volunteers and in 40 randomly selected patients referred to the vascular investigation laboratory over a period of two months. All 40 healthy volunteers had normal pulse oximetry readings. Normal pulse oximetry reading in the toes was defined as > 95% O2 Sat and +/-2 of finger pulse oximetry reading. In all 40 patients, pulse oximetry readings were either normal or not detected at all. Since there was no gradation in decrease in the pulse oximetry reading with severity of disease or with elevation of the patient's lower extremity, an absent or no reading was considered as an abnormal result from the test. The frequency of abnormal pulse oximetry readings increased significantly in groups with abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and also varied significantly with elevation of the patients' lower limbs. In patients with no PVD detected by Doppler (ABPI > 0.9), pulse oximetry readings were normal in all. However, in patients with moderate PVD (ABPI, 0.5-0.9), 84% of the patients' lower limbs had normal pulse oximetry readings and 16% had an abnormal reading at baseline level (flat). An additional 12% of the lower limbs in this group had an abnormal reading on elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In patients with severe PVD (ABPI < 0.5), 54% of the patients' lower limbs had an abnormal reading at baseline and an additional 23% had an abnormal reading at elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In conclusion, pulse oximetry was not a sensitive test for detecting early PVD. PMID:9269142

  9. Neuropathological diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia with implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is recognised as a neurocognitive disorder, which is explained by numerous vascular causes in the general absence of other pathologies. The heterogeneity of cerebrovascular disease makes it challenging to elucidate the neuropathological substrates and mechanisms of VaD as well as vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Consensus and accurate diagnosis of VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychometric and neuroimaging measures with subsequent pathological confirmation. Pathological diagnosis of suspected clinical VaD requires adequate postmortem brain sampling and rigorous assessment methods to identify important substrates. Factors that define the subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases appear the most common substrates of vascular brain injury or infarction. Small vessel disease characterised by arteriolosclerosis and lacunar infarcts also causes cortical and subcortical microinfarcts, which appear to be the most robust substrates of cognitive impairment. Diffuse WM changes with loss of myelin and axonal abnormalities are common to almost all subtypes of VaD. Medial temporal lobe and hippocampal atrophy accompanied by variable hippocampal sclerosis are also features of VaD as they are of Alzheimer's disease. Recent observations suggest that there is a vascular basis for neuronal atrophy in both the temporal and frontal lobes in VaD that is entirely independent of any Alzheimer pathology. Further knowledge on specific neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes in key regions resulting in executive dysfunction and other cognitive deficits, which define VCI and VaD, needs to be gathered. Hereditary arteriopathies such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy or CADASIL have provided insights into the mechanisms of

  10. VASCULAR ACTIONS OF ESTROGENS: FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Duckles, Sue P.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of estrogen exposure in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease is controversial. But it is clear that estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology, with potential therapeutic implications. Therefore, it is the goal of this review to summarize, using an integrated approach, current knowledge of the vascular effects of estrogen, both in humans and in experimental animals. Aspects of estrogen synthesis and receptors, as well as general mechanisms of estrogenic action are reviewed with an emphasis on issues particularly relevant to the vascular system. Recent understanding of the impact of estrogen on mitochondrial function suggests that the longer lifespan of women compared to men may depend in part on the ability of estrogen to decrease production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Mechanisms by which estrogen increases endothelial vasodilator function, promotes angiogenesis and modulates autonomic function are summarized. Key aspects of the relevant pathophysiology of inflammation, atherosclerosis, stroke, migraine and thrombosis are reviewed concerning current knowledge of estrogenic effects. A number of emerging concepts are addressed throughout. These include the importance of estrogenic formulation and route of administration and the impact of genetic polymorphisms, either in estrogen receptors or in enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism, on responsiveness to hormone treatment. The importance of local metabolism of estrogenic precursors and the impact of timing for initiation of treatment and its duration are also considered. While consensus opinions are emphasized, controversial views are presented in order to stimulate future research. PMID:18579753

  11. Classical cardiovascular disease risk factors associate with vascular function and morphology in rheumatoid arthritis: a six-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). An early manifestation of CVD is endothelial dysfunction which can lead to functional and morphological vascular abnormalities. Classical CVD risk factors and inflammation are both implicated in causing endothelial dysfunction in RA. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of baseline inflammation, cumulative inflammation, and classical CVD risk factors on the vasculature following a six-year follow-up period. Methods A total of 201 RA patients (155 females, median age (25th to 75th percentile): 61 years (53 to 67)) were examined at baseline (2006) for presence of classical CVD risk factors and determination of inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). At follow-up (2012) patients underwent assessments of microvascular and macrovascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, along with assessment of carotid atherosclerosis. The CRP and ESR were recorded from the baseline study visit to the follow-up visit for each patient to calculate cumulative inflammatory burden. Results Classical CVD risk factors, but not RA disease-related inflammation, predicted microvascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, macrovascular endothelium-independent function and carotid atherosclerosis. These findings were similar in a sub-group of patients free from CVD, and not receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors or biologics. Cumulative inflammation was not associated with microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function, but a weak association was apparent between area under the curve for CRP and carotid atherosclerosis. Conclusions Classical CVD risk factors may be better long-term predictors of vascular function and morphology than systemic disease-related inflammation in patients with RA. Further studies are needed to

  12. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  13. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  14. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  15. Reactivity of rat abdominal aorta to U46619 following whole-body gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Warfield, M.E.; Schneidkraut, M.J.; Cunard, C.M.; Ramwell, P.W.; Kot, P.A.

    1989-03-01

    Rats exposed to 20 Gy whole-body irradiation demonstrated a depressed aortic responsiveness to the thromboxane mimic, U46619, 48 h postirradiation. The mechanism for this observed response was investigated. Shielding the abdominal aorta attenuated this altered vascular reactivity. Since this suggests that radiation exposure induces local changes in the aorta, vascular smooth muscle function was assessed with cumulative concentrations of KCl. Radiation-induced smooth muscle damage was insufficient to account for the decreased reactivity to U46619. Next, calcium availability for vascular smooth muscle function was evaluated and found not to be responsible for the radiation-induced depression in aortic responsiveness. Finally, the role that cyclooxygenase products play in the depressed contractile response was investigated. Indomethacin treatment prior to and for 48 h after irradiation attenuated the altered vascular reactivity to U46619. These data suggest that a radiation-induced increase in cyclooxygenase products may play a role in the decreased aortic reactivity to the thromboxane mimic.

  16. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R.; Panicker, T. M. R.; Korath, M. Paul; Jagadeesan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1° C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders. PMID:20126565

  17. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  18. [Pathogenesis and treatment of vascular calcification in CKD].

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, D; Gallieni, M; Pasho, S; Fallabrino, G; Olivi, L; Volpi, E; Ciceri, P; Missaglia, E; Ronga, C; Brambilla, C; Butti, A; Rocca-Rey, L; Chiarelli, G; Cozzolino, M

    2009-01-01

    Increased vascular calcification is a major cause of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is the result of an active ossification process counteracted by ''bone'' proteins such as osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin, and osteocalcin. Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism that occurs in CKD. In addition to abnormalities in the serum calcium and phosphate profile, CKD-MBD is characterized by abnormalities of bone turnover, mineralization, volume and growth as well as vascular calcification. Considering that the presence and extent of vascular calcification in CKD portend a poor prognosis, many efforts have been made to shed light on this complicated phenomenon to prevent vascular calcium deposition and its progression. Indeed, careful control of calcium load, serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone along with the use of calcium-free phosphate binders and vitamin D receptor activators represent a new therapeutic armamentarium to improve quality of life and reduce mortality in CKD. PMID:19382090

  19. Sox17 is required for normal pulmonary vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Alexander W.; Haitchi, Hans Michael; LeCras, Timothy D.; Sridharan, Anusha; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; James, Jeanne; Udell, Nicholas; Thurner, Philipp J.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The SRY-box containing transcription factor Sox17 is required for endoderm formation and vascular morphogenesis during embryonic development. In the lung, Sox17 is expressed in mesenchymal progenitors of the embryonic pulmonary vasculature and is restricted to vascular endothelial cells in the mature lung. Conditional deletion of Sox17 in splanchnic mesenchyme-derivatives using Dermo1-Cre resulted in substantial loss of Sox17 from developing pulmonary vascular endothelial cells and caused pulmonary vascular abnormalities before birth, including pulmonary vein varices, enlarged arteries, and decreased perfusion of the microvasculature. While survival of Dermo1-Cre;Sox17Δ/Δ mice (herein termed Sox17Δ/Δ) was unaffected at E18.5, most Sox17Δ/Δ mice died by 3 weeks of age. After birth, the density of the pulmonary microvasculature was decreased in association with alveolar simplification, biventricular cardiac hypertrophy, and valvular regurgitation. The severity of the postnatal cardiac phenotype was correlated with the severity of pulmonary vasculature abnormalities. Sox17 is required for normal formation of the pulmonary vasculature and postnatal cardiovascular homeostasis. PMID:24418654

  20. Sox17 is required for normal pulmonary vascular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Alexander W; Haitchi, Hans Michael; LeCras, Timothy D; Sridharan, Anusha; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; James, Jeanne; Udell, Nicholas; Thurner, Philipp J; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-01

    The SRY-box containing transcription factor Sox17 is required for endoderm formation and vascular morphogenesis during embryonic development. In the lung, Sox17 is expressed in mesenchymal progenitors of the embryonic pulmonary vasculature and is restricted to vascular endothelial cells in the mature lung. Conditional deletion of Sox17 in splanchnic mesenchyme-derivatives using Dermo1-Cre resulted in substantial loss of Sox17 from developing pulmonary vascular endothelial cells and caused pulmonary vascular abnormalities before birth, including pulmonary vein varices, enlarged arteries, and decreased perfusion of the microvasculature. While survival of Dermo1-Cre;Sox17Δ/Δ mice (herein termed Sox17Δ/Δ) was unaffected at E18.5, most Sox17Δ/Δ mice died by 3 weeks of age. After birth, the density of the pulmonary microvasculature was decreased in association with alveolar simplification, biventricular cardiac hypertrophy, and valvular regurgitation. The severity of the postnatal cardiac phenotype was correlated with the severity of pulmonary vasculature abnormalities. Sox17 is required for normal formation of the pulmonary vasculature and postnatal cardiovascular homeostasis. PMID:24418654

  1. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  2. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  3. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  4. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  5. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  6. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  7. Perivascular fat, AMP-activated protein kinase and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Almabrouk, T A M; Ewart, M A; Salt, I P; Kennedy, S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that modulates vascular function, with implications for the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipocytes and stromal cells contained within PVAT produce mediators (adipokines, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and gaseous compounds) with a range of paracrine effects modulating vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, proliferation and migration. However, the modulatory effect of PVAT on the vascular system in diseases, such as obesity, hypertension and atherosclerosis, remains poorly characterized. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates adipocyte metabolism, adipose biology and vascular function, and hence may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the vascular complications associated with obesity and T2DM. The role of AMPK in PVAT or the actions of PVAT have yet to be established, however. Activation of AMPK by pharmacological agents, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, may modulate the activity of PVAT surrounding blood vessels and thereby contribute to their beneficial effect in cardiometabolic diseases. This review will provide a current perspective on how PVAT may influence vascular function via AMPK. We will also attempt to demonstrate how modulating AMPK activity using pharmacological agents could be exploited therapeutically to treat cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24490856

  8. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  9. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  10. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  11. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels of peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and the downstream targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, and Idh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (all P< 0.05). Although there were no differences in EX and SED mice concerning endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction was blunted in vessels from EX compared with SED mice, and this effect was normalized by NOS inhibition. These training-induced increases in vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  12. Reconciling paradigms of abnormal pulmonary blood flow and quasi-malignant cellular alterations in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Happé, C M; Szulcek, R; Voelkel, N F; Bogaard, H J

    2016-08-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) structural and functional abnormalities of the small lung vessels interact and lead to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure. A current pathobiological concept characterizes PAH as a 'quasi-malignant' disease focusing on cancer-like alterations in endothelial cells (EC) and the importance of their acquired apoptosis-resistant, hyper-proliferative phenotype in the process of vascular remodeling. While changes in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) have been long-since recognized and linked to the development of PAH, little is known about a possible relationship between an altered PBF and the quasi-malignant cell phenotype in the pulmonary vascular wall. This review summarizes recognized and hypothetical effects of an abnormal PBF on the pulmonary vascular bed and links these to quasi-malignant changes found in the pulmonary endothelium. Here we describe that abnormal PBF does not only trigger a pulmonary vascular cell growth program, but may also maintain the cancer-like phenotype of the endothelium. Consequently, normalization of PBF and EC response to abnormal PBF may represent a treatment strategy in patients with established PAH. PMID:26804008

  13. Essential Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Vascular Leakage in the Retina of Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sungeun; Hwang, JongYun; Kim, Soo-Youl; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we designed an in vivo transglutaminase (TGase) activity assay in mouse retina and demonstrated that hyperglycemia induced vascular leakage by activating TGase2 in diabetic retina. VEGF elevated TGase2 activity through sequential elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in endothelial cells. The TGase inhibitors cystamine and monodansylcadaverin or TGase2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of two TGase inhibitors or TGase2 siRNA successfully inhibited hyperglycemia-induced TGase activation and microvascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. C-peptide or ROS scavengers also inhibited TGase activation in diabetic mouse retinas. The role of TGase2 in VEGF-induced vascular leakage was further supported using diabetic TGase2(-/-) mice. Thus, our findings suggest that ROS-mediated activation of TGase2 plays a key role in VEGF-induced vascular leakage by stimulating stress fiber formation and VE-cadherin disruption. PMID:27207524

  14. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  15. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-02-28

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  16. Adiposity and Insufficient MVPA Predict Cardiometabolic Abnormalities in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Snih, Soham Al; Stoddard, Jonathan; McClain, James; Lee, IMin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the extent to which different combinations of objectively measured sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity contribute to cardiometabolic health. Design and Methods A population representative sample of 5,268 individuals, aged 20-85 years, was included from the combined 2003-2006 NHANES datasets. Activity categories were created on the combined basis of objectively measured SB and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) tertiles. Cardiometabolic abnormalities included elevated blood pressure, levels of triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, C-reactive protein, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance value, and low HDL-cholesterol level. BMI, and DXA-derived percent body fat (% BF) and android adiposity were also compared across groups. Predictors for a metabolically abnormal phenotype (≥3 cardiometabolic abnormalities, or insulin resistance) were determined. Results Adults with the least SB and greatest MVPA exhibited the healthiest cardiometabolic profiles, whereas adults with the greatest SB and lowest MVPA were older and had elevated risk. Time spent in SB was not a predictor of the metabolically abnormal phenotype when MVPA was accounted for. Adults with the highest MVPA across SB tertiles did not differ markedly in prevalence of obesity, adiposity, and/or serum cardiometabolic risk factors; however, less MVPA was associated with substantial elevations of obesity and cardiometabolic risk. Android adiposity (per kilogram) was independently associated with the metabolically abnormal phenotype in both men (OR: 2.36 [95% CI, 1.76-3.17], p<0.001) and women (OR: 2.00 [95% CI, 1.63-2.45], p<0.001). Among women, greater SB, and less lifestyle moderate activity and MVPA were each independently associated with the metabolically abnormal phenotype, whereas only less MVPA was associated with it in men. Conclusions MVPA is a strong predictor of cardiometabolic health among adults, independent of time spent in SB. PMID

  17. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  18. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the estimation of the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery through the use of a digital image processing system for vascular angiograms. The film digitizer uses an electronic image dissector camera to scan the angiogram and convert the recorded optical density information into a numerical format. Another processing step involves locating the vessel edges from the digital image. The computer has been programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements are combined into an atherosclerosis index, which is found in a post-mortem study to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  19. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  20. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  1. Targeting Cellular Antioxidant Enzymes for Treating Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular dysfunction is a chronic inflammatory process that spreads from the fatty streak and foam cells through lesion progression. Therefore, its early diagnosis and prevention is unfeasible. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Intracellular redox status is tightly regulated by oxidant and antioxidant systems. Imbalance in these systems causes oxidative or reductive stress which triggers cellular damage or aberrant signaling, and leads to dysregulation. Paradoxically, large clinical trials have shown that non-specific ROS scavenging by antioxidant vitamins is ineffective or sometimes harmful. ROS production can be locally regulated by cellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins. Therapeutic approach targeting these antioxidant enzymes might prove beneficial for prevention of ROS-related atherosclerotic vascular disease. Conversely, the development of specific antioxidant enzyme-mimetics could contribute to the clinical effectiveness. PMID:24009865

  2. Iron chelation inhibits the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Preston, Ioana R; Hill, Nicholas S; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Because iron is an important regulator of ROS biology, this study examined the effects of iron chelation on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The administration of an iron chelator, deferoxamine, to rats prevented chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Various iron chelators inhibited the growth of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Protein carbonylation, an important iron-dependent biological event, was promoted in association with pulmonary vascular remodeling and cell growth. A proteomic approach identified that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor (a negative regulator of RhoA) is carbonylated. In human plasma, the protein carbonyl content was significantly higher in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension than in healthy controls. These results suggest that iron plays an important role in the ROS-dependent mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22974762

  3. Effect of agmatine on experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nader, M A; Gamiel, N M; El-Kashef, H; Zaghloul, M S

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of agmatine sulfate (AG, CAS2482-00-0) in nicotine (NIC)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rabbits. NIC was administered to produce VED in rabbits with or without AG for 6 weeks. Serum lipid profile, serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase generation, serum nitrite/nitrate, serum vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and aortic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) levels were analyzed.Treatment with AG markedly improves lipid profile and prevented NIC-induced VED and oxidative stress. The mechanism of AG in improving NIC-induced VED may be due to the significant reduction in serum VCAM-1 levels and aortic NF-κB. Thus, it may be concluded that AG reduces the oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, VCAM-1 levels, and aortic NF-κB expression, thereby consequently improving the integrity of vascular endothelium. PMID:26424770

  4. Mitochondria as signaling organelles in the vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Marisol; Colombo, Sergio L.; Godfrey, Andrew; Moncada, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic and consume relatively low amounts of oxygen (O2) compared with other cells. We have confirmed that oxidative phosphorylation is not the main source of ATP generation in these cells. We also show that at a low O2 concentration (<1%) endogenous NO plays a key role in preventing the accumulation of the α-subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1. At higher O2 concentrations (1–3%) NO facilitates the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. This production activates the AMP-activated protein kinase by a mechanism independent of nucleotide concentrations. Thus, the primary role of mitochondria in vascular endothelial cells may not be to generate ATP but, under the control of NO, to act as signaling organelles using either O2 or O2-derived species as signaling molecules. Diversion of O2 away from endothelial cell mitochondria by NO might also facilitate oxygenation of vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:16565215

  5. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders. We will discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. This is not carry out a comprehensive review; rather we selectively discuss existing evidence in building an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

  6. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  7. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  8. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  9. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  10. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  11. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  12. Clinical and pathological umbilical cord abnormalities in fetal thrombotic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Redline, Raymond W

    2004-12-01

    Although inherited fetal coagulation disorders may lead to fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV) in occasional cases, several studies have failed to show a significant association between these 2 entities. This study tests the hypothesis that vascular stasis related to chronic umbilical cord obstruction might be a contributing factor. The study population consisted of 125 neurologically impaired term infants who were the focus of clinical negligence litigation. FTV, as defined by an average of >15 villi per slide exhibiting either a complete lack of blood vessels or villous stromal karyorrhexis, was found in the placentas of 23 cases. Clinical umbilical cord entanglement (ie, true knots or cord loops around the neck or body parts at delivery) was significantly more common in cases with FTV (61% vs 24% in cases without FTV; P = 0.0009). Potentially obstructive pathological abnormalities of the umbilical cord (marginal/ membranous insertion, decreased Wharton's jelly, maximum cord diameter <8 mm, or hypercoiling) were also more frequent in this group (30% vs 9% without FTV; P = 0.0055). Overall, 16 of 23 placentas with FTV had either clinical or pathological cord abnormalities. This study, with careful documentation of cord status at delivery and on the delivered placenta, is the first to report that clinical cord entanglement and pathological cord abnormalities are significantly increased in placentas with FTV. PMID:15619208

  13. Vascular Aging: Lessons From Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in children is associated with early vascular aging (EVA) and underlying immunologic-metabolic abnormalities and accelerated biological maturation. Morphologic and functional vascular changes underlying EVA and HTN in children resemble those seen in the elderly including but not limited to an increase in intima-media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. Although progeria syndrome leading to EVA and the development of clinically manifested cardiovascular (CV) disease in the second decade of life is a rare hereditary disorder, primary HTN, which is also associated with EVA, is much more common (reported in up to 10% in adolescents). EVA associated with HTN in children leads to the premature development of target organ injury in childhood and CV events in early adulthood. Limited evidence from prospective observational studies in children and adolescents indicates that early lifestyle measures (low salt/low sugar intake and exercise) or pharmacologic treatment of HTN, or both, partially reverses morphologic and functional changes underlying EVA such as an increase in carotid IMT and pulse wave velocity, a decrease in flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, and an increase in oxidative stress and visceral fat. Future mechanistic and therapeutic clinical trials are desirable to assess the mechanisms and treatment strategies of EVA in the context of HTN in children and their effect on CV events in early adulthood. PMID:27040097

  14. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  15. The Effect of the Postnatal Environment on Altered Fetal Programming of Adult Vascular Function in Mice Lacking Endothelial Nitic Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Shannon M.; Makhlouf, Michel; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Anderson, Garland D.; Saade, George R.; Longo, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate vascular reactivity in heterozygous and homozygous offspring with a genetic predisposition for hypertension after postnatal cross fostering to mothers with the opposite genetic inheritance of the NOS3 knockout allele. Study design: Homozygous NOS3 knockout (C57BL/6J-NOS3−/−KO) and wild-type mice (NOS3+/+WT) were bred to obtain heterozygous litters with a paternally-derived (NOS3+/−pat) or maternally-derived (NOS3+/−mat) knockout allele. After delivery, heterozygous and homozygous litters were cross fostered to a mother with the opposite NOS3 gene status. Carotid arteries were placed in a wire myograph for isometric tension recording using contractile and relaxant agents. Statistical analysis with One-Way ANOVA and Neuman-Keuls post-hoc testing was performed. Results: Increased sensitivity to phenylephrine and absent relaxation to acetycholine in NOS3+/−mat was reversed with cross-fostering and vasorelaxation to isoproteronol was increased. Contraction to calcium was increased in the cross fostered paternally-derived and wild-type litters. Conclusion: Postnatal interventions may favorably alter the adult vascular profile resulting from an abnormal intrauterine environment. PMID:17403420

  16. [Vascular vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Dieterich, M

    2002-12-01

    Ischemia,hemorrhages, and other vascular disorders can result in various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo, oculomotor/balance disturbances, and nausea. The vascular vertigo syndromes listed in Table 1 can however be brought about by other causes such as demyelitizing focuses in multiple sclerosis or space-occupying lesions, so that not only localization of the damaged structure but also the various etiologies are decisive for the choice of therapy. Occasionally, combined functional disturbances of the peripheral and central vestibular system appear, such as an infarction of the inferior anterior cerebellar artery, which supplies the labyrinth and parts of the brainstem and cerebellum. In rare cases, a central lesion can have the same signs as a peripheral-vertibular disturbance: a lacunar infarct at the root entry zone of the eighth nerve can mimic a unilateral partial loss of labyrinth function as it occurs in vestibular neuritis, thus named "pseudoneuritis". Differential diagnosis between vestibular migraine, vestibular paroxysmia, transient ischemic brainstem attacks, and Meniere's disease is sometimes so difficult that only trial therapies such as prophylaxis with beta blockers, carbamazepine, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, or betahistin can clarify the issue. PMID:12486562

  17. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  18. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  19. Mutation of rnf213a by TALEN causes abnormal angiogenesis and circulation defects in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Sun, Xunsha; Chen, Huimin; Liu, Huijiao; Lai, Rong; Li, Jiaoxing; Wang, Yufang; Zhang, Jingjing; Sheng, Wenli

    2016-08-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is characterized by a stenosis at the terminal of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. RNF213 is a susceptibility gene for MMD in East Asians. The role of RNF213 in the etiology of MMD remains unknown. Here we generated rnf213a mutant zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technique and described the characteristics of a zebrafish embryonic model of MMD. rnf213a mutant zebrafish developed abnormal angiogenesis in intersegmental vessels and cranial secondary vessels. Endothelial cells exhibited the defects in morphogenesis and formation of vascular tubes despite normal cell to cell contacts under electron microscope. Circulatory disorder was induced by abnormal sprouts in the trunk and head. Reduced circulation in the abnormal vessels was revealed by microangiography. No blood flow permeated across the vessels wall despite the extremely abnormal structure. rnf213a mutant showed lower erythrocyte velocity in dorsal aorta than that in wild-type siblings. In this study, we provided a promising in vivo model for MMD, and this model would aid to understand the function of rnf213a in angiogenesis. PMID:27125596

  20. Monitoring microvascular reactivity in dental subjects.

    PubMed

    Roth, G I; Matheny, J L; Gonty, A A; Paterson, R L

    1980-01-01

    In this section of a larger study, a system for monitoring changes in the microcirculation, in humans in the dental setting, is described. The technique involves clinical nailfold capillary photomicroscopy and electronic image-scan measurements. The system was tested using reactive hyperemia after vascular occlusion; it proved reliable and sufficiently sensitive for measuring vascular reactivity in humans. (In a subsequent paper, clinical findings relative to the use of this technique with patients undergoing nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia will be presented).The importance of the microcirculation for the integrity of the tissues cannot be overemphasized. Since the term "microcirculation" can be defined as the microscopic subdivisions of the vascular system that lie within the tissue proper and are exposed to its immediate environment,(1) it is evident that most of the exchange of nutrients and waste products occuring in the tissue will occur at this level. Furthermore, the adequacy of tissue perfusion during drug administration, or during and after anesthesia, is dependent on the adequacy and reactivity of this subdivision of the vascular system.(2)A basic prerequisite to the understanding of microcirculatory function in a given vascular bed is the precise quantitation of dimensional changes in those vessels(3). Dynamic measurements in vivo are required, since it is difficult, if not impossible, to ensure that the dimensions obtained from fixed tissue specimens are accurate measures of those occurring in the living state. This is especially true where vessel dimensions are rapidly changing in response to endogenous or exogenous influences. Unfortunately the task of in vivo measurement of microvascular dimensions is difficult in most microcirculatory beds. Since the vessels are an integral part of a threedimensional structure,(4) the tasks of visualizing, isolating and measuring the vessels are formidable. These difficulties are compounded if the particular vessels

  1. The effect of basal vasodilation on hypercapnic and hypocapnic reactivity measured using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Molly G; Donahue, Manus J; Duyn, Jeff H; Jezzard, Peter; Bulte, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity to vasodilatory hypercapnic and vasoconstrictive hypocapnic challenges is known to be altered in several hemodynamic disorders, which is often attributable to changes in smooth muscle-mediated vascular compliance. Recently, attenuated reactivity to hypercapnia but enhanced reactivity to hypocapnia was observed in patients with chronic stroke. We hypothesize that the latter observation could be explained by a change in the basal vascular tone. In particular, reduced cerebral perfusion pressure, as is prevalent in these patients, may cause vasodilation through autoregulatory mechanisms, and this compensatory baseline condition may alter reactivity to vasoconstrictive hypocapnic challenges. To test this hypothesis, a predilated vascular condition was created in young, healthy subjects (n=11; age=23 to 36 years) using inhalation of 4% CO2. Using blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, breath holding and cued deep breathing respiratory challenges were administered to assess hypercapnia and hypocapnia reactivity, respectively. During the predilated condition, vasoconstrictive reactivity to hypocapnia was significantly (21.1%, P=0.016) enhanced throughout the gray matter, whereas there was no significant change (6.4%, P=0.459) in hypercapnic vasodilatory reactivity. This suggests that baseline vasodilation may explain the enhanced hypocapnia reactivity observed in some stroke patients, and that hypocapnia challenges may help identify the level of vascular compliance in patients with reduced cerebral perfusion pressure. PMID:20959855

  2. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  3. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sean X; Stevens, Jeff W; Lentz, Steven R

    2015-06-18

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  4. Development of vascularization in the chondroepiphysis of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ganey, T M; Love, S M; Ogden, J A

    1992-07-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the presence of cartilage canals within developing epiphyses, the chronology of their appearance and their vascular contribution to the developing chondroepiphysis remain to be studied. We have selected a model, similar to the developing human skeletal system, in which extensive cartilage canal development precedes the subsequent secondary ossification process. In the rabbit proximal tibia, both chondroepiphyseal and vascular (cartilage canals) development were quantified from the first evidence of vessels until the formation of the secondary center of ossification. The volume of hyaline cartilage increased 25 times after intraepiphyseal vessels were initially observed. The blood supply, measured in cartilage canal volume, increased 400-fold over the same period. Three distinct cartilage canal morphologies were identifiable before the formation of the secondary center of ossification: (a) an early phase, in which the canals appeared as infoldings derived from the perichondrium; (b) a reactive phase, occurring simultaneously with chondrocyte hypertrophy and characterized by a very large increase in mesenchymal cells within the cartilage canal; and (c) a vascular phase, coincident with mineralization of the matrix, in which the familiar, unitary canal morphology was replaced by that of a vascular plexus. While matrix mineralization and the formation of bone seem dependent on critical cellular events, notably chondrocyte hypertrophy, the role that the vascular supply plays in developing sufficient biological inertia for the ossifying transition must not be underestimated. PMID:1613625

  5. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Stevens, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  6. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  7. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  8. Novel Technique to Evaluate Pulmonary Vascular Resistance in a Patient With Aortopulmonary Window.

    PubMed

    Penk, Jamie; Wax, David; Gilbert, Christian; Duffy, C E

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 15-month-old female presenting with a large aortopulmonary window during a medical mission. The optimal surgical correction for this patient would be based on an estimation of her pulmonary vascular reactivity. This report details the use of antegrade/retrograde flow ratios using Doppler measurements in the proximal descending aorta at baseline and while receiving 100% oxygen. A large increase in the proportion of retrograde flow under the 100% oxygen condition suggested a reactive pulmonary vascular bed. She underwent a complete repair with patch closure of the aortopulmonary window. A postoperative echocardiographic assessment showed near normal right ventricular pressures. PMID:26586308

  9. [Vascular ectasia of the gastric antrum with "watermelon stomach." Report of an interesting case].

    PubMed

    Young, K

    1997-01-01

    A patient with vascular ectasia of the gastric antrum is presented. This abnormality caused him anemia, treated with packed red cells. He received hormonal treatment during two weeks, but he did not improve. Therefore, an antrectomy with vagectomy, and a gastroduodenal anastomosis Billroth type I were performed. PMID:10997182

  10. Vascular rings: a radiological review of anatomical variations

    PubMed Central

    Ganie, Iqbal Siddi; Amod, Khatija; Reddy, Darshan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The imaging modalities used to diagnose vascular rings have evolved over time, from basic radiographic studies to advanced cross-sectional imaging. The goal of preoperative imaging is to provide the surgeon with an accurate representation of the ring configuration so that the surgical approach may be planned. Methods We conducted a review of all patients with vascular rings who underwent surgery at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban, South Africa from 1 July 2008 to 1 July 2013. Results Eight patients were diagnosed with vascular rings. Seven patients had an abnormal plain chest radiograph (right aortic arch, tracheal narrowing, or abnormal mediastinal silhouette), while in six patients the contrast oesophagogram demonstrated a fixed extrinsic oesophageal indentation. Computed tomography angiography confirmed the pathology in all cases, with six double aortic arches and two right aortic arches with aberrant left subclavian artery and left ligamentum arteriosum. Conclusions We advocate a diagnostic imaging algorithm consisting of plain chest radiography, contrast oesophagogram and computed tomography angiography prior to surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide an alternative axial imaging modality depending on institutional preference. PMID:26523459

  11. The metabolic vascular syndrome - guide to an individualized treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Markolf; Pistrosch, Frank; Bornstein, Stefan R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2016-03-01

    In ancient Greek medicine the concept of a distinct syndrome (going together) was used to label 'a group of signs and symptoms' that occur together and 'characterize a particular abnormality and condition'. The (dys)metabolic syndrome is a common cluster of five pre-morbid metabolic-vascular risk factors or diseases associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, fatty liver disease and risk of cancer. The risk for major complications such as cardiovascular diseases, NASH and some cancers develops along a continuum of risk factors into clinical diseases. Therefore we still include hyperglycemia, visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension as diagnostic traits in the definition according to the term 'deadly quartet'. From the beginning elevated blood pressure and hyperglycemia were core traits of the metabolic syndrome associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus metabolic and vascular abnormalities are in extricable linked. Therefore it seems reasonable to extend the term to metabolic-vascular syndrome (MVS) to signal the clinical relevance and related risk of multimorbidity. This has important implications for integrated diagnostics and therapeutic approach. According to the definition of a syndrome the rapid global rise in the prevalence of all traits and comorbidities of the MVS is mainly caused by rapid changes in life-style and sociocultural transition resp. with over- and malnutrition, low physical activity and social stress as a common soil. PMID:26956847

  12. Cardiovascular reactivity and adaptation to recurrent psychological stress: effects of prior task exposure.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, R M; Blascovich, J; Tomaka, J; Leitten, C L; Schneider, T R; Wiens, S

    1999-11-01

    The effects of prior task exposure on cardiovascular reactivity to stress were examined in two experiments by randomly assigning participants to repeated exposure groups that performed mental arithmetic pretest and test tasks versus delayed exposure groups that performed only the test task after prolonged rest. Impedance cardiographic and blood pressure measures were recorded continuously from 60 undergraduate men in Experiment 1 and 112 undergraduate men and women in Experiment 2. Task repetition attenuated cardiovascular reactivity and improved task performance in repeated exposure groups (p < .001), suggesting an integrated process of behavioral adaptation. During the test task, delayed exposure groups showed greater cardiac reactivity (p < .01), but not vascular reactivity, than repeated exposure groups. Thus, cardiac reactivity varied as a specific function of prior task exposure, whereas vascular reactivity varied as a general function of time. PMID:10554594

  13. Hyperoside inhibits high-glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Kwon, O-Jun; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-10-01

    Hyperoside, an active compound from the genera of Hypericum and Crataegus, was reported to have antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and anticoagulant activities. Vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in this study, we attempted to determine whether hyperoside can suppress vascular inflammatory processes induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. Data showed that HG induced markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expressions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Remarkably, all of the above-mentioned vascular inflammatory effects of HG were attenuated by pretreatment with hyperoside. Vascular inflammatory responses induced by HG are critical events underlying development of various diabetic complications; therefore, our results suggest that hyperoside may have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis. PMID:24609927

  14. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material. PMID:11552466

  15. Detrimental effects of high-fat diet loading on vascular endothelial function and therapeutic efficacy of ezetimibe and statins in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Akira; Okada, Yosuke; Mori, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takuya; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-05-31

    Several recent reports from large clinical trials have described the role of postprandial hyperlipidemia in the onset of atherosclerosis. In this pilot study, the effects of postprandial lipid abnormalities induced by high-fat diet loading on vascular endothelial function in type 2 diabetes were investigated and the effects of ezetimibe and statins on endothelial function were compared. In 20 patients in Study 1, peripheral arterial tonometry tests were performed before and 4h after loading to measure the reactive hyperemia index (RHI). In Study 2, the same patients were randomly allocated to ezetimibe or rosuvastatin. After 1 week of treatment, loading tests were conducted in the same manner. In Study 1, the RHI decreased from 1.86 to 1.60. There were no significant correlations between changes in RHI and the area under the curve (AUC) or coefficient of variation (CV) of each metabolic marker. In Study 2, ezetimibe treatment resulted in a significant improvement in RHI. The two drugs had comparable effects on changes in AUC. There were no significant correlations between changes in RHI and changes in AUC or changes in CV. When age, sex, drug, hemoglobin A1c, and changes in each lipid were evaluated as independent variables with RHI improvement as the dependent variable, drug differences were found to exert the greatest effect on RHI improvement using a stepwise procedure. The results of this study suggest that the progression of atherosclerosis is due to abnormalities in postprandial lipid metabolism and that ezetimibe can potentially inhibit the aggravation of vascular endothelial dysfunction after high-fat diet loading. PMID:26842592

  16. Abnormality on Liver Function Test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Children with abnormal liver function can often be seen in outpatient clinics or inpatients wards. Most of them have respiratory disease, or gastroenteritis by virus infection, accompanying fever. Occasionally, hepatitis by the viruses causing systemic infection may occur, and screening tests are required. In patients with jaundice, the tests for differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In the case of a child with hepatitis B virus infection vertically from a hepatitis B surface antigen positive mother, the importance of the recognition of immune clearance can't be overstressed, for the decision of time to begin treatment. Early diagnosis changes the fate of a child with Wilson disease. So, screening test for the disease should not be omitted. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is mainly discovered in obese children, is a new strong candidate triggering abnormal liver function. Muscular dystrophy is a representative disease mimicking liver dysfunction. Although muscular dystrophy is a progressive disorder, and early diagnosis can't change the fate of patients, it will be better to avoid parent's blame for delayed diagnosis. PMID:24511518

  17. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  18. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  19. Protocatechuic Acid Restores Vascular Responses in Rats With Chronic Diabetes Induced by Streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Thukhammee, Wipawee; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in development of vascular dysfunction in diabetes. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) has been reported to exert antioxidant and anti-hyperglycemic activities. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). The rats were maintained in a state of hyperglycemia for 12 weeks. Then, PCA (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) was administered orally or insulin (4 U/kg/day) was subcutaneous injected to the rats for 6 weeks. Blood pressure, vascular responses to vasoactive agents, vascular superoxide production, blood glucose, insulin, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes were examined. The diabetic rats showed weight loss, insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, increased oxidative stress, decreased plasma nitric oxide, elevated blood pressure, increased vascular response to phenylephrine and decreased vascular responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. PCA significantly decreased blood glucose and oxidative stress, and increased plasma nitric oxide in diabetic rats. Interestingly, PCA treatment restored blood pressure and vascular reactivity, and antioxidant enzyme activity diabetic rats. This study provides the first evidence of the efficacy of PCA in restoring the vascular reactivity of diabetic rats. The mechanism of action may be associated with an alleviation of oxidative stress. PMID:26575211

  20. The value of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of pediatric mediastinal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.J.; Sagel, S.S.; Reed, K.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of computed tomography (CT) in evaluation of mediastinal abnormalities was assessed in 23 pediatric patients. By comparison with standard chest radiography, CT provided additional diagnostic information in 82% of the patients. In 65%, the CT findings contributed to a change in clinical management. CT was most useful in documenting a benign process (near-water-density mass or a normal vascular or soft-tissue structure) and in demonstrating the full extent of a malignant tumor.

  1. Vascular dysfunction in the offspring of AT1 receptor antibody-positive pregnant rats during high-salt diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Su-Li; Xiong, Hai-Yan; DU, Yun-Hui; Quan, Lin; Yang, Jie; Ma, Xiu-Rui; Liu, Hui-Rong

    2011-04-25

    Antibody against the angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1-Ab) could disturb placental development. The placenta is the key organ between mother and fetus. Placental damage will seriously impair fetal growth and development in utero, leading to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Based on the fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD) hypothesis, IUGR could increase a propensity to develop adult onset cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present study was designed to determine whether vascular function has changed in the adult offspring of AT1-Ab positive pregnant rats. Twenty four female rats (8-week-old, AT1-Ab negative) were randomly divided into two groups, immunized and vehicle groups. Immunized group received active immunization to establish AT1-Ab-positive model, while vehicle group was subjected to Freund's adjuvant without antigen. After 8 weeks of immunization, the antibody titers in sera from the female rats were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Then all the female rats were mated with normal Wistar male rats and became pregnant. Immunized/vehicle group offspring rats (I offspring/V offspring) were raised to 40-week-old under standard chow feeding. Then the two groups' offspring rats were given a high-salt diet for 12 weeks (4% NaCl in chow feeding). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured dynamically by noninvasive blood pressure system. The vascular ring experiment was performed to detect vascular function and reactivity. As detected by ELISA, the titers of antibody peaked at the 8th week (OD values: 2.75 ± 0.08 vs 0.33 ± 0.01, P < 0.01 vs vehicle group at the same time point). There was no significant difference of SBP between the two groups' offspring rats during the high-salt diet (P > 0.05). Isolated thoracic aortic rings of I offspring had significantly decreased constriction under norepinephrine treatment (P < 0.01 vs V offspring) and significantly decreased dilation under acetylcholine treatment (P < 0.05 vs V offspring). These

  2. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  3. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  4. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  5. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jaechan; Lee, In Kyu

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  6. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  7. Vascular toxicity of silver nanoparticles to developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Mapes, Christopher D; Khlebnikova, Maria; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Marisol S

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs, 1-100 nm) can enter the environment and result in exposure to humans and other organisms leading to potential adverse health effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of early life exposure to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs, 50 nm), particularly with respect to vascular toxicity on zebrafish embryos and larvae (Danio rerio). Previously published data has suggested that PVP-AgNP exposure can inhibit the expression of genes within the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway, leading to delayed and abnormal vascular development. Here, we show that early acute exposure (0-12 h post-fertilization, hpf) of embryos to PVP-AgNPs at 1 mg/L or higher results in a transient, dose-dependent induction in VEGF-related gene expression that returns to baseline levels at hatching (72 hpf). Hatching results in normoxia, negating the effects of AgNPs on vascular development. Interestingly, increased gene transcription was not followed by the production of associated proteins within the VEGF pathway, which we attribute to NP-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The impaired translation may be responsible for the observed delays in vascular development at later stages, and for smaller larvae size at hatching. Silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations were < 0.001 mg/L at all times, with no significant effects on the VEGF pathway. We propose that PVP-AgNPs temporarily delay embryonic vascular development by interfering with oxygen diffusion into the egg, leading to hypoxic conditions and ER stress. PMID:27499207

  8. Effects of acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot welding with mild-steel on pulmonary, vascular and immune responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Meighan, Terence G.; Erdely, Aaron; Fedan, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Janet A.; Bilgesu, Suzan; Waugh, Stacey; Anderson, Stacey; Marshall, Nikki B.; Afshari, Aliakbar; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Spot welding is used in the automotive and aircraft industries, where high-speed, repetitive welding is needed to join thin sections of metal. Epoxy adhesives are applied as sealers to the metal seams. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation have been reported in spot welders, but no animal toxicology studies exist. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate vascular, immune and lung toxicity measures after exposure to these metal fumes in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation to 25 mg/m3 to either mild-steel spot welding aerosols with sparking (high metal, HM) or without sparking (low metal, LM) for 4 h/d for 3, 8 and 13 d. Shams were exposed to filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung gene expression and ex vivo BAL cell challenge were performed to assess lung toxicity. Lung resistance (RL) was evaluated before and after challenge with inhaled methacholine (MCh). Functional assessment of the vascular endothelium in isolated rat tail arteries and leukocyte differentiation in the spleen and lymph nodes via flow cytometry was also done. Immediately after exposure, baseline RL was significantly elevated in the LM spot welding aerosols, but returned to control level by 24 h postexposure. Airway reactivity to MCh was unaffected. Lung inflammation and cytotoxicity were mild and transient. Lung epithelial permeability was significantly increased after 3 and 8 d, but not after 13 d of exposure to the HM aerosol. HM aerosols also caused vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased CD4+, CD8+ and B cells in the spleen. Only LM aerosols caused increased IL-6 and MCP-1 levels compared with sham after ex vivo LPS stimulation in BAL macrophages. Acute inhalation of mild-steel spot welding fumes at occupationally relevant concentrations may act as an irritant as evidenced by the increased RL and result in endothelial dysfunction, but otherwise had minor effects on the lung. PMID:25140454

  9. Abnormalities of the Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane, including the hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes, are an important group of inherited hemolytic anemias. Classified by distinctive morphology on peripheral blood smear, these disorders are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Once considered routine, growing recognition of the longterm risks of splenectomy, including cardiovascular disease, thrombotic disorders, and pulmonary hypertension, as well as the emergence of penicillin-resistant pneumococci, a concern for infection in overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, have led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Current management guidelines acknowledge these important considerations when entertaining splenectomy and recommend detailed discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. PMID:24237975

  10. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  11. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  12. Aberrant Pulmonary Vascular Growth and Remodeling in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other organs, a significant portion of lung development occurs after birth during alveolarization, thus rendering the lung highly susceptible to injuries that may disrupt this developmental process. Premature birth heightens this susceptibility, with many premature infants developing the chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease characterized by arrested alveolarization. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the elucidation of mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development, including extensive data suggesting that impaired pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of BPD. Moreover, in addition to impaired vascular growth, patients with BPD also frequently demonstrate alterations in pulmonary vascular remodeling and tone, increasing the risk for persistent hypoxemia and the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, an overview of normal lung development will be presented, and the pathologic features of arrested development observed in BPD will be described, with a specific emphasis on the pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Key pathways that promote normal pulmonary vascular development will be reviewed, and the experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating alterations of these essential pathways in BPD summarized. PMID:27243014

  13. Respiratory and psychiatric abnormalities in chronic symptomatic hyperventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C; Gardner, W N

    1985-01-01

    Many physicians believe that the hyperventilation syndrome is invariably associated with anxiety or undiagnosed organic disease such as asthma and pulmonary embolus, or both. Twenty one patients referred by specialist physicians with unexplained somatic symptoms and unequivocal chronic hypocapnia (resting end tidal Pco2 less than or equal to 4 kPa (30 mm Hg) on repeated occasions during prolonged measurement) were investigated. All but one complained of inability to take a satisfying breath. Standard lung function test results and chest radiographs were normal in all patients, but histamine challenge showed bronchial hyper-reactivity in two of 20 patients tested, and skin tests to common allergens were positive in three of 18. Ventilation-perfusion scanning was abnormal in a further three of 15 patients studied, with unmatched perfusion defects in two and isolated ventilation defects in one. None of the 21 had thyrotoxicosis, severe coronary heart disease, or other relevant cardiovascular abnormalities. Ten of the 21 patients were neurotic and suffered from chronic psychiatric disturbance characterised by anxiety, panic, and phobic symptoms. The remainder had no detectable psychiatric disorders but reported proportionately more somatic than anxiety symptoms. Severe hyperventilation can occur in the absence of formal psychiatric or detectable respiratory or other organic abnormalities. Asthma and pulmonary embolus must be specifically excluded. PMID:3922504

  14. Modeling human endothelial cell transformation in vascular neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Victoria W.; MacKenzie, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC)-derived neoplasias range from benign hemangioma to aggressive metastatic angiosarcoma, which responds poorly to current treatments and has a very high mortality rate. The development of treatments that are more effective for these disorders will be expedited by insight into the processes that promote abnormal proliferation and malignant transformation of human ECs. The study of primary endothelial malignancy has been limited by the rarity of the disease; however, there is potential for carefully characterized EC lines and animal models to play a central role in the discovery, development and testing of molecular targeted therapies for vascular neoplasias. This review describes molecular alterations that have been identified in EC-derived neoplasias, as well as the processes that underpin the immortalization and tumorigenic conversion of ECs. Human EC lines, established through the introduction of defined genetic elements or by culture of primary tumor tissue, are catalogued and discussed in relation to their relevance as models of vascular neoplasia. PMID:24046386

  15. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  16. Vascular infections: exceeding the threshold.

    PubMed

    Cox, T R

    1995-12-01

    During fiscal year 1988, our hospital infection control practitioner identified a 400% increase in the incidence of vascular surgery nosocomial infections. The six graft and six amputation infections were validated as nosocomial against hospital definitions adopted from the Centers for Disease Control. Our Infection Control Committee mandated an audit of the infected vascular surgery patients using a case/control design to identify and examine associated variables that may need attention. The significant finding was microbial resistance to prophylactic antibiotics used during surgery (p > 0.0001, Fisher's exact). The use of vancomycin as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent for all major vascular cases was recommended to the surgeons. PMID:8775383

  17. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  18. Autophagy in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Lee, Seon-Jin; Smith, Akaya; Choi, Augustine M K

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy, or "self eating," refers to a regulated cellular process for the lysosomal-dependent turnover of organelles and proteins. During starvation or nutrient deficiency, autophagy promotes survival through the replenishment of metabolic precursors derived from the degradation of endogenous cellular components. Autophagy represents a general homeostatic and inducible adaptive response to environmental stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and exposure to pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics. Whereas elevated autophagy can be observed in dying cells, the functional relationships between autophagy and programmed cell death pathways remain incompletely understood. Preclinical studies have identified autophagy as a process that can be activated during vascular disorders, including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and other organs, cardiomyopathy, myocardial injury, and atherosclerosis. The functional significance of autophagy in human cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood, and potentially involves both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, depending on model system. Although relatively few studies have been performed in the lung, our recent studies also implicate a role for autophagy in chronic lung disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that regulate autophagy could potentially provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the prevention or treatment of human disease. PMID:20160147

  19. Education in vascular access.

    PubMed

    Moist, Louise M; Lee, Timmy C; Lok, Charmaine E; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed; Xi, Wang; Campbell, Vern; Graham, Janet; Wilson, Barb; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    The successful creation and use of an arteriovenous vascular access (VA) requires a coordinated, educated multidisciplinary team to ensure an optimal VA for each patient. Patient education programs on VA are associated with increased arteriovenous VA use at dialysis initiation. Education should be tailored to patient goals and preferences with the understanding that experiential education from patient to patient is far more influential than that provided by the healthcare professional. VA education for the nephrologist should focus on addressing the systematic and patient-level barriers in achieving a functional VA, with specific components relating to VA creation, maturation, and cannulation that consider patient goals and preferences. A deficit in nursing skills in the area of assessment and cannulation can have devastating consequences for hemodialysis patients. Delivery of an integrated education program increases nurses' knowledge of VA and development of simulation programs or constructs to assist in cannulation of the VA will greatly facilitate the much needed skill transfer. Adequate VA surgical training and experience are critical to the creation and outcomes of VA. Simulations can benefit nephrologists, dialysis nurses surgeons, and interventionalists though aiding in surgical creation, understanding of the physiology and anatomy of a dysfunctional VA, and practicing cannulation techniques. All future educational initiatives must emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary care to attain successful VA outcomes. PMID:23432319

  20. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  1. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  2. Breathing abnormalities in sleep in achondroplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, K A; Everett, F; Sillence, D; Fagan, E; Sullivan, C E

    1993-01-01

    Overnight sleep studies were performed in 20 subjects with achondroplasia to document further the respiratory abnormalities present in this group. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded in 19 of the subjects to screen for the presence of brainstem abnormalities, which are one of the potential aetiological mechanisms. Fifteen children aged 1 to 14 years, and five young adults, aged 20 to 31 years were included. All had upper airway obstruction and 15 (75%) had a pathological apnoea index (greater than five per hour). Other sleep associated respiratory abnormalities, including partial obstruction, central apnoea, and abnormal electromyographic activity of accessory muscles of respiration, also showed a high prevalence. SEPs were abnormal in eight (42%), but there was no correlation between abnormal SEPs and apnoea during sleep, either qualitatively or quantitatively. A high prevalence of both sleep related respiratory abnormalities and abnormal SEPs in young subjects with achondroplasia was demonstrated. However, the sleep related respiratory abnormalities do not always result in significant blood gas disturbances or correlate with abnormal SEPs in this group. PMID:8215519

  3. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  4. Mechanisms, significance and treatment of vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on lipid-regulating therapy.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Richard J; Chew, Gerard T; Watts, Gerald F

    2005-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness occur early in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. They are both powerful independent predictors of cardiovascular risk. Advances in non-invasive methodologies have led to widespread clinical investigation of these abnormalities in diabetes mellitus, generating a wealth of new knowledge concerning the mechanisms of vascular dysfunction, risk factor associations and potential treatment targets. Endothelial dysfunction primarily reflects decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO), a critical endothelium-derived vasoactive factor with vasodilatory and anti-atherosclerotic properties. Techniques for assessing endothelial dysfunction include ultrasonographic measurement of flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery and plethysmography measurement of forearm blood flow responses to vasoactive agents. Arterial stiffness may be assessed using pulse wave analysis to generate measures of pulse wave velocity, arterial compliance and wave reflection. The pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes is multifactorial, with principal contributors being oxidative stress, dyslipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. Elevated blood glucose levels drive production of reactive oxidant species (ROS) via multiple pathways, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity, reducing NO availability and generating further ROS. Hyperglycaemia also contributes to accelerated arterial stiffening by increasing formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), which alter vessel wall structure and function. Diabetic dyslipidaemia is characterised by accumulation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and increased postprandial free fatty acid flux. These lipid abnormalities contribute to increasing oxidative stress and may directly inhibit eNOS activity

  5. EMILIN-1 Deficiency Induces Elastogenesis and Vascular Cell Defects

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Miriam; Braghetta, Paola; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Mura, Isabella; Doliana, Roberto; Colombatti, Alfonso; Volpin, Dino; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bressan, Giorgio M.

    2004-01-01

    EMILINs constitute a family of genes of the extracellular matrix with high structural similarity. Four genes have been identified so far in human and mouse. To gain insight into the function of this gene family, EMILIN-1 has been inactivated in the mouse by gene targeting. The homozygous animals were fertile and did not show obvious abnormalities. However, histological and ultrastructural examination revealed alterations of elastic fibers in aorta and skin. Formation of elastic fibers by mutant embryonic fibroblasts in culture was also abnormal. Additional alterations were observed in cell morphology and anchorage of endothelial and smooth muscle cells to elastic lamellae. Considering that EMILIN-1 is adhesive for cells and that the protein binds to elastin and fibulin-5, EMILIN-1 may regulate elastogenesis and vascular cell maintenance by stabilizing molecular interactions between elastic fiber components and by endowing elastic fibers with specific cell adhesion properties. PMID:14701737

  6. β-Adrenergic receptor expression in vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Karen M; Chang, Kay W; Truong, Mai T; Kwok, Shirley; West, Rob B; Heerema-McKenney, Amy E

    2012-11-01

    Propranolol has recently emerged as an effective therapy for infantile hemangiomas causing regression. The β-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist is thought to cause vasoconstriction by its effect on nitric oxide, block angiogenesis by its effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and induce apoptosis. In a prior report, we identified expression of β2-AR (B2-AR) and its phosphorylated form (B2-ARP) in a case of infantile hemangioma that responded to propranolol treatment. We now explore the expression of βARs on a variety of vascular lesions utilizing a tissue microarray containing 141 lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and various vascular malformations. The array was immunostained for B2-AR, B2-ARP, and β3-AR (B3-AR), and the results scored for the intensity of endothelial cell expression as negative, weak positive, or strong positive. All phases of infantile hemangiomas had strong expression of all three receptors, with the exception of only weak expression of B2-ARP in the proliferative phase infantile hemangioma. Strong expression of all three receptors was present in many hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and vascular malformations. Absent to weak expression of all three receptors was seen in glomus tumor, hobnail hemangioendothelioma, pyogenic granuloma, and reactive vascular proliferations. This is the first study to report β-AR expression in a variety of vascular lesions. Although immunohistochemical expression of the receptors does not necessarily indicate that similar pathways of responsiveness to β-blockade are present, it does raises the possibility that β-blockade could potentially affect apoptosis and decrease responsiveness to VEGF. Additional study is warranted, as therapeutic options are limited for some patients with these lesions. PMID:22743651

  7. 3D numerical study of tumor microenvironmental flow in response to vascular-disrupting treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Cai, Yan; Xu, Shixiong; Longs, Quan; Ding, Zurong; Dong, Cheng

    2012-06-01

    The effects of vascular-disrupting treatments on normalization of tumor microvasculature and its microenvironmental flow were investigated, by mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of tumor vascular-disrupting and tumor haemodynamics. Four disrupting approaches were designed according to the abnormal characteristics of tumor microvasculature compared with the normal one. The results predict that the vascular-disrupting therapies could improve tumor microenvironment, eliminate drug barrier and inhibit metastasis of tumor cells to some extent. Disrupting certain types of vessels may get better effects. In this study, the flow condition on the networks with "vascular-disrupting according to flowrate" is the best comparing with the other three groups, and disrupting vessels of lower maturity could effectively enhance fluid transport across vasculature into interstitial space. PMID:23113373

  8. Effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on vascular smooth muscle cell calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, En-Gang; Tian, Jun; Xu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells were cultured with various concentrations of EGb 761 and β-glycerophosphate for 7 days. Calcium content in the cells, alkaline phosphatase activity, cell protein content, NF-κB activation, and reactive oxygen species production were assayed, respectively. Results The calcium depositions of vascular smooth muscle cells of the β-glycerophosphate group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.01), and were inhibited by EGb 761 in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Data showed β-glycerophosphate induced the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase, up-regulated the NF-κB activity and increased reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells while these decreased when administrated with EGb 761(p < 0.05). Conclusions EGb 761 significantly reduced deposition of calcium induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. It not only reduced the deposition of calcium, but also inhibited osteogenic transdifferentiation, which may be associated with decreasing expression of alkaline phosphatase, down-regulating the NF-κB activity, and reducing reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells, and may have the potential to serve as a role for vascular calcification in clinical situations. PMID:26908182

  9. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:26382939

  10. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  11. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  12. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  13. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  14. Synaptic protein levels altered in vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Lindsey I; Tayler, Hannah M; Love, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral ischaemia is the defining pathophysiological abnormality in most forms of vascular dementia (VAD), but the pathogenesis of the dementia remains poorly understood. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is early loss of synaptic proteins, but these have been little studied in VAD. Materials and Methods We measured synaptophysin, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), drebrin, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in superior temporal cortex from 11 patients with VAD and, initially, 11 non-dementia controls. We corrected for neuronal content by measurement of neuron-specific enolase. A further 11 controls were subsequently used in a validation study. Simulation of post-mortem delay found that PSD-95 was stable at 4°C but declined slightly at RT. SNAP-25 and drebrin showed good post-mortem stability. Previous studies had shown good post-mortem preservation of synaptophysin and VEGF. Results The VAD cases had lower synaptophysin (but P > 0.05 in initial study), significantly lower SNAP-25 (P = 0.024) and significantly higher drebrin (P = 0.020). On comparison with the second control group, the reduction in synaptophysin was significant (P = 0.008), and the other results were confirmed. Conclusion There is probably a reduction in presynaptic proteins in the temporal cortex in VAD, although not as marked as in AD. In VAD, there is also an increase in drebrin, which may be a response to reduced synaptic input. PMID:25559750

  15. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25691415

  16. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems. PMID:25729824

  17. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  18. Abnormal Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bo; Wang, Xinglong; Zheng, Ling; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases. A deeper understanding of the remarkably dynamic nature of mitochondria, characterized by a delicate balance of fission and fusion, has helped to fertilize a recent wave of new studies demonstrating abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease and discusses how these abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. We propose that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics represents a key common pathway that mediates or amplifies mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal dysfunction during the course of neurodegeneration. PMID:19799998

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, K E; Kim, J H; Moon, S Y; Oh, S K

    1999-08-01

    To determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in a child psychiatric population, and to evaluate possible associations between types of abnormalities and patient's clinical characteristics, cytogenetic examination was performed on 604 patients. Demographic data, reasons for karyotyping, clinical signs, and other patient characteristics were assessed and correlated with the results from karyotyping. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 69 patients (11.3%); these were structural in 49 cases and numerical in 20. Inversion of chromosome nine was found in 15 subjects, trisomy of chromosome 21 in 11, and fragile X in five patients. When karyotyping was performed because of intellectual impairment or multiple developmental delay, significantly more abnormalities were found than average; when performed because autistic disorder was suspected, the number of abnormalities was significantly fewer. There were no differences in clinical variables between structural and numerical abnormalities, nor among nine types of chromosomal abnormalities, except that numerical abnormalities and polymorphism were found at a later age, and that walking was more delayed and IQ was lower in patients with Down syndrome. Clinicians should be aware of the possible presence of chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric populations; the close collaboration with geneticists and the use of more defined guidelines for cytogenetic investigation are important. PMID:10485616

  20. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2016-03-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  1. In vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine in experimental portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bomzon, A; Jacob, G; Lee, S S; Meddings, J

    1991-02-01

    It has been postulated that loss of response to norepinephrine accounts in part for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease. The in vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine was measured in aortic rings and portal veins excised from four different rat models of hepatic disease with and without portal hypertension, hepatocellular damage, and hyperbilirubinemia--the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension, the five-week chronic bile duct ligated and resected (CBDL) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension and hyperbilirubinemia, the 10-day partial ligated portal vein (PVL) portal hypertensive rat without hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia, and the three-day bile duct ligated (ABDL) rat with acute hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia but without portal hypertension. Sham-treated or operated groups for each model were also prepared. Vascular reactivity of the aortic rings to norepinephrine was potentiated in the three portal hypertensive groups, and attenuated in the model of acute cholestasis. No consistent pattern of response to norepinephrine was evident in the portal veins. Based upon the presented in vitro data and the discussed limitations of an in vitro study, we conclude that it is unlikely that the loss of response to norepinephrine accounts for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease. PMID:2040106

  2. Sympathetic vascular transduction is augmented in young normotensive blacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine sympathetic vascular transduction in young normotensive black and white adults. We hypothesized that blacks would demonstrate augmented transduction of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) into vascular resistance. To test this hypothesis, MSNA, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). At rest, no differences existed in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). Likewise, LBNP elicited comparable responses of these variables for blacks and whites. Baseline MSNA did not differ between blacks and whites, but whites demonstrated greater increases during LBNP (28 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 18%, 81 +/- 21 vs. 137 +/- 42%, 174 +/- 81 vs. 556 +/- 98% for -5, -15, and -40 mmHg LBNP, respectively; P < 0.001). Consistent with smaller increases in MSNA but similar FVR responses during LBNP, blacks demonstrated greater sympathetic vascular transduction (%FVR/%MSNA) than whites (0.95 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.82 +/- 0.07 U; 0.82 +/- 0.11 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.09 U; 0.95 +/- 0.37 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.09 U; P < 0.01). In summary, young whites demonstrate greater increases in MSNA during baroreceptor unloading than age-matched normotensive blacks. However, more importantly, for a given increase in MSNA, blacks demonstrate greater forearm vasoconstriction than whites. This finding may contribute to augmented blood pressure reactivity in blacks.

  3. Differential and synergistic effects of mechanical stimulation and growth factor presentation on vascular wall function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mao-Shih; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Lei, Pedro; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that immobilizing TGF-β1 within fibrin hydrogels may act in synergy with cyclic mechanical stimulation to enhance the properties of vascular grafts. To this end, we engineered a fusion TGF-β1 protein that can covalently anchor to fibrin during polymerization upon the action of factor XIII. We also developed a 24-well based bioreactor in which vascular constructs can be mechanically stimulated by distending the silastic mandrel in the middle of each well. TGF-β1 was either conjugated to fibrin or supplied in the culture medium and the fibrin based constructs were cultured statically for a week followed by cyclic distention for another week. The tissues were examined for myogenic differentiation, vascular reactivity, mechanical properties and ECM content. Our results showed that some aspects of vascular function were differentially affected by growth factor presentation vs. pulsatile force application, while others were synergistically enhanced by both. Overall, this two-prong biomimetic approach improved ECM secretion, vascular reactivity and mechanical properties of vascular constructs. These findings may be applied in other tissue engineering applications such as cartilage, tendon or cardiac regeneration where growth factors TGF-β1 and mechano-stimulation play critical roles. PMID:23810080

  4. Impairment of endothelial progenitor cell function and vascularization capacity by aldosterone in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Thomas; Schmitter, Kerstin; Fleissner, Felix; Wiebking, Volker; Dietrich, Bernd; Widder, Julian D.; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Hahner, Stefanie; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Aims Hyperaldosteronism is associated with vascular injury and increased cardiovascular events. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in endothelial repair and vascular homeostasis. We hypothesized that hyperaldosteronism impairs EPC function and vascularization capacity in mice and humans. Methods and results We characterized the effects of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade on EPC number and function as well as vascularization capacity and endothelial function. Treatment of human EPC with aldosterone induced translocation of the MR and impaired multiple cellular functions of EPC, such as differentiation, migration, and proliferation in vitro. Impaired EPC function was rescued by pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of the MR. Aldosterone protein kinase A (PKA) dependently increased reactive oxygen species formation in EPC. Aldosterone infusion in mice impaired EPC function, EPC homing to vascular structures and vascularization capacity in a MR-dependent but blood pressure-independent manner. Endothelial progenitor cells from patients with primary hyperaldosteronism compared with controls of similar age displayed reduced migratory potential. Impaired EPC function was associated with endothelial dysfunction. MR blockade in patients with hyperaldosteronism improved EPC function and arterial stiffness. Conclusion Endothelial progenitor cells express a MR that mediates functional impairment by PKA-dependent increase of reactive oxygen species. Normalization of EPC function may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the beneficial effects of MR blockade in cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment. PMID:20926363

  5. Narp knockout mice show normal reactivity to novelty but attenuated recovery from neophobia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Ashley M; Lee, Jongah J; Tao, Bo; Smith, Dani R; Johnson, Alexander W; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2013-11-15

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate cognitive inflexibility and addictive behavior, which are associated with abnormal reactivity to a novel stimulus. To assess reactivity to novelty, we tested Narp KO and wild-type (WT) mice on a neophobia procedure. Both Narp KO and WT mice showed a similar decrease in consumption upon initial exposure to a novel flavor, but Narp KO mice did not increase consumption with subsequent exposures to the novel flavor like the WT mice. Therefore, Narp KO mice do not have abnormal reactivity to novelty but show deficits in adapting behavior to reflect the updated value of a stimulus. PMID:24120400

  6. Cardiovascular reactivity, stress, and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Webb, Heather E.; Zourdos, Michael C.; Acevedo, Edmund O.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress has been proposed as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Acute mental stress can activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis, eliciting the release of catecholamines (NE and EPI) resulting in the elevation of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Combined stress (psychological and physical) can exacerbate these cardiovascular responses, which may partially contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and increased proportionate mortality risks experienced by some occupations (e.g., firefighting and law enforcement). Studies have supported the benefits of physical activity on physiological and psychological health, including the cardiovascular response to acute stress. Aerobically trained individuals exhibit lower sympathetic nervous system (e.g., HR) reactivity and enhanced cardiovascular efficiency (e.g., lower vascular reactivity and decreased recovery time) in response to physical and/or psychological stress. In addition, resistance training has been demonstrated to attenuate cardiovascular responses and improve mental health. This review will examine stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity and plausible explanations for how exercise training and physical fitness (aerobic and resistance exercise) can attenuate cardiovascular responses to stress. This enhanced functionality may facilitate a reduction in the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction. Finally, this review will also address the interaction of obesity and physical activity on cardiovascular reactivity and CVD. PMID:24223557

  7. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  8. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  9. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  11. Vascular smooth muscle-specific deletion of the leptin receptor attenuates leptin-induced alterations in vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Coleman, T Taylor; Sasser, Jennifer M; Pittman, Katarina M; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-05-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased plasma levels of the adipose-derived hormone leptin. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) express leptin receptors (LepR); however, their physiological role is unclear. We hypothesized that leptin, at levels to mimic morbid obesity, impairs vascular relaxation. To test this, we used control and VSM-LepR knockout mice (VSM-LepR KO) created with a tamoxifen-inducible specific Cre recombinase to delete the LepR gene in VSMC. Control (10-12 wk old) and VSM-LepR KO (10-12 wk old) mice were fed a diet containing tamoxifen (50 mg/kg) for 6 wk, after which vascular reactivity was studied in isolated carotid arteries using an organ chamber bath. Vessels were incubated with leptin (100 ng/ml) or vehicle (0.1 mM Tris·HCl) for 30 min. Leptin treatment resulted in significant impairment of vessel relaxation to the endothelial-specific agonist acetylcholine (ACh). When these experiments were repeated in the presence of the superoxide scavenger tempol, relaxation responses to ACh were restored. VSM-LepR deletion resulted in a significant attenuation of leptin-mediated impaired ACh-induced relaxation. These data show that leptin directly impairs vascular relaxation via a VSM-LepR-mediated mechanism, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for leptin to increase cardiovascular risk during obesity. PMID:26936780

  12. Vascular hand-arm vibration syndrome--magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Poole, C J M; Cleveland, T J

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of vascular hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) requires consistent symptoms, photographic evidence of digital blanching and sufficient exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV; A(8) > 2.5 m/s2). There is no reliable quantitative investigation for distinguishing HAVS from other causes of Raynaud's phenomenon and from normal individuals. Hypothenar and thenar hammer syndromes produce similar symptoms to HAVS but are difficult to diagnose clinically and may be confused with HAVS. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a safe and minimally invasive method of visualizing blood vessels. Three cases of vascular HAVS are described in which MRA revealed occlusions of the ulnar, radial and superficial palmar arteries. It is proposed that HTV was the cause of these occlusions, rather than blows to the hand unrelated to vibration, the assumed mechanism for the hammer syndromes. All three cases were advised not to expose their hands to HTV despite one of them being at Stockholm vascular stage 2 (early). MRA should be the investigation of choice for stage 2 vascular HAVS or vascular HAVS with unusual features or for a suspected hammer syndrome. The technique is however technically challenging and best done in specialist centres in collaboration with an occupational physician familiar with the examination of HAVS cases. Staging for HAVS should be developed to include anatomical arterial abnormalities as well as symptoms and signs of blanching. Workers with only one artery supplying a hand, or with only one palmar arch, may be at increased risk of progression and therefore should not be exposed to HTV irrespective of their Stockholm stage. PMID:26470947

  13. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-04-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  14. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  15. Circulating Microparticles from Crohn’s Disease Patients Cause Endothelial and Vascular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Daniela; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Tesse, Angela; Viennot, Stéphanie; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Bretagne, Anne-Laure; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2013-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs) are small vesicles released during cell activation or apoptosis. They are involved in coagulation, inflammation and vascular dysfunction in several diseases. We characterized circulating MPs from Crohn’s Disease (CD) patients and evaluated their effects on endothelial function and vascular reactivity after in vivo injection into mice. Methods Circulating MPs and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry from blood samples from healthy subjects (HS) and inactive or active CD patients. MPs were intravenously injected into mice. After 24 hours, endothelial function and vascular reactivity were assessed. Results Circulating MP levels did not differ between HS and inactive CD patients except for an increase in leukocyte-derived MPs in CD. Active CD patients compared to HS displayed increased total circulating MPs, pro-coagulant MPs and those from platelets, endothelium, erythrocytes, leukocytes, activated leukocytes and activated platelets. A significant correlation was found between total levels of MPs, those from platelets and endothelial cells, and the Harvey-Bradshaw clinical activity index. MPs from CD, but not from HS, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mice aorta and flow-induced dilation in mice small mesenteric arteries, MPs from inactive CD patients being more effective than those from active patients. CDMPs induced vascular hypo-reactivity in aorta that was prevented by a nitric oxide (NO)-synthase inhibitor, and was associated with a subtle alteration of the balance between NO, reactive oxygen species and the release of COX metabolites. Conclusions We provide evidence that MPs from CD patients significantly alter endothelial and vascular function and therefore, may play a role in CD pathophysiology, at least by contributing to uncontrolled vascular-dependent intestinal damage. PMID:24019899

  16. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  17. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  18. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  19. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  20. Role of the fetoplacental endothelium in fetal growth restriction with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Emily J

    2015-10-01

    Growth-restricted fetuses with absent or reversed end-diastolic velocities in the umbilical artery are at substantially increased risk for adverse perinatal and long-term outcome, even in comparison to growth-restricted fetuses with preserved end-diastolic velocities. Translational studies show that this Doppler velocimetry correlates with fetoplacental blood flow, with absent or reversed end-diastolic velocities signifying abnormally elevated resistance within the placental vasculature. The fetoplacental vasculature is unique in that it is not subject to autonomic regulation, unlike other vascular beds. Instead, humoral mediators, many of which are synthesized by local endothelial cells, regulate placental vascular resistance. Existing data demonstrate that in growth-restricted pregnancies complicated by absent or reversed umbilical artery end-diastolic velocities, an imbalance in production of these vasoactive substances occurs, favoring vasoconstriction. Morphologically, placentas from these pregnancies also demonstrate impaired angiogenesis, whereby vessels within the terminal villi are sparsely branched, abnormally thin, and elongated. This structural deviation from normal placental angiogenesis restricts blood flow and further contributes to elevated fetoplacental vascular resistance. Although considerable work has been done in the field of fetoplacental vascular development and function, much remains unknown about the mechanisms underlying impaired development and function of the human fetoplacental vasculature, especially in the context of severe fetal growth restriction with absent or reversed umbilical artery end-diastolic velocities. Fetoplacental endothelial cells are key regulators of angiogenesis and vasomotor tone. A thorough understanding of their role in placental vascular biology carries the significant potential of discovering clinically relevant and innovative approaches to prevention and treatment of fetal growth restriction with compromised

  1. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induces malformed and hyperfused vessels during embryonic neovascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, C J; Little, C D

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific endothelial mitogen that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo [Leung, D. W., Cachianes, G., Kuang, W.-J., Goeddel, D. V. & Ferrara, N. (1989) Science 246 1306-1309]. To determine if VEGF also influences the behavior of primordial endothelial cells, we used an in vivo vascular assay based on the de novo formation of vessels. Japanese quail embryos injected with nanomolar quantities of the 165-residue form of VEGF at the onset of vasculogenesis exhibited profoundly altered vessel development. In fact, the overall patterning of the vascular network was abnormal in all VEGF-injected embryos. The malformations were attributable to two specific endothelial cell activities: (i) inappropriate neovascularization in normally avascular areas and (ii) the unregulated, excessive fusion of vessels. In the first instance, supernumerary vessels directly linked the inflow channel of the heart to the aortic outflow channel. The second aberrant activity led to the formation of vessels with abnormally large lumens. Ultimately, unregulated vessel fusion generated massive vascular sacs that obliterated the identity of individual vessels. These observations show that exogenous VEGF has an impact on the behavior of primordial endothelial cells engaged in vasculogenesis, and they strongly suggest that endogenous VEGF is important in vascular patterning and regulation of vessel size (lumen formation). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7543999

  2. [Abnormality in bone metabolism after burn].

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Xie, W G

    2016-08-20

    Burn causes bone metabolic abnormality in most cases, including the changes in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone mass loss, and bone absorption, which results in decreased bone mineral density. These changes are sustainable for many years after burn and even cause growth retardation in burned children. The mechanisms of bone metabolic abnormality after burn include the increasing glucocorticoids due to stress response, a variety of cytokines and inflammatory medium due to inflammatory response, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and bone loss due to long-term lying in bed. This article reviews the pathogenesis and regularity of bone metabolic abnormality after burn, the relationship between bone metabolic abnormality and burn area/depth, and the treatment of bone metabolic abnormality, etc. and discusses the research directions in the future. PMID:27562160

  3. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. PMID:26964551

  4. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  5. Inflammation in the Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Rene; May, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite decreases in atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease over the last several decades, atherosclerosis remains a major cause of mortality in developed nations. One possible contributor to this residual risk is oxidant stress, which is generated by the inflammatory response of atherosclerosis. Although there is a wealth of in vitro, cellular, and animal data supporting a protective role for antioxidant vitamins and nutrients in the atherosclerotic process, the best clinical trials have been negative. This may be due to the fact that antioxidant therapies are applied “too little and too late.” This review considers the role of vitamin C, or ascorbic acid in preventing the earliest inflammatory changes in atherosclerosis. It focuses on the three major vascular cell types involved in atherosclerosis: endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Ascorbate chemistry, recycling, and function are described for these cell types, with emphasis on whether and how the vitamin might affect the inflammatory process. For endothelial cells, ascorbate helps to prevent endothelial dysfunction, stimulates type IV collagen synthesis, and enhances cell proliferation. For vascular smooth muscle cells, ascorbate inhibits dedifferentiation, recruitment, and proliferation in areas of vascular damage. For macrophages, ascorbate decreases oxidant stress related to their activation, decreases uptake and degradation of oxidized LDL in some studies, and enhances several aspects of their function. Although further studies of ascorbate function in these cell types and in novel animal models are needed, available evidence generally supports a salutary role for this vitamin in ameliorating the earliest stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:18582947

  6. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  7. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  8. Venous vascular malformation of the floor of mouth masquerading as a dermoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dmytriw, Adam A; Song, Jin Soo A; Gullane, Patrick; terBrugge, Karel G; Yu, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Venous vascular malformations (VVMs) are described as abnormal post-capillary lesions which exhibit low flow. These are typically malleable and may grow with endocrine fluctuations. A VVM that mimics the classic appearance of dermoid tumor on imaging has never been reported. We encountered a 43-year-old woman with intermittent dysphagia relating to a firm submandibular mass. Physical exam and cross-sectional imaging revealed features consistent with variant dermoid cyst. However, catheter angiography eventually demonstrated a VVM which possessed vessels of variable size and partial thrombosis. We report the case and propose that catheter angiography remains important in cases where vascular malformation is considered. PMID:26851131

  9. Mesothelial Cells Within Vascular Transformation of Mediastinal Lymph Node Sinuses: An Unusual Benign Collision Mimicking Colliding Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Mark N; Tawil, Ayman N; Boulos, Fouad I

    2016-04-01

    Vascular transformation of lymph node sinuses represents a rare benign entity mimicking malignant counterparts such as nodal Kaposi sarcoma. The presence of mildly atypical benign mesothelial cells within nodal sinuses raises the possibility of metastatic malignancy. Herein, a rare case of vascular transformation of lymph node sinuses with reactive sinusoidal mesothelial cells is outlined as a unique benign pathology and a potential mimicker of a malignant collision tumor. PMID:26689690

  10. Frequency of and Predictive Factors for Vascular Invasion after Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoshinari; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Nakagomi, Ryo; Kondo, Mayuko; Fujiwara, Naoto; Minami, Tatsuya; Sato, Masaya; Uchino, Koji; Enooku, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Kondo, Yuji; Shiina, Shuichiro; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular invasion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is representative of advanced disease with an extremely poor prognosis. The detailed course of its development has not been fully elucidated. Methods We enrolled 1057 consecutive patients with HCC who had been treated with curative intent by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) as an initial therapy from 1999 to 2008 at our department. We analyzed the incidence rate of and predictive factors for vascular invasion. The survival rate after detection of vascular invasion was also analyzed. Results During a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years, 6075 nodules including primary and recurrent lesions were treated by RFA. Vascular invasion was observed in 97 patients. The rate of vascular invasion associated with site of original RFA procedure was 0.66% on a nodule basis. The incidence rates of vascular invasion on a patient basis at 1, 3, and 5 years were 1.1%, 5.9%, and 10.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size, tumor number, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein were significant risk predictors of vascular invasion. In multivariate analysis, DCP was the most significant predictor for vascular invasion (compared with a DCP of ≤100 mAu/mL, the hazard ratio was 1.95 when DCP was 101–200 mAu/mL and 3.22 when DCP was >200 mAu/mL). The median survival time after development of vascular invasion was only 6 months. Conclusion Vascular invasion occurs during the clinical course of patients initially treated with curative intent. High-risk patients may be identified using tumor markers. PMID:25397677

  11. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  12. [Permanent vascular access for haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Manafov, E N; Batrashov, V A; Sergeev, O G; Yudaev, S S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a permanent vascular access (PVA) is the pledge of successful treatment of patients being on chronic haemodialysis (CD). Creation and maintenance of a functioning PVA is the priority task of vascular and endovascular surgeons, nephrologists and specialists of haemodialysis departments. According to the KDOQI guidelines, the most preferable type of PVA is a native arteriovenous fistula (AVF). As an alternative it is possible to use a synthetic prosthesis for creating an arteriovenous shunt (AVS) or implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC). Various complications of vascular accesses leading to their loss create the necessity of forming just another PVA, thus negatively influencing the life span and quality of life of this cohort of patients. Improving surgical technique and approaches to treatment, as well as carrying out dynamic monitoring of the condition of the created PVA make it possible to considerably decrease the incidence rate of such complications and to improve the quality of medical care rendered. PMID:26451410

  13. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Microvascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Staiculescu, Marius C.; Foote, Christopher; Meininger, Gerald A.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    The microcirculation is a portion of the vascular circulatory system that consists of resistance arteries, arterioles, capillaries and venules. It is the place where gases and nutrients are exchanged between blood and tissues. In addition the microcirculation is the major contributor to blood flow resistance and consequently to regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, structural remodeling of this section of the vascular tree has profound implications on cardiovascular pathophysiology. This review is focused on the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play on changing the structural characteristics of vessels within the microcirculation. Particular attention is given to the resistance arteries and the functional pathways that are affected by ROS in these vessels and subsequently induce vascular remodeling. The primary sources of ROS in the microcirculation are identified and the effects of ROS on other microcirculatory remodeling phenomena such as rarefaction and collateralization are briefly reviewed. PMID:25535075

  14. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a vascular component

    PubMed Central

    Garriga, Marina; Milà, Marta; Mir, Manzoor; Al-Baradie, Raid; Huertas, Sonia; Castejon, Cesar; Casas, Laura; Badenes, Dolors; Giménez, Nuria; Font, M. Angels; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Ysamat, Maria; Aguilar, Miguel; Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common cause of dementia. Cerebral ischemia is a major risk factor for development of dementia. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTScan) is a complementary tool in the differential diagnoses of patients with incomplete or uncertain Parkinsonism. Additional application of DaTScan enables the categorization of Parkinsonian disease with dementia (PDD), and its differentiation from pure AD, and may further contribute to change the therapeutic decision. The aim of this study was to analyze the vascular contribution towards dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the utility of DaTScan for the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a clinical vascular component, and the association between neuropsychological function, vascular component and dopaminergic function on DaTScan. One-hundred and five patients with MCI or the initial phases of dementia were studied prospectively. We developed an initial assessment using neurologic examination, blood tests, cognitive function tests, structural neuroimaging and DaTScan. The vascular component was later quantified in two ways: clinically, according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and by structural neuroimaging using Wahlund Scale Total Score (WSTS). Early diagnosis of dementia was associated with an abnormal DaTScan. A significant association was found between a high WSTS and an abnormal DaTScan (p < 0.01). Mixed AD was the group with the highest vascular component, followed by the VaD group, while MCI and pure AD showed similar WSTS. No significant associations were found between neuropsychological impairment and DaTScan independently of associated vascular component. DaTScan seems to be a good tool to discriminate, in a first clinical assessment, patients with MCI from those with established dementia. There was bigger general vascular affectation observable in MRI or CT in patients with abnormal dopaminergic uptake seen on Da

  15. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a vascular component.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Marina; Milà, Marta; Mir, Manzoor; Al-Baradie, Raid; Huertas, Sonia; Castejon, Cesar; Casas, Laura; Badenes, Dolors; Giménez, Nuria; Font, M Angels; Gonzalez, Jose M; Ysamat, Maria; Aguilar, Miguel; Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common cause of dementia. Cerebral ischemia is a major risk factor for development of dementia. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTScan) is a complementary tool in the differential diagnoses of patients with incomplete or uncertain Parkinsonism. Additional application of DaTScan enables the categorization of Parkinsonian disease with dementia (PDD), and its differentiation from pure AD, and may further contribute to change the therapeutic decision. The aim of this study was to analyze the vascular contribution towards dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the utility of DaTScan for the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a clinical vascular component, and the association between neuropsychological function, vascular component and dopaminergic function on DaTScan. One-hundred and five patients with MCI or the initial phases of dementia were studied prospectively. We developed an initial assessment using neurologic examination, blood tests, cognitive function tests, structural neuroimaging and DaTScan. The vascular component was later quantified in two ways: clinically, according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and by structural neuroimaging using Wahlund Scale Total Score (WSTS). Early diagnosis of dementia was associated with an abnormal DaTScan. A significant association was found between a high WSTS and an abnormal DaTScan (p < 0.01). Mixed AD was the group with the highest vascular component, followed by the VaD group, while MCI and pure AD showed similar WSTS. No significant associations were found between neuropsychological impairment and DaTScan independently of associated vascular component. DaTScan seems to be a good tool to discriminate, in a first clinical assessment, patients with MCI from those with established dementia. There was bigger general vascular affectation observable in MRI or CT in patients with abnormal dopaminergic uptake seen on Da

  16. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  17. Systemic Vascular Function Is Associated with Muscular Power in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Chalé, Angela; Hau, Cynthia; Cloutier, Gregory J.; Phillips, Edward M.; Warner, Patrick; Nickerson, Heather; Reid, Kieran F.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power is a critical determinant of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measures of vascular endothelial function included brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and the pulse wave amplitude reactive hyperemia index (PWA-RHI). Augmentation index (AIx) was taken as a measure of systemic vascular function related to arterial stiffness and wave reflection. Measures of muscular strength included one repetition maximum (1RM) for a bilateral leg press. Peak muscular power was measured during 5 repetitions performed as fast as possible for bilateral leg press at 40% 1RM. Muscular power was associated with brachial FMD (r = 0.43, P < 0.05), PWA-RHI (r = 0.42, P < 0.05), and AIx (r = −0.54, P < 0.05). Muscular strength was not associated with any measure of vascular function. In conclusion, systemic vascular function is associated with lower-limb muscular power but not muscular strength in older adults. Whether loss of muscular power with aging contributes to systemic vascular deconditioning or vascular dysfunction contributes to decrements in muscular power remains to be determined. PMID:22966457

  18. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A; Chong, Andrew; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M; Cowley, Allen W; Geurts, Aron M; Staruschenko, Alexander; Imig, John D; Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  19. Nailfold Capillary Abnormalities in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Louis R.; Hanyuda, Akiko; Ren, Ai; Giovingo, Michael; Greenstein, Scott H.; Cousins, Clara; Patrianakos, Thomas; Tanna, Angelo P.; Wanderling, Christopher; Norkett, William; Wiggs, Janey L.; Green, Kelsey; Kang, Jae H.; Knepper, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is considerable evidence for systemic vascular dysfunction in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). We performed nailfold capillary video microscopy to observe directly the nature of nonocular microvasculature abnormalities in POAG. Methods We enrolled 199 POAG patients and 124 control subjects from four sites. We used JH-1004 capillaroscopes to perform nailfold capillary video microscopy on the fourth and fifth digits of each subject's nondominant hand. Videos were evaluated for hemorrhages, dilated capillary loops > 50 μm, and avascular zones > 100 μm by graders masked to case status. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for POAG were obtained by means of logistic regression analyses that were applied to data from all cases and controls. Corresponding estimates of moderate or severe POAG versus mild POAG (based on the Hodapp-Anderson-Parrish scale) were obtained among cases only. Results After controlling for demographic factors, family history of glaucoma, systemic diseases, and use of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, for each 100 nailfold capillaries assessed, all types of microvascular abnormalities were significantly associated with POAG. Specifically, the presence of any dilated capillaries (OR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6–5.6), avascular zones (OR = 4.4; 95% CI, 1.7–11.3) and hemorrhages (OR = 12.2; 95% CI, 5.9–25.1) were associated with POAG. Among cases, the frequency of microvascular abnormalities was not associated with glaucoma severity (P ≥ 0.43). Conclusions These data provided support for nonocular capillary bed abnormalities in POAG. Comparable vascular abnormalities in the optic nerve may render it susceptible to glaucomatous damage. PMID:26523386

  20. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  1. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike many neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, vascular damage is preventable. Despite the heterogeneity of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and the complexity of its clinical presentations, the potential for limiting progression and changing the trajectory of damage makes it all the more important for physicians to be educated about the syndrome and to remain vigilant when taking care of patients. In this review, we outline an approach to patients with possible VCI, summarize current treatment and prevention guidelines, and provide an overview with case examples. PMID:26124978

  2. Genetic basis for vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Grossberg, Anna L; Püttgen, Katherine B

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental genetics of many isolated vascular anomalies and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies have been elucidated. The rate of discovery continues to increase, expanding our understanding of the underlying interconnected molecular pathways. This review summarizes genetic and clinical information on the following diagnoses: capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, arteriovenous malformation, PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS), Proteus syndrome, SOLAMEN syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, congenital hemangioma, verrucous venous malformation, cutaneomucosal venous malformation, blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, and Maffucci syndrome. PMID:27607321

  3. Vascular Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisatsugu; Washida, Kazuo; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated vascular functioning in patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of either Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD) and examined a possible relationship between vascular function and cognitive status. Twenty-seven patients with AD, 23 patients with VaD, and 26 healthy control patients underwent measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and intima-media thickness (IMT). The FMD was significantly lower in patients with AD or VaD compared to controls. There were no significant differences in ABI, CAVI, or IMT among the 3 groups. A significant correlation was found between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and FMD. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis revealed that FMD was significantly predicted by MMSE scores. These results suggest that endothelial involvement plays a role in AD pathogenesis, and FMD may be more sensitive than other surrogate methods (ABI, CAVI, and IMT) for detecting early-stage atherosclerosis and/or cognitive decline. PMID:27284205

  4. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  5. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  6. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a case with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Morais, Paulo; Mota, Alberto; Eloy, Catarina; Lopes, José Manuel; Torres, Fátima; Palmeiro, Aida; Tavares, Purificação; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy, born prematurely and hypotonic, from non-consanguineous healthy parents, was referred to our department because of easy bruising. A slightly extensible, thin and translucent skin, associated with dysmorphic facies, acrogeria, multiple ecchymoses, hypermobility of the small joints, dorsal kyphosis, genu valgum, flat feet, elongated upper limbs, and low muscle tone were all evident. A history of learning disability and bilateral inguinal hernia was present. Blood and imaging studies were unremarkable. A skin biopsy disclosed an unremarkable dermis; electron microscopy showed abnormalities in the diameter, contour, and shape of collagen fibrils/fibers. Genetic analysis revealed heterozygosity for a novel mutation in COL3A1 gene (c.3527G>A), confirming the diagnosis of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (VEDS). The patient died at 15 years of age because of aortic dissection. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare, life-threatening, autosomal dominant variant of EDS, resulting from mutations in COL3A1 gene. Affected individuals are prone to serious and potentially fatal complications, especially vascular, intestinal, and uterine ruptures. Delay in diagnosis is common, even when the clinical presentation is typical. Therefore, dermatologists should be familiar with VEDS features because the skin findings may be the first signs. Early diagnosis will improve management of visceral complications and allow early genetic counseling. PMID:21549076

  7. Piezo1 integration of vascular architecture with physiological force

    PubMed Central

    Tumova, Sarka; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Bruns, Alexander; Ludlow, Melanie J; Sedo, Alicia; Hyman, Adam J; McKeown, Lynn; Young, Richard S; Yuldasheva, Nadira Y; Majeed, Yasser; Wilson, Lesley A; Rode, Baptiste; Bailey, Marc A; Kim, Hyejeong R; Fu, Zhaojun; Carter, Deborah AL; Bilton, Jan; Imrie, Helen; Ajuh, Paul; Dear, T Neil; Cubbon, Richard M; Kearney, Mark T; Prasad, Raj K; Evans, Paul C; Ainscough, Justin FX; Beech, David J

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which physical forces regulate endothelial cells to determine the complexities of vascular structure and function are enigmatic1-5. Studies of sensory neurons have suggested Piezo proteins as subunits of Ca2+-permeable non-selective cationic channels for detection of noxious mechanical impact6-8. Here we show Piezo1 (FAM38A) channels as sensors of frictional force (shear stress) and determinants of vascular structure in both development and adult physiology. Global or endothelial-specific disruption of mouse Piezo1 profoundly disturbed the developing vasculature and was embryonic lethal within days of the heart beating. Haploinsufficiency was not lethal but endothelial abnormality was detected in mature vessels. Importance of Piezo1 channels as sensors of blood flow was shown by Piezo1 dependence of shear stress-evoked ionic current and calcium influx in endothelial cells and the ability of exogenous Piezo1 to confer sensitivity to shear stress on otherwise resistant cells. Downstream of this calcium influx was protease activity and spatial organization of endothelial cells to the polarity of the applied force. The data suggest Piezo1 channels as pivotal integrators in vascular biology. PMID:25119035

  8. Risk factors and prevention of vascular complications in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Barbui, T; Finazzi, G

    1997-01-01

    Risk factors for vascular complications in polycythemia vera (PV) include laboratory and clinical findings. Among laboratory values, the hematocrit has been clearly associated with thrombosis, particularly in the cerebral circulation. Platelet count is a possible but not yet clearly established predictor of vascular complications. Platelet function tests are of little help in prognostic evaluation because most attempts to correlate these abnormalities with clinical events have been disappointing. Clinical predictors of thrombosis include increasing age and a previous history of vascular events. Identifying risk factors for thrombosis is important to initiate therapy. Phlebotomy is associated with an increased incidence of thrombosis in the first 3 to 5 years, whereas chemotherapy may induce a higher risk of secondary malignancies after 7 to 10 years of follow-up. New cytoreductive drugs virtually devoid of mutagenic risk include interferon-alpha and anagrelide, but their role in reducing thrombotic complications remains to be demonstrated. Antithrombotic drugs, such as aspirin, are frequently used in PV, despite doubts regarding safety and efficacy. Two recent studies from the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera (GISP) assessed the rate of major thrombosis as well as the tolerability of low-dose aspirin in PV patients. These investigations created a favorable scenario for launching a European collaborative clinical trial (ECLAP study) aimed at testing the efficacy of low-dose aspirin in preventing thrombosis and prolonging survival in patients with PV. PMID:9387204

  9. Vascular considerations in glaucoma patients of African and European descent.

    PubMed

    Huck, Andrew; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Kim, Nathaniel; Muchnik, Michael; Kanakamedala, Priyanka; Amireskandari, Annahita; Abrams-Tobe, Leslie

    2014-08-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in individuals of African descent (AD). While open-angle glaucoma (OAG) disproportionately affects individuals of AD compared with persons of European descent (ED), the physiological mechanisms behind this disparity are largely unknown. The more rapid progression and greater severity of the disease in persons of AD further raise the concern for identifying these underlying differences in disease pathophysiology between AD and ED glaucoma patients. Ocular structural differences between AD and ED patients, including larger optic disc area, cup:disc ratio and thinner corneas, have been found. AD individuals are also disproportionately affected by systemic vascular diseases, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes mellitus. Abnormal ocular blood flow has been implicated as a risk factor for glaucoma, and pilot research is beginning to identify localized ocular vascular differences between AD and ED OAG patients. Given the known systemic vascular deficits and the relationship between glaucoma and ocular blood flow, exploring these concepts in terms of glaucoma risk factors may have a significant impact in elucidating the mechanisms behind the disease disparity in the AD population. PMID:24460758

  10. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, ‘premature’ vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using ‘endothelial therapy’ aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21557734

  11. Sleep physiology, abnormal States, and therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Wickboldt, Alvah T; Bowen, Alex F; Kaye, Aaron J; Kaye, Adam M; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  12. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  13. Right Liver Lobe Hypoplasia and Related Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Alicioglu, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hypoplasia and agenesis of the liver lobe is a rare abnormality. It is associated with biliary system abnormalities, high location of the right kidney, and right colon interposition. These patients are prone to gallstones, portal hypertension and possible surgical complications because of anatomical disturbance. Case Report Magnetic resonance imaging features of a rare case of hypoplasia of the right lobe of the liver in a sigmoid cancer patient are presented. Conclusions Hypoplasia of the right liver should not be confused with liver atrophy; indeed, associations with other coexistent abnormalities are also possible. Awareness and familiarity with these anomalies are necessary to avoid fatal surgical and interventional complications. PMID:26634012

  14. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  16. Onychomycosis in patients with chronic leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Cabete, Joana; Galhardas, Célia; Apetato, Margarida; Lestre, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Nails have a limited number of reactive patterns to disease. Accordingly, toenail changes of different etiologies may mimic onychomycosis. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among patients with leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities attending a dermatology clinic. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through the analysis of clinical records and results of mycological examination. RESULTS A total of 81 patients were included, with a median age of 76.0 years. Most ulcers were of venous etiology, followed by those of mixed and arterial pathogenesis. The mycological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 27.2% of the patients. The etiologic agent was a dermatophyte in 59.1% of isolates in nail samples, while Trichophyton interdigitale was the most frequent fungal species (40.9%). CONCLUSIONS Most toenail abnormalities in patients with chronic leg ulcer were not onychomycosis. This study highlights the importance of systematic mycological examination in these patients, in order to avoid overtreatment with systemic antifungals, unnecessary costs and side effects. PMID:25672317

  17. Onychomycosis in patients with chronic leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cabete, Joana; Galhardas, Célia; Apetato, Margarida; Lestre, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Nails have a limited number of reactive patterns to disease. Accordingly, toenail changes of different etiologies may mimic onychomycosis. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among patients with leg ulcer and toenail abnormalities attending a dermatology clinic. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through the analysis of clinical records and results of mycological examination. RESULTS A total of 81 patients were included, with a median age of 76.0 years. Most ulcers were of venous etiology, followed by those of mixed and arterial pathogenesis. The mycological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 27.2% of the patients. The etiologic agent was a dermatophyte in 59.1% of isolates in nail samples, while Trichophyton interdigitale was the most frequent fungal species (40.9%). CONCLUSIONS Most toenail abnormalities in patients with chronic leg ulcer were not onychomycosis. This study highlights the importance of systematic mycological examination in these patients, in order to avoid overtreatment with systemic antifungals, unnecessary costs and side effects. PMID:25672317

  18. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  19. Comparing EndoPAT and BIOPAC measurement of vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Rebecca E; Felmlee-Devine, M Donna; Brown, Troy E; Lerman, Amir

    2011-06-01

    There are currently no comparison measurements of stress-induced changes in vascular function during acute mental stress tests to measurements made by BIOPAC MP150 systems technology, a standard polygraph device used to detect deception during polygraph examinations in military or law enforcement applications. Vascular responses to reactive hyperaemia and acute mental stress in 25 healthy subjects were measured by both peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT) and a blood pressure cuff attached to a pressure transducer (BIOPAC) and compared. Reactive hyperaemia was performed at baseline and following three acute mental stress tests. There was no difference in vascular reactivity at baseline and following acute mental stress, as measured by EndoPAT or BIOPAC systems (p > 0·05). Mental stress ratios measured by EndoPAT were significantly different than those measured by BIOPAC (p < 0·01). These data suggest that EndoPAT measurements of vascular responses to acute mental stress may be more specific and sensitive than measurements using the BIOPAC system. PMID:21671245

  20. [A new biological vascular prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Erasmi, H; Schmidt, R

    1991-01-01

    In an experimental study on sheeps a new biologic vascular graft was implanted, 30 x in carotidal, 30 x in aortal position. Only one early occlusion of the graft, due to technical reasons, could be observed. Without aneurysmatic degeneration all graft were in function at the time of harvesting the samples. Morphologically a "revitalisation" of the grafts could be proved. PMID:1788779

  1. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  2. Perioperative assessment in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: The use of ultrasound and computerized tomographic scanning in the diagnosis of vascular pathology; Ancillary techniques in diagnostic angiography; Pre-bypass operative arteriography; Perioperative assessment of in situ bypass grafts; and Early and late evaluation of postoperative carotid restenosis and occlusion.

  3. The relationships of vascular plants.

    PubMed Central

    Kenrick, P

    2000-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic research indicates that vascular plants evolved from bryophyte-like ancestors and that this involved extensive modifications to the life cycle. These conclusions are supported by a range of systematic data, including gene sequences, as well as evidence from comparative morphology and the fossil record. Within vascular plants, there is compelling evidence for two major clades, which have been termed lycophytes (clubmosses) and euphyllophytes (seed plants, ferns, horsetails). The implications of recent phylogenetic work are discussed with reference to life cycle evolution and the interpretation of stratigraphic inconsistencies in the early fossil record of land plants. Life cycles are shown to have passed through an isomorphic phase in the early stages of vascular plant evolution. Thus, the gametophyte generation of all living vascular plants is the product of massive morphological reduction. Phylogenetic research corroborates earlier suggestions of a major representational bias in the early fossil record. Mega-fossils document a sequence of appearance of groups that is at odds with that predicted by cladogram topology. It is argued here that the pattern of appearance and diversification of plant megafossils owes more to changing geological conditions than to rapid biological diversification. PMID:10905613

  4. Vascular basis of mucosal color

    PubMed Central

    Kleinheinz, Johannes; Büchter, André; Fillies, Thomas; Joos, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Background Besides the color of the teeth the color of the alveolar gingiva plays a crucial role in esthetic rehabilitation in dento-alveolar treatment. Whereas nowadays the color of the teeth can be determined exactly and individually, the specific influence of the red color of the gingiva on treatment has not been assessed yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vascularization as the basis for gingival esthetics. Methods Standardized photographs of defined areas of the alveolar gingiva in operated and non-operated patients were taken and assigned to groups with same characteristics after color comparisons. In addition, histologic and immunohistologic analyses of gingival specimens were performed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vessels and vascularization. Finally, colors and number of vessels were correlated. Results Our results demonstrated three different constellations of colors of the alveolar gingiva in healthy patients. The operated patients could not be grouped because of disparate depiction. There was a clear correlation between color and vessel number in the alveolar gingiva. Conclusion Our investigations revealed the connections between vascularization and gingival color. Recommendations for specific change or even selection of colors based on the results cannot be given, but the importance of vascularly based incision lines was demonstrated. PMID:16270929

  5. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  6. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  7. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... because they do not affect hearing. However, sometimes cosmetic surgery is recommended. Skin tags may be tied off, ... 5 years old. More severe abnormalities may require surgery for cosmetic reasons as well as for function. Surgery to ...

  8. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...