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Sample records for abnormal vascular remodeling

  1. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  2. Vascular remodeling underlies rebleeding in hemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olmer, Merissa; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L; Cramer, Thomas J; Barnes, Richard Fw; Ball, Scott T; Hughes, Tudor H; Silva, Mauricio; Luck, James V; Moore, Randy E; Mosnier, Laurent O; von Drygalski, Annette

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilic arthropathy is a debilitating condition that can develop as a consequence of frequent joint bleeding despite adequate clotting factor replacement. The mechanisms leading to repeated spontaneous bleeding are unknown. We investigated synovial, vascular, stromal, and cartilage changes in response to a single induced hemarthrosis in the FVIII-deficient mouse. We found soft-tissue hyperproliferation with marked induction of neoangiogenesis and evolving abnormal vascular architecture. While soft-tissue changes were rapidly reversible, abnormal vascularity persisted for months and, surprisingly, was also seen in uninjured joints. Vascular changes in FVIII-deficient mice involved pronounced remodeling with expression of α-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), Endoglin (CD105), and vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as alterations of joint perfusion as determined by in vivo imaging. Vascular architecture changes and pronounced expression of α-SMA appeared unique to hemophilia, as these were not found in joint tissue obtained from mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and from patients with the same conditions. Evidence that vascular changes in hemophilia were significantly associated with bleeding and joint deterioration was obtained prospectively by dynamic in vivo imaging with musculoskeletal ultrasound and power Doppler of 156 joints (elbows, knees, and ankles) in a cohort of 26 patients with hemophilia at baseline and during painful episodes. These observations support the hypothesis that vascular remodeling contributes significantly to bleed propagation and development of hemophilic arthropathy. Based on these findings, the development of molecular targets for angiogenesis inhibition may be considered in this disease.

  3. Maternal Uterine Vascular Remodeling During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Osol, George; Mandala, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient uteroplacental blood flow is essential for normal pregnancy outcome and is accomplished by the coordinated growth and remodeling of the entire uterine circulation, as well as the creation of a new fetal vascular organ: the placenta. The process of remodeling involves a number of cellular processes, including hyperplasia and hypertrophy, rearrangement of existing elements, and changes in extracellular matrix. In this review, we provide information on uterine blood flow increases during pregnancy, the influence of placentation type on the distribution of uterine vascular resistance, consideration of the patterns, nature, and extent of maternal uterine vascular remodeling during pregnancy, and what is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:19196652

  4. Soluble Endoglin Modulates Aberrant Cerebral Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongmei; Hao, Qi; Kim, Helen; Su, Hua; Letarte, Michelle; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Lawton, Michael T.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are an important cause of neurological morbidity in young adults. The pathophysiology of these lesions is poorly understood. A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) has been shown to cause endothelial dysfunction and induce preeclampsia. We tested if sEng would be elevated in brain AVM tissues relative to epilepsy brain tissues, and also investigated whether sEng overexpression via gene transfer in the mouse brain would induce vascular dysplasia and associated changes in downstream signaling pathways. Methods Expression levels of sEng in surgical specimens were determined by Western blot assay and ELISA. Vascular dysplasia, levels of MMP and oxidative stress were determined by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. Results Brain AVMs (n=33) had higher mean sEng levels (245 ± 175 vs 100 ± 60, % of control, P=0.04) compared with controls (n=8), as determined by Western blot. In contrast, membrane-bound Eng was not significantly different (108 ± 79 vs 100 ± 63, % of control, P=0.95). sEng gene transduction in the mouse brain induced abnormal vascular structures. It also increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity by 490 ± 30% (MMP-9), 220 ± 30% (MMP-2), and oxidants by 260 ± 20% (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) at 2 weeks after injection, suggesting that MMPs and oxidative radicals may mediate sEng-induced pathological vascular remodeling. Interpretation The results suggest that elevated sEng may play a role in the generation of sporadic brain AVMs. Our findings may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention for patients with brain AVMs. PMID:19670444

  5. Endothelial cell dynamics in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Barbacena, Pedro; Carvalho, Joana R; Franco, Claudio A

    2016-01-01

    In this ESCHM 2016 conference talk report, we summarise two recently published original articles Franco et al. PLoS Biology 2015 and Franco et al. eLIFE 2016. The vascular network undergoes extensive vessel remodelling to become fully functional. Is it well established that blood flow is a main driver for vascular remodelling. It has also been proposed that vessel pruning is a central process within physiological vessel remodelling. However, despite its central function, the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating vessel regression, and their interaction with blood flow patterns, remain largely unexplained. We investigated the cellular process governing developmental vascular remodelling in mouse and zebrafish. We established that polarised reorganization of endothelial cells is at the core of vessel regression, representing vessel anastomosis in reverse. Moreover, we established for the first time an axial polarity map for all endothelial cells together with an in silico method for the computation of the haemodynamic forces in the murine retinal vasculature. Using network-level analysis and microfluidics, we showed that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarisation at lower shear stress levels. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinases: Inflammatory Regulators of Cell Behaviors in Vascular Formation and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qishan; Jin, Min; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Jianhua; Xiao, Qingzhong; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling contribute to pathogenesis of a number of disorders such as tumor, arthritis, atherosclerosis, restenosis, hypertension, and neurodegeneration. During angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, behaviors of stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) play a critical role in the processes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), well-known inflammatory mediators are a family of zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of ECM and non-ECM molecules mediating tissue remodeling in both physiological and pathological processes. MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, and MT1-MMP, are stimulated and activated by various stimuli in vascular tissues. Once activated, MMPs degrade ECM proteins or other related signal molecules to promote recruitment of stem/progenitor cells and facilitate migration and invasion of ECs and VSMCs. Moreover, vascular cell proliferation and apoptosis can also be regulated by MMPs via proteolytically cleaving and modulating bioactive molecules and relevant signaling pathways. Regarding the importance of vascular cells in abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, regulation of vascular cell behaviors through modulating expression and activation of MMPs shows therapeutic potential. PMID:23840100

  8. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  9. PECAM-1 is necessary for flow-induced vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Tzima, Ellie

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vascular remodeling is a physiological process that occurs in response to long-term changes in hemodynamic conditions, but may also contribute to the pathophysiology of intima-media thickening (IMT) and vascular disease. Shear stress detection by the endothelium is thought to be an important determinant of vascular remodeling. Previous work showed that Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a component of a mechanosensory complex that mediates endothelial cell (EC) responses to shear stress. METHODS AND RESULTS We tested the hypothesis that PECAM-1 contributes to vascular remodeling by analyzing the response to partial carotid artery ligation in PECAM-1 knockout mice and wild-type littermates. PECAM-1 deficiency resulted in impaired vascular remodeling and significantly reduced IMT in areas of low flow. Inward remodeling was associated with PECAM-1-dependent NFκB activation, surface adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte infiltration as well as Akt activation and vascular cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS PECAM-1 plays a crucial role in the activation of the NFκB and Akt pathways and inflammatory cell accumulation during vascular remodeling and IMT. Elucidation of some of the signals that drive vascular remodeling represent pharmacologically tractable targets for the treatment of restenosis after balloon angioplasty or stent placement. PMID:19390054

  10. Aberrant Pulmonary Vascular Growth and Remodeling in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other organs, a significant portion of lung development occurs after birth during alveolarization, thus rendering the lung highly susceptible to injuries that may disrupt this developmental process. Premature birth heightens this susceptibility, with many premature infants developing the chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease characterized by arrested alveolarization. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the elucidation of mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development, including extensive data suggesting that impaired pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of BPD. Moreover, in addition to impaired vascular growth, patients with BPD also frequently demonstrate alterations in pulmonary vascular remodeling and tone, increasing the risk for persistent hypoxemia and the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, an overview of normal lung development will be presented, and the pathologic features of arrested development observed in BPD will be described, with a specific emphasis on the pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Key pathways that promote normal pulmonary vascular development will be reviewed, and the experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating alterations of these essential pathways in BPD summarized. PMID:27243014

  11. Prostacyclin receptor-dependent modulation of pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, Y; Voelkel, N F; Gesell, T L; Moore, M D; Morris, K G; Alger, L A; Narumiya, S; Geraci, M W

    2001-07-15

    Prostacyclin (PGI(2)) reduces pulmonary vascular resistance and attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through signal transduction following ligand binding to its receptor. Because patients with severe pulmonary hypertension have a reduced PGI(2) receptor (PGI-R) expression in the remodeled pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, we hypothesized that pulmonary vascular remodeling may be modified PGI-R dependently. To test this hypothesis, PGI-R knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a simulated altitude of 17,000 ft or Denver altitude for 3 wk, and right ventricular pressure and lung histology were assessed. The PGI-R KO mice developed more severe pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling after chronic hypoxic exposure when compared to the WT mice. Our results indicate that PGI(2) and its receptor play an important role in the regulation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling, and that the absence of a functional receptor worsens pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  14. Role of microRNAs in Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Y.-C.; Yeh, C.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Besides being involved in the gradual formation of blood vessels during embryonic development, vascular remodeling also contributes to the progression of various cardiovascular diseases, such as; myocardial infarction, heart failure, atherosclerosis, pulmonary artery hypertension, restenosis, aneurysm, etc. The integrated mechanisms; proliferation of medial smooth muscle cell, dysregulation of intimal endothelial cell, activation of adventitial fibroblast, inflammation of macrophage, and the participation of extracellular matrix proteins are important factors in vascular remodeling. In the recent studies, microRNAs (miRs) have been shown to be expressed in all of these cell-types and play important roles in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling. Therefore, some miRs may be involved in prevention and others in the aggravation of the vascular lesions. miRs are small, endogenous, conserved, single-stranded, non-coding RNAs; which degrade target RNAs or inhibit translation post-transcriptionally. In this paper, we reviewed the function and mechanisms of miRs, which are highly expressed in various cells types, especially endothelial and smooth muscle cells, which are closely involved in the process of vascular remodeling. We also assess the functions of these miRs in the hope that they may provide new possibilities of diagnosis and treatment choices for the related diseases. PMID:26391551

  15. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  16. Chymase-producing cells of the innate immune system are required for decidual vascular remodeling and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nicole; Woidacki, Katja; Knöfler, Martin; Meinhardt, Gudrun; Nowak, Désirée; Velicky, Philipp; Pollheimer, Jürgen; Zenclussen, Ana C

    2017-03-22

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is caused by insufficient remodeling of spiral arteries (SAs). The mechanism underlying the relevance of natural killer cells (NKs) and mast cells (MCs) for SA remodeling and its effects on pregnancy outcome are not well understood. We show that NK depletion arrested SA remodeling without affecting pregnancy. MC depletion resulted in abnormally remodeled SAs and IUGR. Combined absence of NKs and MCs substantially affected SA remodeling and impaired fetal growth. We found that α-chymase mast cell protease (Mcpt) 5 mediates apoptosis of uterine smooth muscle cells, a key feature of SA remodeling. Additionally, we report a previously unknown source for Mcpt5: uterine (u) NKs. Mice with selective deletion of Mcpt5(+) cells had un-remodeled SAs and growth-restricted progeny. The human α-chymase CMA1, phylogenetic homolog of Mcpt5, stimulated the ex vivo migration of human trophoblasts, a pre-requisite for SA remodeling. Our results show that chymases secreted by uMCs and uNKs are pivotal to the vascular changes required to support pregnancy. Understanding the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-induced vascular changes is essential for developing therapeutic options against pregnancy complications associated with poor vascular remodeling.

  17. Chymase-producing cells of the innate immune system are required for decidual vascular remodeling and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Nicole; Woidacki, Katja; Knöfler, Martin; Meinhardt, Gudrun; Nowak, Désirée; Velicky, Philipp; Pollheimer, Jürgen; Zenclussen, Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is caused by insufficient remodeling of spiral arteries (SAs). The mechanism underlying the relevance of natural killer cells (NKs) and mast cells (MCs) for SA remodeling and its effects on pregnancy outcome are not well understood. We show that NK depletion arrested SA remodeling without affecting pregnancy. MC depletion resulted in abnormally remodeled SAs and IUGR. Combined absence of NKs and MCs substantially affected SA remodeling and impaired fetal growth. We found that α-chymase mast cell protease (Mcpt) 5 mediates apoptosis of uterine smooth muscle cells, a key feature of SA remodeling. Additionally, we report a previously unknown source for Mcpt5: uterine (u) NKs. Mice with selective deletion of Mcpt5+ cells had un-remodeled SAs and growth-restricted progeny. The human α-chymase CMA1, phylogenetic homolog of Mcpt5, stimulated the ex vivo migration of human trophoblasts, a pre-requisite for SA remodeling. Our results show that chymases secreted by uMCs and uNKs are pivotal to the vascular changes required to support pregnancy. Understanding the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-induced vascular changes is essential for developing therapeutic options against pregnancy complications associated with poor vascular remodeling. PMID:28327604

  18. Rapid remodeling of airway vascular architecture at birth.

    PubMed

    Ni, Amy; Lashnits, Erin; Yao, Li-Chin; Baluk, Peter; McDonald, Donald M

    2010-09-01

    Recent advances have documented the development of lung vasculature before and after birth, but less is known of the growth and maturation of airway vasculature. We sought to determine whether airway vasculature changes during the perinatal period and when the typical adult pattern develops. On embryonic day 16.5 mouse tracheas had a primitive vascular plexus unlike the adult airway vasculature, but instead resembling the yolk sac vasculature. Soon after birth (P0), the primitive vascular plexus underwent abrupt and extensive remodeling. Blood vessels overlying tracheal cartilage rings regressed from P1 to P3 but regrew from P4 to P7 to form the hierarchical, segmented, ladder-like adult pattern. Hypoxia and HIF-1α were present in tracheal epithelium over vessels that survived but not where they regressed. These findings reveal the plasticity of airway vasculature after birth and show that these vessels can be used to elucidate factors that promote postnatal vascular remodeling and maturation.

  19. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Tombetti, Enrico; Maugeri, Norma; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment. PMID:27069480

  20. Adrenal Androgen Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Inhibits Vascular Remodeling Following Arterial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ii, Masaaki; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Fukui, Ryosuke; Nakakoji, Takahiro; Kohbayashi, Eiko; Shibata, Nobuhiko; Furutama, Daisuke; Ishihara, Tadashi; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Losordo, Douglas W.; Ohsawa, Nakaaki

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have suggested that serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels have a significant inverse correlation with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. However, direct evidence for the association with DHEAS and vascular disorders has not yet been explored. DHEAS significantly reduced neointima formation 28 days after surgery without altering other serum metabolite levels in a rabbit carotid balloon injury model. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) index and increase of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) index, expressing differentiated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) markers in the media 7 days after surgery. In vitro, DHEAS exhibited inhibitory effects on VSMC proliferation and migration activities, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest with upregulation of one of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16INK4a and apoptosis with activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α in VSMCs. DHEAS inhibits vascular remodeling reducing neointima formation after vascular injury via its effects on VSMC phenotypic modulation, functions and apoptosis upregulating p16INK4a/activating PPARα. DHEAS may play a pathophysiological role for vascular remodeling in cardiovascular disease. PMID:19298964

  1. Carotid Vascular Abnormalities in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M. D.; Fleischer, J.; Rundek, T.; McMahon, D. J.; Homma, S.; Sacco, R.; Silverberg, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data on the presence, extent, and reversibility of cardiovascular disease in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are conflicting. Objective: This study evaluated carotid structure and function in PHPT patients compared with population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: Forty-nine men and women with PHPT and 991 controls without PHPT were studied. Outcome Measures: We measured carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque presence and thickness, and carotid stiffness, strain, and distensibility. Results: IMT, carotid plaque thickness, carotid stiffness, and distensibility were abnormal in PHPT patients, and IMT was higher in patients than controls (0.959 vs. 0.907 mm, P < 0.0001). In PHPT, PTH levels, but not calcium concentration, predicted carotid stiffness (P = 0.04), strain (P = 0.06), and distensibility (P = 0.07). Patients with increased carotid stiffness had significantly higher PTH levels than did those with normal stiffness (141 ± 48 vs. 94.9 ± 44 pg/ml, P = 0.002), and odds of abnormal stiffness increased 1.91 (confidence interval = 1.09–3.35; P = 0.024) for every 10 pg/ml increase in PTH, adjusted for age, creatinine, and albumin-corrected calcium. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical carotid vascular manifestations. IMT, a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, is increased. Measures of carotid stiffness are associated with extent of PTH elevation, suggesting that those with more severe PHPT may have impaired vascular compliance and that PTH, rather than calcium, is the mediator. PMID:19755478

  2. Regulator of calcineurin 1 mediates pathological vascular wall remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Vanesa; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Jesús Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis; Roqué, Mercè; Novensá, Laura; Belén García-Redondo, Ana; Salaices, Mercedes; Vila, Luis; Arbonés, María L.

    2011-01-01

    Artery wall remodeling, a major feature of diseases such as hypertension, restenosis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm, involves changes in the tunica media mass that reduce or increase the vessel lumen. The identification of molecules involved in vessel remodeling could aid the development of improved treatments for these pathologies. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a key effector of aortic wall remodeling that contributes to aneurysm formation and restenosis through incompletely defined signaling pathways. We show that AngII induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and vessel remodeling in mouse models of restenosis and aneurysm. These effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin (CN) or lentiviral delivery of CN-inhibitory peptides. Whole-genome analysis revealed >1,500 AngII-regulated genes in VSMCs, with just 11 of them requiring CN activation. Of these, the most sensitive to CN activation was regulator of CN 1 (Rcan1). Rcan1 was strongly activated by AngII in vitro and in vivo and was required for AngII-induced VSMC migration. Remarkably, Rcan1−/− mice were resistant to AngII-induced aneurysm and restenosis. Our results indicate that aneurysm formation and restenosis share mechanistic elements and identify Rcan1 as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of aneurysm and restenosis progression. PMID:21930771

  3. Regulation of tyrosine phosphatases in the adventitia during vascular remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Patrick; Hackbusch, Daniel; Mercan, Sibel; Stawowy, Philipp; Ostman, Arne; Kappert, Kai

    2009-05-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are regulators of growth factor signalling in vascular remodelling. The aim of this study was to evaluate PTP expression in the context of PDGF-signalling in the adventitia after angioplasty. Utilising a rat carotid artery model, the adventitial layers of injured and non-injured vessels were laser microdissected. The mRNA expression of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, the ligands PDGF-A/B/C/D and the receptor-antagonising PTPs (DEP-1, TC-PTP, SHP-2, PTP1B) were determined and correlated to vascular morphometrics, proliferation markers and PDGF {beta}-receptor phosphorylation. The levels of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, PDGF-C and PDGF-D were upregulated concurrently with the antagonising PTPs DEP-1 and TC-PTP at day 8, and normalised at day 14 after vessel injury. Although the proliferation parameters were time-dependently altered in the adventitial layer, the phosphorylation of the PDGF {beta}-receptor remained unchanged. The expression dynamics of specific PTPs indicate a regulatory role of PDGF-signalling also in the adventitia during vascular remodelling.

  4. Gasoline exhaust emissions induce vascular remodeling pathways involved in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amie K; Knuckles, Travis L; Obot Akata, Chrys; Shohet, Ralph; McDonald, Jacob D; Gigliotti, Andrew; Seagrave, Jean Clare; Campen, Matthew J

    2007-02-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that environmental air pollutants are positively associated with the development of chronic vascular disease; however, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. In the present study we examined molecular pathways associated with chronic vascular disease in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice, including markers of vascular remodeling and oxidative stress, in response to exposure to the ubiquitous environmental pollutant, gasoline engine emissions. ApoE(-/-) mice, on a high-fat diet, were exposed by inhalation to either filtered air; 8, 40, or 60 mug/m(3) particulate matter whole exhaust; or filtered exhaust with gases matching the 60-mug/m(3) concentration, for 7 weeks. Aortas and plasma were collected and assayed for changes in histochemical markers, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and indicators of oxidative damage. Inhalational exposure to gasoline engine emissions resulted in increased aortic mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-7, and MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2, endothelin-1 and heme oxygenase-1 in ApoE(-/-) mice; increased aortic MMP-9 protein levels were confirmed through immunohistochemistry. Elevated reactive oxygen species were also observed in arteries from exposed animals, despite absence of plasma markers. Similar findings were also observed in the aortas of ApoE(-/-) mice exposed to particle-filtered atmosphere, implicating the gaseous components of the whole exhaust in mediating the expression of markers associated with the vasculopathy. These findings demonstrate that exposure to gasoline engine emissions results in the transcriptional upregulation of factors associated with vascular remodeling, as well as increased markers of vascular oxidative stress, which may contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced stability of vulnerable plaques.

  5. Tie1 controls angiopoietin function in vascular remodeling and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Emilia A.; Lampinen, Anita; Giri, Hemant; Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; D’Amico, Gabriela; Sipilä, Tuomas J.; Lohela, Marja; Vaheri, Antti; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Koh, Gou Young; McDonald, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    The angiopoietin/Tie (ANG/Tie) receptor system controls developmental and tumor angiogenesis, inflammatory vascular remodeling, and vessel leakage. ANG1 is a Tie2 agonist that promotes vascular stabilization in inflammation and sepsis, whereas ANG2 is a context-dependent Tie2 agonist or antagonist. A limited understanding of ANG signaling mechanisms and the orphan receptor Tie1 has hindered development of ANG/Tie-targeted therapeutics. Here, we determined that both ANG1 and ANG2 binding to Tie2 increases Tie1-Tie2 interactions in a β1 integrin–dependent manner and that Tie1 regulates ANG-induced Tie2 trafficking in endothelial cells. Endothelial Tie1 was essential for the agonist activity of ANG1 and autocrine ANG2. Deletion of endothelial Tie1 in mice reduced Tie2 phosphorylation and downstream Akt activation, increased FOXO1 nuclear localization and transcriptional activation, and prevented ANG1- and ANG2-induced capillary-to-venous remodeling. However, in acute endotoxemia, the Tie1 ectodomain that is responsible for interaction with Tie2 was rapidly cleaved, ANG1 agonist activity was decreased, and autocrine ANG2 agonist activity was lost, which led to suppression of Tie2 signaling. Tie1 cleavage also occurred in patients with hantavirus infection. These results support a model in which Tie1 directly interacts with Tie2 to promote ANG-induced vascular responses under noninflammatory conditions, whereas in inflammation, Tie1 cleavage contributes to loss of ANG2 agonist activity and vascular stability. PMID:27548530

  6. Vascular remodeling in primary pulmonary hypertension. Potential role for transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Botney, M. D.; Bahadori, L.; Gold, L. I.

    1994-01-01

    Active exogenous transforming growth factor-beta s (TGF-beta s) are potent modulators of extracellular matrix synthesis in cell culture and stimulate matrix synthesis in wounds and other remodeling tissues. The role of endogenous TGF-beta s in remodeling tissues is less well defined. Vascular remodeling in the pulmonary arteries of patients with primary pulmonary hypertension is characterized, in part, by abnormal deposition of immunohistochemically detectable procollagen, thereby identifying actively remodeling vessels. We used this marker of active matrix synthesis to begin defining the in vivo role of TGF-beta in the complex milieu of actively remodeling tissues. Immunohistochemistry using isoform-specific anti-TGF-beta antibodies was performed to determine whether TGF-beta was present in actively remodeling hypertensive pulmonary arteries 20 to 500 microns in diameter. Intense, cell-associated TGF-beta 3 immunoreactivity was observed in the media and neointima of these hypertensive muscular arteries. Immunostaining was present, but less intense, in normal arteries of comparable size. TGF-beta 2 immunoreactivity was observed in normal vessels and was increased slightly in hypertensive vessels, in a pattern resembling TGF-beta 3 immunoreactivity. No staining was associated with the adventitia. TGF-beta 1 immunostaining was either faint or absent in both normal and hypertensive vessels. Comparison of procollagen and TGF-beta localization demonstrated that TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3 colocalized at all sites of procollagen synthesis. However, TGF-beta was observed in vessels, or vascular compartments, where there was no procollagen synthesis. Procollagen immunoreactivity was not present in normal vessels that showed immunoreactivity for TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3. These observations suggest: a) the stimulation of procollagen synthesis by TGF-beta in vivo is more complex than suggested by in vitro studies and b) a potential role for TGF-beta 2 or TGF-beta 3, but not

  7. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  8. Pleiotrophin is a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In a recent report by Zhang et al., pleiotrophin (PTN) was demonstrated to enhance glioma growth by promoting vascular abnormalization. PTN stimulates glioma vessels through anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk)-mediated perivascular deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Targeting of Alk or VEGF signaling normalizes tumor vessels in PTN-expressing tumors.

  9. Salvianolic acid A attenuates vascular remodeling in a pulmonary arterial hypertension rat model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-cai; Yuan, Tian-yi; Zhang, Hui-fang; Wang, Dan-shu; Yan, Yu; Niu, Zi-ran; Lin, Yi-huang; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The current therapeutic approaches have a limited effect on the dysregulated pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study we examined whether salvianolic acid A (SAA) extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine 'Dan Shen' attenuated vascular remodeling in a PAH rat model, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Methods: PAH was induced in rats by injecting a single dose of monocrotaline (MCT 60 mg/kg, sc). The rats were orally treated with either SAA (0.3, 1, 3 mg·kg−1·d−1) or a positive control bosentan (30 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements were performed on d 28. Then the hearts and lungs were harvested, the organ indices and pulmonary artery wall thickness were calculated, and biochemical and histochemical analysis were conducted. The levels of apoptotic and signaling proteins in the lungs were measured using immunoblotting. Results: Treatment with SAA or bosentan effectively ameliorated MCT-induced pulmonary artery remodeling, pulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities and the subsequent increases of right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP). Furthermore, the treatments significantly attenuated MCT-induced hypertrophic damage of myocardium, parenchymal injury and collagen deposition in the lungs. Moreover, the treatments attenuated MCT-induced apoptosis and fibrosis in the lungs. The treatments partially restored MCT-induced reductions of bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPRII) and phosphorylated Smad1/5 in the lungs. Conclusion: SAA ameliorates the pulmonary arterial remodeling in MCT-induced PAH rats most likely via activating the BMPRII-Smad pathway and inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, SAA may have therapeutic potential for the patients at high risk of PAH. PMID:27180980

  10. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinases and their Inhibitors in Vascular Remodeling and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raffetto, Joseph D.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Members of the MMP family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins and membrane-type MMPs. ProMMPs are cleaved into active forms that promote degradation of ECM proteins. Also, recent evidence suggests direct or indirect effects of MMPs on ion channels in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, and on other mechanisms of vascular relaxation/contraction. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) reduce excessive proteolytic ECM degradation by MMPs. The balance between MMPs and TIMPs plays a major role in vascular remodeling, angiogenesis, and the uterine and systemic vasodilation during normal pregnancy. An imbalance in the MMPs/TIMPs activity ratio may underlie the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins, hypertension and preeclampsia. Downregulation of MMPs using genetic manipulations of endogenous TIMPs, or synthetic pharmacological inhibitors such as BB-94 (Batimastat) and doxycycline, and Ro-28-2653, a more specific inhibitor of gelatinases and membrane type 1-MMP, could be beneficial in reducing the MMP-mediated vascular dysfunction and the progressive vessel wall damage associated with vascular disease. PMID:17678629

  12. Intrapulmonary vascular remodeling: MSCT-based evaluation in COPD and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosnier, Adeline; Fetita, Catalin; Thabut, Gabriel; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Whether COPD is generally known as a small airway disease, recent investigations suggest that vascular remodeling could play a key role in disease progression. This paper develops a specific investigation framework in order to evaluate the remodeling of the intrapulmonary vascular network and its correlation with other image or clinical parameters (emphysema score or FEV1) in patients with smoking- or genetic- (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency - AATD) related COPD. The developed approach evaluates the vessel caliber distribution per lung or lung region (upper, lower, 10%- and 20%- periphery) in relation with the severity of the disease and computes a remodeling marker given by the area under the caliber distribution curve for radii less than 1.6mm, AUC16. It exploits a medial axis analysis in relation with local caliber information computed in the segmented vascular network, with values normalized with respect to the lung volume (for which a robust segmentation is developed). The first results obtained on a 34-patient database (13 COPD, 13 AATD and 8 controls) showed significant vascular remodeling for COPD and AATD versus controls, with a negative correlation with the emphysema degree for COPD, but not for AATD. Significant vascular remodeling at 20% lung periphery was found both for the severe COPD and AATD patients, but not for the moderate groups. Also the vascular remodeling in AATD did not correlate with the FEV1, nor with DLCO, which might suggest independent mechanisms for bronchial and vascular remodeling in the lung.

  13. Drinking citrus fruit juice inhibits vascular remodeling in cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI.

  14. The Role of Hippo/YAP Signaling in Vascular Remodeling and Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Bao, Qiankun; Yan, Meng; Liang, Jing; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Chunjiong; Ai, Ding

    2017-04-03

    Vascular remodeling is a vital process of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and represents the altered structure and arrangement of blood vessels. The Hippo pathway controls organ size by regulating cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. Emerging evidence supports that the Hippo/YAP pathway plays an important role in vascular-remodeling and related cardiovascular diseases. The Hippo/YAP pathway has been shown to alter extracellular matrix production or degradation and the growth, death and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, which contributes to vascular remodeling in cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, aortic aneurysms and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings about the roles and mechanisms of Hippo/YAP signaling in vascular-remodeling and related diseases.

  15. Circulating microparticles enhanced rat vascular wall remodeling following endothelial denudation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fan-Yen; Lu, Hung-I; Chai, Han-Tan; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tein-Hung; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Mel S; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that circulating microparticles (MPs) exacerbated vascular wall (VW) remodeling after endothelial denudation by 0.014 wire in a rat model. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 40) were equally categorized into group 1 [sham-control (SC); 3.0 mL saline intravenous injection], group 2 [SC + intravenous MPs (1.0 × 107) derived from patients with carotid artery stenosis (CAS)], group 3 [femoral arterial endothelial denudation (FAED)], group 4 (FAED + MPs derived from healthy subjects), and group 5 (FAED + CAS-derived MPs). Animals were euthanized by day 28 after FAED procedure. The results demonstrated that neointimal area (NIA) (mm2), medial area, and number of infiltrated cells in medial layer were highest in group 5 and lowest in groups 1 and 2, and significantly higher in group 4 than those in group 3 (all P<0.0001), but no differences were noted between groups 1 and 2. However, the ratio of luminal area to VW area showed an opposite pattern compared to that of NIA among five groups (P<0.0001). Immunofluorescent study showed an identical pattern of changes in the numbers of inflammatory (F4/80, CD14, CD40, IL-β) and proliferative (Ki-67, Cx43) cells in VW compared to that of NIA among the five groups (all P<0.00). The mNRA expressions of inflammatory (MMP-9, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, PDGF) and cell activation (c-Fos, c-Myc, osteopontin, PCNA) biomarkers showed an identical pattern compared to that of NIA among all groups (all P<0.001). Take altogether, CAS-derived MPs further aggravated MP-mediated VW remodeling after endothelial damage compared to that observed after administration of MPS derived from healthy subjects. PMID:27904658

  16. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fu; Chambon, Pierre; Tellides, George; Kong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  17. Pulmonary vascular development goes awry in congenital lung abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kool, Heleen; Mous, Daphne; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Rottier, Robbert J

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular diseases of the newborn comprise a wide range of pathological conditions with developmental abnormalities in the pulmonary vasculature. Clinically, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is characterized by persistent increased resistance of the vasculature and abnormal vascular response. The classification of PH is primarily based on clinical parameters instead of morphology and distinguishes five groups of PH. Congenital lung anomalies, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) and PH associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), but also bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are classified in group three. Clearly, tight and correct regulation of pulmonary vascular development is crucial for normal lung development. Human and animal model systems have increased our knowledge and make it possible to identify and characterize affected pathways and study pivotal genes. Understanding of the normal development of the pulmonary vasculature will give new insights in the origin of the spectrum of rare diseases, such as CDH, ACD, and BPD, which render a significant clinical problem in neonatal intensive care units around the world. In this review, we describe normal pulmonary vascular development, and focus on four diseases of the newborn in which abnormal pulmonary vascular development play a critical role in morbidity and mortality. In the future perspective, we indicate the lines of research that seem to be very promising for elucidating the molecular pathways involved in the origin of congenital pulmonary vascular disease.

  18. Mechanical Stress Induces Remodeling of Vascular Networks in Growing Leaves.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Sharon, Eran; Armon, Shahaf; Nakayama, Naomi; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-04-01

    Differentiation into well-defined patterns and tissue growth are recognized as key processes in organismal development. However, it is unclear whether patterns are passively, homogeneously dilated by growth or whether they remodel during tissue expansion. Leaf vascular networks are well-fitted to investigate this issue, since leaves are approximately two-dimensional and grow manyfold in size. Here we study experimentally and computationally how vein patterns affect growth. We first model the growing vasculature as a network of viscoelastic rods and consider its response to external mechanical stress. We use the so-called texture tensor to quantify the local network geometry and reveal that growth is heterogeneous, resembling non-affine deformations in composite materials. We then apply mechanical forces to growing leaves after veins have differentiated, which respond by anisotropic growth and reorientation of the network in the direction of external stress. External mechanical stress appears to make growth more homogeneous, in contrast with the model with viscoelastic rods. However, we reconcile the model with experimental data by incorporating randomness in rod thickness and a threshold in the rod growth law, making the rods viscoelastoplastic. Altogether, we show that the higher stiffness of veins leads to their reorientation along external forces, along with a reduction in growth heterogeneity. This process may lead to the reinforcement of leaves against mechanical stress. More generally, our work contributes to a framework whereby growth and patterns are coordinated through the differences in mechanical properties between cell types.

  19. Mechanical Stress Induces Remodeling of Vascular Networks in Growing Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Sharon, Eran; Armon, Shahaf; Nakayama, Naomi; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation into well-defined patterns and tissue growth are recognized as key processes in organismal development. However, it is unclear whether patterns are passively, homogeneously dilated by growth or whether they remodel during tissue expansion. Leaf vascular networks are well-fitted to investigate this issue, since leaves are approximately two-dimensional and grow manyfold in size. Here we study experimentally and computationally how vein patterns affect growth. We first model the growing vasculature as a network of viscoelastic rods and consider its response to external mechanical stress. We use the so-called texture tensor to quantify the local network geometry and reveal that growth is heterogeneous, resembling non-affine deformations in composite materials. We then apply mechanical forces to growing leaves after veins have differentiated, which respond by anisotropic growth and reorientation of the network in the direction of external stress. External mechanical stress appears to make growth more homogeneous, in contrast with the model with viscoelastic rods. However, we reconcile the model with experimental data by incorporating randomness in rod thickness and a threshold in the rod growth law, making the rods viscoelastoplastic. Altogether, we show that the higher stiffness of veins leads to their reorientation along external forces, along with a reduction in growth heterogeneity. This process may lead to the reinforcement of leaves against mechanical stress. More generally, our work contributes to a framework whereby growth and patterns are coordinated through the differences in mechanical properties between cell types. PMID:27074136

  20. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington’s epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington’s theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  1. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington's epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington's theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality.

  2. Defining the critical hypoxic threshold that promotes vascular remodeling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Milner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In animal models, hypoxic pre-conditioning confers protection against subsequent neurological insults, mediated in part through an extensive vascular remodeling response. In light of the therapeutic potential of this effect, the goal of this study was to establish the dose-response relationship between level of hypoxia and the extent of cerebrovascular modeling, and to define the mildest level of hypoxia that promotes remodeling. Mice were exposed to different levels of continuous hypoxia (8-21% O2) for seven days before several aspects of vascular remodeling were evaluated, including endothelial proliferation, total vascular area, arteriogenesis, and fibronectin/α5β1 integrin expression. For most events, the threshold level of hypoxia that stimulated remodeling was 12-13% O2. Interestingly, many parameters displayed a biphasic dose-response curve, with peak levels attained at 10% O2, but declined thereafter. Further analysis in the 12-13% O2 range revealed that vascular remodeling occurs by two separate mechanisms: (i) endothelial hyperplasia, triggered by a hypoxic threshold of 13% O2, which leads to increased capillary growth, and (ii) endothelial hypertrophy, triggered by a more severe hypoxic threshold of 12% O2, which leads to expansion of large vessels and arteriogenesis. Taken together, these results define the hypoxic thresholds for vascular remodeling in the brain, and point to two separate mechanisms mediating this process.

  3. Changes in vascular extracellular matrix composition during decidual spiral arteriole remodeling in early human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha D; Choudhury, Ruhul H; Matos, Patricia; Horn, James A; Lye, Stephen J; Dunk, Caroline E; Aplin, John D; Jones, Rebecca L; Harris, Lynda K

    2016-05-01

    Uterine spiral arteriole (SA) remodeling in early pregnancy involves a coordinated series of events including decidual immune cell recruitment, vascular cell disruption and loss, and colonization by placental-derived extravillous trophoblast (EVT). During this process, decidual SA are converted from narrow, muscular vessels into dilated channels lacking vasomotor control. We hypothesized that this extensive alteration in SA architecture must require significant reorganization and/or breakdown of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). First trimester decidua basalis (30 specimens) was immunostained to identify spiral arterioles undergoing trophoblast-independent and -dependent phases of remodeling. Serial sections were then immunostained for a panel of ECM markers, to examine changes in vascular ECM during the remodeling process. The initial stages of SA remodeling were characterized by loss of laminin, elastin, fibrillin, collagen types III, IV and VI from the basement membrane, vascular media and/or adventitia, and surrounding decidual stromal cells. Loss of ECM correlated with disruption and disorganization of vascular smooth muscle cells, and the majority of changes occurred prior to extensive colonization of the vessel wall by EVT. The final stages of SA remodeling, characterized by the arrival of EVT, were associated with the increased mural deposition of fibronectin and fibrinoid. This study provides the first detailed analysis of the spatial and temporal loss of ECM from the walls of remodeling decidual SA in early pregnancy.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Abnormalities in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mourani, Peter M; Abman, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of preterm infants, these infants remain at risk bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which results in prolonged need for supplemental oxygen, recurrent respiratory exacerbations, and exercise intolerance. Recent investigations have highlighted the important contribution of the developing pulmonary circulation to lung development, showing that these infants are also at risk for pulmonary vascular disease (PVD), including pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Several epidemiologic studies have delineated the incidence of PH in preterm infants and the impact on outcomes. These studies have also highlighted gaps in the understanding of PVD in BPD.

  5. Vascular remodeling: A redox-modulated mechanism of vessel caliber regulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2017-01-18

    Vascular remodeling, i.e. whole-vessel structural reshaping, determines lumen caliber in (patho)physiology. Here we review mechanisms underlying vessel remodeling, with emphasis in redox regulation. First, we discuss confusing terminology and focus on strictu sensu remodeling. Second, we propose a mechanobiological remodeling paradigm based on the concept of tensional homeostasis as a setpoint regulator. We first focus on shear-mediated models as prototypes of remodeling closely dominated by highly redox-sensitive endothelial function. More detailed discussions focus on mechanosensors, integrins, extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton and inflammatory pathways as potential of mechanisms potentially coupling tensional homeostasis to redox regulation. Further discussion of remodeling associated with atherosclerosis and injury repair highlights important aspects of redox vascular responses. While neointima formation has not shown consistent responsiveness to antioxidants, vessel remodeling has been more clearly responsive, indicating that despite the multilevel redox signaling pathways, there is a coordinated response of the whole vessel. Among mechanisms that may orchestrate redox pathways, we discuss roles of superoxide dismutase activity and extracellular protein disulfide isomerase. We then discuss redox modulation of aneurysms, a special case of expansive remodeling. We propose that the redox modulation of vascular remodeling may reflect (1) remodeling pathophysiology is dominated by a particularly redox-sensitive cell type, e.g., endothelial cells (2) redox pathways are temporospatially coordinated at an organ level across distinct cellular and acellular structures or (3) the tensional homeostasis setpoint is closely connected to redox signaling. The mechanobiological/redox model discussed here can be a basis for improved understanding of remodeling and helps clarifying mechanisms underlying prevalent hard-to-treat diseases.

  6. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Vascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Kafoury, Ramzi; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The RAAS through its physiological effectors plays a key role in promoting and maintaining inflammation. Inflammation is an important mechanism in the development and progression of CVD such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. In addition to its main role in regulating blood pressure and its role in hypertension, RAAS has proinflammatory and profibrotic effects at cellular and molecular levels. Blocking RAAS provides beneficial effects for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Evidence shows that inhibition of RAAS positively influences vascular remodeling thus improving CVD outcomes. The beneficial vascular effects of RAAS inhibition are likely due to decreasing vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and positive effects on regeneration of endothelial progenitor cells. Inflammatory factors such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and CRP have key roles in mediating vascular inflammation and blocking RAAS negatively modulates the levels of these inflammatory molecules. Some of these inflammatory markers are clinically associated with CVD events. More studies are required to establish long-term effects of RAAS inhibition on vascular inflammation, vascular cells regeneration, and CVD clinical outcomes. This review presents important information on RAAS's role on vascular inflammation, vascular cells responses to RAAS, and inhibition of RAAS signaling in the context of vascular inflammation, vascular remodeling, and vascular inflammation-associated CVD. Nevertheless, the review also equates the need to rethink and rediscover new RAAS inhibitors. PMID:24804145

  7. Region-specific vascular remodeling and its prevention by artificial gravity in weightless environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan

    2013-12-01

    Evidence from recent ground and spaceflight studies with animals and humans supports the notion that microgravity-induced vascular remodeling contributes to postflight orthostatic intolerance. In the vascular beds of lower body, such as in splanchnic and lower limb circulation, resistance vessels would undergo hypotrophy and decrement in myogenic tone and vasoreactivity. Thus, despite the concurrent sympathetic activation, the increase in peripheral vascular resistance would still be compromised while astronauts were re-exposed to Earth's 1-G gravity, since ~75 % of the total vascular conductance lies below the heart. On the contrary, cerebral arteries would undergo hypertrophy and vasoreactivity enhancement due to adaptation to cerebral hypertension, which protects the down-stream microcirculation in the brain during spaceflight. However, the enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebral vessels might also aggravate postflight orthostatic intolerance, particularly after long-duration spaceflight. Animal studies have indicated that the underlying mechanisms may involve ion-channel remodeling in vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular NO-NOS and local renin-angiotensin system (L-RAS). Furthermore, vascular remodeling and associated ion-channel and L-RAS changes can be prevented by a countermeasure of daily short-duration restoring to normal standing posture. These findings substantiate in general the hypothesis that redistribution of transmural pressure along the arterial vasculature due to the removal of gravity might be the primary factor that initiates vascular remodeling in microgravity, and daily short-duration restoring its normal distribution by intermittent artificial gravity (IAG) can effectively prevent the vascular adaptation and hence postflight cardiovascular deconditioning. IAG might also be beneficial in maintaining vascular health during future long-duration space flight.

  8. Aqueous garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Prieto, Marcela Alejandra; González, Roxana Elizabeth; Renna, Nicolás Federico; Galmarini, Claudio Rómulo; Miatello, Roberto Miguel

    2010-06-09

    The organosulfur profile and the effect on oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in fructose-fed rats (FFR) were evaluated in Fuego INTA and Morado INTA garlic cultivars. Wistar rats were fed either normal rat chow (control) or the same diet plus 10% fructose in drinking water. During the last 6 weeks of a 12 week period of the corresponding diet, a subgroup of control and FFR received an aqueous extract of Fuego INTA and Morado INTA. Fuego INTA showed higher levels of total thiosulfinates, allicin, and pungency than Morado INTA. FFR showed an increase of systolic blood pressure, aortic NAD(P)H oxidase activity, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and vascular remodeling that was significantly reduced after both garlic administrations. The beneficial effect was slightly higher when Fuego INTA was administered. Both aqueous garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in rats with metabolic syndrome, suggesting the existence of slight differences among cultivars.

  9. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  10. Berberine Attenuates Vascular Remodeling and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Xing; Li, Chuan-Bao; Xiao, Jie; Gao, Hai-Qing; Wang, He-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Ji, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Berberine is a natural product that shows benefits for metabolic syndrome (MS). However, the effects of berberine on the improvement of vascular inflammation and remodeling in MS remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether berberine could prevent vascular remodeling and inflammation in the MS condition. A rat model of MS was established, and MS rats were divided into two groups: MS group without berberine treatment, and MSB group with berberine treatment (each group n-10). Ten normal Wistar rats were used as controls (NC group). Vascular damage was examined by transmission electron microscopy and pathological staining. Compared to the NC group, the secretion of inflammatory factors was increased and the aortic wall thicker in the MS group. The MSB group exhibited decreased secretion of inflammatory factors and improved vascular remodeling, compared to the MS group. In addition, the levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) were significantly decreased in the MSB group compared to the MS group. In conclusion, our data show that berberine improves vascular inflammation and remodeling in the MS condition, and this is correlated with the ability of berberine to inhibit p38 MAPK activation, ATF-2 phosphorylation, and MMP-2 expression.

  11. Regulation of vascular endothelial junction stability and remodeling through Rap1-Rasip1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher W; Ye, Weilan

    2014-01-01

    The ability of blood vessels to sense and respond to stimuli such as fluid flow, shear stress, and trafficking of immune cells is critical to the proper function of the vascular system. Endothelial cells constantly remodel their cell-cell junctions and the underlying cytoskeletal network in response to these exogenous signals. This remodeling, which depends on regulation of the linkage between actin and integral junction proteins, is controlled by a complex signaling network consisting of small G proteins and their various downstream effectors. In this commentary, we summarize recent developments in understanding the small G protein RAP1 and its effector RASIP1 as critical mediators of endothelial junction stabilization, and the relationship between RAP1 effectors and modulation of different subsets of endothelial junctions.   The vasculature is a dynamic organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of signaling stimuli and mechanical stresses. In embryogenesis, nascent blood vessels form via a process termed vasculogenesis, wherein mesodermally derived endothelial precursor cells aggregate into cords, which subsequently form a lumen that permits trafficking of plasma and erythrocytes. (1)(,) (2) Angiogenesis occurs after establishment of this primitive vascular network, where new vessels sprout from existing vessels, migrate into newly expanded tissues, and anastomose to form a functional and complex circulatory network. (1)(,) (2) In the mouse, this process occurs through the second half of embryogenesis and into postnatal development in some tissues, such as the developing retinal vasculature. (3) Further, angiogenesis occurs in a variety of pathological conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, wound healing, and tumor growth. (1)(,) (2)(,) (4) Both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are driven through signaling by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and therapeutic

  12. Decreased Neprilysin and Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Marilee J.; Buesing, Erica J.; Wehling, Carol A.; Loomis, Zoe L.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Zamora, Martin R.; Miller, York E.; Colgan, Sean P.; Hersh, Louis B.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Dempsey, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Studies with genetically engineered mice showed that decreased expression of the transmembrane peptidase neprilysin (NEP) increases susceptibility to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypertension; in hypoxic wild-type mice, expression is decreased early in distal pulmonary arteries, where prominent vascular remodeling occurs. Therefore, in humans with smoke- and hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling, as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary activity/expression of NEP may likewise be decreased. Objectives: To test whether NEP activity and expression are reduced in COPD lungs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exposed to cigarette smoke extract or hypoxia and begin to investigate mechanisms involved. Methods: Control and advanced COPD lung lysates (n = 13–14) were analyzed for NEP activity and protein and mRNA expression. As a control, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was analyzed. Lung sections were assessed for vascular remodeling and oxidant damage. Human pulmonary arterial SMCs were exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, or H2O2, and incubated with antioxidants or lysosomal/proteasomal inhibitors. Measurements and Main Results: COPD lungs demonstrated areas of vascular rarification, distal muscularization, and variable intimal and prominent medial/adventitial thickening. NEP activity was reduced by 76%; NEP protein expression was decreased in alveolar walls and distal vessels; mRNA expression was also decreased. In SMCs exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, and H2O2, NEP activity and expression were also reduced. Reactive oxygen species inactivated NEP activity; NEP protein degradation appeared to be substantially induced. Conclusions: Mechanisms responsible for reduced NEP activity and protein expression include oxidative reactions and protein degradation. Maintaining or increasing lung NEP may protect against pulmonary vascular remodeling in response to chronic smoke and hypoxia. PMID:20813891

  13. The Adventitia: Essential Role in Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Kurt R.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia; Anwar, Adil; Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette; Frid, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A rapidly emerging concept is that the vascular adventitia acts as a biological processing center for the retrieval, integration, storage, and release of key regulators of vessel wall function. It is the most complex compartment of the vessel wall and comprises a variety of cells including fibroblasts, immunomodulatory cells, resident progenitor cells, vasa vasorum endothelial cells, and adrenergic nerves. In response to vascular stress or injury, resident adventitial cells are often the first to be activated and reprogrammed to then influence tone and structure of the vessel wall. Experimental data indicate that the adventitial fibroblast, the most abundant cellular constituent of adventitia, is a critical regulator of vascular wall function. In response to vascular stresses such as overdistension, hypoxia, or infection, the adventitial fibroblast is activated and undergoes phenotypic changes that include proliferation, differentiation, and production of extracellular matrix proteins and adhesion molecules, release of reactive oxygen species, chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and metalloproteinases that, collectively, affect medial smooth muscle cell tone and growth directly and that stimulate recruitment and retention of circulating inflammatory and progenitor cells to the vessel wall. Resident dendritic cells also participate in “sensing” vascular stress and actively communicate with fibroblasts and progenitor cells to simulate repair processes that involve expansion of the vasa vasorum, which acts as a conduit for further delivery of inflammatory/progenitor cells. This review presents the current evidence demonstrating that the adventitia acts as a key regulator of pulmonary vascular wall function and structure from the “outside in.” PMID:23737168

  14. VEGF-A regulated by progesterone governs uterine angiogenesis and vascular remodelling during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minah; Park, Hyeung Ju; Seol, Jae Won; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Cho, Young-Suk; Kim, Kyu Rae; Choi, Youngsok; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Shibuya, Masabumi; Ferrara, Napoleone; Sung, Hoon-Ki; Nagy, Andras; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young

    2013-01-01

    The features and regulation of uterine angiogenesis and vascular remodelling during pregnancy are poorly defined. Here we show that dynamic and variable decidual angiogenesis (sprouting, intussusception and networking), and active vigorous vascular remodelling such as enlargement and elongation of ‘vascular sinus folding’ (VSF) and mural cell drop-out occur distinctly in a spatiotemporal manner in the rapidly growing mouse uterus during early pregnancy — just after implantation but before placentation. Decidual angiogenesis is mainly regulated through VEGF-A secreted from the progesterone receptor (PR)-expressing decidual stromal cells which are largely distributed in the anti-mesometrial region (AMR). In comparison, P4-PR-regulated VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signalling, ligand-independent VEGFR3 signalling and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells positively and coordinately regulate enlargement and elongation of VSF. During the postpartum period, Tie2 signalling could be involved in vascular maturation at the endometrium in a ligand-independent manner, with marked reduction of VEGF-A, VEGFR2 and PR expressions. Overall, we show that two key vascular growth factor receptors — VEGFR2 and Tie2 — strikingly but differentially regulate decidual angiogenesis and vascular remodelling in rapidly growing and regressing uteri in an organotypic manner. PMID:23853117

  15. Procontractile G protein–mediated signaling pathways antagonistically regulate smooth muscle differentiation in vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Till F.; Juárez, Julián Albarrán; Troidl, Kerstin; Tang, Cong; Wang, Shengpeng; Wirth, Angela; Takefuji, Mikito; Wettschureck, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (Sm) cells (VSMCs) are highly plastic. Their differentiation state can be regulated by serum response factor (SRF), which activates genes involved in Sm differentiation and proliferation by recruiting cofactors, such as members of the myocardin family and ternary complex factors (TCFs), respectively. However, the extracellular cues and upstream signaling mechanisms regulating SRF-dependent VSMC differentiation under in vivo conditions are poorly understood. In this study, we show that the procontractile signaling pathways mediated by the G proteins G12/G13 and Gq/G11 antagonistically regulate VSMC plasticity in different models of vascular remodeling. In mice lacking Gα12/Gα13 or their effector, the RhoGEF protein LARG, RhoA-dependent SRF-regulation was blocked and down-regulation of VSMC differentiation marker genes was enhanced. This was accompanied by an excessive vascular remodeling and exacerbation of atherosclerosis. In contrast, Sm-specific Gαq/Gα11 deficiency blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and the TCF Elk-1, resulting in a reduced VSMC dedifferentiation in response to flow cessation or vascular injury. These data show that the balanced activity of both G protein–mediated pathways in VSMCs is required for an appropriate vessel remodeling response in vascular diseases and suggest new approaches to modulate Sm differentiation in vascular pathologies. PMID:23129751

  16. Slug Is Increased in Vascular Remodeling and Induces a Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Peinado, Victor I.; Pisano, María V.; Párrizas, Marcelina; Blanco, Isabel; Evers, Maurits; Engelmann, Julia C.; García-Lucio, Jessica; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have confirmed Slug as a key player in regulating phenotypic changes in several cell models, however, its role in smooth muscle cells (SMC) has never been assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of Slug during the phenotypic switch of SMC in vitro and throughout the development of vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Slug expression was decreased during both cell-to-cell contact and TGFβ1 induced SMC differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a known inductor of a proliferative/dedifferentiated SMC phenotype, induces the expression of Slug in SMC. Slug knockdown blocked TNFα-induced SMC phenotypic change and significantly reduced both SMC proliferation and migration, while its overexpression blocked the TGFβ1-induced SMC differentiation and induced proliferation and migration. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis showed that in SMC, Slug knockdown induced changes mainly in genes related to proliferation and migration, indicating that Slug controls these processes in SMC. Notably, Slug expression was significantly up-regulated in lungs of mice using a model of pulmonary hypertension-related vascular remodeling. Highly remodeled human pulmonary arteries also showed an increase of Slug expression compared to less remodeled arteries. Conclusions Slug emerges as a key transcription factor driving SMC towards a proliferative phenotype. The increased Slug expression observed in vivo in highly remodeled arteries of mice and human suggests a role of Slug in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27441378

  17. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  18. Human miR-221/222 in Physiological and Atherosclerotic Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dmitry A.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of miR-221/222 is a key player in vascular biology through exhibiting its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). These miRNAs contribute to vascular remodeling, an adaptive process involving phenotypic and behavioral changes in vascular cells in response to vascular injury. In proliferative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, pathological vascular remodeling plays a prominent role. The miR-221/222 cluster controls development and differentiation of ECs but inhibits their proangiogenic activation, proliferation, and migration. miR-221/222 are primarily implicated in maintaining endothelial integrity and supporting quiescent EC phenotype. Vascular expression of miR-221/222 is upregulated in initial atherogenic stages causing inhibition of angiogenic recruitment of ECs and increasing endothelial dysfunction and EC apoptosis. In contrast, these miRNAs stimulate VSMCs and switching from the VSMC “contractile” phenotype to the “synthetic” phenotype associated with induction of proliferation and motility. In atherosclerotic vessels, miR-221/222 drive neointima formation. Both miRNAs contribute to atherogenic calcification of VSMCs. In advanced plaques, chronic inflammation downregulates miR-221/222 expression in ECs that in turn could activate intralesion neoangiogenesis. In addition, both miRNAs could contribute to cardiovascular pathology through their effects on fat and glucose metabolism in nonvascular tissues such as adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscles. PMID:26221589

  19. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  20. Remodeling the Vascular Microenvironment of Glioblastoma with α-Particles.

    PubMed

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E M; Hassan, Iman F; Veach, Darren R; Keshari, Kayvan R; Gutin, Philip H; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    Tumors escape antiangiogenic therapy by activation of proangiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We previously investigated targeted α-particle therapy with (225)Ac-E4G10 as an antivascular approach and showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here, we investigated changes in tumor vascular morphology and functionality caused by (225)Ac-E4G10.

  1. Inhibition of vascular remodelling in a porcine coronary injury model by herbal extract XS0601

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji

    2006-01-01

    Background Arterial remodelling is a major pathologic change of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Our previous studies showed that XS0601 (consisting of Chuangxingol and paeoniflorin) had some effects on the prevention of restenosis after PCI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether and how its mechanism was related to the regulation of the arterial remodelling after endothelial injury by balloon dilation. Methods Twenty Chinese mini-pigs were randomized into four groups: control, probucol, low-dose XS0601 and high-dose XS0601 group before oversized balloon injury of the left anterior descending coronary arteries. Starting from two days before balloon injury, the mini-pigs in the treated group were administered with probucol (2 g/day) and XS0601 (0.02 g/kg/day for low dose; 0.04 g/kg/day for high dose) for four weeks after balloon injury. The animals receiving balloon injury alone were used as control. Morphometric and angiographic analysis of the injured arteries were performed. Results The contribution of intimal hyperplasia and arterial remodelling to angiographic late lumen loss was 41% and 59% respectively. XS0601 markedly inhibited proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and transformation of SMCs from contractile to synthetic phenotype in neointima, inhibited hyperplasia-related indices of morphometric analysis and reduce late angiographic lumen loss. The reduction of the late angiographic lumen loss resulting from vascular remodelling was greater after XS0601 treatment. Conclusion Both intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodelling are attributed to late lumen loss in this porcine coronary injury model. XS0601 markedly reduced angiographic late lumen loss resulting from intimal hyperplasia, vascular remodelling and XS0601 may be a potential agent to prevent restenosis after PCI. PMID:17302965

  2. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  3. Peri/Epicellular Protein Disulfide Isomerase Sustains Vascular Lumen Caliber Through an Anticonstrictive Remodeling Effect.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Araújo, Haniel A; Hironaka, Gustavo K; Araujo, Thaís L S; Takimura, Celso K; Rodriguez, Andres I; Casagrande, Annelise S; Gutierrez, Paulo S; Lemos-Neto, Pedro Alves; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2016-03-01

    Whole-vessel remodeling critically determines lumen caliber in vascular (patho)physiology, and it is reportedly redox-dependent. We hypothesized that the cell-surface pool of the endoplasmic reticulum redox chaperone protein disulfide isomerase-A1 (peri/epicellular=pecPDI), which is known to support thrombosis, also regulates disease-associated vascular architecture. In human coronary atheromas, PDI expression inversely correlated with constrictive remodeling and plaque stability. In a rabbit iliac artery overdistension model, there was unusually high PDI upregulation (≈25-fold versus basal, 14 days postinjury), involving both intracellular and pecPDI. PecPDI neutralization with distinct anti-PDI antibodies did not enhance endoplasmic reticulum stress or apoptosis. In vivo pecPDI neutralization with PDI antibody-containing perivascular gel from days 12 to 14 post injury promoted 25% decrease in the maximally dilated arteriographic vascular caliber. There was corresponding whole-vessel circumference loss using optical coherence tomography without change in neointima, which indicates constrictive remodeling. This was accompanied by decreased hydrogen peroxide generation. Constrictive remodeling was corroborated by marked changes in collagen organization, that is, switching from circumferential to radial fiber orientation and to a more rigid fiber type. The cytoskeleton architecture was also disrupted; there was a loss of stress fiber coherent organization and a switch from thin to medium thickness actin fibers, all leading to impaired viscoelastic ductility. Total and PDI-associated expressions of β1-integrin, and levels of reduced cell-surface β1-integrin, were diminished after PDI antibody treatment, implicating β1-integrin as a likely pecPDI target during vessel repair. Indeed, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, a downstream β1-integrin effector, was decreased by PDI antibody. Thus, the upregulated pecPDI pool tunes matrix/cytoskeleton reshaping to

  4. A Role for Soluble ST2 in Vascular Remodeling Associated with Obesity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Miana, María; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rousseau, Elodie; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Background The function of the Interleukin-33 (IL-33)/ST2 system has been mainly investigated on immunological aspects, but recent data suggest that this pathway plays also an important role in cardiovascular system and adipose tissue. Whereas IL-33 has been demonstrated to exert anti-inflammatory and protective effects, circulating soluble ST2 (sST2) has emerged as a prognostic biomarker in patients with myocardial infarction and heart failure. Furthermore, sST2 is increased in severe obesity, although its role in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling associated with obesity is still not well defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Wistar rats fed standard diet (Control) or high fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. Aortic tunica media from diet-induced obese animals showed hypertrophy and fibrosis. The IL-33/ST2 system was spontaneously expressed in the aorta from Wistar rats. Administration of HFD in animals did not modify IL-33 expression at the transcriptional level. By contrast, HFD group showed an increase in aortic soluble sST2 and a decrease in the transmembrane isoform (ST2L) levels, resulting in decreased protective pathway activity. Aortic sST2 mRNA levels were associated with parameters showing vascular hypertrophy and fibrosis. In vitro experiments showed that primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) spontaneously expressed the IL-33/ST2 system. VSMCs stimulated with sST2 showed an increase in collagen type I, fibronectin and profibrotic factors. Conclusions This is the first study demonstrating a deleterious role for sST2 in the vascular remodeling associated with obesity. In addition, we demonstrated that sST2 may act not only as a decoy receptor by binding IL-33 and preventing ST2L, but also modulating ECM remodeling and turnover. Thus, sST2 could be a new therapeutic target to reduce vascular remodeling in the context of obesity. PMID:24265755

  5. Nox4 Is Expressed In Pulmonary Artery Adventitia And Contributes To Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Scott A.; Chen, Feng; Su, Yunchao; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Wang, Yusi; Catravas, John D.; Han, Weihong; Orfi, Laszlo; Szantai-Kis, Csaba; Keri, Gyorgy; Szabadkai, Istvan; Barabutis, Nektarios; Rafikova, Olga; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M.; Jonigk, Danny; Giannis, Athanassios; Asmis, Reto; Stepp, David W.; Ramesh, Ganesan; Fulton, David J.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease arising from remodeling and narrowing of pulmonary arteries (PA) resulting in high pulmonary blood pressure and ultimately right ventricular failure. Elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is associated with increased pressure in PH. However, the cellular location of Nox4 and its contribution to aberrant vascular remodeling in PH remains poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to identify the vascular cells expressing Nox4 in PA and determine the functional relevance of Nox4 in PH. APPROACH AND RESULTS Elevated expression of Nox4 was detected in hypertensive PA from 3 rat PH models and human PH using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. In the vascular wall, Nox4 was detected in both endothelium and adventitia and perivascular staining was prominently increased in hypertensive lung sections, colocalizing with cells expressing fibroblast and monocyte markers and matching the adventitial location of ROS production. Small molecule inhibitors of Nox4 reduced adventitial ROS generation and vascular remodeling as well as ameliorating right ventricular hypertrophy and non-invasive indices of PA stiffness in monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats as determined by morphometric analysis and high resolution digital ultrasound. Nox4 inhibitors improved PH in both prevention and reversal protocols and reduced the expression of fibroblast markers in isolated PA. In fibroblasts, Nox4 over-expression stimulated migration and proliferation and was necessary for matrix gene expression. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that Nox4 is prominently expressed in the adventitia and contributes to altered fibroblast behavior, hypertensive vascular remodeling and the development of PH. PMID:24947524

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1-dependent mechanisms of vascularization and vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Sergio; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2010-01-01

    The vascular system delivers oxygen and nutrients to every cell in the vertebrate organism. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of hypoxic/ischaemic vascular responses, driving transcriptional activation of hundreds of genes involved in vascular reactivity, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and the mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived angiogenic cells. This review will focus on the pivotal role of HIF-1 in vascular homeostasis, the involvement of HIF-1 in vascular diseases, and recent advances in targeting HIF-1 for therapy in preclinical models. PMID:20164116

  7. Simultaneous imaging of blood flow dynamics and vascular remodelling during development.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Siavash; Leask, Richard L; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2015-12-01

    Normal vascular development requires blood flow. Time-lapse imaging techniques have revolutionised our understanding of developmental biology, but measuring changes in blood flow dynamics has met with limited success. Ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography can concurrently image vascular structure and blood flow velocity, but these techniques lack the resolution to accurately calculate fluid forces such as shear stress. This is important because hemodynamic forces are biologically active and induce changes in the expression of genes important for vascular development. Regional variations in shear stress, rather than the overall level, control processes such as vessel enlargement and regression during vascular remodelling. We present a technique to concurrently visualise vascular remodelling and blood flow dynamics. We use an avian embryonic model and inject an endothelial-specific dye and fluorescent microspheres. The motion of the microspheres is captured with a high-speed camera and the velocity of the blood flow in and out of the region of interest is quantified by micro-particle image velocitymetry (µPIV). The vessel geometry and flow are used to numerically solve the flow physics with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Using this technique, we can analyse changes in shear stress, pressure drops and blood flow velocities over a period of 10 to 16 h. We apply this to study the relationship between shear stress and chronic changes in vessel diameter during embryonic development, both in normal development and after TGFβ stimulation. This technique allows us to study the interaction of biomolecular and biomechanical signals during vascular remodelling using an in vivo developmental model.

  8. Effect of glucocorticoids on collagen accumulation in pulmonary vascular remodeling in the rat.

    PubMed

    Poiani, G J; Tozzi, C A; Thakker-Varia, S; Choe, J K; Riley, D J

    1994-04-01

    Administration of corticosteroids may attenuate the development of pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting the cell proliferation and protein synthesis that occur in early pulmonary vascular remodeling. However, in vitro studies show that corticosteroids stimulate collagen synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells, and corticosteroid administration may be deleterious in stimulating collagen deposition. To test whether corticosteroid treatment promotes vascular collagen production in vivo, we administered triamcinolone diacetate to rats exposed to 10% O2 for 3 days and measured pro alpha 1(I) collagen mRNA and the hydroxyproline/protein ratio in the main pulmonary artery. Triamcinolone treatment (12 mg/kg intraperitoneally, once daily for 3 days) reduced mean right ventricular pressure (11 +/- 1 versus 14 +/- 1 mm Hg) and protein content of pulmonary arteries (1.8 +/- 0.1 versus 2.7 +/- 0.1 mg/vessel) (both p < 0.05). However, corticosteroid treatment produced a dose-related increase in pro alpha 1(I) mRNA levels and increased the ratio of hydroxyproline/protein (47 +/- 2 versus 38 +/- 3 micrograms/mg; p < 0.05). Thus, corticosteroid administration ameliorated the increase in pulmonary hypertension in early hypoxia, but increased the proportion of collagen in the vessel wall. Corticosteroid treatment in pulmonary vascular remodeling may be deleterious in increasing the concentration of collagen in the vessel wall.

  9. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M; Kirkby, Nicholas S; van de Putte, Elisabeth E Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F P; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2017-02-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade-mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling.

  10. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; van de Putte, Elisabeth E. Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A.; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F.P.; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V.; Kuc, Rhoda E.; Davenport, Anthony P.; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade–mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling. PMID:28028193

  11. MMP-2 Is Mainly Expressed in Arterioles and Contributes to Cerebral Vascular Remodeling Associated with TGF-β1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ye; Zhang, Weifeng; Xie, Zhenying; Xu, Nanfei; Lu, Yunnan

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in vascular remodeling. It has been reported that hypoxia stimulated MMP-9 expression in brain endothelial cells and MMP-9 plays an important role in cerebral vascular remodeling. However, little is known about MMP-2 in the cerebral vessels remodeling. Herein, the aim of this study is to examine the class of vessel and cell type expressing MMP-2 in cerebral vessels and to investigate its potential role in vascular remodeling. In the present study, dual-immunofluorescence assay showed that MMP-2 was mainly expressed in arterioles. In addition, we found that MMP-2 expression in cerebral vessels was derived from endothelial cells, not astrocyte cells. Notably, in the normoxic central nervous system (CNS), there was no effect on vascular development, integrity, or endothelial proliferation when MMP-2 was knocked out, but lack of MMP-2 led to defective arteriolar remodeling and associated with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CNS. Moreover, blocking TGF-β with SB431542, a specific TGF-β inhibitor, significantly reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of MMP-2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our findings reveal that the level of MMP-2 is high in arteriolar endothelial cells and demonstrate a novel connection between MMP-2 and TGF-β1 signaling in cerebral vascular remodeling.

  12. Distal vessel stiffening is an early and pivotal mechanobiological regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Haeger, Christina Mallarino; Dieffenbach, Paul B.; Sicard, Delphine; Chrobak, Izabela; Coronata, Anna Maria F.; Velandia, Margarita M. Suárez; Vitali, Sally; Colas, Romain A.; Norris, Paul C.; Marinković, Aleksandar; Liu, Xiaoli; Ma, Jun; Rose, Chase D.; Lee, Seon-Jin; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Serhan, Charles N.; Walsh, Stephen R.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial (PA) stiffness is associated with increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH); however, the role of PA stiffening in the pathogenesis of PH remains elusive. Here, we show that distal vascular matrix stiffening is an early mechanobiological regulator of experimental PH. We identify cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) suppression and corresponding reduction in prostaglandin production as pivotal regulators of stiffness-dependent vascular cell activation. Atomic force microscopy microindentation demonstrated early PA stiffening in experimental PH and human lung tissue. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) grown on substrates with the stiffness of remodeled PAs showed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, exaggerated contraction, enhanced matrix deposition, and reduced COX-2–derived prostanoid production compared with cells grown on substrates approximating normal PA stiffness. Treatment with a prostaglandin I2 analog abrogated monocrotaline-induced PA stiffening and attenuated stiffness-dependent increases in proliferation, matrix deposition, and contraction in PASMC. Our results suggest a pivotal role for early PA stiffening in PH and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of interrupting mechanobiological feedback amplification of vascular remodeling in experimental PH. PMID:27347562

  13. Erythro-myeloid progenitors can differentiate from endothelial cells and modulate embryonic vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kasaai, Bahar; Caolo, Vincenza; Peacock, Hanna M.; Lehoux, Stephanie; Gomez-Perdiguero, Elisa; Luttun, Aernout; Jones, Elizabeth A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) were recently described to arise from the yolk sac endothelium, just prior to vascular remodeling, and are the source of adult/post-natal tissue resident macrophages. Questions remain, however, concerning whether EMPs differentiate directly from the endothelium or merely pass through. We provide the first evidence in vivo that EMPs can emerge directly from endothelial cells (ECs) and demonstrate a role for these cells in vascular development. We find that EMPs express most EC markers but late EMPs and EMP-derived cells do not take up acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), as ECs do. When the endothelium is labelled with AcLDL before EMPs differentiate, EMPs and EMP-derived cells arise that are AcLDL+. If AcLDL is injected after the onset of EMP differentiation, however, the majority of EMP-derived cells are not double labelled. We find that cell division precedes entry of EMPs into circulation, and that blood flow facilitates the transition of EMPs from the endothelium into circulation in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. In gain-of-function studies, we inject the CSF1-Fc ligand in embryos and found that this increases the number of CSF1R+ cells, which localize to the venous plexus and significantly disrupt venous remodeling. This is the first study to definitively establish that EMPs arise from the endothelium in vivo and show a role for early myeloid cells in vascular development. PMID:28272478

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthase 3-Dependent Vascular Remodeling and Circulatory Dysfunction in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Varo, Guillermo; Ros, Josefa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Cejudo-Martín, Pilar; Arroyo, Vicente; Solé, Manel; Rivera, Francisca; Rodés, Juan; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2003-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is an active process that consists in important modifications in the vessel wall. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in this phenomenon. We assessed wall thickness (WT), total wall area (TWA), lumen diameter, and total nuclei number/cross-section (TN) in cirrhotic rats with ascites and in control rats. A second group of cirrhotic rats received the NO synthesis inhibitor, L-NAME, or vehicle daily for 11 weeks and systemic hemodynamics, arterial compliance, aortic NO synthase 3 (NOS3) protein expression, and vascular morphology were analyzed. Cirrhotic vessels showed a significant reduction in WT, TWA, and TN as compared to control vessels. Long-term inhibition of NOS activity in cirrhotic rats resulted in a significant increase in WT, TWA, and TN as compared to cirrhotic rats receiving vehicle. NOS3 protein abundance was higher in aortic vessels of nontreated cirrhotic animals than in controls. This difference was abolished by chronic treatment with L-NAME. NOS inhibition in cirrhotic rats resulted in higher arterial pressure and peripheral resistance and lower arterial compliance than cirrhotic rats receiving vehicle. Therefore, vascular remodeling in cirrhosis with ascites is a generalized process with significant functional consequences that can be negatively modulated by long-term inhibition of NOS activity. PMID:12759254

  15. A Review of Vascular Abnormalities of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rahul; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Gyure, Kymberly; Boo, Sohyun

    2017-01-01

    Patients with spinal vascular lesions present with unique symptoms and have important anatomical and physiologic changes that must be considered prior to treatment. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of normal spinal vascular anatomy and discuss several key spinal vascular lesions. We provide an overview of cavernous malformations, intradural arteriovenous malformations, perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Important considerations are addressed in terms of pathologic characterization, specific imaging findings, and treatment approaches. PMID:28191502

  16. Western diet consumption promotes vascular remodeling in non-senescent mice consistent with accelerated senescence, but does not modify vascular morphology in senescent ones.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Ana Paula; Onetti, Yara; Oliveira, María Aparecida; Carvalho, Maria Helena; Heras, Magda; Vila, Elisabet; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are susceptible to developing vascular dysfunction and remodeling. Food intake and type of diet have also been identified as determining factors in vascular remodeling. However, the interplay between senescence and diet in vascular remodeling is largely unknown. We aimed to analyze structure of large (aorta) and small (mesenteric; MA) arteries from seven-month-old SAM prone (SAMP8) and resistant (SAMR1) mice that received a Western-type high-fat diet (WD; 8weeks). Aortic structure was assessed by morphometric analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained cross sections, and collagen content by qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and picrosirius red. In MAs, structural and mechanical properties were measured by pressure myography; elastin and collagen content by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence; nuclei distribution by confocal microscopy; and apoptosis by qRT-PCR and TUNEL assay. In aorta, wall thickness (WT), but not cross-sectional area (CSA), was increased by senescence, and WD only increased WT in SAMR1. WD intake, but not senescence, was associated with increased collagen deposition. In MAs, senescence diminished WT and CSA, without altering collagen and elastin deposition, reduced the number of MA wall cells, and increased pro apoptotic activation. WD consumption promoted in SAMR1 the same remodeling observed with senescence, while in SAMP8 the senescence-associated changes remained unaffected. The mechanisms involved in WD-induced MA remodeling in SAMR1 mimicked those observed in senescence per se. Our study reveals qualitatively different remodeling in aortas and MAs from senescent mice. Consumption of a WD induced remodeling of the SAMR1 vasculature similar to that induced by senescence, while it did not promote any further alteration in the latter. Therefore, we propose that increased consumption of fat-enriched diets could promote accelerated senescence of the non-senescent vasculature, although it does not exacerbate vascular

  17. The mouse retina in 3D: quantification of vascular growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Milde, Florian; Lauw, Stephanie; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2013-12-01

    The mouse retina has become a prominent model for studying angiogenesis. The easy access and well-known developmental progression have significantly propelled our ability to examine and manipulate blood vessels in vivo. Nonetheless, most studies have restricted their evaluations to the superficial plexus (an upper vascular layer in contact with the vitreous). Here we present experimental data and quantification for the developmental progression of the full retina including the intermediate and deeper plexus that sprouts from the superficial layer. We analyze the origin and advancement of vertical sprouting and present the progression of vascular perfusion within the tissue. Furthermore, we introduce the use of Minkowsky functionals to quantify remodeling in the superficial and deeper plexus. The work expands information on the retina towards a 3D structure. This is of particular interest, as recent data have demonstrated differential effects of gene deletion on the upper and deeper plexus, highlighting the concept of distinct operational pathways during sprouting angiogenesis.

  18. Possible role of lysophosphatidic acid in rat model of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the vascular wall of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid, is implicated in this vascular remodeling in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Exposure of Wistar rats to 10% O2 for 3 weeks induced an increase in the mean serum levels of LPA, to 40.9 (log-detransformed standard deviations: 23.4–71.7) μM versus 21.6 (11.0–42.3) μM in a matched control animal group (P = 0.037). We also observed perivascular LPA immunohistochemical staining in lungs of hypoxic rats colocalized with the secreted lysophospholipase D autotaxin (ATX). Moreover, ATX colocalized with mast cell tryptase, suggesting implication of these cells in perivascular LPA production. Hypoxic rat lungs expressed more ATX transcripts (2.4-fold) and more transcripts of proteins implicated in cell migration: β2 integrin (1.74-fold), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; 1.84-fold), and αM integrin (2.70-fold). Serum from the hypoxic group of animals had significantly higher chemoattractant properties toward rat primary lung fibroblasts, and this increase in cell migration could be prevented by the LPA receptor 1 and 3 antagonists. LPA also increased adhesive properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells as well as those of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, via the activation of LPA receptor 1 or 3 followed by the stimulation of gene expression of ICAM-1, β-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule integrins. In conclusion, chronic hypoxia increases circulating and tissue levels of LPA, which might induce fibroblast migration and recruitment of mononuclear cells in pulmonary vasculature, both of which contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:25621161

  19. Granulocytes and Vascularization Regulate Uterine Bleeding and Tissue Remodeling in a Mouse Menstruation Model

    PubMed Central

    Menning, Astrid; Walter, Alexander; Rudolph, Marion; Gashaw, Isabella; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Roese, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Menstruation-associated disorders negatively interfere with the quality of life of many women. However, mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of menstrual disorders remain poorly investigated up to date. Among others, this is based on a lack of appropriate pre-clinical animal models. We here employ a mouse menstruation model induced by priming mice with gonadal hormones and application of a physical stimulus into the uterus followed by progesterone removal. As in women, these events are accompanied by menstrual-like bleeding and tissue remodeling processes, i.e. disintegration of decidualized endometrium, as well as subsequent repair. We demonstrate that the onset of bleeding coincides with strong upregulation of inflammatory mediators and massive granulocyte influx into the uterus. Uterine granulocytes play a central role in regulating local tissue remodeling since depletion of these cells results in dysregulated expression of matrix modifying enzymes. As described here for the first time, uterine blood loss can be quantified by help of tampon-like cotton pads. Using this novel technique, we reveal that blood loss is strongly reduced upon inhibition of endometrial vascularization and thus, is a key regulator of menstrual bleeding. Taken together, we here identify angiogenesis and infiltrating granulocytes as critical determinants of uterine bleeding and tissue remodeling in a mouse menstruation model. Importantly, our study provides a technical and scientific basis allowing quantification of uterine blood loss in mice and thus, assessment of therapeutic intervention, proving great potential for future use in basic research and drug discovery. PMID:22879894

  20. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4−/−) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4−/− mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4−/− mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling. PMID:26709781

  1. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-/-) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4(-/-) mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling.

  2. The Fractal-based Analysis of the Regulation of Vascular Remodeling in the Quail Chorioallantoic Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Genee S.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to the advancement of space exploration is the safety and well being of astronauts while in space. This study focuses on the second highest of NASA-defined risk categories for human space exploration, cardiovascular alterations. Current research of this problem is being tackled by investigating angiogenesis through vascular remodeling. Angiogenesis is the growth and formation of new blood vessels. Angiogenesis is an important part of maintaining normal development and bodily functions. The loss of control of this process, either insufficient or excessive vascular growth, is considered a common denominator in many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery disease. Objectives are presently being met by observing the effects of various regulators, like thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and a novel vessel tortuosity factor (TF), through the use of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of Japanese quail embryos, which enables the direct optical imaging of 2-dimensional vascular branching trees. Research within the CAM is being performed to deduce numerous methods of regulating vessel growth. This project centers on the ability of a novel vessel regulator to affect angiogenesis. For example, it is hypothesized that the TSP-1 will inhibit the growth of CAM vasculature. Fractal/VESGEN-based techniques and PTV analysis are the methodologies used to investigate vascular differentiation. This tactic is used to quantify results and measure the growth patterns and morphology of blood vessels. The regulatory mechanisms posed by this vessel regulator can be deduced by alterations found within the vasculature patterns of quail embryos.

  3. Congenital vascular malformation associated with multiple cranial, vertebral and upper limb skeletal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marsden, N; Shokrollahi, K; Maw, K; Sierakowski, A; Bhat, F A; Mathur, B

    2010-07-01

    The association between congenital vascular malformations and altered bone growth, the so-called vascular bone syndrome, is well documented. Various eponymous syndromes each with their individual traits, such as Klippel-Trenaunay, Parkes-Weber and Servelle-Martorell syndrome have been described, along with variations. We report on a previously undescribed case of congenital vascular malformation associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities affecting the skull, vertebrae and right upper limb, and discuss the literature.

  4. Pioglitazone alleviates cardiac and vascular remodelling and improves survival in monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Arnica; Trappiel, Manuela; Berghausen, Eva Maria; Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Odenthal, Margarete; Blaschke, Florian; Er, Fikret; Gassanov, Natig; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan; Kappert, Kai; Caglayan, Evren

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease with limited therapeutic options. Pathophysiological changes comprise obliterative vascular remodelling of small pulmonary arteries, elevated mean pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) due to elevated resistance of pulmonary vasculature, adverse right ventricular remodelling, and heart failure. Recent findings also indicate a role of increased inflammation and insulin resistance underlying the development of PAH. We hypothesized that treatment of this condition with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activator pioglitazone, known to regulate the expression of different genes addressing insulin resistance, inflammatory changes, and vascular remodelling, could be a beneficial approach. PAH was induced in adult rats by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (MCT). Pioglitazone was administered for 2 weeks starting 3 weeks after MCT-injection. At day 35, hemodynamics, organ weights, and -indices were measured. We performed morphological and molecular characterization of the pulmonary vasculature, including analysis of the degree of muscularization, proliferation rates, and medial wall thickness of the small pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, markers of cardiac injury, collagen content, and cardiomyocyte size were analyzed. Survival rates were monitored throughout the experimental period. Pioglitazone treatment improved survival, reduced PASP, muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and medial wall thickness. Further, MCT-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis were attenuated. This was accompanied with reduced cardiac expression of brain natriuretic peptide, as well as decreased cardiomyocyte size. Finally, pulmonary macrophage content and osteopontin gene expression were attenuated. Based on the beneficial impact of pioglitazone, activation of PPARγ might be a promising treatment option in PAH.

  5. Hemodynamic evidence of vascular remodeling in combined post- and precapillary pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Evan L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Farber-Eger, Eric H.; Halliday, Stephen J.; Doss, Laura N.; Xu, Meng; Wang, Li; Harrell, Frank E.; Yu, Chang; Robbins, Ivan M.; Newman, John H.; Hemnes, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although commonly encountered, patients with combined postcapillary and precapillary pulmonary hypertension (Cpc-PH) have poorly understood pulmonary vascular properties. The product of pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance, resistance-compliance (RC) time, is a measure of pulmonary vascular physiology. While RC time is lower in postcapillary PH than in precapillary PH, the RC time in Cpc-PH and the effect of pulmonary wedge pressure (PWP) on RC time are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that Cpc-PH has an RC time that resembles that in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) more than that in isolated postcapillary PH (Ipc-PH). We analyzed the hemodynamics of 282 consecutive patients with PH referred for right heart catheterization (RHC) with a fluid challenge from 2004 to 2013 (cohort A) and 4,382 patients who underwent RHC between 1998 and 2014 for validation (cohort B). Baseline RC time in Cpc-PH was higher than that in Ipc-PH and lower than that in PAH in both cohorts (P < 0.001). In cohort A, RC time decreased after fluid challenge in patients with Ipc-PH but not in those with PAH or Cpc-PH (P < 0.001). In cohort B, the inverse relationship of pulmonary vascular compliance and resistance, as well as that of RC time and PWP, in Cpc-PH was similar to that in PAH and distinct from that in Ipc-PH. Our findings demonstrate that patients with Cpc-PH have pulmonary vascular physiology that resembles that of patients with PAH more than that of Ipc-PH patients. Further study is warranted to identify determinants of vascular remodeling and assess therapeutic response in this subset of PH. PMID:27683608

  6. Do subclinical vascular abnormalities precede impaired physical ability and ADL disability?

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Marjolein E M; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Mueller-Schotte, Sigrid; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, YvonneT

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of disability in activities of daily living (ADL) through its effect on physical functioning. However, it is unclear whether subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change in subclinical vascular abnormalities is also associated with an impaired physical ability and with ADL disability. In a longitudinal study, 490 middle-aged and older persons were included. Physical ability was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery and ADL disability using a questionnaire on self-reported basic and instrumental ADL. Subclinical vascular abnormalities were measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, in men only). Longitudinal associations between baseline markers of subclinical vascular abnormalities, their rate of change, and change in physical ability or ADL disability were assessed using generalized estimation equation models. After adjustment for confounders, higher baseline PWV, change in PWV, baseline CIMT (in men) and change in CIMT (in men) were associated with a higher rate of change in physical ability (regression coefficients 0.035, 95% CI [0.018; 0.052]; 0.047, 95% CI [0.024; 0.069]; 0.214, 95% CI [0.070; 0.358] and 0.148, 95% CI [0.019; 0.277], respectively). No relations were found for change in ADL disability. In subjects with incident cardiovascular disease, higher change in PWV was associated with a higher rate of change in ADL disability (regression coefficient 0.054, 95% CI [0.001; 0.106]). The present study showed that subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change were associated with higher rate of change in physical ability. The association between (change in) subclinical vascular abnormalities and ADL disability tended to be stronger in persons with incident and prevalent cardiovascular disease. These data may suggest that ADL decline is more a direct effect of experienced clinically manifest vascular events rather than the effect of progression of

  7. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  8. Coupled Simulation of Hemodynamics and Vascular Growth and Remodeling in a Subject-Specific Geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiacheng; Shadden, Shawn C

    2015-07-01

    A computational framework to couple vascular growth and remodeling (G&R) with blood flow simulation in a 3D patient-specific geometry is presented. Hyperelastic and anisotropic properties are considered for the vessel wall material and a constrained mixture model is used to represent multiple constituents in the vessel wall, which was modeled as a membrane. The coupled simulation is divided into two time scales-a longer time scale for G&R and a shorter time scale for fluid dynamics simulation. G&R is simulated to evolve the boundary of the fluid domain, and fluid simulation is in turn used to generate wall shear stress and transmural pressure data that regulates G&R. To minimize required computation cost, the fluid dynamics are only simulated when G&R causes significant vascular geometric change. For demonstration, this coupled model was used to study the influence of stress-mediated growth parameters, and blood flow mechanics, on the behavior of the vascular tissue growth in a model of the infrarenal aorta derived from medical image data.

  9. Biophysical Properties and Motility of Human Mature Dendritic Cells Deteriorated by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor through Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Hui; Long, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yun; Jia, Yi; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Wen, Zong-Yao; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zeng, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells, play a central role in the initiation, regulation, and maintenance of the immune responses. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the important cytokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and can inhibit the differentiation and functional maturation of DCs. To elucidate the potential mechanisms of DC dysfunction induced by VEGF, the effects of VEGF on the biophysical characteristics and motility of human mature DCs (mDCs) were investigated. The results showed that VEGF had a negative influence on the biophysical properties, including electrophoretic mobility, osmotic fragility, viscoelasticity, and transmigration. Further cytoskeleton structure analysis by confocal microscope and gene expression profile analyses by gene microarray and real-time PCR indicated that the abnormal remodeling of F-actin cytoskeleton may be the main reason for the deterioration of biophysical properties, motility, and stimulatory capability of VEGF-treated mDCs. This is significant for understanding the biological behavior of DCs and the immune escape mechanism of tumors. Simultaneously, the therapeutic efficacies may be improved by blocking the signaling pathway of VEGF in an appropriate manner before the deployment of DC-based vaccinations against tumors. PMID:27809226

  10. Calcium antagonist verapamil prevented pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers with ascites by arresting pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Qiao, Jian; Wang, Huiyu; Gao, Mingyu; Ou, Deyuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Maohong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaobo; Guo, Yuming

    2007-04-30

    Calcium signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Verapamil, one of the calcium antagonists, is used to characterize the role of calcium signaling in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension syndrome in broilers. The suppression effect of verapamil on pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling was examined in broilers, from the age of 16 days to 43 days. Our results showed that oral administration of lower dose of verapamil (5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h) prevented the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, the ascites heart index and the erythrocyte packed cell volume of birds at low temperature from increasing, the heart rate from decreasing, and pulmonary arteriole median from thickening, and no pulmonary arteriole remodeling in broilers treated with the two doses of verapamil at low temperature was observed. Our results indicated that calcium signaling was involved in the development of broilers' pulmonary arterial hypertension, which leads to the development of ascites, and we suggest that verapamil may be used as a preventive agent to reduce the occurrence and development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

  11. DYSREGULATED SELECTIN EXPRESSION AND MONOCYTE RECRUITMENT DURING ISCHEMIA-RELATED VASCULAR REMODELING IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Chad L.; Qi, Yue; Davidson, Brian; Chadderdon, Scott; Jayaweera, Ananda R.; Belcik, J. Todd; Benner, Cameron; Xie, Aris; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with impaired ischemia-related vascular remodeling and also dysregulation of the inflammatory response. We sought to determine whether impaired selectin-mediated monocyte recruitment in ischemic tissues contributes to blunted ischemia-mediated angiogenesis in DM. Methods and Results Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) perfusion imaging and molecular imaging of endothelial P-selectin expression in the proximal hindlimb were performed at 1,3, and 21 days after arterial ligation in wild-type and db/db mice. Ligation reduced muscle blood flow to ≈0.05 ml/min/g in both strains. Significant recovery of flow occurred only in wild-type mice (60–65% of baseline flow). On molecular imaging in db/db mice, baseline P-selectin signal was 4-fold higher in db/db compared to wild-type mice (p<0.01) but increased minimally in at day one after ischemia whereas signal increased approximately 10-fold in wild-type mice (p<0.01). Immunohistology of the hindlimb demonstrated severely reduced monocyte recruitment in db/db mice compared to wild-type mice. Local treatment with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) corrected the deficits in post-ischemic P-selectin expression and monocyte recruitment in db/d mice, and led to greater recovery in blood flow. Conclusions In DM, there is dysregulation of the selectin response to limb ischemia which leads to impaired monocyte recruitment, which may be mechanistically related to reduced vascular remodeling in limb ischemia. PMID:21885854

  12. The mast cell - B-cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang Michael

    2017-02-24

    Over the past years, a critical role for the immune system and in particular, for mast cells, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B-cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague Dawley rats and B-cell deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, sugen-hypoxia and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B-cells, as a) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast cell stabilizers, and b) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B-cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B-cells in PH was demonstrated, in that either blocking B-cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell - B-cell axis driven by IL-6 as critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ-Rho-kinase interactions contribute to vascular remodeling after chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Nancy; Seedorf, Gregory; Roe, Gates; Abman, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and Rho-kinase (ROCK) regulate smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and contribute to vascular remodeling in adult pulmonary hypertension. Whether these pathways interact to contribute to the development of vascular remodeling in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) remains unknown. We hypothesized that ROCK-PPARγ interactions increase SMC proliferation resulting in vascular remodeling in experimental PPHN. Pulmonary artery SMCs (PASMCs) were harvested from fetal sheep after partial ligation of the ductus arteriosus in utero (PPHN) and controls. Cell counts were performed daily for 5 days with or without PPARγ agonists and ROCK inhibition. PPARγ and ROCK protein expression/activity were measured by Western blot in normal and PPHN PASMCs. We assessed PPARγ-ROCK interactions by studying the effect of ROCK activation on PPARγ activity and PPARγ inhibition (siRNA) on ROCK activity and PASMC proliferation. At baseline, PPHN PASMC cell number was increased by 38% above controls on day 5. ROCK protein expression/activity were increased by 25 and 34% and PPARγ protein/activity decreased by 40 and 50% in PPHN PASMC. ROCK inhibition and PPARγ activation restored PPHN PASMC growth to normal values. ROCK inhibition increased PPARγ activity by 50% in PPHN PASMC, restoring PPARγ activity to normal. In normal PASMCs, ROCK activation decreased PPARγ activity and PPARγ inhibition increased ROCK activity and cell proliferation, resulting in a PPHN hyperproliferative PASMC phenotype. PPARγ-ROCK interactions regulate SMC proliferation and contribute to increased PPHN PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling in PPHN. Restoring normal PPARγ-ROCK signaling may prevent vascular remodeling and improve outcomes in PPHN. PMID:24375792

  14. Role of Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide in Regulating Vascular Structural Remodeling in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Selena; Tang, Chaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2), an emerging gasotransmitter, was discovered to be endogenously generated in the cardiovascular system. Recently, the physiological effects of endogenous SO2 were confirmed. Vascular structural remodeling (VSR), an important pathological change in many cardiovascular diseases, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Here, the authors reviewed the research progress of endogenous SO2 in regulating VSR by searching the relevant data from PubMed and Medline. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and pulmonary hypertensive rats, SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway was significantly altered. SO2 inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, promoted apoptosis, inhibited the synthesis of extracellular collagen but promoted its degradation, and enhanced antioxidative capacity, thereby playing a significant role in attenuating VSR. However, the detailed mechanisms needed to be further explored. Further studies in this field would be important for the better understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension. Also, clinical trials are needed to demonstrate if SO2 would be a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27721913

  15. Vascular remodeling and its role in the pathogenesis of ascites in fast growing commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Nain, S; Wojnarowicz, C; Laarveld, B; Olkowski, A A

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the putative role of blood vessel pathology in the development of ascites in broilers. Major blood vessels (aorta, brachiocephalic arteries, pulmonary arteries, and vena cava) from normal commercial male broiler chickens, and broilers that developed congestive heart failure (CHF) with or without ascites were subjected to gross and microscopic examination. On cross-section, grossly, the arteries from normal broilers and those showing dilated cardiomyopathy without ascites appeared circular, with firm wall tone characteristic of the normal artery. In contrast, the arteries from ascitic broilers appeared flaccid and lacked elasticity, which was evidenced by collapsing, ellipsoid cross-sectional arterial lumen owing to the structural weakness of the arterial walls. Microscopically, ascitic broilers showed thinning or occasionally total loss of elastic elements in the arterial wall, and reduced network density of the structural matrix of the vascular wall, as well as increased thickness of fibers in vena cava. The structural changes seen in the major arteries from ascitic broilers are maladaptive, and as such would definitively impose an increased hemodynamic burden on the already failing heart pump. The changes in veins are indicative of pathological remodeling conducive to increased permeability of the vascular wall, particularly in the situation when a poorly distensible structure is further subjected to wall stress associated with increased pressure and volume overload. Taken together, increased hemodynamic burden and reduced structural density of the venous wall constitute conditions conducive for seepage and accumulation of ascitic fluid.

  16. Chronic Hyperhomocysteinemia Causes Vascular Remodeling by Instigating Vein Phenotype in Artery†

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Poulami; Qipshidze, Natia; Sen, Utpal; Givvimani, Srikanth; Munjal, Charu; Mishra, Paras K.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we tested the hypothesis whether hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine level, induces venous phenotype in artery. To test our hypothesis, we employed wild type (WT) and cystathionine β-synthase+/− (CBS+/−) mice treatment with or without folic acid (FA). Aortic blood flow and velocity were significantly lower in CBS+/− mice compared to WT. Aortic lumen diameter was significantly decreased in CBS+/− mice, whereas FA treatment normalized it. Medial thickness and collagen were significantly increased in CBS+/− aorta, whereas elastin / collagen ratio was significantly decreased. Superoxide and gelatinase activity was significantly high in CBS +/− aorta vs WT. Western blot showed significant increase in MMP-2, -9,-12, TIMP-2 and decrease in TIMP-4 in aorta. RT-PCR revealed significant increase of vena cava marker EphB4, MMP-13 and TIMP-3 in aorta. We summarize that chronic HHcy causes vascular remodeling that transduces changes in vascular wall in a way that artery expresses vein phenotype. PMID:21838575

  17. Angiotensin II receptor blockade or deletion of vascular endothelial ACE does not prevent vascular dysfunction and remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Victor; Joseph, Gregory; Shkolnik, Brian; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Frank Fan; Gotlinger, Katherine; Falck, John R; Dakarapu, Rambabu; Capdevila, Jorge H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Schwartzman, Michal Laniado

    2015-07-01

    Increased vascular 20-HETE is associated with hypertension and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through induction of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression. Cyp4a12tg mice, whose Cyp4a12-20-HETE synthase expression is under the control of a tetracycline (doxycycline, DOX) promoter, were used to assess the contribution of ACE/RAS to microvascular remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. Treatment of Cyp4a12tg mice with DOX increased systolic blood pressure (SBP; 136 ± 2 vs. 102 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by administration of 20-HEDGE, lisinopril, or losartan. DOX-induced hypertension was associated with microvascular dysfunction and remodeling of preglomerular microvessels, which was prevented by 20-HEDGE, a 20-HETE antagonist, yet only lessened, but not prevented, by lisinopril or losartan. In ACE 3/3 mice, which lack vascular endothelial ACE, administration of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a known inducer of 20-HETE production, increased SBP; however, the increase was about 50% of that in wild-type (WT) mice (151 ± 1 vs. 126 ± 1 mmHg). Losartan and 20-HEDGE prevented the DHT-induced increase in SBP in WT and ACE 3/3 mice. DHT treatment increased 20-HETE production and microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice; however, remodeling was attenuated in the ACE 3/3 mice as opposed to WT mice (15.83 ± 1.11 vs. 22.17 ± 0.92 μm; P < 0.05). 20-HEDGE prevented microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice, while losartan had no effect on microvascular remodeling in ACE 3/3. Taken together, these results suggest that RAS contributes to 20-HETE-mediated microvascular remodeling in hypertension and that 20-HETE-driven microvascular remodeling independent of blood pressure elevation does not fully rely on ACE activity in the vascular endothelium.

  18. PPARβ/δ, a Novel Regulator for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotypic Modulation and Vascular Remodeling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongrong; Jiang, Li; Guo, Zongduo; Zhong, Jianjun; Wu, Jingchuan; He, Junchi; Liu, Han; He, Zhaohui; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Chongjie; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-03-22

    Cerebral vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switch is involved in the pathophysiology of vascular injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), whereas the molecular mechanism underlying it remains largely speculative. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has been implicated to modulate the vascular cells proliferation and vascular homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of PPARβ/δ in VSMC phenotypic switch following SAH. Activation of PPARβ/δ by GW0742 and adenoviruses PPARβ/δ (Ad-PPARβ/δ) significantly inhibited hemoglobin-induced VSMC phenotypic switch. However, the effects of PPARβ/δ on VSMC phenotypic switch were partly obstacled in the presence of LY294002, a potent inhibitor of Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase-AKT (PI3K/AKT). Furthermore, following study demonstrated that PPARβ/δ-induced PI3K/AKT activation can also contribute to Serum Response Factor (SRF) nucleus localization and Myocardin expression, which was highly associated with VSMC phenotypic switch. Finally, we found that Ad-PPARβ/δ positively modulated vascular remodeling in SAH rats, i.e. the diameter of basilar artery and the thickness of vessel wall. In addition, overexpression of PPARβ/δ by adenoviruses significantly improved neurological outcome. Taken together, this study identified PPARβ/δ as a useful regulator for VSMC phenotypic switch and vascular remodeling following SAH, providing novel insights into the therapeutic strategies of delayed cerebral ischemia.

  19. PPARβ/δ, a Novel Regulator for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotypic Modulation and Vascular Remodeling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongrong; Jiang, Li; Guo, Zongduo; Zhong, Jianjun; Wu, Jingchuan; He, Junchi; Liu, Han; He, Zhaohui; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Chongjie; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switch is involved in the pathophysiology of vascular injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), whereas the molecular mechanism underlying it remains largely speculative. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has been implicated to modulate the vascular cells proliferation and vascular homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of PPARβ/δ in VSMC phenotypic switch following SAH. Activation of PPARβ/δ by GW0742 and adenoviruses PPARβ/δ (Ad-PPARβ/δ) significantly inhibited hemoglobin-induced VSMC phenotypic switch. However, the effects of PPARβ/δ on VSMC phenotypic switch were partly obstacled in the presence of LY294002, a potent inhibitor of Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase-AKT (PI3K/AKT). Furthermore, following study demonstrated that PPARβ/δ-induced PI3K/AKT activation can also contribute to Serum Response Factor (SRF) nucleus localization and Myocardin expression, which was highly associated with VSMC phenotypic switch. Finally, we found that Ad-PPARβ/δ positively modulated vascular remodeling in SAH rats, i.e. the diameter of basilar artery and the thickness of vessel wall. In addition, overexpression of PPARβ/δ by adenoviruses significantly improved neurological outcome. Taken together, this study identified PPARβ/δ as a useful regulator for VSMC phenotypic switch and vascular remodeling following SAH, providing novel insights into the therapeutic strategies of delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:28327554

  20. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is associated with structural and vascular placental abnormalities and leptin dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Helen N.; Olbrych, Stephanie K.; Smith, Kathleen L.; Cnota, James F.; Habli, Mounira; Gonzales-Ramos, Osniel; Owens, Kathryn J; Hinton, Andrea C.; Polzin, William J.; Muglia, Louis J.; Hinton, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe cardiovascular malformation (CVM) associated with fetal growth abnormalities. Genetic and environmental factors have been identified that contribute to pathogenesis, but the role of the placenta is unknown. The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the placenta in HLHS with and without growth abnormalities. Methods HLHS term singleton births were identified from a larger cohort when placenta tissue was available. Clinical data were collected from maternal and neonatal medical records, including anthropometrics and placental pathology reports. Placental tissues from cases and controls were analyzed to assess parenchymal morphology, vascular architecture and leptin signaling. Results HLHS cases (n = 16) and gestational age-matched controls (n = 18) were analyzed. Among cases, the average birth weight was 2993 grams, including 31% that were small for gestational age. When compared with controls, gross pathology of HLHS cases demonstrated significantly reduced placental weight and increased fibrin deposition, while micropathology showed increased syncytial nuclear aggregates, decreased terminal villi, reduced vasculature and increased leptin expression in syncytiotrophoblast and endothelial cells. Discussion Placentas from pregnancies complicated by fetal HLHS are characterized by abnormal parenchymal morphology, suggesting immature structure may be due to vascular abnormalities. Increased leptin expression may indicate an attempt to compensate for these vascular abnormalities. Further investigation into the regulation of angiogenesis in the fetus and placenta may elucidate the causes of HLHS and associated growth abnormalities in some cases. PMID:26278057

  1. Loss of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 in vascular endothelium increases pericyte coverage and promotes pulmonary arterial remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xue-Jiao; Tao, Yong-Kang; He, Xiaochen; Roman, Richard J.; Aschner, Judy L.; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a leading cause of heart failure. Although pulmonary endothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role in the progression of the PAH, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The HIF-α hydroxylase system is a key player in the regulation of vascular remodeling. Knockout of HIF-2α has been reported to cause pulmonary hypertension. The present study examined the role of endothelial cell specific prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) in the development of PAH and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The PHD2f/f mouse was crossbred with VE-Cadherin-Cre promoter mouse to generate an endothelial specific PHD2 knockout (Cdh5-Cre-PHD2ECKO) mouse. Pulmonary arterial pressure and the size of the right ventricle was significantly elevated in the PHD2ECKO mice relative to the PHD2f/f controls. Knockout of PHD2 in EC was associated with vascular remodeling, as evidenced by an increase in pulmonary arterial media to lumen ratio and number of muscularized arterioles. The pericyte coverage and vascular smooth muscle cells were also significantly increased in the PA. The increase in vascular pericytes was associated with elevated expression of fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1). Moreover, perivascular interstitial fibrosis of pulmonary arteries was significantly increased in the PHD2ECKO mice. Mechanistically, knockout of PHD2 in EC increased the expression of Notch3 and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the lung tissue. We conclude that the expression of PHD2 in endothelial cells plays a critical role in preventing pulmonary arterial remodeling in mice. Increased Notch3/TGF-β signaling and excessive pericyte coverage may be contributing to the development of PAH following deletion of endothelial PHD2. PMID:27613846

  2. The Effects of Protein Regulators on the Vascular Remodeling of Japanese Quail Chorioallantoic Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Arati

    2004-01-01

    Contributing to NASA s mission, the Microgravity Fluid Physics research program conducts experiments to promote space exploration and improvement of processes and products on Earth. One of the projects through this program deals with the affect of regulators on vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. This project is being led by Dr. Patricia Parsons-Wingerter. To perform the experiments, protein regulators are tested on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the Japanese quail embryos. The different types of regulators used can be broken down into two major groups of stimulators, and inhibitors. Stimulators increase the rate of blood vessel growth and inhibitors decrease of blood vessel growth. The specified regulator proteins include thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and a novel vessel tortuosity factor (TF), these are just the ones used in this specific experiment; other various protein regulators can also be used. The novel vessel tortuosity factor (TF) is a special kind of stimulator because it stimulates vessel tortuosity and curvature, rather than actual blood vessel growth. These regulators are being tested on Japanese quail embryos. The Japanese quail embryos naturally form a chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) from which blood flow, vascular remodeling, and angiogenesis can be observed. Chorioallantoic membranes are also easier to use because they are two dimensional when mounted onto a slide for examination. The analysis of the affect of the regulators on the CAM can be studied through PIVPROC; the program is used to analyze the altered blood flow in response to application of TF. Regulators are being thoroughly studied because cardiovascular alterations are the second highest, NASA-defined, risk categories in human space exploration. This research done on the quail is extending to even more projects that will be done on lab animals such as mice and also in human clinical studies like the diabetic retina. Not only will this research be beneficial to further space

  3. Krypton laser photocoagulation induces retinal vascular remodeling rather than choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Behar-Cohen, F; Benezra, D; Soubrane, G; Jonet, L; Jeanny, J C

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the retina and choroid response following krypton laser photocoagulation. Ninety-two C57BL6/Sev129 and 32 C57BL/6J, 5-6-week-old mice received one single krypton (630 nm) laser lesion: 50 microm, 0.05 s, 400 mW. On the following day, every day thereafter for 1 week and every 2-3 days for the following 3 weeks, serial sections throughout the lesion were systematically collected and studied. Immunohistology using specific markers or antibodies for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (astrocytes, glia and Muller's cells), von Willebrand (vW) (vascular endothelial cells), TUNEL (cells undergoing caspase dependent apoptosis), PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) p36, CD4 and F4/80 (infiltrating inflammatory and T cells), DAPI (cell nuclei) and routine histology were carried out. Laser confocal microscopy was also performed on flat mounts. Temporal and spatial observations of the created photocoagulation lesions demonstrate that, after a few hours, activated glial cells within the retinal path of the laser beam express GFAP. After 48 h, GFAP-positive staining was also detected within the choroid lesion center. "Movement" of this GFAP-positive expression towards the lasered choroid was preceded by a well-demarcated and localized apoptosis of the retina outer nuclear layer cells within the laser beam path. Later, death of retinal outer nuclear cells and layer thinning at this site was followed by evagination of the inner nuclear retinal layer. Funneling of the entire inner nuclear and the thinned outer nuclear layers into the choroid lesion center was accompanied by "dragging" of the retinal capillaries. Thus, from days 10 to 14 after krypton laser photocoagulation onward, well-formed blood capillaries (of retinal origin) were observed within the lesion. Only a few of the vW-positive capillary endothelial cells stained also for PCNA p36. In the choroid, dilatation of the vascular bed occurred at the vicinity of the

  4. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-08

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

  5. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space) were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs) have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling) which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed.

  6. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  7. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H; Covell, James W

    2004-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 +/- 2 wk (means +/- SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 +/- 0.030; P <0.05), whereas the apical site did not [P=not significant (NS)]. Sheet shear at the basal site increased progressively toward the final study (0.040 +/- 0.003 at 2 wk and 0.054 +/- 0.021 at final; both P <0.05), which contributed to a significant increase in wall thickness at the final study (0.181 +/- 0.047; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not (P=NS). We conclude that the remodeling of the transmural architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture.

  8. Contrasting roles of leukemia inhibitory factor in murine bone development and remodeling involve region-specific changes in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Ingrid J; McGregor, Narelle E; Pompolo, Sueli; Walker, Emma C; Sims, Natalie A

    2012-03-01

    We describe here distinct functions of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in bone development/growth and adult skeletal homeostasis. In the growth plate and developing neonate bones, LIF deficiency enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, enlarged blood vessel formation, and increased the formation of "giant" osteoclasts/chondroclasts that rapidly destroyed the mineralized regions of the growth plate and developing neonatal bone. Below this region, osteoblasts formed large quantities of woven bone. In contrast, in adult bone undergoing remodeling osteoclast formation was unaffected by LIF deficiency, whereas osteoblast formation and function were both significantly impaired, resulting in osteopenia. Consistent with LIF promoting osteoblast commitment, enhanced marrow adipocyte formation was also observed in adult LIF null mice, and adipocytic differentiation of murine stromal cells was delayed by LIF treatment. LIF, therefore, controls vascular size and osteoclast differentiation during the transition of cartilage to bone, whereas an anatomically separate LIF-dependent pathway regulates osteoblast and adipocyte commitment in bone remodeling.

  9. Severe diffuse hypoplasia of the aorta associated with multiple vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Grebeldinger, Slobodan P; Balj, Svetlana S; Adic, Oto

    2011-06-01

    Hypoplasia of the thoracic and abdominal aorta is an extremely rare vascular pathology. The most common clinical manifestation is severe uncontrolled hypertension in adolescents and young adults. Medical treatment alone can decrease blood pressure, but often very high doses of antihypertensive drugs are needed. When hypertension is refractory to the antihypertensive medications, surgical revascularization is considered as the treatment of choice. We report the case of a severe and diffuse hypoplasia of the aorta, beginning with the aortic isthmus, to the aortic bifurcation, associated with an aberrant celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery, and with other multiple vascular abnormalities. Unlikely, the only manifestation of this extensive vascular malformation was medicamentously controllable hypertension. To our knowledge, this severe vascular anomaly, with such a minimal clinical manifestation, has not been previously described in the English literature.

  10. Comparison between Stromal Vascular Fraction and Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Remodeling Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Frouin, Eric; Rigau, Valérie; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Magalon, Guy; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are characterized by excessive amount of collagen deposition and principally occur following burn injuries or surgeries. In absence of effective treatments, the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which have been shown to attenuate fibrosis in various applications, seems of interest. The objectives of the present study were therefore to evaluate the effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) on a pre-existing HTS in a humanized skin graft model in Nude mice and to compare the efficacy of hASCs versus stromal vascular fraction (SVF). We found that injection of SVF or hASCs resulted in an attenuation of HTS as noticed after clinical evaluation of skin thickness, which was associated with lower total collagen contents in the skins of treated mice and a reduced dermis thickness after histological analysis. Although both SVF and hASCs were able to significantly reduce the clinical and histological parameters of HTS, hASCs appeared to be more efficient than SVF. The therapeutic effect of hASCs was attributed to higher expression of TGFβ3 and HGF, which are important anti-fibrotic mediators, and to higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio, which reflect the remodelling activity responsible for fibrosis resorption. These results demonstrated the therapeutic potential of hASCs for clinical applications of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:27227960

  11. Inhibition of kinin B1 receptors attenuates pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Priya; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Bernlöhr, Christian; Lee, Dongwon; Khang, Gilson; Doods, Henri; Wu, Dongmei

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether the kinin B1 receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension, and whether its inhibition could reduce inflammation, pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and right heart dysfunction. Male Wistar rats underwent left pneumonectomy. Seven days later, the rats were injected subcutaneously with monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). The rats were then randomly assigned to receive treatment with vehicle or with BI113823 (a selective B1 receptor antagonist, 30 mg/kg, twice per day) via oral gavage from the day of monocrotaline injection to day 28. By day 28, BI113823-treated rats had significantly lower mean pulmonary artery pressure, less right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial neointimal formation than that of the vehicle-treated rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that there was a significant increase in mRNA expression of B1 receptors in the lungs of monocrotaline-challenged pneumonectomized rats. Treatment with BI113823 significantly reduced macrophage recruitment, as measured via bronchoalveolar lavage. It also markedly reduced CD-68 positive macrophages and proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells in the perivascular areas, reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, and B1 receptors compared with measurements in vehicle-treated rats. These findings demonstrate that kinin B1 receptors represent a novel therapeutic target for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  12. Inhaled corticosteroid normalizes some but not all airway vascular remodeling in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Amir; Walters, Eugene Haydn; Reid, David W; Shukla, Shakti Dhar; Nowrin, Kaosia; Ward, Chris; Muller, H Konrad; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the effects of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) on airway vascular remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Thirty-four subjects with mild-to-moderate COPD were randomly allocated 2:1 to ICS or placebo treatment in a double-blinded clinical trial over 6 months. Available tissue was compared before and after treatment for vessel density, and expression of VEGF, TGF-β1, and TGF-β1-related phosphorylated transcription factors p-SMAD 2/3. This clinical trial has been registered and allocated with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) on 17/10/2012 with reference number ACTRN12612001111864. Results There were no significant baseline differences between treatment groups. With ICS, vessels and angiogenic factors did not change in hypervascular reticular basement membrane, but in the hypovascular lamina propria (LP), vessels increased and this had a proportionate effect on lung air trapping. There was modest evidence for a reduction in LP vessels staining for VEGF with ICS treatment, but a marked and significant reduction in p-SMAD 2/3 expression. Conclusion Six-month high-dose ICS treatment had little effect on hypervascularity or angiogenic growth factors in the reticular basement membrane in COPD, but normalized hypovascularity in the LP, and this was physiologically relevant, though accompanied by a paradoxical reduction in growth factor expression. PMID:27703346

  13. Elevated expression of placental growth factor is associated with airway-wall vascular remodelling and thickening in smokers with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong; Lai, Tianwen; Yuan, Yalian; Chen, Min; Xia, Jun; Li, Wen; Pan, Guihai; Yuan, Binfan; Lv, Quanchao; Li, Yanyu; Li, Dongmin; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The increased expression of placental growth factor (PlGF) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allergy-related asthma suggests its role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In asthmatic smokers, airway remodelling is accompanied by an accelerated decline in lung function. However, whether PlGF contributes to the persistent airflow obstruction and vascular remodelling typically seen in asthmatic smokers is unknown. In this study we measured lung function, airway-wall thickening, and PlGF levels in serum and induced sputum in 74 asthmatic and 42 healthy smokers and never-smokers. Using human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMECs), we evaluated the in vitro effects of PlGF on each step of vascular remodelling, including proliferation, migration, stress-fibre expression, and tubule formation. Our data showed significantly higher serum and sputum PlGF levels in asthma patients, especially asthmatic smokers, than in healthy controls. Serum and sputum PlGF levels correlated negatively with post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the FEV1/forced vital capacity, but positively with airway-wall thickening. Stimulation of HLMECs with rhPlGF promoted all of the steps of airway-microvascular remodelling. These findings provide insights into the influence of cigarette smoking on the structural changes in the airways of asthmatics and the important pathogenic role played by PlGF. PMID:28220848

  14. Cathepsin K Deficiency Prevents the Aggravated Vascular Remodeling Response to Flow Cessation in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lutgens, Suzanne P. M.; Wijnands, Erwin; Johnson, Jason; Schurgers, Leon J.; Liu, Cong-Lin; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Cleutjens, Kitty B. J. M.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Heeneman, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Cathepsin K (catK) is a potent lysosomal cysteine protease involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and inflammatory remodeling responses. Here we have investigated the contribution of catK deficiency on carotid arterial remodeling in response to flow cessation in apoE-/- and wild type (wt) background. Ligation-induced hyperplasia is considerably aggravated in apoE-/- versus wt mice. CatK protein expression was significantly increased in neointimal lesions of apoE-/- compared with wt mice, suggesting a role for catK in intimal hyperplasia under hyperlipidemic conditions. Surprisingly, CatK deficiency completely blunted the augmented hyperplastic response to flow cessation in apoE-/-, whereas vascular remodeling in wt mice was unaffected. As catK deficiency did neither alter lesion collagen content and elastic laminae fragmentation in vivo, we focused on effects of catK on (systemic) inflammatory responses. CatK deficiency significantly reduced circulating CD3 T-cell numbers, but increased the regulatory T cell subset in apoE-/- but not wt mice. Moreover, catK deficiency changed CD11b+Ly6G-Ly6C high monocyte distribution in apoE-/- but not wt mice and tended to favour macrophage M2a polarization. In conclusion, catK deficiency almost completely blunted the increased vascular remodeling response of apoE-/- mice to flow cessation, possibly by correcting hyperlipidemia-associated pro-inflammatory effects on the peripheral immune response. PMID:27636705

  15. Hypertension-Induced Vascular Remodeling Contributes to Reduced Cerebral Perfusion and the Development of Spontaneous Stroke in Aged SHRSP Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    induced vascular remodeling contributes to reduced cerebral perfusion and the development of spontaneous stroke in aged SHRSP rats Erica C Henning1...spontaneously-hypertensive, stroke-prone (SHRSP) rats is of particular interest because the pathogenesis is believed to be similar to that in the...cerebral infarction and the specific role of cerebral perfusion in disease development. Twelve female SHRSP rats (age: - 1 year) were Imaged within 1

  16. The interaction of transient receptor potential melastatin 7 with macrophages promotes vascular adventitial remodeling in transverse aortic constriction rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Ruan, Chengchao; Zhong, Jiuchang; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang; Niu, Wenquan; Guo, Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a novel channel kinase, has been recently identified in the vasculature. However, its regulation and function in vascular diseases remain poorly understood. To address this lack of knowledge, we sought to examine whether TRPM7 can mediate the vascular remodeling process induced by pressure overload in the right common carotid artery proximal to the band (RCCA-B) in male Sprague-Dawley rats with transverse aortic constriction (TAC). The contribution of TRPM7 to amplified vascular remodeling after TAC was tested using morphometric and western blot analyses. Pressure overload-induced vascular wall thickening, especially in the adventitia, was readily detected in RCCA-B. The TRPM7 level was increased with a simultaneous accumulation of macrophages in the adventitia of RCCA-B, whereas the anti-inflammatory molecule annexin-1, a TRPM7 downstream target, was decreased. After the addition of the TRPM7 inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), significant reductions in macrophage accumulation as well as the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, SM-22-α and collagen I were observed, whereas annexin-1 was rescued. Finally, in cultured vascular adventitial fibroblasts treated with macrophage-conditioned medium, there were marked increases in the expression of TRPM7 and SM-22-α with a concurrent reduction in annexin-1 expression; these effects were largely prevented by treatment with 2-APB and specific anti-TRPM7 small interfering RNA. Our findings provide the first demonstration of the potential regulatory roles of TRPM7 in the vascular inflammation, pressure overload-mediated vascular adventitial collagen accumulation and cell phenotypic transformation in TAC rats. The targeting of TRPM7 has potential therapeutic importance for vascular diseases.

  17. Cystathionine beta synthase gene dose dependent vascular remodeling in murine model of hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Qipshidze, Natia; Sen, Utpal; Rodriguez, Walter; Ovechkin, Alexander; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2011-09-30

    Although children born with severe homocystinurea (i.e. cystathionine beta synthase homozygote knockout, CBS-/-) develop deleterious vascular complications with structural malformation and do not live past teenage, the heterozygote (CBS-/+) lives with apparently normal phenotype. Interestingly, this differential role of CBS expression in vascular remodeling is unclear. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is nuclear transcription factor that mitigates vascular complications. The hypothesis was that homocysteine (Hcy) decreased thioredoxin (Trx), peroxiredoxin (Prx), increased NADPH oxidase (NOX1), mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria in a CBS gene dose-dependent manner. ROS transduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation causing thickening (fibrosis) of the basement membrane, rendering ineffective endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and promoted endothelial-smooth muscle disconnection/uncoupling by antagonizing PPARγ. Wild type (WT-CBS+/+), CBS-/+ and CBS -/- mice were treated with or without ciglitazone (CZ, a PPARγ agonist) in food at birth. Aortic nuclear PPARγ expression was measured by EMSA. Aortic mtNOS activity and ROS production was measured using NO- and H(2)O(2)-electrodes, respectively. Aorta was analyzed for Trx, Prx, by Western blot, and PCR. MMP activity was by in situ zymography. Aortic function was measured in tissue myobath. The results suggested 90% morbidity in CBS-/- allele at 12 wks. However, treatment with the PPARγ agonist, CZ significantly reduced the morbidity to 20%. In addition, CZ restored the PPARγ activity in CBS-/+ and -/- mice to normal levels. The oxidative stress was alleviated by CZ treatment. In situ labeling with mito-tracker suggests co-localization of ROS with mitochondrial mitophagy. The mtNOS activity was increased in HHcy compared to WT. The data support the notion that Hcy decreases redoxins, increases mtNOS activity and

  18. Gene silencing of TACE enhances plaque stability and improves vascular remodeling in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhao, Yuxia; Wang, Xuping; Bu, Peili; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to test the hypothesis that gene silencing of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme (TACE) may attenuate lesion inflammation and positive vascular remodeling and enhance plaque stability in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. Lentivirus-mediated TACE shRNA was injected into the abdominal aortic plaques of rabbits which effectively down-regulated TACE expression and activities from week 8 to week 16. TACE gene silencing reduced remodeling index and plaque burden, and diminished the content of macrophages and lipids while increased that of smooth muscle cells and collagen in the aortic plaques. In addition, TACE gene silencing attenuated the local expression of P65, iNOS, ICAM-1, VEGF and Flt-1 and activities of MMP9 and MMP2 while increased the local expression of TGF-β1 together with reduced number of neovessels in the aorta. TACE shRNA treatment resulted in down-regulated expression of TACE in macrophages and blunted ERK-P38 phosphorylation and tube formation of co-cultured mouse vascular smooth muscle cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, gene silencing of TACE enhanced plaque stability and improved vascular positive remodeling. The mechanisms may involve attenuated local inflammation, neovascularization and MMP activation, as well as enhanced collagen production probably via down-regulated ERK-NF-κB and up-regulated TGF-β1 signaling pathways. PMID:26655882

  19. Identification of transcription factors and gene clusters in rabbit smooth muscle cells during high flow-induced vascular remodeling via microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaolong; Yang, Pengfei; Yao, Pengfei; Dai, Dongwei; Yu, Ying; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2016-01-10

    Sustained blood flow, especially high blood flow causes the remodeling of arteries. The molecular mechanism of vascular remodeling has been mainly investigated in cultured cells. However, the in vivo molecular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to explore the gene expression profile of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vascular remodeling. Transcriptional profiles indicated that 947 genes were differentially expressed in SMCs responding to high flow compared with the sham control, of which 617 genes were up-regulated and 330 genes were down-regulated. Gene ontology analysis revealed the special participation of extracellular matrix related genes during high flow-induced vascular remodeling. KEGG pathway analysis showed the enrichment of metabolism and immune function associated genes in SMCs exposed to high flow. Besides, we also identified 25 differentially expressed transcription factors potentially impacted by hemodynamic insult. Finally, we revealed FOXN4 as a novel transcription factor that could modulate MMP2 and MMP9 transcriptional activity. Collectively, our results revealed major gene clusters and transcription factors in SMCs during vascular remodeling which may provide an insight into the molecular mechanism of vascular remodeling and facilitate the screening of candidate genes for vascular diseases.

  20. Acetyl-11-Keto-β-Boswellic Acid Attenuates Prooxidant and Profibrotic Mechanisms Involving Transforming Growth Factor-β1, and Improves Vascular Remodeling in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Peijin; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Tianlong; Zhang, Yikai; Mu, Fei; Zhu, Zhihui; Liang, Lingfei; Zhai, Xiaohu; Ding, Yi; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is an important complication of hypertension with oxidative stress-related profibrotic pathways involved. The transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) has been shown to be a potential target of vasoprotection, and has multiple roles in vascular remodeling. Acetyl-11-Keto-β-Boswellic Acid (AKBA) is one of the active principles of Boswellic acids, and shows antioxidant activity in many diseases. The study is to determine effects of AKBA on systemic oxidative stress of hypertension and vascular remodeling. In the experiments, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were used. And in vitro, fibroblast was pretreated with AKBA before Ang II stimuli. In the results, treatment of AKBA markedly reduced oxidative stress, and decreased vascular remodeling by restoring vascular wall parameters and improving vascular reactivity. AKBA dramatically reduced TGF-β1 and Smad3 expression, as shown in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. In cultured fibroblast, AKBA decreased intracellular ROS levels. Cell viability and proliferation, as well as migration were inhibited by AKBA. Additionally, treatment of AKBA significantly decreased TGF-β1 secretion in culture supernatant. Expression of TGF-β1, Smad3, P-Smad3 and Smad7 were also decreased by AKBA in fibroblast. In conclusion, AKBA is able to attenuate oxidative stress and profibrotic mechanisms, and improve vascular remodeling in hypertension through TGF-β1/Smad3 pathway. PMID:28009003

  1. Vascularization in tissue remodeling after rat hepatic necrosis induced by dimethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu-Lan; Enzan, Hideaki; Kuroda, Naoto; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Toi, Makoto; Miyazaki, Eriko; Hamauzu, Tadashi; Hiroi, Makoto; Guo, Li-Mei; Shen, Zhe-Shi; Saibara, Toshiji

    2006-03-01

    We observed postnecrotic tissue remodeling to examine vascularization in adult rat livers. Livers, bone marrow, and peripheral blood from rats at 24 h to 14 days after an injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) were examined by light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods. Numerous ED-1 (a marker for rat monocytes/macrophages)-positive round mononuclear cells infiltrated in the necrotic areas at 36 h after DMN treatment. On day 5, when necrotic tissues were removed, some of the cells were transformed from round to spindle in shape. On day 7, these cells were contacted with residual reticulin fibers and became positive for SE-1, a marker of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells and Tie-1, an endothelial cell-specific surface receptor, associated with frequent occurrence of ED-1/SE-1 and ED-1/Tie-1 double-positive spindle cells. Ultrastructurally, the spindle cells simultaneously showed phagocytosis and endothelial cell-like morphology. With time necrotic areas diminished, and on day 14, the necrotic tissues were almost replaced by regenerated liver tissues and thin bundles of central-to-central bridging fibrosis. Bone marrow from 12 h to day 2 showed an increase of BrdU-positive mononuclear cells. Some of them were positive for ED-1. The BrdU-labeled and ED-1-positive cells appeared as early as 12 h after DMN injection and reached a peak in number at 36 h. They were similar in structure to ED-1-positive cells in necrotic liver tissues. These findings suggest that round mononuclear ED-1-positive cells proliferate first in bone marrow after DMN treatment, reach necrotic areas of the liver through the circulation, and differentiate to sinusoidal endothelial cells. Namely, hepatic sinusoids in DMN-induced necrotic areas may partly be reorganized possibly by vasculogenesis.

  2. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA.

  3. Kinetics of cardiac and vascular remodeling by spontaneously hypertensive rats after discontinuation of long-term captopril treatment.

    PubMed

    Rocha, W A; Lunz, W; Baldo, M P; Pimentel, E B; Dantas, E M; Rodrigues, S L; Mill, J G

    2010-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce blood pressure and attenuate cardiac and vascular remodeling in hypertension. However, the kinetics of remodeling after discontinuation of the long-term use of these drugs are unknown. Our objective was to investigate the temporal changes occurring in blood pressure and vascular structure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Captopril treatment was started in the pre-hypertensive state. Rats (4 weeks) were assigned to three groups: SHR-Cap (N = 51) treated with captopril (1 g/L) in drinking water from the 4th to the 14th week; SHR-C (N = 48) untreated SHR; Wistar (N = 47) control rats. Subgroups of animals were studied at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after discontinuation of captopril. Direct blood pressure was recorded in freely moving animals after femoral artery catheterism. The animals were then killed to determine left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and the aorta fixed at the same pressure measured in vivo. Captopril prevented hypertension (105 + or - 3 vs 136 + or - 5 mmHg), LVH (2.17 + or - 0.05 vs 2.97 + or - 0.14 mg/g body weight) and the increase in cross-sectional area to luminal area ratio of the aorta (0.21 + or - 0.01 vs 0.26 + or - 0.02 microm(2)) (SHR-Cap vs SHR-C). However, these parameters increased progressively after discontinuation of captopril (22nd week: 141 + or - 2 mmHg, 2.50 + or - 0.06 mg/g, 0.27 + or - 0.02 microm(2)). Prevention of the development of hypertension in SHR by using captopril during the prehypertensive period prevents the development of cardiac and vascular remodeling. Recovery of these processes follows the kinetic of hypertension development after discontinuation of captopril.

  4. HIF-2α-mediated induction of pulmonary thrombospondin-1 contributes to hypoxia-driven vascular remodelling and vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Labrousse-Arias, David; Castillo-González, Raquel; Rogers, Natasha M.; Torres-Capelli, Mar; Barreira, Bianca; Aragonés, Julián; Cogolludo, Ángel; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Calzada, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Hypoxic conditions stimulate pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling, both pathognomonic changes in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is involved in the maintenance of lung homeostasis. New work identified a role for TSP1 in promoting PAH. Nonetheless, it is largely unknown how hypoxia regulates TSP1 in the lung and whether this contributes to pathological events during PAH. Methods and results In cell and animal experiments, we found that hypoxia induces TSP1 in lungs, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, and pulmonary fibroblasts. Using a murine model of constitutive hypoxia, gene silencing, and luciferase reporter experiments, we found that hypoxia-mediated induction of pulmonary TSP1 is a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α-dependent process. Additionally, hypoxic tsp1−/− pulmonary fibroblasts and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell displayed decreased migration compared with wild-type (WT) cells. Furthermore, hypoxia-mediated induction of TSP1 destabilized endothelial cell–cell interactions. This provides genetic evidence that TSP1 contributes to vascular remodelling during PAH. Expanding cell data to whole tissues, we found that, under hypoxia, pulmonary arteries (PAs) from WT mice had significantly decreased sensitivity to acetylcholine (Ach)-stimulated endothelial-dependent vasodilation. In contrast, hypoxic tsp1−/− PAs retained sensitivity to Ach, mediated in part by TSP1 regulation of pulmonary Kv channels. Translating these preclinical studies, we find in the lungs from individuals with end-stage PAH, both TSP1 and HIF-2α protein expression increased in the pulmonary vasculature compared with non-PAH controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that HIF-2α is clearly implicated in the TSP1 pulmonary regulation and provide new insights on its contribution to PAH-driven vascular remodelling and vasoconstriction. PMID:26503986

  5. Impact of hypertension on vascular remodeling in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Puato, M; Ramonda, R; Doria, A; Rattazzi, M; Faggin, E; Balbi, G; Zanon, M; Zanardo, M; Tirrito, C; Lorenzin, M; Modesti, V; Plebani, M; Zaninotto, M; Punzi, L; Pauletto, P

    2014-02-01

    We studied the impact of hypertension along with traditional and new cardiovascular risk factors on the structural and functional properties of arteries in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. We examined 42 PsA subjects (aged 51±9 years) stratified according to hypertensive status (19 normotensive, PsA-NT and 23 hypertensives, PsA-HT). Thirty-eight normotensive subjects (C-NT) and 23 hypertensives (C-HT) comparable by age and sex served as controls. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (mean-IMT) and mean of the maximum IMT (M-Max) were evaluated by ultrasound in carotid artery segment bilaterally. Post-occlusion flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was evaluated by ultrasonography. These parameters were correlated with risk factors, markers of inflammation and disease activity. Values of mean-IMT were higher in both groups of PsA patients compared with C-NT (0.68 mm in PsA-NT and 0.75 mm in PsA-HT versus 0.61 mm in C-NT). PsA-HT displayed higher M-Max (0.95 mm) versus both C-HT (0.71 mm) and PsA-NT (0.79 mm). FMD was impaired in PsA subjects compared with C-NT (5.7% in PsA-NT and 6.0% PsA-HT versus 9.3% in C-NT), whereas there was no difference among PsA-HT, PsA-NT, and C-HT groups. Values of carotid IMT were directly related to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, osteoprotegerin (OPG), blood pressure and lipid profile levels. FMD showed an inverse relationship with TNF-α and blood pressure, but no correlation with lipids. In conclusion, PsA per se implies a pro-atherogenic remodeling, which is enhanced by the hypertensive status. TNF-α and OPG may have an independent role in the development of such vascular damage.

  6. Efficacy of losartan for improving insulin resistance and vascular remodeling in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Song, Yan; Liu, Jing; Ma, Li-Jie; Shen, Yang; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Yi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and vascular remodeling are prevalent and predict cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. Angiotensin II (Ang II) may be involved in both pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the Ang II receptor blocker losartan on insulin resistance, arterial stiffness, and carotid artery structure in hemodialysis patients. Seventy-two hemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to receive either losartan 50 mg qd (n = 36) or β-blocker bisoprolol 5 mg qd (n = 36). At the start and at month 12, ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring, aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements, and carotid artery ultrasound were performed, and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was determined. During the study period, bioimpedance method was used to evaluate volume status every 3 months. Home-monitored BPs were measured at least monthly. Ambulatory BP decreased significantly and similarly by either losartan or bisoprolol. Decreases in PWVs in losartan group at the end of month 12 were significantly greater than changes in PWV in bisoprolol group (0.9 ± 0.3 vs. 0.4 ± 0.5 m/s, P = 0.021). Common carotid artery intima-media cross-sectional area decreased significantly only in patients treated with losartan (20.3 ± 4.9 vs. 19.1 ± 5.1 mm(2) , P = 0.001), and HOMA-IR was also reduced in losartan group only (1.9 ± 1.0 vs. 1.7 ± 0.8, P = 0.003). Multiple regression analysis showed significant correlations between changes in PWV and changes in HOMA-IR. With comparable BP-lowering efficacy, losartan achieved better improvement in insulin sensitivity, arterial stiffness, and carotid artery hypertrophy in hemodialysis patients. The regression of arterial stiffness may be in part through attenuation in insulin resistance.

  7. Vascular and baroreceptor abnormalities in young males with a family history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boutcher, Yati N; Park, Young J; Boutcher, Stephen H

    2009-12-01

    Vascular and baroreceptor abnormalities in 44 young males, mean age 21 years, comprising of offspring with (FH(+); n = 22) and without (FH(-); n = 22) hypertensive parents, were investigated. Peak forearm blood flow (FBF), which was defined as the highest blood flow obtained following reactive hyperaemia, was assessed using strain gauge plethysmography following 5 min of ischemia. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor sensitivity was assessed using lower body negative pressure for 5 min at -20 mmHg and was determined by calculating change of stroke volume and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) to lower body negative pressure. Carotid baroreceptor sensitivity was assessed using neck suction at -20, -40, -60, and -80 mmHg and was calculated by dividing RR interval by systolic blood pressure. Augmentation index, a measure of wave reflection, was assessed using applanation tonometry and was calculated as the ratio of augmented pressure and pulse pressure. Peak FBF of FH(+) was 19% lower than the FH(-) (p = 0.02). Also FH(+) had 17% higher peak FVR compared to FH(-) (p = 0.04). However, there were no significant differences between groups for cardiopulmonary, carotid baroreceptor sensitivity, and augmentation index. These results suggest that peripheral vascular dysfunction appears earlier than abnormal baroreceptor sensitivity in young males with a family history of hypertension.

  8. Vascular remodeling alters adhesion protein and cytoskeleton reactions to inflammatory stimuli resulting in enhanced permeability increases in rat venules.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dong; He, Pingnian

    2012-10-01

    Vascular remodeling has been implicated in many inflammation-involved diseases. This study aims to investigate the microvascular remodeling-associated alterations in cell-cell adhesion and cytoskeleton reactions to inflammatory stimuli and their impact on microvessel permeability. Experiments were conducted in individually perfused rat mesenteric venules. Microvessel permeability was determined by measuring hydraulic conductivity (Lp), and endothelial intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca(2+)](i), was measured in fura-2-perfused vessels. Alterations in VE-cadherin and F-actin arrangement were examined by confocal imaging. Vascular wall cellular composition and structural changes were evaluated by electron microscopy. Vessels exposed to platelet activating factor (PAF) on day 1 were reevaluated 3 days later in rats that had undergone survival surgery. Initial PAF exposure and surgical disturbance increased microvascular wall thickness along with perivascular cell proliferation and altered F-actin arrangement. Although basal permeability was not changed, upon reexposure to PAF, peak endothelial [Ca(2+)](i) was augmented and the peak Lp was 9.3 ± 1.7 times higher than that of day 1. In contrast to patterns of PAF-induced stress fiber formation and VE-cadherin redistribution observed in day 1 vessels, the day 4 vessels at the potentiated Lp peak exhibited wide separations of VE-cadherin between endothelial cells and striking stress fibers throughout the vascular walls. Confocal images and ultrastructural micrographs also revealed that the largely separated VE-cadherin and endothelial gaps were completely covered by F-actin bundles in extended pericyte processes at the PAF-induced Lp peak. These results indicate that inflammation-induced vascular remodeling increased endothelial susceptibility to inflammatory stimuli with augmented Ca(2+) response resulting in upregulated contractility and potentiated permeability increase. Weakened adhesions between the endothelial

  9. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Sung Won; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:26006249

  10. Repeated sauna therapy attenuates ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats by increasing coronary vascularity of noninfarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Shida, Takuya; Ohori, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Matsuki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Repeated sauna therapy (ST) increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and improves cardiac function in heart failure as well as peripheral blood flow in ischemic limbs. The present study investigates whether ST can increase coronary vascularity and thus attenuate cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We induced MI by ligating the left coronary artery of Wistar rats. The rats were placed in a far-infrared dry sauna at 41°C for 15 min and then at 34°C for 20 min once daily for 4 wk. Cardiac hemodynamic, histopathological, and gene analyses were performed. Despite the similar sizes of MI between the ST and non-ST groups (51.4 ± 0.3 vs. 51.1 ± 0.2%), ST reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic (9.7 ± 0.4 vs. 10.7 ± 0.5 mm, P < 0.01) and end-systolic (8.6 ± 0.5 vs. 9.6 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.01) dimensions and attenuated MI-induced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure. Cross-sectional areas of cardiomyocytes were smaller in ST rats and associated with a significant reduction in myocardial atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA levels. Vascular density was reduced in the noninfarcted myocardium of non-ST rats, and the density of cells positive for CD31 and for α-smooth muscle actin was decreased. These decreases were attenuated in ST rats compared with non-ST rats and associated with increases in myocardial eNOS and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels. In conclusion, ST attenuates cardiac remodeling after MI, at least in part, through improving coronary vascularity in the noninfarcted myocardium. Repeated ST might serve as a novel noninvasive therapy for patients with MI.

  11. A Theoretical Model for F-actin Remodeling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Subjected to Cyclic Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Na, S.; Meininger, G.A.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    A constrained mixture theory model was developed and used to estimate remodeling of F-actin in vascular smooth muscle cells that were subjected to 10% equibiaxial stretching for up to 30 minutes. The model was based on a synthesis of data on time-dependent changes in atomic force microscopy measured cell stiffness and immunofluorescence measured focal adhesion associated vinculin as well as data on stress fiber stiffness and pre-stretch. Results suggest that an observed acute (after 2 minutes of stretching) increase in cell stiffness is consistent with an increased stretch of the originally present F-actin plus an assembly of new F-actin having nearly homeostatic values of stretch. Moreover, the subsequent (after 30 minutes of stretching) decrease in cell stiffness back towards the baseline value is consistent with a replacement of the overstretched original filaments with the new (reassembled), less stretched filaments. That is, overall cell response is consistent with a recently proposed concept of “tensional homeostasis” whereby cells seek to maintain constant certain mechanical factors via a remodeling of intracellular and transmembrane proteins. Although there is a need to refine the model based on more comprehensive data sets, using multiple experimental approaches, the present results suggest that a constrained mixture theory can capture salient features of the dynamics of F-actin remodeling and that it offers some advantages over many past methods of modeling, particularly those based on classical linearized viscoelasticity. PMID:17240401

  12. A novel computational remodelling algorithm for the probabilistic evolution of collagen fibre dispersion in biaxially strained vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Gürsan; Çelebi, M Serdar

    2016-09-10

    In this work, we constructed a novel collagen fibre remodelling algorithm that incorporates the complex nature of random evolution acting on single fibres causing macroscopic fibre dispersion. The proposed framework is different from the existing remodelling algorithms, in that the microscopic random force on cellular scales causing a rotational-type Brownian motion alone is considered as an aspect of vascular tissue remodelling. A continuum mechanical framework for the evolution of local dispersion and how it could be used for modeling the evolution of internal radius of biaxially strained artery structures under constant internal blood pressure are presented. A linear evolution form for the statistical fibre dispersion is employed in the model. The random force component of the evolution, which depends on the mechanical stress stimuli, is described by a single parameter. Although the mathematical form of the proposed model is simple, there is a strong link between the microscopic evolution of collagen dispersion on the cellular level and its effects on the macroscopic visible world through mechanical variables. We believe that the proposed algorithm utilizes a better understanding of the relationship between the evolution rates of mean fibre direction and fibre dispersion. The predictive capability of the algorithm is presented using experimental data. The model has been simulated by solving a single-layered axisymmetric artery (adventitia) deformation problem. The algorithm performed well for estimating the quantitative features of experimental anisotropy, the mean fibre direction vector and the dispersion ([Formula: see text]) measurements under strain-dependent evolution assumptions.

  13. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Vascular, metabolic, and inflammatory abnormalities in normoglycemic offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Rizza, Stefano; Iantorno, Micaela; Campia, Umberto; Cardillo, Carmine; Lauro, Davide; Leo, Roberto; Turriziani, Mario; Cocciolillo, Giulio Cesare; Fusco, Angelo; Panza, Julio A; Scuteri, Angelo; Federici, Massimo; Lauro, Renato; Quon, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and elevated levels of circulating proinflammatory markers are among the earliest detectable abnormalities in people at risk for atherosclerosis. Accelerated atherosclerosis is a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus, a complex genetic disorder. Therefore, we hypothesized that normoglycemic offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (NOPD) may have impaired vascular and metabolic function related to an enhanced proinflammatory state. We compared NOPD (n = 51) with matched healthy control subjects without family history of diabetes (n = 35). Flow- and nitroglycerin-mediated brachial artery vasodilation were assessed by ultrasound to evaluate endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular function. Each subject also underwent an oral glucose tolerance test to evaluate metabolic function. Fasting levels of plasma adiponectin and circulating markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, CD40 ligand, interleukin 1beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and intracellular adhesion molecule) were measured. Both NOPD and the control group had fasting glucose and insulin levels well within the reference range. However, results from oral glucose tolerance test and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index revealed that NOPD were insulin resistant with significantly impaired flow- and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation compared with the control group. Adiponectin levels were lower, whereas many circulating markers of inflammation were higher, in NOPD compared with the control group. Normoglycemic offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have impaired vascular and metabolic function accompanied by an enhanced proinflammatory state that may contribute to their increased risk of diabetes and its vascular complications.

  15. Abnormal vascular development in zebrafish models for fukutin and FKRP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alasdair J; Müller, Juliane S; Jepson, Catherine D; Laval, Steve H; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Barresi, Rita; Straub, Volker

    2011-12-15

    Fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP) are involved in the glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, a key receptor for basement membrane proteins. Aberrant α-dystroglycan glycosylation leads to a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from limb girdle muscular dystrophy to Walker-Warburg syndrome. This is the first study investigating a role of fukutin and FKRP-mediated glycosylation in angiogenesis. Transgenic zebrafish expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in blood vessels were treated with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that blocked the expression of fukutin, FKRP and dystroglycan. All morphant fish showed muscle damage and vascular abnormalities at day 1 post-fertilization. Intersegmental vessels of somites failed to reach the dorsal longitudinal anastomosis and in more severe phenotypes retracted further or were in some cases even completely missing. In contrast, the eye vasculature was distorted in both fukutin and FKRP morphants, but not in dystroglycan morphants or control fish. The eye size was also smaller in the fukutin and FKRP morphants when compared with dystroglycan knockdown fish and controls. In general, the fukutin morphant fish had the most severe skeletal muscle and eye phenotype. Our findings suggest that fukutin and FKRP have functions that affect ocular development in zebrafish independently of dystroglycan. Despite anecdotal reports about vascular abnormalities in patients affected by dystroglycanopathies, the clinical relevance of such lesions remains unclear and should be subject to further review and investigations.

  16. Effect of combined VEGF165/ SDF-1 gene therapy on vascular remodeling and blood perfusion in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Jie; Feng, Yu-Gong; Lu, Wen-Peng; Li, Huan-Ting; Xie, Hong-Wei; Li, Shi-Fang

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic neovascularization is a promising strategy for treating patients after an ischemic stroke; however, single-factor therapy has limitations. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins synergistically promote angiogenesis. In this study, the authors assessed the effect of combined gene therapy with VEGF165 and SDF-1 in a rat model of cerebral infarction. METHODS An adenoviral vector expressing VEGF165 and SDF-1 connected via an internal ribosome entry site was constructed (Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1). A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was established; either Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 or control adenovirus Ad- LacZ was stereotactically microinjected into the lateral ventricle of 80 rats 24 hours after MCAO. Coexpression and distribution of VEGF165 and SDF-1 were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. The neurological severity score of each rat was measured on Days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after MCAO. Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling were evaluated via bromodeoxyuridine and CD34 immunofluorescence labeling. Relative cerebral infarction volumes were determined by T2-weighted MRI and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transmit time were assessed using perfusion-weighted MRI. RESULTS The Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 vector mediated coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 in multiple sites around the ischemic core, including the cortex, corpus striatum, and hippocampal granular layer. Coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 improved neural function, reduced cerebral infarction volume, increased microvascular density and promoted angiogenesis in the ischemic penumbra, and improved cerebral blood flow and perfusion. CONCLUSIONS Combined VEGF165 and SDF-1 gene therapy represents a potential strategy for improving vascular remodeling and recovery of neural function after cerebral

  17. AMPK Activation by Metformin Suppresses Abnormal Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Adipose Tissue and Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Nocon, Allison; Fry, Jessica; Sherban, Alex; Rui, Xianliang; Jiang, Bingbing; Xu, X Julia; Han, Jingyan; Yan, Yun; Yang, Qin; Li, Qifu; Zang, Mengwei

    2016-08-01

    Fibrosis is emerging as a hallmark of metabolically dysregulated white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity. Although adipose tissue fibrosis impairs adipocyte plasticity, little is known about how aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of WAT is initiated during the development of obesity. Here we show that treatment with the antidiabetic drug metformin inhibits excessive ECM deposition in WAT of ob/ob mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, as evidenced by decreased collagen deposition surrounding adipocytes and expression of fibrotic genes including the collagen cross-linking regulator LOX Inhibition of interstitial fibrosis by metformin is likely attributable to the activation of AMPK and the suppression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad3 signaling, leading to enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity. The ability of metformin to repress TGF-β1-induced fibrogenesis is abolished by the dominant negative AMPK in primary cells from the stromal vascular fraction. TGF-β1-induced insulin resistance is suppressed by AMPK agonists and the constitutively active AMPK in 3T3L1 adipocytes. In omental fat depots of obese humans, interstitial fibrosis is also associated with AMPK inactivation, TGF-β1/Smad3 induction, aberrant ECM production, myofibroblast activation, and adipocyte apoptosis. Collectively, integrated AMPK activation and TGF-β1/Smad3 inhibition may provide a potential therapeutic approach to maintain ECM flexibility and combat chronically uncontrolled adipose tissue expansion in obesity.

  18. Effects of renal denervation on vascular remodelling in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: A randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Carl; Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Rosen, Stuart D; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of renal denervation (RDT) on micro- and macro-vascular function in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Design A prospective, randomised, open-controlled trial with blinded end-point analysis. Setting A single-centre London teaching hospital. Participants Twenty-five patients with HFpEF who were recruited into the RDT-PEF trial. Main outcome measures Macro-vascular: 24-h ambulatory pulse pressure, aorta distensibilty (from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), aorta pulse wave velocity (CMR), augmentation index (peripheral tonometry) and renal artery blood flow indices (renal MR). Micro-vascular: endothelial function (peripheral tonometry) and urine microalbuminuria. Results At baseline, 15 patients were normotensive, 9 were hypertensive and 1 was hypotensive. RDT did not lower any of the blood pressure indices. Though there was evidence of abnormal vascular function at rest, RDT did not affect these at 3 or 12 months follow-up. Conclusions RDT did not improve markers of macro- and micro-vascular function. PMID:28228942

  19. Non-canonical Wnt signalling modulates the endothelial shear stress flow sensor in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Franco, Claudio A; Jones, Martin L; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Vion, Anne-Clemence; Barbacena, Pedro; Fan, Jieqing; Mathivet, Thomas; Fonseca, Catarina G; Ragab, Anan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Coveney, Peter V; Lang, Richard A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-02-04

    Endothelial cells respond to molecular and physical forces in development and vascular homeostasis. Deregulation of endothelial responses to flow-induced shear is believed to contribute to many aspects of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, how molecular signals and shear-mediated physical forces integrate to regulate vascular patterning is poorly understood. Here we show that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/Wnt11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarization and migration against flow at lower shear levels. Integration of flow modelling and polarity analysis in entire vascular networks demonstrates that polarization against flow is achieved differentially in artery, vein, capillaries and the primitive sprouting front. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  20. Impaired vascular remodeling after endothelial progenitor cell transplantation in MMP9-deficient mice suffering cortical cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Anna; Ma, Feifei; Barceló, Verónica; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Rosell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are being investigated for advanced therapies, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) has an important role in stroke recovery. Our aim was to determine whether tissue MMP9 influences the EPC-induced angiogenesis after ischemia. Wild-type (WT) and MMP9-deficient mice (MMP9/KO) were subjected to cerebral ischemia and treated with vehicle or outgrowth EPCs. After 3 weeks, we observed an increase in the peri-infarct vessel density in WT animals but not in MMP9/KO mice; no differences were found in the vehicle-treated groups. Our data suggest that tissue MMP9 has a crucial role in EPC-induced vascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:26219597

  1. Endogenous sulfur dioxide alleviates collagen remodeling via inhibiting TGF-β/Smad pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaqian; Shen, Zhizhou; Chen, Qinghua; Huang, Pan; Zhang, Heng; Du, Shuxu; Geng, Bin; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Kun; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-14

    The study was designed to investigate the role of endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO2) in collagen remodeling and its mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Overexpression of endogenous SO2 synthase aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) 1 or 2 increased SO2 levels and inhibited collagen I and III expressions induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in VSMCs. In contrast, AAT1 or AAT2 knockdown induced a severe collagen deposition in TGF-β1-treated VSMCs. Furthermore, AAT1 or AAT2 overexpression suppressed procollagen I and III mRNA, upregulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 expression, downregulated tissue inhibitors of MMP-1 level, and vice versa. Mechanistically, AAT1 or AAT2 overexpression inhibited phosphorylation of type I TGF-β receptor (TβRI) and Smad2/3 in TGF-β1-stimulated VSMCs. Whereas SB431542, an inhibitor of TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway, attenuated excessive collagen deposition induced by AAT knockdown. Most importantly, ectopically expressing AAT or exogenous addition of 100 μM SO2 blocked AAT deficiency-aggravated collagen accumulation in TGF-β1-stimulatd VSMCs, while no inhibition was observed at 100 μM ethyl pyruvate. These findings indicated that endogenous SO2 alleviated collagen remodeling by controlling TGF-β1/TβRI/Smad2/3-mediated modulation of collagen synthesis and degradation.

  2. Possible role of NFκB in the embryonic vascular remodeling and the endothelial mesenchymal transition process

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Luz M; De Sanctis, Juan B; Candelle, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The NFκB family of transcription factors, particularly the activated p50/p65 heterodimer, is expressed in vascular cells during intimal thickening formation when hemodynamic conditions are altered. Here, we report that p50, p65, IκBα and IKKα display different spatial and temporal patterns of expression and distribution during both chicken embryo aortic wall remodeling and intimal thickening development. Additionally, we show that both p50 and p65 were located in the nucleus of some mesenchymal cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin which are present in the spontaneous intimal thickening observed at embryonic days 12–14 of development. We also demonstrated that both NFκB subunits are present in monolayers of primary embryonic aortic endothelial cells attached to fibronectin and stimulated with complete medium. This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of activated NFκB during the remodeling of the embryonic aortic wall and the formation of intimal thickening, providing evidence that suggest a possible role for this transcription factor in the EndoMT process. PMID:19262121

  3. Wall shear stress and near-wall convective transport: Comparisons with vascular remodelling in a peripheral graft anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambaruto, A. M.; Doorly, D. J.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-08-01

    Fluid dynamic properties of blood flow are implicated in cardiovascular diseases. The interaction between the blood flow and the wall occurs through the direct transmission of forces, and through the dominating influence of the flow on convective transport processes. Controlled, in vitro testing in simple geometric configurations has provided much data on the cellular-level responses of the vascular walls to flow, but a complete, mechanistic explanation of the pathogenic process is lacking. In the interim, mapping the association between local haemodynamics and the vascular response is important to improve understanding of the disease process and may be of use for prognosis. Moreover, establishing the haemodynamic environment in the regions of disease provides data on flow conditions to guide investigations of cellular-level responses. This work describes techniques to facilitate comparison between the temporal alteration in the geometry of the vascular conduit, as determined by in vivo imaging, with local flow parameters. Procedures to reconstruct virtual models from images by means of a partition-of-unity implicit function formulation, and to align virtual models of follow-up scans to a common coordinate system, are outlined. A simple Taylor series expansion of the Lagrangian dynamics of the near-wall flow is shown to provide both a physical meaning to the directional components of the flow, as well as demonstrating the relation between near-wall convection in the wall normal direction and spatial gradients of the wall shear stress. A series of post-operative follow-up MRI scans of two patient cases with bypass grafts in the peripheral vasculature are presented. These are used to assess how local haemodynamic parameters relate to vascular remodelling at the location of the distal end-to-side anastomosis, i.e. where the graft rejoins the host artery. Results indicate that regions of both low wall shear stress and convective transport towards the wall tend to be

  4. Hypoxia Does neither Stimulate Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Proliferation in Mice and Rats with Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Remodeling nor in Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypoxia results in pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling due to induction of pulmonary artery cell proliferation. Besides pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) are also involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension, but the effect of hypoxia on PAEC proliferation has not been completely understood. Methods We investigated PAEC proliferation in mice and rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling as well as in human PAECs under hypoxia. Results and Conclusion We did not find significant PAEC proliferation in chronically hypoxic rats or mice. There was a slight decrease in proliferation in mice and rats with pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. We also did not find significant human PAEC proliferation and cell cycle progression under different levels of oxygen (1, 2, 3, 5 and 10%) for one day, although the same conditions of hypoxia induced significant proliferation and cell cycle progression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery fibroblasts. Exposure to hypoxia for 7 days also did not increase PAEC proliferation. These results demonstrated that hypoxia alone is not a stimulus to PAEC proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The present study provides a novel role for PAECs in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. PMID:21691120

  5. Targeted disruption of p185/Cul7 gene results in abnormal vascular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takehiro; Kasper, Jocelyn S; Skaar, Jeffrey R; Ali, Syed Hamid; Takahashi, Chiaki; DeCaprio, James A

    2003-08-19

    Cul1, a member of the cullin ubiquitin ligase family, forms a multiprotein complex known as SCF and plays an essential role in numerous cellular and biological activities. A Cul1 homologue, p185 (Cul7), has been isolated as an simian virus 40 large T antigen-binding protein. To understand the physiological role of p185, we generated mice lacking p185. p185-/- embryos are runted and die immediately after birth because of respiratory distress. Dermal and hypodermal hemorrhage is detected in mutant embryos at late gestational stage. p185-/- placentas show defects in the differentiation of the trophoblast lineage with an abnormal vascular structure. We demonstrate that p185 forms an SCF-like complex with Skp1, Rbx1, Fbw6 (Fbx29), and FAP68 (FAP48, glomulin). FAP68 has recently been identified as a gene responsible for familial glomuvenous malformation. These results suggest that p185 forms a multiprotein complex and plays an important role in vascular morphogenesis.

  6. Targeted disruption of p185/Cul7 gene results in abnormal vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takehiro; Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Ali, Syed Hamid; Takahashi, Chiaki; DeCaprio, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Cul1, a member of the cullin ubiquitin ligase family, forms a multiprotein complex known as SCF and plays an essential role in numerous cellular and biological activities. A Cul1 homologue, p185 (Cul7), has been isolated as an simian virus 40 large T antigen-binding protein. To understand the physiological role of p185, we generated mice lacking p185. p185–/– embryos are runted and die immediately after birth because of respiratory distress. Dermal and hypodermal hemorrhage is detected in mutant embryos at late gestational stage. p185–/– placentas show defects in the differentiation of the trophoblast lineage with an abnormal vascular structure. We demonstrate that p185 forms an SCF-like complex with Skp1, Rbx1, Fbw6 (Fbx29), and FAP68 (FAP48, glomulin). FAP68 has recently been identified as a gene responsible for familial glomuvenous malformation. These results suggest that p185 forms a multiprotein complex and plays an important role in vascular morphogenesis. PMID:12904573

  7. Low levels of natural IgM antibodies against phosphorylcholine are independently associated with vascular remodeling in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Christian A; Erbel, Christian; Haeussler, Julia; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Domschke, Gabriele; Linden, Fabian; Doesch, Andreas O; Conradson, Göran; Buss, Sebastian J; Hofmann, Nina P; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Katus, Hugo A; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2015-01-01

    Low anti-phosphorylcholine (PC) IgM plasma levels have been associated with increased incidence of adverse events in coronary artery disease (CAD). The underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that atheroprotection mediated by anti-PC IgM antibodies is associated with reduced vascular remodeling and therefore tested whether anti-PC IgM plasma levels independently predict vascular remodeling. In a prospective cross-sectional study, anti-PC IgM plasma levels were measured in 175 consecutive patients with suspected CAD undergoing cardiac computed tomography angiography. Plaque morphology was thoroughly analyzed. Vascular remodeling was defined by a change in the vessel diameter at the plaque site in comparison to the reference segment proximal to the lesion (reference diameter) of ≥10%. Mean age of the patients was 64.8 ± 10.7 years, 48.6% were female. In 98 patients CAD was diagnosed, 57 (58.2%) of which displayed non-obstructive CAD (stenosis <50%), whereas 41 (41.8%) exhibited obstructive CAD (stenosis ≥50%). In 34 of 98 (34.7%) CAD patients vascular remodeling was present. Mean anti-PC IgM levels did not differ between patients with and without CAD (70.8 ± 52.7 vs. 69.1 ± 55.1 U/mL). However, anti-PC IgM levels were significantly lower in CAD patients compared to those without vascular remodeling (46.6 ± 31.6 vs. 73.3 ± 58.5 U/mL, P = 0.024). Using multivariate logistic regression, anti-PC IgM plasma levels independently predicted coronary vascular remodeling (HR 0.322, 95% confidence interval 0.121-0.856, P = 0.023). In conclusion, low anti-PC IgM levels are independently associated with coronary vascular remodeling. These findings may represent the link between in vitro studies demonstrating atheroprotective effects of anti-PC IgM and clinical data demonstrating that low anti-PC IgM levels are associated with adverse outcome in CAD patients.

  8. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Link, Patrick A.; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  9. Doxycycline, a matrix metalloprotease inhibitor, reduces vascular remodeling and damage after cerebral ischemia in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pires, Paulo W; Rogers, Curt T; McClain, Jonathon L; Garver, Hannah S; Fink, Gregory D; Dorrance, Anne M

    2011-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of zinc peptidases involved in extracellular matrix turnover. There is evidence that increased MMP activity is involved in remodeling of resistance vessels in chronic hypertension. Thus we hypothesized that inhibition of MMP activity with doxycycline (DOX) would attenuate vascular remodeling. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with DOX (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) in the drinking water) for 6 wk. Untreated SHRSP were controls. Blood pressure was measured by telemetry during the last week. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and mesenteric resistance artery (MRA) passive structures were assessed by pressure myography. MMP-2 expression in aortas was measured by Western blot. All results are means ± SE. DOX caused a small increase in mean arterial pressure (SHRSP, 154 ± 1; SHRSP + DOX, 159 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.001). Active MMP-2 expression was reduced in aorta from SHRSP + DOX (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.49 ± 0.13 arbitrary units; P < 0.05). In the MCA, at 80 mmHg, DOX treatment increased the lumen (273.2 ± 4.7 vs. 238.3 ± 6.3 μm; P < 0.05) and the outer diameter (321 ± 5.3 vs. 290 ± 7.6 μm; P < 0.05) and reduced the wall-to-lumen ratio (0.09 ± 0.002 vs. 0.11 ± 0.003; P < 0.05). Damage after transient cerebral ischemia (transient MCA occlusion) was reduced in SHRSP + DOX (20.7 ± 4 vs. 45.5 ± 5% of hemisphere infarcted; P < 0.05). In the MRA, at 90 mmHg DOX, reduced wall thickness (29 ± 1 vs. 22 ± 1 μm; P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio (0.08 ± 0.004 vs. 0.11 ± 0.008; P < 0.05) without changing lumen diameter. These results suggest that MMPs are involved in hypertensive vascular remodeling in both the peripheral and cerebral vasculature and that DOX reduced brain damage after cerebral ischemia.

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 contributes to vascular remodelling and endothelial dysfunction in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hernanz, R; Martínez-Revelles, S; Palacios, R; Martín, A; Cachofeiro, V; Aguado, A; García-Redondo, L; Barrús, M T; de Batista, P R; Briones, A M; Salaices, M; Alonso, M J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling contributes to inflammatory cardiovascular diseases, but its role in hypertension and the associated vascular damage is not known. We investigated whether TLR4 activation contributed to angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertension and the associated vascular structural, mechanical and functional alterations. Experimental Approach AngII was infused (1.44 mg·kg−1·day−1, s.c.) for 2 weeks in C57BL6 mice, treated with a neutralizing anti-TLR4 antibody or IgG (1 μg·day−1); systolic BP (SBP) and aortic cytokine levels were measured. Structural, mechanical and contractile properties of aortic and mesenteric arterial segments were measured with myography and histology. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to analyse these tissues and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from hypertensive rats (SHR). Key Results Aortic TLR4 mRNA levels were raised by AngII infusion. Anti-TLR4 antibody treatment of AngII-treated mice normalised: (i) increased SBP and TNF-α, IL-6 and CCL2 levels; (ii) vascular structural and mechanical changes; (iii) altered aortic phenylephrine- and ACh-induced responses; (iv) increased NOX-1 mRNA levels, superoxide anion production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity and effects of catalase, apocynin, ML-171 and Mito-TEMPO on vascular responses; and (v) reduced NO release and effects of L-NAME on phenylephrine-induced contraction. In VSMC, the MyD88 inhibitor ST-2825 reduced AngII-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activity. The TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 reduced AngII-induced increased phospho-JNK1/2 and p65 NF-κB subunit nuclear protein expression. Conclusions and Implications TLR4 up-regulation by AngII contributed to the inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling and stiffness associated with hypertension by mechanisms involving oxidative stress. MyD88-dependent activation and JNK/NF-κB signalling pathways participated in these alterations. PMID:25712370

  11. Mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway during vascular collagen remodeling of hypertension induced by ANG II.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Yong; Chen, Jiyan; Wei, Xuebiao; Tan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    More and more researches show that hypertensive vascular remodeling is closely related to the imbalance of immune system in recent years. IFN-γ is natural protein with the function of immune regulation and has resistance effect on vascular remodeling. However, the mechanism of IFN-γ is to be defined. This paper is to explore the mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway. In this research, animal models of vascular collagen remodeling were established by inducing hypertensive mice with ANG II. There was no statistical significance when the systolic blood pressures and the percentages of wall thickness/lumen diameter in both groups of WT + AngII + IFN-γ and WT + PBS were compared (P=0.219>0.05, P=0.118>0.05). The concentration of serum precollagen-type I and III and their ratio in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group were decreased after the IFN-γ being given (P<0.01). Expression of OPN within tissue in WT + Ang II group was relatively high, but lowered after treated by IFN-γ. Th17 cell ratio was decreased in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group (P<0.01). Expressions of RORα and RORγt mRNA within Th17 cell were decreased (P<0.01). The content of IL-23 in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group was increased, while IL-10 and TGF-β decreased. It has proved that IFN-γ can regulate the hypertensive vascular collagen remodeling induced by ANG II, lower the systolic pressure and reduce the pathological damage of vascular collagen remodeling and the collagen synthesis. The mechanism may that the differentiation of Th17 is inhibited by suppressing the OPN expression and regulating the secretion of inflammatory cytokines.

  12. C/EBPβ and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Differentially Regulate Adamts-1 Induction by Stimuli Associated with Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oller, Jorge; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Villahoz, Silvia; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Martín-Alonso, Mara; Arroyo, Alicia G.; Escolano, Amelia; Armesilla, Angel Luis

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the metalloproteinase Adamts-1 plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of vessel remodeling, but little is known about the signaling pathways that control Adamts-1 expression. We show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiotensin-II, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α, stimuli implicated in pathological vascular remodeling, increase Adamts-1 expression in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Analysis of the intracellular signaling pathways implicated in this process revealed that VEGF and angiotensin-II upregulate Adamts-1 expression via activation of differential signaling pathways that ultimately promote functional binding of the NFAT or C/EBPβ transcription factors, respectively, to the Adamts-1 promoter. Infusion of mice with angiotensin-II triggered phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of C/EBPβ proteins in aortic cells concomitantly with an increase in the expression of Adamts-1, further underscoring the importance of C/EBPβ signaling in angiotensin-II-induced upregulation of Adamts-1. Similarly, VEGF promoted NFAT activation and subsequent Adamts-1 induction in aortic wall in a calcineurin-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that Adamts-1 upregulation by inducers of pathological vascular remodeling is mediated by specific signal transduction pathways involving NFAT or C/EBPβ transcription factors. Targeting of these pathways may prove useful in the treatment of vascular disease. PMID:26217013

  13. Non-canonical Wnt signalling modulates the endothelial shear stress flow sensor in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Claudio A; Jones, Martin L; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Vion, Anne-Clemence; Barbacena, Pedro; Fan, Jieqing; Mathivet, Thomas; Fonseca, Catarina G; Ragab, Anan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Coveney, Peter V; Lang, Richard A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to molecular and physical forces in development and vascular homeostasis. Deregulation of endothelial responses to flow-induced shear is believed to contribute to many aspects of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, how molecular signals and shear-mediated physical forces integrate to regulate vascular patterning is poorly understood. Here we show that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/Wnt11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarization and migration against flow at lower shear levels. Integration of flow modelling and polarity analysis in entire vascular networks demonstrates that polarization against flow is achieved differentially in artery, vein, capillaries and the primitive sprouting front. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07727.001 PMID:26845523

  14. Physiological and Therapeutic Vascular Remodeling Mediated by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kakali; Semenza, Gregg L.

    Angiogenesis along with arteriogenesis and vasculogenesis is a fundamental process in ischemic repair in adult animals including humans. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) plays a central role in mediating adaptive responses to hypoxia/ischemia by expressing angiogenic cytokines/growth factors and their cognate receptors. Angiogenic growth factors are the homing signal for circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), which are mobilized to peripheral blood from bone marrow, recruited to target tissues, and promote vascularization. Impairment of HIF-1-mediated gene transcription contributes to the impaired vascular responses in peripheral vascular disease that are associated with aging and diabetes. Promoting neovascularization in ischemic tissues is a promising strategy for the treatment of peripheral vascular disease when surgical or catheter-based revascularization is not possible. Intramuscular injection of an adenovirus encoding a constitutively active form of HIF-1α (AdCA5), into the ischemic limb of diabetic mice increases the recovery of limb perfusion and function, rescues the diabetes-associated impairment of CACs, and increases vascularization. Administration of AdCA5 overcomes the effect of aging on recovery of blood flow in middle-aged mice following femoral artery ligation in a mouse model of age-dependent critical limb ischemia. Intramuscular injection of AdCA5 along with intravenous injection of bone-marrow-derived angiogenic cells cultured in the presence of prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine, increases blood flow and limb salvage in old mice following femoral artery ligation. HIF-1α gene therapy increases homing of bone-marrow-derived cells, whereas induction of HIF-1 in these cells increases their retention in the ischemic tissue by increasing their adhesion to endothelium leading to synergistic effects of combined therapy on improving blood flow.

  15. Endothelial Dysfunction and Diabetes: Effects on Angiogenesis, Vascular Remodeling, and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by inappropriate hyperglycemia due to lack of or resistance to insulin. Patients with DM are frequently afflicted with ischemic vascular disease or wound healing defect. It is well known that type 2 DM causes amplification of the atherosclerotic process, endothelial cell dysfunction, glycosylation of extracellular matrix proteins, and vascular denervation. These complications ultimately lead to impairment of neovascularization and diabetic wound healing. Therapeutic angiogenesis remains an attractive treatment modality for chronic ischemic disorders including PAD and/or diabetic wound healing. Many experimental studies have identified better approaches for diabetic cardiovascular complications, however, successful clinical translation has been limited possibly due to the narrow therapeutic targets of these agents or the lack of rigorous evaluation of pathology and therapeutic mechanisms in experimental models of disease. This paper discusses the current body of evidence identifying endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis during diabetes. PMID:22611498

  16. Herpes Virus Infection Is Associated with Vascular Remodeling and Pulmonary Hypertension in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Fiorella; Kipar, Anja; Lunardi, Francesca; Balestro, Elisabetta; Perissinotto, Egle; Rossi, Emanuela; Nannini, Nazarena; Marulli, Giuseppe; Stewart, James P.; Rea, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) represents an important complication of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with a negative impact on patient survival. Herpes viruses are thought to play an etiological role in the development and/or progression of IPF. The influence of viruses on PH associated with IPF is unknown. We aimed to investigate the influence of viruses in IPF patients focusing on aspects related to PH. A laboratory mouse model of gamma-herpesvirus (MHV-68) induced pulmonary fibrosis was also assessed. Methods Lung tissue samples from 55 IPF patients and 41 controls were studied by molecular analysis to detect various viral genomes. Viral molecular data obtained were correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and arterial remodelling. Different clinical and morphological variables were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses at time of transplant and in the early post-transplant period. The same lung tissue analyses were performed in MHV-68 infected mice. Results A higher frequency of virus positive cases was found in IPF patients than in controls (p = 0.0003) and only herpes virus genomes were detected. Viral cases showed higher mPAP (p = 0.01), poorer performance in the six minute walking test (6MWT; p = 0.002) and higher frequency of primary graft (PGD) dysfunction after lung transplant (p = 0.02). Increased arterial thickening, particularly of the intimal layer (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004) and higher TGF-β expression (p = 0.002) were demonstrated in viral cases. The remodelled vessels showed increased vessel cell proliferation (Ki-67 positive cells) in the proximity to metaplastic epithelial cells and macrophages. Viral infection was associated with higher mPAP (p = 0.03), poorer performance in the 6MWT (p = 0.008) and PGD (p = 0.02) after adjusting for other covariates/intermediate factors. In MHV-68 infected mice, morphological features were similar to those of patients. Conclusion

  17. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  18. Expression and localization of inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins during tissue and vascular remodelling in the human corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Narayanan, Rachna; Giakoumelou, Sevasti; Boswell, Lyndsey; Hogg, Kirsten; Duncan, W Colin

    2013-02-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily are likely to have major roles in the regulation of tissue and vascular remodelling in the corpus luteum (CL). There are four inhibitor-of-differentiation (ID1-4) genes that are regulated by members of the TGF-β superfamily and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of cell growth and differentiation. We studied their expression, localization and regulation in dated human corpora lutea from across the luteal phase (n = 22) and after human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) administration in vivo (n = 5), and in luteinized granulosa cells (LGCs), using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. ID1-4 can be localized to multiple cell types in the CL across the luteal phase. Endothelial cell ID3 (P < 0.05) and ID4 (P < 0.05) immunostaining intensities peak at the time of angiogenesis but overall ID1 (P < 0.05) and ID3 (P < 0.05) expression peaks at the time of luteolysis, and luteal ID3 expression is inhibited by hCG in vivo (P < 0.01). In LGC cultures in vitro, hCG had no effect on ID1, down-regulated ID3 (P < 0.001), and up-regulated ID2 (P < 0.001) and ID4 (P < 0.01). Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) had no effect on ID4 expression but up-regulated ID1 (P < 0.01 to P < 0.005). BMP up-regulation of ID2 (P < 0.05) was additive to the hCG up-regulation of ID2 expression (P < 0.001), while BMP cancelled out the down regulative effect of hCG on ID3 regulation. As well as documenting regulation patterns specific for ID1, ID2, ID3 and ID4, we have shown that IDs are located and differentially regulated in the human CL, suggesting a role in the transcriptional regulation of luteal cells during tissue and vascular remodelling.

  19. In Vivo Remodeling of Fibroblast-Derived Vascular Scaffolds Implanted for 6 Months in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tondreau, Maxime Y.; Laterreur, Véronique; Vallières, Karine; Gauvin, Robert; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Catherine; Lacroix, Dan; Germain, Lucie; Ruel, Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular grafts since clinical applications are halted by the limited suitability of autologous or synthetic grafts. This study uses the self-assembly approach to produce a fibroblast-derived decellularized vascular scaffold (FDVS) that can be available off-the-shelf. Briefly, extracellular matrix scaffolds were produced using human dermal fibroblasts sheets rolled around a mandrel, maintained in culture to allow for the formation of cohesive and three-dimensional tubular constructs, and decellularized by immersion in deionized water. The FDVSs were implanted as an aortic interpositional graft in six Sprague-Dawley rats for 6 months. Five out of the six implants were still patent 6 months after the surgery. Histological analysis showed the infiltration of cells on both abluminal and luminal sides, and immunofluorescence analysis suggested the formation of neomedia comprised of smooth muscle cells and lined underneath with an endothelium. Furthermore, to verify the feasibility of producing tissue-engineered blood vessels of clinically relevant length and diameter, scaffolds with a 4.6 mm inner diameter and 17 cm in length were fabricated with success and stored for an extended period of time, while maintaining suitable properties following the storage period. This novel demonstration of the potential of the FDVS could accelerate the clinical availability of tissue-engineered blood vessels and warrants further preclinical studies. PMID:27999795

  20. miR-126 Is Involved in Vascular Remodeling under Laminar Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mondadori dos Santos, Ana; Metzinger, Laurent; Haddad, Oualid; M'baya-Moutoula, Eléonore; Taïbi, Fatiha; Charnaux, Nathalie; Massy, Ziad A.; Hlawaty, Hanna; Metzinger-Le Meuth, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Morphology and changes in gene expression of vascular endothelium are mainly due to shear stress and inflammation. Cell phenotype modulation has been clearly demonstrated to be controlled by small noncoding micro-RNAs (miRNAs). This study focused on the effect of laminar shear stress (LSS) on human endothelial cells (HUVECs), with an emphasis on the role of miRNA-126 (miR-126). Exposure of HUVECs in vitro to LSS modified the shape of HUVECs and concomitantly regulated the expression of miR-126, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and syndecan-4 (SDC-4). A significant upregulation of miR-126 during long-term exposure to flow was shown. Interestingly, LSS enhanced SDC-4 expression on the HUVEC membranes. Overexpression of miR-126 in HUVECs decreased the levels of targets stromal cell-derived factor-1 SDF-1/CXCL12 and VCAM-1 but increased the expression of RGS16, CXCR4, and SDC-4. No significant difference in terms of cell proliferation and apoptosis was observed between scramble, anti-miR-126, and pre-miR-126 transfected HUVECs. In Apo-E KO/CKD mice aortas expressing a high level of miR-126, SDC-4 was concomitantly increased. In conclusion, our results suggest that miR-126 (i) is overexpressed by long-term LSS, (ii) has a role in up- and downregulation of genes involved in atherosclerosis, and (iii) affects SDC-4 expression. PMID:26221595

  1. Diabetic retinopathy: retina-specific methods for maintenance of diabetic rodents and evaluation of vascular histopathology and molecular abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Alexander; Liu, Haitao; Lee, Chieh Allen; Du, Yunpeng; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of visual impairment, which continues to increase in prevalence as more and more people develop diabetes. Despite the importance of vision, the retina is one of the smallest tissues in the body, and specialized techniques to study the retinopathy have been developed. This chapter will summarize several methods used to (i) induce diabetes, (ii) maintain the diabetic animals throughout the months required for the development of typical vascular histopathology, (iii) evaluate vascular histopathology of diabetic retinopathy, and (iv) quantitate abnormalities implicated in the development of the retinopathy. PMID:26331759

  2. Involvement of Inflammation and Adverse Vascular Remodelling in the Blood Pressure Raising Effect of Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Kamisah, Yusof; Faizah, Othman; Jubri, Zakiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2012-01-01

    Oil thermoxidation during deep frying generates harmful oxidative free radicals that induce inflammation and increase the risk of hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, aortic morphometry, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: control, fresh palm oil (FPO), one-time-heated palm oil (1HPO), five-time-heated palm oil (5HPO), or ten-time-heated palm oil (10HPO). Feeding duration was six months. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and monthly using tail-cuff method. After six months, the rats were sacrificed and the aortic arches were dissected for morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. FPO group showed significantly lower blood pressure than all other groups. Blood pressure was increased significantly in 5HPO and 10HPO groups. The aortae of 5HPO and 10HPO groups showed significantly increased thickness and area of intima-media, circumferential wall tension, and VCAM-1 than other groups. Elastic lamellae were disorganised and fragmented in 5HPO- and 10HPO-treated rats. VCAM-1 expression showed a significant positive correlation with blood pressure. In conclusion, prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil causes blood pressure elevation, adverse remodelling, and increased VCAM-1, which suggests a possible involvement of inflammation. PMID:22778962

  3. Adiponectin Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Remodeling through Nitric Oxide and the RhoA/ROCK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldine, Wared; Ghantous, Crystal M.; Zibara, Kazem; Dib, Leila; Issaa, Hawraa; Itani, Hana A.; El-Zein, Nabil; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adiponectin (APN), an adipocytokine, exerts protective effects on cardiac remodeling, while angiotensin II (Ang II) induces hypertension and vascular remodeling. The potential protective role of APN on the vasculature during hypertension has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we evaluate the molecular mechanisms of the protective role of APN in the physiological response of the vascular wall to Ang II. Methods and Results: Rat aortic tissues were used to investigate the effect of APN on Ang II-induced vascular remodeling and hypertrophy. We investigated whether nitric oxide (NO), the RhoA/ROCK pathway, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the anti-hypertrophic effect of APN. Ang II-induced protein synthesis was attenuated by pre-treatment with APN, NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), or cGMP. The hypertrophic response to Ang II was associated with a significant increase in RhoA activation and vascular force production, which were prevented by APN and SNAP. NO was also associated with inhibition of Ang II-induced phosphorylation of cofilin. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that 24 h Ang II treatment increased the F- to G-actin ratio, an effect that was inhibited by SNAP. Ang II-induced ROS formation and upregulation of p22phox mRNA expression were inhibited by APN and NO. Both compounds failed to inhibit Nox1 and p47phox expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the anti-hypertrophic effects of APN are due, in part, to NO-dependent inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and ROS formation. PMID:27092079

  4. Remodeling of rat stromal-vascular cells to brite/beige adipocytes by prolyl-hydroxyproline

    PubMed Central

    MINAGUCHI, Jun A.; OGATA, Sakino; TAKAHASHI, Naoki; HIROSE, Takuya; UEDA, Hiromi; TAKEHANA, Kazushige

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) on the proliferation and differentiation of rat stromal-vascular cells (SVCs) being cultured in a medium with (Pro-Hyp group) or without Pro-Hyp (control group). The results showed that there was no significant difference in proliferation rate of SVCs, lipid droplet (LD) diameter or intracellular concentration of triglycerides between two groups. However, the diameter range of LDs in the Pro-Hyp group tended to be smaller than that in the control group. Transmission electron microscopy showed a tendency for increase in the area of mitochondria and decrease in the number of mitochondria in the Pro-Hyp-treated SVCs. The mRNA expression levels of white adipose tissue differentiation markers (Cbp, Fabp and Serpina3k) were significantly lower, but those of the brown adipose tissue differentiation markers (Dio2, Ucp1 and Ucp3) were significantly higher in the Pro-Hyp group than in the control group. Our results suggested that Pro-Hyp can facilitate SVCs to differentiate into “brite/beige” adipocytes. PMID:28123139

  5. Adipokines: A Possible Contribution to Vascular and Bone Remodeling in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kochetkova, Evgenia A; Ugai, Ludmila G; Maistrovskaia, Yuliya V; Nevzorova, Vera A

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a major comorbidity of cardio-respiratory diseases, but the mechanistic links between pulmonary arterial hypertension and bone remain elusive. The purpose of the stud was to evaluate serum adipokines and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels in the patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) NYHA class III-IV and to determine its associations with bone mineral density (BMD). Pulmonary and hemodynamic parameters, BMD Z-scores at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), serum leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and endothelin-1 (ET-1), were evaluated in 32 patients with IPAH NYHA class III-IV and 30 healthy volunteers. Leptin, adiponectin and ET-1 were higher in the patients with IPAH than in healthy subjects. Visfatin level showed a tendency to increase compared to that of healthy subjects (p = 0.076). The univariate analysis revealed a positive correlation between BMD Z-scores at both sites and 6-min walk test, and inverse relation with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP). Adiponectin and visfatin showed positive correlations with PVR (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006). Serum adiponectin, visfatin and leptin were inversely associated with Z-scores. After adjusting for BMI and FMI, such associations persisted between visfatin and adiponectin levels and Z-scores at both sites. ET-1 related to mPAP, cardiac index and PVR. Negative correlation was observed between ET-1 and FN BMD (p = 0.01). Positive correlations have revealed between ET-1 and adiponectin (p = 0.02), visfatin (p = 0.004) in IPAH patients. These results provide further evidence that adipokine and endothelial dysregulation may cause not only a decrease in BMD, but also an increase in hemodynamic disorders of IPAH.

  6. Severe Sprengel deformity associated with Klippel-Feil syndrome and a complex vascular abnormality that determined the corrective surgery technique.

    PubMed

    Fontecha, Cesar G; Navarro Cano, Ester; Soldado, Francisco; Barber, Ignasi

    2014-11-01

    Sprengel deformity (SD), a congenital condition characterized by elevation of the scapula, is a cause of functional and aesthetic defects that can be improved by surgical correction. Many cases of SD are associated with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS), in which there may be abnormalities of the supra-aortic vessels. We present the case of an 11-year-old girl with severe SD and KFS. The left vertebral artery arose from the subclavian artery in a very high cervical location, which made surgical descent of the scapula unfeasible. The patient was treated using a Mears procedure, with osteotomy of the scapula and tenotomy of the long head of the triceps. The appearance and range of motion of the shoulders improved considerably, and there were no vascular complications. A morphologic vascular assessment is essential in children with SD and concomitant KFS to avoid potentially serious iatrogenic vascular injury when performing a scapular-descending surgical technique.

  7. Lung matrix and vascular remodeling in mechanically ventilated elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorff, Anne; Parai, Kakoli; Ertsey, Robert; Navarro, Edwin; Jain, Noopur; Carandang, Francis; Peterson, Joanna; Mokres, Lucia; Milla, Carlos; Preuss, Stefanie; Alcazar, Miguel Alejandre; Khan, Suleman; Masumi, Juliet; Ferreira-Tojais, Nancy; Mujahid, Sana; Starcher, Barry; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Bland, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Elastin plays a pivotal role in lung development. We therefore queried if elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice (Eln(+/-)) would exhibit abnormal lung structure and function related to modified extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Because mechanical ventilation (MV) has been linked to dysregulated elastic fiber formation in the newborn lung, we also asked if elastin haploinsufficiency would accentuate lung growth arrest seen after prolonged MV of neonatal mice. We studied 5-day-old wild-type (Eln(+/+)) and Eln(+/-) littermates at baseline and after MV with air for 8-24 h. Lungs of unventilated Eln(+/-) mice contained ∼50% less elastin and ∼100% more collagen-1 and lysyl oxidase compared with Eln(+/+) pups. Eln(+/-) lungs contained fewer capillaries than Eln(+/+) lungs, without discernible differences in alveolar structure. In response to MV, lung tropoelastin and elastase activity increased in Eln(+/+) neonates, whereas tropoelastin decreased and elastase activity was unchanged in Eln(+/-) mice. Fibrillin-1 protein increased in lungs of both groups during MV, more in Eln(+/-) than in Eln(+/+) pups. In both groups, MV caused capillary loss, with larger and fewer alveoli compared with unventilated controls. Respiratory system elastance, which was less in unventilated Eln(+/-) compared with Eln(+/+) mice, was similar in both groups after MV. These results suggest that elastin haploinsufficiency adversely impacts pulmonary angiogenesis and that MV dysregulates elastic fiber integrity, with further loss of lung capillaries, lung growth arrest, and impaired respiratory function in both Eln(+/+) and Eln(+/-) mice. Paucity of lung capillaries in Eln(+/-) newborns might help explain subsequent development of pulmonary hypertension previously reported in adult Eln(+/-) mice.

  8. Prognostic heterogeneity of diastolic abnormalities along left ventricular remodeling continuum according to survival rates and laser polarimetry of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Kolomoiets, M. Y.; Mikhaliev, K. O.; Chursina, T. Y.

    2011-09-01

    The results of examination of 35 arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease patients are presented. The clinical, paraclinical and echocardiographic examinations were performed, and the parameters of prognosis (survival) according to Seattle Heart Failure Model, as well as the optical (polarimetric) properties of erythrocytic suspension were determined. The group of patients under examination was stratified by patterns of remodeling of left ventricle (LV). It was determined that increasing of anisotropy of erythrocytic suspension along LV remodeling patterns continuum correlates with aggravation of structural and functional state of LV and is associated with unfavorable prognosis.

  9. Prognostic heterogeneity of diastolic abnormalities along left ventricular remodeling continuum according to survival rates and laser polarimetry of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Kolomoiets, M. Y.; Mikhaliev, K. O.; Chursina, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The results of examination of 35 arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease patients are presented. The clinical, paraclinical and echocardiographic examinations were performed, and the parameters of prognosis (survival) according to Seattle Heart Failure Model, as well as the optical (polarimetric) properties of erythrocytic suspension were determined. The group of patients under examination was stratified by patterns of remodeling of left ventricle (LV). It was determined that increasing of anisotropy of erythrocytic suspension along LV remodeling patterns continuum correlates with aggravation of structural and functional state of LV and is associated with unfavorable prognosis.

  10. Effects of puerarin on pulmonary vascular remodeling and protein kinase C-alpha in chronic cigarette smoke exposure smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoxia; Xu, Yongjian; Zou, Hui; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Ni, Wang; Chen, Shixin

    2008-02-01

    In order to investigate the effects of puerarin on pulmonary vascular remodeling and protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) in chronic exposure smoke rats, 54 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: control group (C group), smoke exposure groups (S4w group, S8w group), puerarin groups (P4w group, P8w group), propylene glycol control groups (PC4w group, PC8w group). Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke or air for 4 to 8 weeks. Rats in puerarin groups also received puerarin. To evaluate vascular remodeling, alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SM-actin) staining was used to count the percentage of completely muscularised vessels to intraacinar pulmonary arteries (CMA/IAPA) which was determined by morphometric analysis of histological sections. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis was detected by in situ end labeling technique (TUNEL), and proliferation by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis were done to detect the PKC-alpha mRNA and protein expression in pulmonary arteries. The results showed that in cigarette smoke-exposed rats the percentage of CMA/IAPA and alpha-SM-actin expression were increased greatly, PASMC apoptosis was increased and proliferation was markedly increased; Apoptosis indices (AI) and proliferation indices (PI) were higher than in C group; AI and PI were correlated with vascular remodeling indices; The expression of PKC-alpha mRNA and protein in pulmonary arteries was significantly higher than in C group. In rats treated with puerarin, the percentage of CMA/IAPA and cell proliferation was reduced, whereas PASMC apoptosis was increased; The expression levels of PKC-alpha mRNA and protein were lower than in smoke exposure rats. There was no difference among all these data between S groups and PC groups. These findings suggested that cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling was most

  11. Targeted SPECT/CT Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in the Evaluation of Remodeling Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts Implanted in a Growing Lamb Model

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Mitchel R.; Naito, Yuji; Maxfield, Mark W.; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Tara, Shuhei; Chan, Chung; Rocco, Kevin A.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Sinusas, Albert J.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) The clinical translation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts has been demonstrated in children. The remodeling of biodegradable, cell-seeded scaffolds to functional neovessels is partially attributed to matrix metalloproteinases. Noninvasive assessment of matrix metalloproteinase activity may indicate graft remodeling and elucidate the progression of neovessel formation. Therefore, matrix metalloproteinase activity was evaluated in grafts implanted in lambs using in vivo and ex vivo hybrid imaging. Graft growth and remodeling was quantified using in vivo X-ray computed tomography angiography. Methods Cell-seeded and unseeded scaffolds were implanted in lambs (n=5) as inferior vena cava interposition grafts. At 2 and 6 months post-implantation, in vivo angiography assessed graft morphology. In vivo and ex vivo single photon emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging was performed with a radiolabeled compound targeting matrix metalloproteinase activity at 6 months. Neotissue was examined at 6 months using qualitative histologic and immunohistochemical staining and quantitative biochemical analysis. Results Seeded grafts demonstrated significant luminal and longitudinal growth from 2 to 6 months. In vivo imaging revealed subjectively higher matrix metalloproteinase activity in grafts vs. native tissue. Ex vivo imaging confirmed a quantitative increase in matrix metalloproteinase activity and demonstrated higher activity in unseeded vs. seeded grafts. Glycosaminoglycan content was increased in seeded grafts vs. unseeded grafts, without significant differences in collagen content. Conclusions Matrix metalloproteinase activity remains elevated in tissue-engineered grafts 6 months post-implantation and may indicate remodeling. Optimization of in vivo imaging to noninvasively evaluate matrix metalloproteinase activity may assist in serial assessment of vascular graft remodeling. PMID:24952823

  12. Endothelial cell migration during murine yolk sac vascular remodeling occurs by means of a Rac1 and FAK activation pathway in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanism(s) controlling cell migration during vascular morphogenesis in vivo remain largely undefined. To address this within a physiological context, we used retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (Raldh2) null mouse embryos and demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) deficiency results in abnorm...

  13. Role of Arginase in Vessel Wall Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Durante, William

    2013-01-01

    Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vascular cell dysfunction and vessel wall remodeling in several diseases. Clinical and experimental studies have documented increases in the expression and/or activity of arginase I or II in blood vessels following arterial injury and in pulmonary and arterial hypertension, aging, and atherosclerosis. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of arginase in animals ameliorates abnormalities in vascular cells and normalizes blood vessel architecture and function in all of these pathological states. The detrimental effect of arginase in vascular remodeling is attributable to its ability to stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell proliferation, and collagen deposition by promoting the synthesis of polyamines and l-proline, respectively. In addition, arginase adversely impacts arterial remodeling by directing macrophages toward an inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, the proliferative, fibrotic, and inflammatory actions of arginase in the vasculature are further amplified by its capacity to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by competing with NO synthase for substrate, l-arginine. Pharmacologic or molecular approaches targeting specific isoforms of arginase represent a promising strategy in treating obstructive fibroproliferative vascular disease. PMID:23717309

  14. Atorvastatin and sildenafil decrease vascular TGF-β levels and MMP-2 activity and ameliorate arterial remodeling in a model of renovascular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Danielle A.; Rizzi, Elen; Ceron, Carla S.; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Gerlach, Raquel F.; Shiva, Sruti; Tanus-Santos, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    Imbalanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity and transforming growth factor expression (TGF-β) are involved in vascular remodeling of hypertension. Atorvastatin and sildenafil exert antioxidant and pleiotropic effects that may result in cardiovascular protection. We hypothesized that atorvastatin and sildenafil alone or in association exert antiproliferative effects by down-regulating MMP-2 and TGF-β, thus reducing the vascular hypertrophy induced by two kidney, one clip (2K1C) hypertension. Sham and 2K1C rats were treated with oral atorvastatin 50 mg/kg, sildenafil 45 mg/kg, or both, daily for 8 weeks. Blood pressure was monitored weekly. Morphologic changes in the aortas were studied. TGF-β levels were determined by immunofluorescence. MMP-2 activity and expression were determined by in situ zymography, gel zymography, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. The effects of both drugs on proliferative responses of aortic smooth muscle cells to PDGF and on on MMP-2 activity in vitro were determined. Atorvastatin, sildenafil, or both drugs exerted antiproliferative effects in vitro. All treatments attenuated 2K1C-induced hypertension and prevented the increases in the aortic cross-sectional area and media/lumen ratio in 2K1C rats. Aortas from 2K1C rats showed higher collagen deposition, TGF-β levels and MMP-2 activity and expression when compared with Sham-operated animals. Treatment with atorvastatin and/or sildenafil was associated with attenuation of 2K1C hypertension-induced increases in these pro-fibrotic factors. However, these drugs had no in vitro effects on hr-MMP-2 activity. Atorvastatin and sildenafil was associated with decreased vascular TGF-β levels and MMP-2 activity in renovascular hypertensive rats, thus ameliorating the vascular remodeling. These novel pleiotropic effects of both drugs may translate into protective effects in patients. PMID:26343345

  15. Microstructural White Matter Abnormalities and Cognitive Dysfunction in Subcortical Ischemic Vascular Disease: an Atlas-Based Diffusion Tensor Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Xue, Yunjing; Duan, Qing; Sun, Bin; Lin, Hailong; Chen, Xiaodan; Luo, Ling; Wei, Xiaofan; Zhang, Zhongping

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) suggest the involvement of white matter (WM) abnormalities underlying the pathogenesis of cognitive function impairment. Here, we performed magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on detecting WM damage and to investigate the correlations between DTI measures and cognitive dysfunction in SIVD patients. Fifty right-handed SIVD patients were recruited and divided into vascular cognitive impairment on dementia (VCIND) group and normal cognition (NC) group. Twenty-two VCIND patients and 28 NC patients underwent DTI scanning and neuropsychological assessment. Atlas-based analysis (ABA) was performed on each subject for extracting FA and MD measures from supratentorial tracts. Among VCIND, as compared to NC patients, decreased FA and increased MD were observed in all projection fibers (bilateral anterior, posterior limb, and retrolenticular part of internal capsule, anterior, superior, and posterior corona radiata and posterior thalamic radiation), association fibers (bilateral sagittal stratum, external capsule, cingulum, fornix, and stria terminalis, superior longitudinal fasciculus, superior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), and commissural fibers (genu, body, splenium, and bilateral tapetum of corpus callosum). Furthermore, we also found that MoCA scores correlated with DTI values in all supratentorial WM tracts. The results suggested that SIVD patients demonstrated abnormal WM connectivity in all supratentorial regions. Moreover, the severity of damage in WM tracts correlated with cognitive dysfunction.

  16. The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Small-airway Remodelling in a Rat Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Zhibo; Chen, Bin; He, Wei; Hu, Jingxian; Zhang, Liting; Liu, Xianzhong; Chen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Small-airway remodelling is one of the most remarkable pathological features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in which angiogenesis plays a critical role that contributes to disease progression. The endothelial cell-specific mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as its receptors, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, are thought to be the major mediators of pathological angiogenesis, and sunitinib exhibits anti-angiogenesis property through VEGF blockage and has been widely used to treat various cancers. In our study, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection and cigarette smoke (CS) inhalation to induce COPD, following sunitinib administration was conducted. Haematoxylin-eosin, Masson staining and immunostaining analysis were used to evaluate the pathological changes; quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to provide more compelling data on the function of VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2 in angiogenesis. Sunitinib treatment was associated with less angiogenesis in small-airway remodelling with a slightly disordered lung architecture, and lower expression level of VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2. Overall, our results indicate that VEGF is a vital important factor that contributes to the small-airway remodelling in a rat model of COPD through promoting angiogenesis, which mainly depend on the specific binding between VEGF and VEGFR1 and can be effectively attenuated by sunitinib. PMID:28117425

  17. Abnormal thallium kinetics in postoperative coarctation of the aorta: evidence for diffuse hypertension-induced vascular pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, B.P.; Shurvell, B.L.; Mildenberger, R.R.; Houle, S.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1986-03-01

    After operative correction of congenital coarctation of the aorta, patients continue to have excess cardiovascular mortality, including manifestations of ischemic heart disease. Previous morphologic studies support the concept of direct hypertensive vascular injury in these patients. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion were present in an asymptomatic group of patients with coarctation repair, 18 men and 9 women with a mean age of 26 years (range 19 to 41) were studied between 2 and 25 years after operative correction. Stress electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging by a circumferential profile technique were used. These patients were compared with a normal group, statistically defined as having a less than 1% prevalence of significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The postoperative coarctation group demonstrated a reduction in global thallium redistribution in each view analyzed. As compared with findings in the control subjects, thallium washout in the anterior view (41.9 versus 48.6%, p = 0.02) and left anterior oblique projection (40.5 versus 48.2%, p = 0.007) was significantly diminished. Although the postoperative coarctation group had a lower thallium redistribution rate in the lateral view (41.4 versus 46.3%, p = 0.09) this difference did not reach statistical significance because of the intrinsic variability of this projection. Plots of the median percent thallium washout revealed independence from circumferential profile angle, indicating global abnormalities in perfusion. No correlation between clinical variables and thallium kinetics could be established, suggesting marked individual variability in the development of this vascular lesion. The observation of abnormal thallium kinetics in patients with coarctation repair may have consequences for long-term follow-up and therapy.

  18. Hindlimb Suspension as a Model to Study Ophthalmic Complications in Microgravity Status Report: Optimization of Rat Retina Flat Mounts Staining to Study Vascular Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary data from a prior tissue-sharing experiment has suggested that early growth response protein-1 (Egr1), a transcription factor involved in various stress responses in the vasculature, is induced in the rat retina after 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HS) and may be evidence that mechanical stress is occurring secondary to the cephalad fluid shift. This mechanical stress could cause changes in oxygenation of the retina, and the subsequent ischemia- or inflammation-driven hypoxia may lead to microvascular remodeling. This microvascular remodeling process can be studied using image analysis of retinal vessels and can be then be quantified by the VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, a computational tool that quantifies remodeling patterns of branching vascular trees and capillary or vasculogenic networks. Our project investigates whether rodent HS is a valid model to study the effects of simulated-weightlessness on ocular structures and their relationship with intracranial pressure (ICP). One of the hypotheses to be tested is that HS-induced cephalad fluid shift is accompanied by vascular engorgement that produces changes in retinal oxygenation, leading to oxidative stress, hypoxia, microvascular remodeling, and cellular degeneration. We have optimized the procedure to obtain flat mounts of rat retina, staining of the endothelial lining in vasculature and acquisition of high quality images suitable for VESGEN analysis. Briefly, eyes were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 hours and retinas were detached and then mounted flat on microscope slides. The microvascular staining was done with endothelial cell-specific isolectin binding, coupled to Alexa-488 fluorophore. Image acquisition at low magnification and high resolution was performed using a new Leica SP8 confocal microscope in a tile pattern across the X,Y plane and multiple sections along the Z-axis. This new confocal microscope has the added capability of dye separation using the Linear

  19. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase–Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Katie Y.; Montezano, Augusto C.; Harvey, Adam P.; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)–induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen–Nox–dependent processes was studied in female Nox1−/− and Nox4−/− mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2–regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1−/− but not Nox4−/− mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1−/− mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2

  20. Abnormal Mammary Adipose Tissue Environment of Brca1 Mutant Mice Show a Persistent Deposition of Highly Vascularized Multilocular Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laundette P; Buelto, Destiney; Tago, Elaine; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo E

    2011-12-08

    A major challenge to breast cancer research is the identification of alterations in the architecture and composition of the breast that are associated with breast cancer progression. The aim of the present investigation was to characterize the mammary adipose phenotype from Brca1 mutant mice in the expectation that this would shed light on the role of the mammary tissue environment in the early stages of breast tumorigenesis. We observed that histological sections of mammary tissue from adult Brca1 mutant mice abnormally display small, multilocular adipocytes that are reminiscent of brown adipose tissue (BAT) as compared to wildtype mice. Using a marker for BAT, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), we demonstrated that these multilocular adipose regions in Brca1 mutant mice stain positive for UCP1. Transcriptionally, UCP1 mRNA levels in the Brca1 mutant mice were elevated greater than 50-fold compared to age-matched mammary glands from wildtype mice. Indeed, BAT has characteristics that are favorable for tumor growth, including high vascularity. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the multilocular brown adipose phenotype in the mammary fat pad of Brca1 mutant mice displayed regions of increased vascularity as evidenced by a significant increase in the protein expression of CD31, a marker for angiogenesis. This Brca1 mutant mouse model should provide a physiologically relevant context to determine whether brown adipose tissue can play a role in breast cancer development.

  1. Key Role of ROS in the Process of 15-Lipoxygenase/15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoiccid-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Hypoxia Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Gaofeng; Sheng, Tingting; Yu, Xiufeng; Wang, Shuang; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) and its metabolite 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) were up-regulated in pulmonary arterial cells from both pulmonary artery hypertension patients and hypoxic rats and that these factors mediated the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary arterial (PA) cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of the remodeling induced by 15-HETE have remained unclear. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 15-LO are both induced by hypoxia, it is possible that ROS are involved in the events of hypoxia-induced 15-LO expression that lead to PH. We employed immunohistochemistry, tube formation assays, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, and cell cycle analyses to explore the role of ROS in the process of 15-HETE-mediated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We found that exogenous 15-HETE facilitated the generation of ROS and that this effect was mainly localized to mitochondria. In particular, the mitochondrial electron transport chain and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (Nox4) were responsible for the significant 15-HETE-stimulated increase in ROS production. Moreover, ROS induced by 15-HETE stimulated endothelial cell (EC) migration and promoted pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation under hypoxia via the p38 MAPK pathway. These results indicated that 15-HETE-regulated ROS mediated hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) via the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26871724

  2. Key Role of ROS in the Process of 15-Lipoxygenase/15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoiccid-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Hypoxia Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Mao, Min; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Gaofeng; Sheng, Tingting; Yu, Xiufeng; Wang, Shuang; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) and its metabolite 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) were up-regulated in pulmonary arterial cells from both pulmonary artery hypertension patients and hypoxic rats and that these factors mediated the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary arterial (PA) cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of the remodeling induced by 15-HETE have remained unclear. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 15-LO are both induced by hypoxia, it is possible that ROS are involved in the events of hypoxia-induced 15-LO expression that lead to PH. We employed immunohistochemistry, tube formation assays, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, and cell cycle analyses to explore the role of ROS in the process of 15-HETE-mediated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We found that exogenous 15-HETE facilitated the generation of ROS and that this effect was mainly localized to mitochondria. In particular, the mitochondrial electron transport chain and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (Nox4) were responsible for the significant 15-HETE-stimulated increase in ROS production. Moreover, ROS induced by 15-HETE stimulated endothelial cell (EC) migration and promoted pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation under hypoxia via the p38 MAPK pathway. These results indicated that 15-HETE-regulated ROS mediated hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) via the p38 MAPK pathway.

  3. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  4. FTY720 (Fingolimod) Inhibits HIF1 and HIF2 Signaling, Promotes Vascular Remodeling, and Chemosensitizes in Renal Cell Carcinoma Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Gstalder, Cécile; Ader, Isabelle; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible factors HIF1α and HIF2α play a crucial role in ccRCC initiation and progression. We previously identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway as a new modulator of HIF1α and HIF2α under hypoxia in various cancer cell models. Here, we report that FTY720, an inhibitor of the S1P signaling pathway, inhibits both HIF1α and HIF2α accumulation in several human cancer cell lines. In a ccRCC heterotopic xenograft model, we show that FTY720 transiently decreases HIF1α and HIF2α intratumoral level and modifies tumor vessel architecture within 5 days of treatment, suggesting a vascular normalization. In mice bearing subcutaneous ccRCC tumor, FTY720 and a gemcitabine-based chemotherapy alone display a limited effect, whereas, in combination, there is a significant effect on tumor size without toxicity. Noteworthy, administration of FTY720 for 5 days before chemotherapy is not associated with a more effective tumor control, suggesting a mode of action mainly independent of the vascular remodeling. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that FTY720 could successfully sensitize ccRCC to chemotherapy and establish this molecule as a potent therapeutic agent for ccRCC treatment, independently of drug scheduling. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2465-74. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH.

  6. In Vitro Model of Physiological and Pathological Blood Flow with Application to Investigations of Vascular Cell Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Winston; Scott-Drechsel, Devon; Tan, Wei

    2015-11-03

    Vascular disease is a common cause of death within the United States. Herein, we present a method to examine the contribution of flow dynamics towards vascular disease pathologies. Unhealthy arteries often present with wall stiffening, scarring, or partial stenosis which may all affect fluid flow rates, and the magnitude of pulsatile flow, or pulsatility index. Replication of various flow conditions is the result of tuning a flow pressure damping chamber downstream of a blood pump. Introduction of air within a closed flow system allows for a compressible medium to absorb pulsatile pressure from the pump, and therefore vary the pulsatility index. The method described herein is simply reproduced, with highly controllable input, and easily measurable results. Some limitations are recreation of the complex physiological pulse waveform, which is only approximated by the system. Endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts are affected by the blood flow through the artery. The dynamic component of blood flow is determined by the cardiac output and arterial wall compliance. Vascular cell mechano-transduction of flow dynamics may trigger cytokine release and cross-talk between cell types within the artery. Co-culture of vascular cells is a more accurate picture reflecting cell-cell interaction on the blood vessel wall and vascular response to mechanical signaling. Contribution of flow dynamics, including the cell response to the dynamic and mean (or steady) components of flow, is therefore an important metric in determining disease pathology and treatment efficacy. Through introducing an in vitro co-culture model and pressure damping downstream of blood pump which produces simulated cardiac output, various arterial disease pathologies may be investigated.

  7. Endotoxin "priming" potentiates lung vascular abnormalities in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin: an example of synergism between endo- and exotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin of Escherichia coli (HlyA), an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections, causes thromboxane generation and related vasoconstriction in perfused rabbit lungs (Seeger, W., H. Walter, N. Suttorp, M. Muhly, and S. Bhakdi. 1989. J. Clin. Invest. 84:220). We investigated the influence of pulmonary vascular "priming" with endotoxin on the responsiveness of the lung to a low-dose HlyA challenge. Rabbit lungs were perfused with Krebs Henseleit buffer containing 0.1-100 ng/ml Salmonella abortus equii lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 60-180 min. This treatment caused protracted release of tumor necrosis factor into the recirculating medium, but did not induce significant alterations of pulmonary hemodynamics and fluid balance. At a dose of 1 ng/ml, HlyA elicited only moderate thromboxane release (< 200 pg/ml) and pulmonary artery pressure increase (< or = 6 mmHg) in control lungs. Acceleration and potentiation of both the metabolic and vasoconstrictor response occurred in lungs primed with LPS. This priming effect displayed dose (threshold integral of 0.1-1 ng/ml LPS) and time dependencies (threshold integral of 60-90 min LPS incubation). Maximum thromboxane release and pulmonary artery pressure increase surpassed the responses to HlyA in nonprimed lungs by more than 15-fold. Cyclooxygenase inhibition and thromboxane-receptor antagonism blocked these effects. These data demonstrate that LPS priming synergizes with HlyA challenge to provoke vascular abnormalities that are possibly relevant to the pathogenesis of organ failure in severe local and systemic infections. PMID:7931076

  8. Murine pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 23 induces the proangiogenic factors transforming-growth factor beta 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor a in cell types involved in vascular remodeling in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Julie A; Johnson, Briana L; Chen, Yongqing; Ha, Cam T; Dveksler, Gabriela S

    2008-12-01

    Haemochorial placentation is a unique physiological process in which the fetal trophoblast cells remodel the maternal decidual spiral arteries to establish the fetoplacental blood supply. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family. PSGs are produced by the placenta of rodents and primates and are secreted into the bloodstream. PSG23 is one of 17 members of the murine PSG family (designated PSG16 to PSG32). Previous studies determined that PSGs have immunoregulatory functions due to their ability to modulate macrophage cytokine secretion. Here we show that recombinant PSG23 induces transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1, TGFB1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in primary murine macrophages and the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, we identified new cell types that responded to PSG23 treatment. Dendritic cells, endothelial cells, and trophoblasts, which are involved in maternal vasculature remodeling during pregnancy, secreted TGFB1 and VEGFA in response to PSG23. PSG23 showed cross-reactivity with human cells, including human monocytes and the trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo cells. We analyzed the binding of PSG23 to the tetraspanin CD9, the receptor for PSG17, and found that CD9 is not essential for PSG23 binding and activity in macrophages. Overall these studies show that PSGs can modulate the secretion of important proangiogenic factors, TGFB1 and VEGFA, by different cell types involved in the development of the placenta.

  9. Effects of early feed restriction and cold temperature on lipid peroxidation, pulmonary vascular remodelling and ascites morbidity in broilers under normal and cold temperature.

    PubMed

    Pan, J Q; Tan, X; Li, J C; Sun, W D; Wang, X L

    2005-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of early feed restriction on lipid peroxidation, pulmonary vascular remodelling and ascites incidence in broilers under normal and low ambient temperature. In experiment 1, the restricted birds were fed 8h per day either from 7 to 14 d or from 7 to 21 d, while the controlled birds were fed ad libitum. In experiment 2, the restricted birds were fed 80 or 60% of the previous 24-h feed consumption of full-fed controls for 7 d from 7 to 14 d. On d 14, half of the birds in each treatment both in experiment 1 and experiment 2 were exposed to low ambient temperature to induce ascites. Body weight and feed conversion ratio were measured weekly. The incidences of ascites and other disease were recorded to determine ascites morbidity and total mortality. Blood samples were taken on d 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 to measure the plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). On d 42, samples were taken to determine the right/total ventricular weight ratio (RV/TV), vessel wall area/vessel total area ratio (WA/TA) and mean media thickness in pulmonary arterioles (mMTPA). Low-temperature treatment increased plasma MDA concentration. When broilers were exposed to a cool environment for 3 weeks, plasma SOD and GSH-Px activity were decreased compared with normal-temperature chicks. RV/TV, WA/TA and mMTPA on d 42 were increased in birds exposed to cold, consistent with the increased pulmonary hypertension and ascites morbidity. Early feed restriction markedly decreased plasma MDA concentration. The plasma SOD and GSH-Px activity of feed-restricted birds were markedly higher than those fed ad libitum on d 35 and d 42. All early feed restriction treatments reduced ascites morbidity and total mortality. On d 42, the RV/TV, WA/TA and mMTPA of feed-restricted broilers were lower than that of the ad libitum-fed broilers. The results suggested that early feed restriction alleviated the lipid

  10. TLR Accessory Molecule RP105 (CD180) Is Involved in Post-Interventional Vascular Remodeling and Soluble RP105 Modulates Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Karper, Jacco C.; Ewing, Mark M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Peters, Erna A. B.; de Boer, Hetty C.; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Eric G.; Brondijk, T. Harma C.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background RP105 (CD180) is TLR4 homologue lacking the intracellular TLR4 signaling domain and acts a TLR accessory molecule and physiological inhibitor of TLR4-signaling. The role of RP105 in vascular remodeling, in particular post-interventional remodeling is unknown. Methods and Results TLR4 and RP105 are expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) as well as in the media of murine femoral artery segments as detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the response to the TLR4 ligand LPS was stronger in VSMC from RP105−/− mice resulting in a higher proliferation rate. In RP105−/− mice femoral artery cuff placement resulted in an increase in neointima formation as compared to WT mice (4982±974 µm2 vs.1947±278 µm2,p = 0.0014). Local LPS application augmented neointima formation in both groups, but in RP105−/− mice this effect was more pronounced (10316±1243 µm2 vs.4208±555 µm2,p = 0.0002), suggesting a functional role for RP105. For additional functional studies, the extracellular domain of murine RP105 was expressed with or without its adaptor protein MD1 and purified. SEC-MALSanalysis showed a functional 2∶2 homodimer formation of the RP105-MD1 complex. This protein complex was able to block the TLR4 response in whole blood ex-vivo. In vivo gene transfer of plasmid vectors encoding the extracellular part of RP105 and its adaptor protein MD1 were performed to initiate a stable endogenous soluble protein production. Expression of soluble RP105-MD1 resulted in a significant reduction in neointima formation in hypercholesterolemic mice (2500±573 vs.6581±1894 µm2,p<0.05), whereas expression of the single factors RP105 or MD1 had no effect. Conclusion RP105 is a potent inhibitor of post-interventional neointima formation. PMID:23844130

  11. Transdifferentiation of pulmonary arteriolar endothelial cells into smooth muscle-like cells regulated by myocardin involved in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengcheng; Huang, Lei; Ge, Xiaona; Yan, Fei; Wu, Renliang; Ao, Qilin

    2006-01-01

    Myocardin gene has been identified as a master regulator of smooth muscle cell differentiation. Smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular remodelling (PVR). The purpose of this study was to investigate the change of myocardin gene expression in the pulmonary vessels of hypoxia-induced PH affected by Sildenafil treatment and the involvement of endothelial cells transdifferentiation into smooth muscle cells in the process of hypoxia-induced PH and PVR. Myocardin and relative markers were investigated in animal models and cultured endothelial cells. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was measured. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to show the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed respectively to detect the myocardin and SMA expression at mRNA levels. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced suppression of myocardin in cultured cells. We confirmed that hypoxia induced the PH and PVR in rats. Sildenafil could attenuate the hypoxia-induced PH. We found that myocardin mRNA expression is upregulated significantly in the hypoxic pulmonary vessels and cultured cells but downregulated in PH with Sildenafil treatment. The porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) transdifferentiate into smooth muscle-like cells in hypoxic culture while the transdifferentiation did not occur when SiRNA of myocardin was applied. Our results suggest that myocardin gene, as a marker of smooth muscle cell differentiation, was expressed in the pulmonary vessels in hypoxia-induced PH rats, which could be downregulated by Sildenafil treatment, as well as in hypoxic cultured endothelial cells. Hypoxia induced the transdifferentiation of endothelial cells of vessels into smooth muscle-like cells which was regulated by myocardin. PMID:17222214

  12. VASCULAR INFLAMMATION AND ABNORMAL AORTIC HISTOMORPHOMETRY IN PATIENTS FOLLOWING PULSATILE AND CONTINUOUS FLOW LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE PLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mike; Akashi, Hirokazu; Kato, Tomoko S.; Takayama, Hiroo; Wu, Christina; Xu, Katherine; Collado, Elias; Weber, Matthew P.; Kennel, Peter J.; Brunjes, Danielle L; Ji, Ruiping; Naka, Yoshifumi; George, Isaac; Mancini, Donna; Farr, Maryjane; Schulze, P. Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective Left ventricular assist devices are increasingly used in patients with advanced heart failure as both destination therapy and bridge-to-transplantation. We aimed to analyze histomorphometric, structural and inflammatory changes following pulsatile and continuous flow left ventricular assist device placement. Method Clinical and echocardiographic data were collected from medical records. Aortic wall diameter, cellularity and inflammation were assessed by immunohistochemistry on aortic tissue collected at left ventricular assist device placement and at explantation during heart transplantation. Expression of adhesion molecules was quantified by western blot. Results Decellularization of the aortic tunica media was observed in patients receiving continuous flow support. Both device types showed an increased inflammatory response following left ventricular assist device placement with variable T cell and macrophage accumulations and increased expression of vascular E-selectin, ICAM and VCAM in the aortic wall. Conclusion Left ventricular assist device implantation is associated with distinct vascular derangements with development of vascular inflammation. These changes are pronounced in patients on continuous flow left ventricular assist and associated with aortic media decellularization. These findings help to explain the progressive aortic root dilation and vascular dysfunction in patients following continuous flow device placement. PMID:26899764

  13. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension and BMP system abnormality].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fumio

    2008-11-01

    Genetic analysis has uncovered that familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is linked to germline mutations in BMP type II receptor (BMPRII). PAH is characterized by enhanced remodeling of pulmonary arteries due to arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation. BMPRII mutations contribute to abnormal mitotic responses to BMP ligands in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Unbalanced Smad signaling induced by BMP and TGFbeta is functionally involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. BMPRII mutations also increase the susceptibility of endothelial cell apoptosis. The combination of increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation is critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH. However, the detailed molecular mechanism leading to severe vascular remodeling caused by BMPRII mutations has yet to be elucidated.

  14. The Effects of Antidepressants “Fluoxetine and Imipramine” on Vascular Abnormalities and Toll Like Receptor-4 Expression in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Rats Exposed to Chronic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mohamed; Shaker, Safaa; El-Gayar, Nesreen; Aboul-Fotouh, Sawsan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies reveal that diabetes doubles the odds of comorbid depression with evidence of a pro-inflammatory state underlying its vascular complications. Indeed, little information is available about vascular effects of antidepressant drugs in diabetes. Method: We investigated the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine “FLU” and imipramine “IMIP” on behavioral, metabolic and vascular abnormalities in diabetic and non-diabetic rats exposed to chronic restraint stress (CRS). Results: Both diabetes and CRS induced depressive-like behavior which was more prominent in diabetic/depressed rats; this was reversed by chronic treatment with FLU and IMIP in a comparable manner. Diabetic and non-diabetic rats exposed to CRS exhibited abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and vascular function, manifested by decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased systolic blood pressure and histopathological atherosclerotic changes. Vascular and metabolic dysfunctions were associated with significant increase in aortic expression of TLR-4, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1ß). FLU ameliorated these metabolic, vascular and inflammatory abnormalities, while IMIP induced either no change or even worsening of some parameters. Conclusion: FLU has favorable effect over IMIP on metabolic, vascular and inflammatory aberrations associated with DM and CRS in Wistar rats, clarifying the preference of FLU over IMIP in management of comorbid depression in diabetic subjects. PMID:25826421

  15. Peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma-mediated leafy flower symptoms and abnormal vascular bundles development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Te; Huang, Hsin-Mei; Hong, Syuan-Fei; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Yang, Chiao-Yin; Lin, Yen-Yu; Lin, Chan-Pin; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2015-01-01

    The peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma causes virescence symptoms such as phyllody (leafy flower) in infected peanuts. However, the obligate nature of phytoplasma limits the study of host-pathogen interactions, and the detailed anatomy of PnWB-infected plants has yet to be reported. Here, we demonstrate that 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining can be used to track PnWB infection. The DAPI-stained phytoplasma cells were observed in phloem/internal phloem tissues, and changes in vascular bundle morphology, including increasing pith rays and thinner cell walls in the xylem, were found. We also discerned the cell types comprising PnWB in infected sieve tube members. These results suggest that the presence of PnWB in phloem tissue facilitates the transmission of phytoplasma via sap-feeding insect vectors. In addition, PnWB in sieve tube members and changes in vascular bundle morphology might strongly promote the ability of phytoplasmas to assimilate nutrients. These data will help further an understanding of the obligate life cycle and host-pathogen interactions of phytoplasma.

  16. Wholemount imaging reveals abnormalities of the aqueous outflow pathway and corneal vascularity in Foxc1 and Bmp4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Kidson, Susan H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the FOXC1/Foxc1 gene in humans and mice and Bmp4 in mice are associated with congenital anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and the development of the aqueous outflow structures throughout the limbus. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of anterior segment abnormalities in mouse models of ASD using a 3-D imaging approach. Holistic imaging information combined with quantitative measurements were carried out on PECAM-1 stained individual components of the aqueous outflow vessels and corneal vasculature of Foxc1(+/-) on the C57BL/6Jx129 and ICR backgrounds, Bmp4(+/-) ICR mice, and wildtype mice from each background. In both wildtype and heterozygotes, singular, bifurcated and plexus forms of Schlemm's canal were noted. Of note, missing portions of the canal were seen in the heterozygous groups but not in wildtype animals. In general, we found the number of collector channels to be reduced in both heterozygotes. Lastly, we found a significant increase in the complexity of the corneal arcades and their penetration into the cornea in heterozygotes as compared with wild types. In conclusion, our 3-D imaging studies have revealed a more complex arrangement of both the aqueous vessels and corneal arcades in Foxc1(+/-) and Bmp4(+/-) heterozygotes, and further advance our understanding of how such abnormalities could impact on IOP and the aetiology of glaucoma.

  17. Altered Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Expression/Activity Links Placental Ischemia and Anti-angiogenic sFlt-1 to Uteroplacental and Vascular Remodeling and Collagen Deposition in Hypertensive Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Mata, Karina M.; Mazzuca, Marc Q.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy manifested as maternal hypertension and often fetal growth restriction. Placental ischemia could be an initiating event, but the linking mechanisms leading to hypertension and growth restriction are unclear. We have shown an upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during normal pregnancy (Norm-Preg). To test the role of MMPs in hypertensive-pregnancy (HTN-Preg), maternal and fetal parameters, MMPs expression, activity and distribution, and collagen and elastin content were measured in uterus, placenta and aorta of Norm-Preg rats and in rat model of reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP). Maternal blood pressure was higher, and uterine, placental and aortic weight, and the litter size and pup weight were less in RUPP than Norm-Preg rats. Western blots and gelatin zymography revealed decreases in amount and gelatinase activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in uterus, placenta and aorta of RUPP compared with Norm-Preg rats. Immunohistochemistry confirmed reduced MMPs in uterus, placenta and aortic media of RUPP rats. Collagen, but not elastin, was more abundant in uterus, placenta and aorta of RUPP than Norm-Preg rats. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) decreased MMPs in uterus, placenta and aorta of Norm-Preg rats, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) reversed the decreases in MMPs in tissues of RUPP rats. Thus placental ischemia and anti-angiogenic sFlt-1 decrease uterine, placental and vascular MMP-2 and MMP-9, leading to increased uteroplacental and vascular collagen, and growth-restrictive remodeling in HTN-Preg. Angiogenic factors and MMP activators may reverse the decrease in MMPs and enhance growth-permissive remodeling in preeclampsia. PMID:24704473

  18. [Haematuria as the presentation of a vascular abnormality of the kidney or its excretory system (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Beurton, D; Pascal, B; Moreau, J F; Michel, J R; Cukier, J

    1980-01-01

    The authors report 18 cases of a vascular pathology of the kidney or of its excretory system presenting with heavy and recurrent haematuria. In contrast to data in the literature, their series includes a majority of capillary angiomas (8 cases), as against 6 aneurysms, 2 arteriovenous fistulae and 2 peripyelo-ureteric varices. Of the six arterial aneurysms, all recognised by arteriography, 4 underwent surgery: 2 endo-aneurysmorrhaphies with success, 1 nephrectomy for rupture of the aneurysm and 1 nephrectomy made necessary by the multiplicity of aneurysms inaccessible in situ. Both cases of arteriovenous fistula were recognised by arteriography. One was treated by polar nephrectomy (success) whilst the other underwent nephrectomy after failure of an attempt at embolisation. Of the two cases of peri-uretero-pelvic varices identified by selective phlebography under cover of an intra-renal-artery injection of angiotensin, only one was treated successfully by excision of the varicosities. The eight cases of capillary angioma were divided into two groups: one, of 4 cases where the diagnosis was made by selective renal phlebography without angiotensin and renal arteriography; and another of 4 cases not identified by these vascular investigations. In these 4 cases, after elimination of Berger's disease by a surgical renal biopsy, the authors exposed the kidney, performed a pyelocalyscopy during a period of haematuria, localised the haemorrhagic segment of the kidney and treated the lesion by partial nephrectomy in the presence of a pathologist to immediately identify the haemorrhagic lesion and examine it histologically. Amongst the 7 angiomas treated, 5 partial nephrectomies gave successful results whilst two nephrectomies were necessary: one because of a diagnostic error and the other following failure of an attempt at hyperselective arterial embolisation.

  19. Abnormalities in three-dimensional capillary architecture and imbalance between vascular endothelial growth factor-A and thrombospondin-1 in soleus muscle of ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kanazashi, Miho; Maezawa, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Hiroyo; Fujino, Hidemi

    2015-09-01

    Reduced ovarian hormone levels associated with menopause or ovariectomy (OVX) not only result in vascular dysfunction but also lead to structural abnormalities in capillaries. Therefore, the effect of OVX on the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of capillary networks and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated in rat soleus muscle. Seven-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into the OVX and sham-treated (Sham) groups. The OVX group exhibited lower endurance exercise capacity compared to the sham group and resulted in decreased capillary diameter, number of anastomoses and capillary/anastomosis volume in soleus muscle, indicating 3-D structural abnormalities of capillary networks. Furthermore, OVX led to increased concentrations of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) protein and a decreased VEGF-A/TSP-1 ratio, an indicator of angio-adaptations, in soleus muscle compared with the Sham group. These results indicate OVX may induce 3-D capillary regression in soleus muscle through an imbalance between VEGF-A and TSP-1 expression, possibly associated with decreased exercise tolerance in ovariectomized rats.

  20. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  1. MicroRNA-26b attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling via targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 (CCND1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijing; Li, Min; Sun, Li; Xu, Xuan; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in the control of cell growth, and deregulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation plays an essential role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed microRNA(s) and explore its therapeutic role in treatment of the disease. MicroRNA expression profile analysis showed microRNA-26b was differentially expressed in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells harvested from monocrotaline-treated rats, and we validated microRNA-26b targets, in vitro and in vivo, CTGF and CCND1, both of which have been shown, in our previous work, to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. In vivo experiments demonstrated monocrotaline-induced pulmonary artery remodeling could be almost completely abolished by administration of microRNA-26b, while CTGF or CCND1 shRNA significantly, but only partially, attenuated the remodeling by silencing the designed target. Additionally, exogenous expression of the microRNA-26b substantially downregulated CTGF and CCND1 in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. MicroRNA-26b might be a potent therapeutic tool to treat pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27322082

  2. Microrna-26b attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling via targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 (CCND1).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Ding, Xing; Zhou, Sijing; Li, Min; Sun, Li; Xu, Xuan; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-11-08

    MicroRNAs are involved in the control of cell growth, and deregulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation plays an essential role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed microRNA(s) and explore its therapeutic role in treatment of the disease. MicroRNA expression profile analysis showed microRNA-26b was differentially expressed in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells harvested from monocrotaline-treated rats, and we validated microRNA-26b targets, in vitro and in vivo, CTGF and CCND1, both of which have been shown, in our previous work, to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. In vivo experiments demonstrated monocrotaline-induced pulmonary artery remodeling could be almost completely abolished by administration of microRNA-26b, while CTGF or CCND1 shRNA significantly, but only partially, attenuated the remodeling by silencing the designed target. Additionally, exogenous expression of the microRNA-26b substantially downregulated CTGF and CCND1 in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. MicroRNA-26b might be a potent therapeutic tool to treat pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2kb and -1.0kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex. PMID:26340092

  4. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2 kb and -1.0 kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex.

  5. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  6. Niflumic Acid Attenuated Pulmonary Artery Tone and Vascular Structural Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Induced by High Pulmonary Blood Flow In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Ma, Jianfa; Pang, Yusheng; Lao, Jinquan; Pan, Xuanren; Tang, Qiaoyun; Zhang, Feng; Su, Danyan; Qin, Suyuan; Shrestha, Arnav Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play a vital role in regulating pulmonary artery tone during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high blood flow. The role of CaCCs inhibitor niflumic acid (NFA) in vivo during this process requires further investigation. We established the PAH model by abdominal shunt surgery and treated with NFA in vivo. Fifty rats were randomly divided into normal, sham, shunt, NFA group 1 (0.2 mg/kg), and NFA group 2 (0.4 mg/kg). Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter were analyzed. Then contraction reactions of pulmonary arteries were measured. Finally, the electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were investigated using patch-clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH developed, accompanied with increased right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter. In the NFA treatment groups, the pressure and pathological changes were alleviated. The pulmonary artery tone in the shunt group increased, whereas it decreased after NFA treatment. The current density of CaCC was higher in the shunt group, and it was decreased in the NFA treatment groups. In conclusion, NFA attenuated pulmonary artery tone and structural remodeling in PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow in vivo. CaCCs were involved and the augmented current density was alleviated by NFA treatment.

  7. Lipidomics and H218O labeling techniques reveal increased remodeling of DHA-containing membrane phospholipids associated with abnormal locomotor responses in α-tocopherol deficient zebrafish (danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Melissa Q.; Choi, Jaewoo; Stevens, Jan F.; Truong, Lisa; Tanguay, Robert L.; Traber, Maret G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is required by the developing embryonic brain to prevent depletion of highly polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), the loss of which we predicted would underlie abnormal morphological and behavioral outcomes. Therefore, we fed adult 5D zebrafish (Danio rerio) defined diets without (E−) or with added α-tocopherol (E+, 500 mg RRR-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg diet) for a minimum of 80 days, and then spawned them to obtain E− and E+ embryos. The E− compared with E+ embryos were 82% less responsive (p<0.01) to a light/dark stimulus at 96 h post-fertilization (hpf), demonstrating impaired locomotor behavior, even in the absence of gross morphological defects. Evaluation of phospholipid (PL) and lysophospholipid (lyso-PL) composition using untargeted lipidomics in E− compared with E+ embryos at 24, 48, 72, and 120 hpf showed that four PLs and three lyso-PLs containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), including lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 22:6, required for transport of DHA into the brain, p<0.001), were at lower concentrations in E− at all time-points. Additionally, H218O labeling experiments revealed enhanced turnover of LPC 22:6 (p<0.001) and three other DHA-containing PLs in the E− compared with the E+ embryos, suggesting that increased membrane remodeling is a result of PL depletion. Together, these data indicate that α-tocopherol deficiency in the zebrafish embryo causes the specific depletion and increased turnover of DHA-containing PL and lyso-PLs, which may compromise DHA delivery to the brain and thereby contribute to the functional impairments observed in E− embryos. PMID:26774753

  8. Mechanotransduction in Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Beth L.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of biochemical signals provides spatial and temporal cues that carefully orchestrate the complex process of vertebrate embryonic development. The embryonic vasculature develops not only in the context of these biochemical cues, but also in the context of the biomechanical forces imparted by blood flow. In the mature vasculature, different blood flow regimes induce distinct genetic programs, and significant progress has been made toward understanding how these forces are perceived by endothelial cells and transduced into biochemical signals. However, it cannot be assumed that paradigms that govern the mature vasculature are pertinent to the developing embryonic vasculature. The embryonic vasculature can respond to the mechanical forces of blood flow, and these responses are critical in vascular remodeling, certain aspects of sprouting angiogenesis, and maintenance of arterial-venous identity. Here, we review data regarding mechanistic aspects of endothelial cell mechanotransduction, with a focus on the response to shear stress, and elaborate upon the multifarious effects of shear stress on the embryonic vasculature. In addition, we discuss emerging predictive vascular growth models and highlight the prospect of combining signaling pathway information with computational modeling. We assert that correlation of precise measurements of hemodynamic parameters with effects on endothelial cell gene expression and cell behavior is required for fully understanding how blood flow-induced loading governs normal vascular development and shapes congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:22744845

  9. Role of thyroid hormones in ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac remodeling includes alterations in molecular, cellular, and interstitial systems contributing to changes in size, shape, and function of the heart. This may be the result of injury, alterations in hemodynamic load, neurohormonal effects, electrical abnormalities, metabolic changes, etc. Thyroid hormones (THs) serve as master regulators for diverse remodeling processes of the cardiovascular system-from the prenatal period to death. THs promote a beneficial cardiomyocyte shape and improve contractility, relaxation, and survival via reversal of molecular remodeling. THs reduce fibrosis by decreasing interstitial collagen and reduce the incidence and duration of arrhythmias via remodeling ion channel expression and function. THs restore metabolic function and also improve blood flow both by direct effects on the vessel architecture and decreasing atherosclerosis. Optimal levels of THs both in the circulation and in cardiac tissues are critical for normal homeostasis. This review highlights TH-based remodeling and clinically translatable strategies for diverse cardiovascular disorders.

  10. Catalase and superoxide dismutase conjugated with platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule antibody distinctly alleviate abnormal endothelial permeability caused by exogenous reactive oxygen species and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2011-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion (O(2)()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced by activated leukocytes and endothelial cells in sites of inflammation or ischemia cause endothelial barrier dysfunction that may lead to tissue edema. Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) conjugated with antibodies to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) specifically bind to endothelium, quench the corresponding ROS, and alleviate vascular oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present work, we studied the effects of anti-PECAM/catalase and anti-PECAM/SOD conjugates on the abnormal permeability manifested by transendothelial electrical resistance decline, increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran influx, and redistribution of vascular endothelial-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers. Anti-PECAM/catalase protected HUVEC monolayers against H(2)O(2)-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase exerted orders of magnitude lower endothelial uptake and no protective effect, similarly to IgG/catalase. Anti-PECAM/catalase, but not anti-PECAM/SOD, alleviated endothelial hyperpermeability caused by exposure to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, implicating primarily H(2)O(2) in the disruption of the endothelial barrier in this model. Thrombin-induced endothelial permeability was not affected by treatment with anti-PECAM/AOEs or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or overexpression of AOEs, indicating that the endogenous ROS play no key role in thrombin-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction. In contrast, anti-PECAM/SOD, but not anti-PECAM/catalase, inhibited a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced increase in endothelial permeability, identifying a key role of endogenous O(2)() in the VEGF-mediated regulation of endothelial barrier function. Therefore, AOEs targeted to endothelial cells provide versatile molecular tools for testing the roles of

  11. Pulmonary vascular complications in portal hypertension and liver disease: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, M; Gallegos-Orozco, J F; Garcia, H; Aguirre, J; Macias-Rodriguez, R U; Torre-Delgadillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension may be associated with one of the two pulmonary vascular complications: portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. These pulmonary vascular disorders are notoriously underdiagnosed; however, they have a substantial negative impact on survival and require special attention in order to understand their diagnostic approach and to select the best therapeutic options. Portopulmonary hypertension results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. On the other hand, abnormal intrapulmonary vascular dilations, profound hypoxemia, and a wide alveolar-arterial gradient are the hallmarks of the hepatopulmonary syndrome, resulting in difficult-to-treat hypoxemia. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest pathophysiologic concepts, diagnostic approach, therapy, and prognosis of portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome, as well as to discuss the role of liver transplantation as a definitive therapy in selected patients with these conditions.

  12. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD.

  13. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  14. Right ventricular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Franco, Veronica

    2012-07-01

    The right ventricle (RV) is in charge of pumping blood to the lungs for oxygenation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by high pulmonary vascular resistance and vascular remodeling, which results in a striking increase in RV afterload and subsequent failure. There is still unexploited potential for therapies that directly target the RV with the aim of supporting and protecting the right side of the heart, striving to prolong survival in patients with PAH.

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  16. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  17. Small artery remodelling in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to briefly review available data regarding changes in the structure of microvessels observed in patients with diabetes mellitus, and possible correction by effective treatment. The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small arteries of smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, although in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodelling may be detected. Moreover, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a hypertrophic remodelling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive and diabetic patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure. In diabetic hypertensive patients, a significant regression of structural alterations of small resistance arteries with drugs blocking the renin–angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers) was demonstrated. Alterations in the microcirculation represent a common pathological finding, and microangiopathy is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the development of organ damage as well as of clinical events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Renin–angiotensin system blockade seems to be effective in preventing/regressing alterations in microvascular structure. PMID:20646125

  18. Multiple, delayed post-tonsillectomy bleedings in 11-year-old girl as a result of vascular abnormality and anastomosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pucher, Beata; Szydlowski, Jaroslaw; Smoczyk, Wieslaw; Jonczyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Grzegorowski, Michal; Korytowska, Aleksandra

    2016-11-01

    Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are the most common surgical procedures in pediatric otolaryngology. The incidence of primary hemorrhage after tonsillectomy in children ranges from 0.38 to 6%. The prevalence of secondary bleeding occurs in 0.5%-9.3% cases [1]. Authors present a case of an 11-year-old girl who experienced 6 delayed, massive post-tonsillectomy bleedings as a result of presence of vascular malformation and the activation of collateral circulation as a result of the left ECA ligature.

  19. Immune modulation of resistance artery remodelling.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. The innate and the adaptive immune responses participate in mechanisms that contribute to inflammatory responses. It has been increasingly appreciated that different subsets of lymphocytes and the cytokines they produce modulate the vascular remodelling that occurs in cardiovascular disease. Effector T cells such as T-helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 lymphocytes (that produce interleukin-4), as well as Th17 (that produce interleukin-17), and T suppressor lymphocytes including regulatory T cells (Treg), which express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are involved in the remodelling of small arteries that occurs under the action of angiotensin II, deoxycorticosterone-salt and aldosterone-salt, as well as in models of hypertension such as the Dahl-salt-sensitive rat. The mechanism whereby the immune system is activated is unclear, but it has been suggested that neo-antigens may be generated by the elevation of blood pressure or other stimuli, leading to the activation of the immune response. Activated Th1 may contribute to vascular remodelling directly on blood vessels via effects of the cytokines produced or indirectly by actions on the kidney. The protective effect of Treg may be mediated similarly directly or via renal effects. These data offer promise for the discovery of new therapeutic targets to ameliorate vascular remodelling, which could lead to improved outcome in cardiovascular disease in humans.

  20. Teaching resources. Chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lue, Neal F

    2005-07-26

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering chromatin remodeling mechanisms and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: a Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of chromatin organization and then proceeds to describe the process of chromatin remodeling through a review of chromatin remodeling complexes and methods used to study their function.

  1. Congenital partial absence of the pericardium presenting with a rare concurrent abnormality of vascular ring diagnosed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Zahra Alizadeh; Savand-Roomi, Zahra; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Sarafan, Shadi; Seifi, Azin; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare abnormality that can be diagnosed by cardiac imaging procedures. A 49-year-old male needed medical attention due to the appearance of palpitation with a systolic murmur, and a notable aortic arch deviation was seen in the chest X-ray. In the echocardiogram, a poor echo window was detected. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a rare concomitant anomaly of partial absence of the pericardium including a rare defect of the right-sided aortic arch. Using cardiac MRI, the pericardium can be easily visualized, and thus, its absence more easily detected, aiding appropriate clinical decision-making. PMID:28217641

  2. Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss and Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus Associated with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Based Review and Analysis of Relationship between Intracranial Vascular Abnormalities and Inner Ear Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cassandro, Ettore; Cassandro, Claudia; Sequino, Giuliano; Scarpa, Alfonso; Petrolo, Claudio; Chiarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    While pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are not rarely associated, the finding of a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in this clinical picture is unusual. Starting from a case of CHL and PT, diagnosed to be due to a DAVF, we analyzed relationship between intracranial vascular abnormalities and inner ear fluids. DAVF was treated with endovascular embolization. Following this, there was a dramatic recovery of PT and of CHL, confirming their cause-effect link with DAVF. We critically evaluated the papers reporting this association. This is the first case of CHL associated with PT and DAVF. We describe the most significant experiences and theories reported in literature, with a personal analysis about the possible relationship between vascular intracranial system and labyrinthine fluids. In conclusion, we believe that this association may be a challenge for otolaryngologists. So we suggest to consider the possibility of a DAVF or other AVMs when PT is associated with CHL, without alterations of tympanic membrane and middle ear tests. PMID:26693371

  3. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  4. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of pulmonary remodelling in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jocelyn; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in left heart disease, classified as group II, is the most common form of PH that occurs in approximately 60% of cases of reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although relatively much is known about hemodynamic stages (passive or reactive) and their consequences on the right ventricle (RV) there is no consensus on the best hemodynamic definition of group II PH. In addition, the main pathways that lead to lung capillary injury and impaired biology of small artery remodelling processes are largely unknown. Typical lung manifestations of an increased pulmonary pressure and progressive RV-pulmonary circulation uncoupling are an abnormal alveolar capillary gas diffusion, impaired lung mechanics (restriction), and exercise ventilation inefficiency. Of several classes of pulmonary vasodilators currently clinically available, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition, because of its strong selectivity for targeting the cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the pulmonary circulation, is increasingly emerging as an attractive opportunity to reach hemodynamic benefits, reverse capillary injury, and RV remodelling, and improve functional capacity. Guanylate cyclase stimulators offer an additional intriguing opportunity but the lack of selectivity and systemic effects might preclude some of the anticipated benefits on the pulmonary circulation. Future trials will determine whether new routes of pharmacologic strategy aimed at targeting lung structural and vascular remodelling might affect morbidity and mortality in left heart disease populations. We believe that this therapeutic goal rather than a pure hemodynamic effect might ultimately emerge as an important challenge for the clinician.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of vein wall remodeling in chronic venous disease: a narrative and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bharath, Vighnesh; Kahn, Susan R; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2014-08-21

    Chronic venous disease encompasses a spectrum of disorders caused by an abnormal venous system. They include chronic venous insufficiency, varicose veins, lipodermatosclerosis, postthrombotic syndrome, and venous ulceration. Some evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to chronic venous disease from gene polymorphisms associated mainly with vein wall remodeling. The literature exploring these polymorphisms has not been reviewed and compiled thus far. In this narrative and systematic review, we present the current evidence available on the role of polymorphisms in genes involved in vein wall remodeling and other pathways as contributors to chronic venous disease. We searched the EMBASE, Medline, and PubMed databases from inception to 2013 for basic science or clinical studies relating to genetic associations in chronic venous disease and obtained 38 relevant studies for this review. Important candidate genes/proteins include the matrix metalloproteinases (extracellular matrix degradation), vascular endothelial growth factors (angiogenesis and vessel wall integrity), FOXC2 (vascular development), hemochromatosis (involved in venous ulceration and iron absorption), and various types of collagen (contributors to vein wall strength). The data on associations between these genes/proteins and the postthrombotic syndrome are limited and additional studies are required. These associations might have future prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  6. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  7. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  8. [Remodeling of Cardiovascular System: Causes and Consequences].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, E V; Kipenko, A V; Penniyaynen, V A; Pasatetckaia, N A; Tsyrline, V A

    2016-01-01

    Literature and our data suggest the regulatory action of a number of biologically active substances (catecholamines, cardiac glycosides, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor) on the growth and proliferation of heart cells. By using of organotypic tissue culture has proved that the basis of this regulation is the ability of test substances, receptor- or transducer-mediated signaling to modulate the function of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase. There is a delay in the development of vascular smooth muscle in the late postnatal period in rats with the blockade of the sympathetic nervous system in the prenatal period. The relationship between vascular remodeling and contractile activity is described. It seems that one of the causes of high blood pressure is a remodeling of the cardiovascular system, which precedes the development of hypertension.

  9. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  10. Vessel remodelling, pregnancy hormones and extravillous trophoblast function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Z-J; Sheehan, Penelope M; Brennecke, Shaun P; Keogh, Rosemary J

    2012-02-26

    During early human pregnancy, extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells from the placenta invade the uterine decidual spiral arterioles and mediate the remodelling of these vessels such that a low pressure, high blood flow can be supplied to the placenta. This is essential to facilitate normal growth and development of the foetus. Defects in remodelling can manifest as the serious pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia. During the period of vessel remodelling three key pregnancy-associated hormones, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), progesterone (P(4)) and oestradiol (E(2)), are found in high concentrations at the maternal-foetal interface. Potentially these hormones may control EVT movement and thus act as regulators of vessel remodelling. This review will discuss what is known about how these hormones affect EVT proliferation, migration and invasion during vascular remodelling and the potential relationship between hCG, P(4), E(2) and the development of pre-eclampsia.

  11. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) Inhibition during Mid-Gestation Impairs Trophoblast Invasion and Spiral Artery Remodelling during Pregnancy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion into the endometrium are fundamental events in the initiation of placentation. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been shown to promote trophoblast invasion in vitro, however its precise role in trophoblast invasion in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling in mice. Both LIF and its receptor (LIFRα) co-localized with cytokeratin-positive invasive endovascular extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via administration of our unique LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal trophoblast invasion and impaired spiral artery remodeling compared to PEG control. PEGLA-treated mouse decidual vessels were characterized by retention of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-positive vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), while PEG control decidual vessels were remodelled by cytokeratin-positive trophoblasts. LIF blockade did not alter F4/80-positive decidual macrophage numbers between treatment groups, but resulted in down-regulation of decidual transcript levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), which are important immune cell activation factors that promote spiral artery remodeling during pregnancy. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in trophoblast invasion in vivo and may facilitate trophoblast-decidual-immune cell cross talk to enable adequate spiral artery remodeling. PMID:26479247

  12. Sinapic Acid Prevents Hypertension and Cardiovascular Remodeling in Pharmacological Model of Nitric Oxide Inhibited Rats

    PubMed Central

    Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Krishna Priya, Mani; Suganya, Natarajan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypertensive heart disease is a constellation of abnormalities that includes cardiac fibrosis in response to elevated blood pressure, systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of sinapic acid on high blood pressure and cardiovascular remodeling. Methods An experimental hypertensive animal model was induced by L-NAME intake on rats. Sinapic acid (SA) was orally administered at a dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Blood pressure was measured by tail cuff plethysmography system. Cardiac and vascular function was evaluated by Langendorff isolated heart system and organ bath studies, respectively. Fibrotic remodeling of heart and aorta was assessed by histopathologic analyses. Oxidative stress was measured by biochemical assays. mRNA and protein expressions were assessed by RT-qPCR and western blot, respectively. In order to confirm the protective role of SA on endothelial cells through its antioxidant property, we have utilized the in vitro model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Results Rats with hypertension showed elevated blood pressure, declined myocardial performance associated with myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis, diminished vascular response, nitric oxide (NO) metabolites level, elevated markers of oxidative stress (TBARS, LOOH), ACE activity, depleted antioxidant system (SOD, CAT, GPx, reduced GSH), aberrant expression of TGF-β, β-MHC, eNOS mRNAs and eNOS protein. Remarkably, SA attenuated high blood pressure, myocardial, vascular dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, oxidative stress and ACE activity. Level of NO metabolites, antioxidant system, and altered gene expression were also repaired by SA treatment. Results of in vitro study showed that, SA protects endothelial cells from oxidative stress and enhance the production of NO in a concentration dependent manner. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that SA may have beneficial role in the

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion channels that have been reported in ECs, 2) discussing the implications of activation of these ion channels for endothelial function, and 3) proposing candidate mechanisms for activation of flow-sensitive ion channels.

  15. Remodeling A School Shop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    Presents guidelines for remodeling a school shop combining major considerations of funds, program changes, class management, and flexibility, with the needs of wiring, painting, and placement of equipment. (Author)

  16. Aldosterone and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Cachofeiro, Victoria; Miana, Maria; de Las Heras, Natalia; Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Sandra; Fernández-Tresguerres, Jesús; Lahera, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    Aldosterone can act in different tissues exerting physiological and pathological effects. At the vascular level, aldosterone affects endothelial function since administration of aldosterone impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. In addition, the administration of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists ameliorate relaxation to acetylcholine in models of both hypertension and atherosclerosis and in patients with heart failure. A reduction in nitric oxide levels seems to be the main mechanism underlying this effect due to a reduction in its production as well as an increase in its degradation by reactive oxygen species. Aldosterone is a pro-inflammatory factor that can participate in the vascular inflammatory process associated with different pathologies including hypertension through activation of the NFkappaB system, which mediates the vascular production of different cytokines. This mineralocorticoid also participates in the vascular remodeling observed in hypertensive rats since the administration of eplerenone improved the media-to-lumen ratio in these animals. This effect seems to be due to an increase in extracellular matrix. In summary, aldosterone through mineralocorticoid receptors can participate in the vascular damage associated with different pathologies including hypertension through its prooxidant, pro-inflammatory and profibrotic effects that triggered endothelial dysfunction, an inflammatory process and vascular remodeling.

  17. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  18. Ventricular remodeling: from bedside to molecule.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R; Flugelman, M Y; Halon, D A; Lewis, B S

    1997-01-01

    The multiple mechanisms that bring about the decompensation of the hypertrophic remodeled myocardium are synergistic and not fully understood. Our current hypothesis is that the increased stress on the ventricle is initially offset by compensatory myocardial hypertrophy. In many instances, however, progressive ventricular dilatation and heart failure occur as a result of maladaptive hypertrophy (abnormal myosin-actin production), programmed cell death (apoptosis) and/or changes in the interstitial vasculature and collagen composition. The molecular and genetic background to these processes includes changes in myocardial gene expression, activation of the local tissue renin-angiotensin and other neurohormonal systems, increased matrix metalloproteinase activity (including collagenase), and expression of certain components of the immune system, such as TNF-alpha. Future research will hopefully provide better methods for limiting the remodeling-ventricular dilatation process by novel pharmacotherapies, gene therapy and, possibly, surgical therapy, and determine the impact of such interventions on survival.

  19. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    PubMed

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-01-10

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  1. Bioactive factors in uteroplacental and systemic circulation link placental ischemia to generalized vascular dysfunction in hypertensive pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dania A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-06-15

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension, and could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unclear. Predisposing demographic, genetic and environmental risk factors could cause localized abnormalities in uteroplacental cytoactive factors such as integrins, matrix metalloproteinases, cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules leading to decreased vascular remodeling, uteroplacental vasoconstriction, trophoblast cells apoptosis, and abnormal development of the placenta. Defective placentation and decreased trophoblast invasion of the myometrium cause reduction in uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia, an important event in preeclampsia. RUPP could stimulate the release of circulating bioactive factors such as the anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin that cause imbalance with the pro-angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor, or cause the release of inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-induced factor-1 and AT1 angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies. The circulating bioactive factors target endothelial cells causing generalized endotheliosis, endothelial dysfunction, decreased vasodilators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin and increased vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1 and thromboxane A2, leading to increased vasoconstriction. The bioactive factors also stimulate the mechanisms of VSM contraction including Ca(2+), protein kinase C, and Rho-kinase and induce extracellular matrix remodeling leading to further vasoconstriction and hypertension. While therapeutic options are currently limited, understanding the underlying mechanisms could help design new interventions for management of preeclampsia.

  2. Bioactive Factors in Uteroplacental and Systemic Circulation Link Placental Ischemia to Generalized Vascular Dysfunction in Hypertensive Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dania A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension, and could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unclear. Predisposing demographic, genetic and environmental risk factors could cause localized abnormalities in uteroplacental cytoactive factors such as integrins, matrix metalloproteinases, cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules leading to decreased vascular remodeling, uteroplacental vasoconstriction, trophoblast cells apoptosis, and abnormal development of the placenta. Defective placentation and decreased trophoblast invasion of the myometrium cause reduction in uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia, an important event in preeclampsia. RUPP could stimulate the release of circulating bioactive factors such as the anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin that cause imbalance with the pro-angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor, or cause the release of inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-induced factor-1 and AT1 angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies. The circulating bioactive factors target endothelial cells causing generalized endotheliosis, endothelial dysfunction, decreased vasodilators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin and increased vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1 and thromboxane A2, leading to increased vasoconstriction. The bioactive factors also stimulate the mechanisms of VSM contraction including Ca2+, protein kinase C, and Rho-kinase and induce extracellular matrix remodeling leading to further vasoconstriction and hypertension. While therapeutic options are currently limited, understanding the underlying mechanisms could help design new interventions for management of preeclampsia. PMID:25916268

  3. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  4. Relation between baseline plaque features and subsequent coronary artery remodeling determined by optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zulong; Dong, Nana; Sun, Rong; Liu, Xinxin; Gu, Xia; Sun, Yong; Du, Hongwei; Dai, Jiannan; Liu, Youbin; Hou, Jingbo; Tian, Jinwei; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-17

    Atherosclerosis often leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. We examined the influence of baseline plaque characteristics on subsequent vascular remodeling in response to changes in plaque size. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), we examined 213 plaques from 138 patients with acute coronary syndrome at baseline and repeated IVUS at the 12-month follow-up. The change in external elastic membrane (EEM) area for each 1 mm2 change in plaque area (i.e., the slope of the regression line) was calculated as a measure of vascular remodeling capacity. In plaques with static positive remodeling, the slope was smaller than in plaques without static positive remodeling. In addition, the slope of the regression line for lesions with a large plaque burden was much smaller than that for lesions with a small plaque burden. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that diabetes, calcification and static positive remodeling were inversely and independently associated with the level of change in EEM area/change in plaque area. Lesions with a large plaque burden, calcifications or static positive remodeling had less remodeling capacity, and calcification and static positive remodeling were independent predictors of reduced subsequent remodeling. Therefore, calcifications and static positive remodeling could be used as morphological biomarkers to predict decreased subsequent arterial remodeling.

  5. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  6. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  7. Pulmonary arterial remodeling revealed by microfocal x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Johnson, Roger H.; Dhyani, Anita H.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2001-05-01

    Animal models and micro-CT imaging are useful for understanding the functional consequences of, and identifying the genes involved in, the remodeling of vascular structures that accompanies pulmonary vascular disease. Using a micro-CT scanner to image contrast-enhanced arteries in excised lungs from fawn hooded rats (a strain genetically susceptible to hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension), we found that portions of the pulmonary arterial tree downstream from a given diameter were morphometrically indistinguishable. This 'self-consistency' property provided a means for summarizing the pulmonary arterial tree architecture and mechanical properties using a parameter vector obtained from measurements of the contiguous set of vessel segments comprising the longest (principal) pathway and its branches over a range of vascular pressures. This parameter vector was used to characterize the pulmonary vascular remodeling that occurred in rats exposed to a hypoxic (11.5% oxygen) environment and provided the input to a hemodynamic model relating structure to function. The major effect of the remodeling was a longitudinally (pulmonary artery to arterioles) uniform decrease in vessel distensibility that resulted in a 90% increase in arterial resistance. Despite the almost uniform change in vessel distensibility, over 50% of the resistance increase was attributable to vessels with unstressed diameters less than 125 microns.

  8. Ventricular remodeling in global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Anversa, P; Zhang, X; Li, P; Olivetti, G; Cheng, W; Reiss, K; Sonnenblick, E H; Kajstura, J

    1995-06-01

    To determine the effects of chronic constriction of the left coronary artery on the function and structure of the heart, coronary artery narrowing was surgically induced in rats and ventricular pump performance, extent and distribution of myocardial damage, and the hypertrophic and hyperplastic response of myocytes were examined. Alterations in cardiac hemodynamics were found in all rats, but the characteristics of the physiological properties of the heart allowed a separation of the animals into two groups which exhibited left ventricular dysfunction and failure, respectively. Left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in both groups and was characterized by ventricular dilatation and wall thinning which were more severe in the failing animals. Multiple foci of myocardial damage across the wall were seen in all animals but tissue injury was more prominent in the endomyocardium and in failing rats. The anatomical and hemodynamic changes resulted in a significant increase in diastolic wall stress which paralleled the depression in ventricular performance. Myocyte cell loss and myocyte cellular hypertrophy were more severe with ventricular failure than with dysfunction. Finally, diastolic overload appeared to be coupled with activation of the DNA synthetic machinery of myocytes and nuclear mitotic division. In conclusion, a fixed lesion of the left coronary artery leads to abnormalities in cardiac dynamics with marked increases in diastolic wall stress and extensive ventricular remodeling in spite of compensatory myocyte cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia in the remaining viable tissue.

  9. Nucleosome Remodeling and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Peter B.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is kept flexible and dynamic to respond to environmental, metabolic, and developmental cues through the action of a family of so-called “nucleosome remodeling” ATPases. Consistent with their helicase ancestry, these enzymes experience conformation changes as they bind and hydrolyze ATP. At the same time they interact with DNA and histones, which alters histone–DNA interactions in target nucleosomes. Their action may lead to complete or partial disassembly of nucleosomes, the exchange of histones for variants, the assembly of nucleosomes, or the movement of histone octamers on DNA. “Remodeling” may render DNA sequences accessible to interacting proteins or, conversely, promote packing into tightly folded structures. Remodeling processes participate in every aspect of genome function. Remodeling activities are commonly integrated with other mechanisms such as histone modifications or RNA metabolism to assemble stable, epigenetic states. PMID:24003213

  10. Remodeling of cell-cell junctions in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2014-02-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a primary myocardial disorder characterized by a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias often preceding the onset of ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. Approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with AC have one or more mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, although non-desmosomal genes have also been associated with the disease. Increasing evidence implicates remodeling of intercalated disk proteins reflecting abnormal responses to mechanical load and aberrant cell signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of AC. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding disease mechanisms in AC that have come from studies of human myocardium and experimental models.

  11. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  12. Mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling during preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo Juan; Canovas, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics involves mechanisms independent of modifications in the DNA sequence that result in changes in gene expression and are maintained through cell divisions. Because all cells in the organism contain the same genetic blueprint, epigenetics allows for cells to assume different phenotypes and maintain them upon cell replication. As such, during the life cycle, there are moments in which the epigenetic information needs to be reset for the initiation of a new organism. In mammals, the resetting of epigenetic marks occurs at two different moments, which both happen to be during gestation, and include primordial germ cells (PGCs) and early preimplantation embryos. Because epigenetic information is reversible and sensitive to environmental changes, it is probably no coincidence that both these extensive periods of epigenetic remodelling happen in the female reproductive tract, under a finely controlled maternal environment. It is becoming evident that perturbations during the extensive epigenetic remodelling in PGCs and embryos can lead to permanent and inheritable changes to the epigenome that can result in long-term changes to the offspring derived from them, as indicated by the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis and recent demonstration of inter- and trans-generational epigenetic alterations. In this context, an understanding of the mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling during early embryo development is important to assess the potential for gametic epigenetic mutations to contribute to the offspring and for new epimutations to be established during embryo manipulations that could affect a large number of cells in the offspring. It is of particular interest to understand whether and how epigenetic information can be passed on from the gametes to the embryo or offspring, and whether abnormalities in this process could lead to transgenerationally inheritable phenotypes. The aim of this review is to highlight recent progress made in

  13. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance?

  14. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    following Rheb expression, as shown in Figure 3. We have seen negligible effect on cellular proliferation in complete media. Rheb expression is not...ras signaling bypasses senescence and causes abnormal vascular morphogenesis. Cancer research 70, 3803-3812. Bajaj, A., Zheng, Q. X., Adam, A...Vincent, P., and Pumiglia, K. (2010b). Activation of Endothelial Ras Signaling Bypasses Senescence and Causes Abnormal Vascular Morphogenesis. Cancer

  15. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  16. Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Children with Biventricular Circulation After Fetal Aortic Valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Kevin G; Freud, Lindsay; Escobar-Diaz, Maria; Banka, Puja; Emani, Sitaram; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) has shown promise in averting the progression of fetal aortic stenosis to hypoplastic left-heart syndrome. Altered loading conditions due to valvar disease, intrinsic endomyocardial abnormalities, and procedures that alter endomyocardial mechanics may place patients with biventricular circulation (BiV) after FAV at risk of abnormal LV remodeling and function. Using the most recent echo data on BiV patients after technically successful FAV (n = 34), we evaluated LV remodeling pattern, risk factors for pathologic LV remodeling, and the association between LV remodeling pattern and LV function. Median age at follow-up was 4.7 years (range 1.0-12.5). Cardiac interventions were common. At latest follow-up, no patient had hypoplastic LV. Nineteen patients (55 %) had dilated LV, and five (16 %) patients had severely dilated LV. LV remodeling patterns were as follows: 12 (35 %) normal ventricle, 11 (32 %) mixed hypertrophy, 8 (24 %) eccentric hypertrophy or remodeling, and 3 (9 %) concentric hypertrophy. Univariate factors associated with pathologic LV remodeling were long-standing AR, ≥2 cardiac interventions, EFE resection, and aortic or mitral regurgitation ≥ moderate at most recent follow-up. In multivariate analysis, only long-standing AR fraction remained associated with pathologic remodeling. Pathologic LV remodeling was associated with depressed ejection fraction, lower septal E´, and higher E/E´. Pathologic LV remodeling, primarily eccentric or mixed hypertrophy, is common in BiV patients after FAV and is related to LV loading conditions imposed by valvar disease. Pathologic remodeling is associated with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in this population.

  17. Klotho and Phosphate Are Modulators of Pathologic Uremic Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mingjun; Cho, Han Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Paek, Jean; Hill, Kathy; Shelton, John; Amaral, Ansel P.; Faul, Christian; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Wolf, Myles; Brand, Markus; Takahashi, Masaya; Kuro-o, Makoto; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in CKD is characterized by aberrant cardiac remodeling with hypertrophy and fibrosis. CKD is a state of severe systemic Klotho deficiency, and restoration of Klotho attenuates vascular calcification associated with CKD. We examined the role of Klotho in cardiac remodeling in models of Klotho deficiency—genetic Klotho hypomorphism, high dietary phosphate intake, aging, and CKD. Klotho-deficient mice exhibited cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy before 12 weeks of age followed by fibrosis. In wild-type mice, the induction of CKD led to severe cardiovascular changes not observed in control mice. Notably, non-CKD mice fed a high-phosphate diet had lower Klotho levels and greatly accelerated cardiac remodeling associated with normal aging compared with those on a normal diet. Chronic elevation of circulating Klotho because of global overexpression alleviated the cardiac remodeling induced by either high-phosphate diet or CKD. Regardless of the cause of Klotho deficiency, the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis correlated tightly with plasma phosphate concentration and inversely with plasma Klotho concentration, even when adjusted for all other covariables. High-fibroblast growth factor–23 concentration positively correlated with cardiac remodeling in a Klotho-deficient state but not a Klotho-replete state. In vitro, Klotho inhibited TGF-β1–, angiotensin II–, or high phosphate–induced fibrosis and abolished TGF-β1– or angiotensin II–induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Klotho deficiency is a novel intermediate mediator of pathologic cardiac remodeling, and fibroblast growth factor–23 may contribute to cardiac remodeling in concert with Klotho deficiency in CKD, phosphotoxicity, and aging. PMID:25326585

  18. The Effect of Hemodynamic Remodeling on the Survival of Arterialized Venous Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hede; Kolkin, Jon; Zhao, Bin; Li, Zhefeng; Jiang, Shichao; Wang, Wei; Xia, Zhen; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of hemodynamic remodeling on the survival status of the arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) and investigate the mechanism of this procedure. Materials and Methods Two 7 x 9 cm skin flaps in each rabbit (n=36) were designed symmetrically in the abdomen. The thoracoepigastric pedicle and one femoral artery were used as vascular sources. Four groups were included: Composite skin grafts group and arterial perfusion group were designed in one rabbit; AVF group and hemodynamic remodeling group by ligation of the thoracoepigastric vein in the middle were outlined in another rabbit. Flap viability, status of vascular perfusion and microvasculature, levels of epidermal metabolite and water content in each group were assessed. Results Highly congested veins and simple trunk veins were found using angiography in the AVF group; while a fairly uniform staining and plenty of small vessels were observed in the hemodynamic remodeling group. The metabolite levels of the remodeling group are comparable with those in the arterial perfusion group. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of flap survival between the arterial perfusion group and hemodynamic remodeling group; however, significant difference was seen between the AVF group and the hemodynamic remodeling group. Conclusions Under the integrated perfusion mode, the AVFs are in an over-perfusion and non-physiological hemodynamic state, resulting in unreliability and unpredictability in flap survival; under the separated perfusion mode produced by remodeling, a physiological-like circulation will be created and therefore, better flap survival can be expected. PMID:24265782

  19. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  20. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  1. Vascular development and hemodynamic force in the mouse yolk sac

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Monica D.; Larina, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of the mouse embryonic yolk sac is a highly dynamic process dependent on multiple genetic signaling pathways as well as biomechanical factors regulating proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell-cell, and cell-matrix interactions. During this early developmental window, the initial primitive vascular network of the yolk sac undergoes a dynamic remodeling process concurrent with the onset of blood flow, in which endothelial cells establish a branched, hierarchical structure of large vessels and smaller capillary beds. In this review, we will describe the molecular and biomechanical regulators which guide vascular remodeling in the mouse embryonic yolk sac, as well as live imaging methods for characterizing endothelial cell and hemodynamic function in cultured embryos. PMID:25191274

  2. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  3. Vascular Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack) may increase your risk of developing dementia. Atherosclerosis. This condition occurs when deposits of cholesterol and ... in your arteries and narrow your blood vessels. Atherosclerosis can increase your risk of vascular dementia — and ...

  4. Chondromodulin I Is a Bone Remodeling Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamichi, Yuko; Shukunami, Chisa; Yamada, Takashi; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Kawano, Hirotaka; Sato, Takashi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Shindo, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Yuji; Kato, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    Chondromodulin I (ChM-I) was supposed from its limited expression in cartilage and its functions in cultured chondrocytes as a major regulator in cartilage development. Here, we generated mice deficient in ChM-I by targeted disruption of the ChM-I gene. No overt abnormality was detected in endochondral bone formation during embryogenesis and cartilage development during growth stages of ChM-I−/− mice. However, a significant increase in bone mineral density with lowered bone resorption with respect to formation was unexpectedly found in adult ChM-I−/− mice. Thus, the present study established that ChM-I is a bone remodeling factor. PMID:12509461

  5. Atrial metabolism and tissue perfusion as determinants of electrical and structural remodelling in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Opacic, Dragan; van Bragt, Kelly A; Nasrallah, Hussein M; Schotten, Ulrich; Verheule, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common tachyarrhythmia in clinical practice. Over decades of research, a vast amount of knowledge has been gathered about the causes and consequences of AF related to cellular electrophysiology and features of the tissue structure that influence the propagation of fibrillation waves. Far less is known about the role of myocyte metabolism and tissue perfusion in the pathogenesis of AF. However, the rapid rates of electrical activity and contraction during AF must present an enormous challenge to the energy balance of atrial myocytes. This challenge can be met by scaling back energy demand and by increasing energy supply, and there are several indications that both phenomena occur as a result of AF. Still, there is ample evidence that these adaptations fall short of redressing this imbalance, which may represent a driving force for atrial electrical as well as structural remodelling. In addition, several 'metabolic diseases' such as diabetes, obesity, and abnormal thyroid function precipitate some well-known 'culprits' of the AF substrate such as myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, while some other AF risk factors, such as heart failure, affect atrial metabolism. This review provides an overview of metabolic and vascular alterations in AF and their involvement in its pathogenesis.

  6. Role of cAMP-Phosphodiesterase 1C Signaling in Regulating Growth Factor Receptor Stability, Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth, Migration, and Neointimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Nagel, David J.; Zhou, Qian; Cygnar, Katherine D.; Zhao, Haiqing; Li, Faqian; Pi, Xinchun; Knight, Peter A.; Yan, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neointimal hyperplasia characterized by abnormal accumulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is a hallmark of occlusive disorders such as atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, and allograft vasculopathy. Cyclic nucleotides are vital in SMC proliferation and migration, which are regulated by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Our goal is to understand the regulation and function of PDEs in SMC pathogenesis of vascular diseases. Methods & Results We performed screening for genes differentially expressed in normal contractile versus proliferating synthetic SMCs. We observed that PDE1C expression was low in contractile SMCs but drastically elevated in synthetic SMCs in vitro and in various mouse vascular injury models in vivo. Additionally, PDE1C was highly induced in neointimal SMCs of human coronary arteries. More importantly, injury-induced neointimal formation was significantly attenuated by PDE1C deficiency or PDE1 inhibition in vivo. PDE1 inhibition suppressed vascular remodeling of human saphenous vein explants ex vivo. In cultured SMCs, PDE1C deficiency or PDE1 inhibition attenuated SMC proliferation and migration. Mechanistic studies revealed that PDE1C plays a critical role in regulating the stability of growth factor receptors, such as PDGF-receptor-beta (PDGFRβ) known to be important in pathological vascular remodeling. PDE1C interacts with LDL-receptor-related-protein-1 (LRP1) and PDGFRβ, thus regulating PDGFRβ endocytosis and lysosome-dependent degradation in an LRP1-dependent manner. A transmembrane-adenylyl-cyclase (tmAC)-cAMP-PKA cascade modulated by PDE1C is critical in regulating PDGFRβ degradation. Conclusion These findings demonstrated that PDE1C is an important regulator of SMC proliferation, migration, and neointimal hyperplasia, in part through modulating endosome/lysosome dependent PDGFRβ protein degradation via LRP1. PMID:25608528

  7. Akt isoforms in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease. PMID:25929188

  8. Building and Remodeling Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Deanna L.; Huntley, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic junctions are generated by adhesion proteins that bridge the synaptic cleft to firmly anchor pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Several cell adhesion molecule (CAM) families localize to synapses, but it is not yet completely understood how each synaptic CAM family contributes to synapse formation and/or structure, and whether or how smaller groups of CAMs serve as minimal, functionally cooperative adhesive units upon which structure is based. Synapse structure and function evolve over the course of development, and in mature animals, synapses are composed of a greater number of proteins, surrounded by a stabilizing extracellular matrix, and often contacted by astrocytic processes. Thus, in mature networks undergoing plasticity, persistent changes in synapse strength, morphology or number must be accompanied by selective and regulated remodeling of the neuropil. Recent work indicates that regulated, extracellular proteolysis may be essential for this, and rather than simply acting permissively to enable synapse plasticity, is more likely playing a proactive role in driving coordinated synaptic structural and functional modifications that underlie persistent changes in network activity. PMID:20882551

  9. Relationship between self-reported residential indoor remodeling and semen quality: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Hua; Li, Zheng; Li, De-Kun; Yan, Bei; Liang, Hong; Zhi, Er-Lei; Du, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the association between residential indoor remodeling and poor semen quality. Sperm donors aged 18-45 years old were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semen specimens were collected and analyzed. An in-person interview was conducted to obtain information on the history of indoor remodeling and potential confounders. A total of 70 participants with abnormal semen quality (case group) and 68 controls were examined. A total of 20 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months, and among them 17 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Compared with participants with no history of indoor remodeling, participants with a history of indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months were more than three times as likely to have poor sperm quality (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3-12.0) after controlling for potential confounders. The association was strengthened when the analysis was restricted to those who had indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that indoor remodeling has an adverse effect on semen quality.

  10. The angiotensin receptor blocker losartan reduces coronary arteriole remodeling in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Husarek, Kathryn E; Katz, Paige S; Trask, Aaron J; Galantowicz, Maarten L; Cismowski, Mary J; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are associated with alterations of blood vessel structure and function. Although endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffness have been documented, little is known about the effects of T2DM on coronary microvascular structural remodeling. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an important role in large artery stiffness and mesenteric vessel remodeling in hypertension and T2DM. The goal of this study was to determine whether the blockade of AT1R signaling dictates vascular smooth muscle growth that partially underlies coronary arteriole remodeling in T2DM. Control and db/db mice were given AT1R blocker losartan via drinking water for 4 weeks. Using pressure myography, we found that coronary arterioles from 16-week db/db mice undergo inward hypertrophic remodeling due to increased wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio with a decreased lumen diameter. This remodeling was accompanied by decreased elastic modulus (decreased stiffness). Losartan treatment decreased wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio, and coronary arteriole cell number in db/db mice. Losartan treatment did not affect incremental elastic modulus. However, losartan improved coronary flow reserve. Our data suggest that Ang II-AT1R signaling mediates, at least in part, coronary arteriole inward hypertrophic remodeling in T2DM without affecting vascular mechanics, further suggesting that targeting the coronary microvasculature in T2DM may help reduce cardiac ischemic events.

  11. Epac2-mediated dendritic spine remodeling: implications for disease

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Srivastava, Deepak P.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian forebrain, most glutamatergic excitatory synapses occur on small dendritic protrusions called dendritic spines. Dendritic spines are highly plastic and can rapidly change morphology in response to numerous stimuli. This dynamic remodeling of dendritic spines is thought to be critical for information processing, memory and cognition. Conversely, multiple studies have revealed that neuropathologies such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are linked with alterations in dendritic spine morphologies and miswiring of neural circuitry. One compelling hypothesis is that abnormal dendritic spine remodeling is a key contributing factor for this miswiring. Ongoing research has identified a number of mechanisms that are critical for the control of dendritic spine remodeling. Among these mechanisms, regulation of small GTPase signaling by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) is emerging as a critical mechanism for integrating physiological signals in the control of dendritic spine remodeling. Furthermore, multiple proteins associated with regulation of dendritic spine remodeling have also been implicated with multiple neuropathologies, including ASDs. Epac2, a GEF for the small GTPase Rap, has recently been described as a novel cAMP(yet PKA-independent) target localized to dendritic spines. Signaling via this protein in response to pharmacological stimulation or cAMP accumulation, via the dopamine D1/5 receptor, results in Rap activation, promotes structural destabilization, in the form of dendritic spine shrinkage, and functional depression due to removal of GluR2/3-containing AMPA receptors. In addition, Epac2 forms macromolecular complexes with ASD-associated proteins, which are sufficient to regulate Epac2 localization and function. Furthermore, rare nonsynonymous variants of the EPAC2 gene associated with the ASD phenotype alter protein function, synaptic protein distribution, and spine morphology. We review here the role of Epac2 in the remodeling

  12. Notch signal integration in the vasculature during remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Rostama, Bahman; Peterson, Sarah M.; Vary, Calvin P. H.; Liaw, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling plays many important roles in homeostasis and remodeling in the vessel wall, and serves a critical role in the communication between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Within blood vessels, Notch signaling integrates with multiple pathways by mechanisms including direct protein-protein interaction, cooperative or synergistic regulation of signal cascades, and co-regulation of transcriptional targets. After establishment of the mature blood vessel, the spectrum and intensity of Notch signaling changes during phases of active remodeling or disease progression. These changes can be mediated by regulation via microRNAs and protein stability or signaling, and corresponding changes in complementary signaling pathways. Notch also affects endothelial cells on a systems level by regulating key metabolic components. This review will outline the most recent findings of Notch activity in blood vessels, with a focus on how Notch signals integrate with other molecular signaling pathways controlling vascular phenotype. PMID:25464152

  13. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  14. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    PubMed

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2016-09-15

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities.

  15. Characterization of vascular tree architecture using the Tokunaga taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarreta-Valverde, Miguel A.; Zoghbi, Jihan M.; Pereira, Fabricio; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiovascular disease is usually assisted by resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) imaging. The identification of abnormal vascular architecture from angiographic three-dimensional images is therefore crucial to the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Automated detection and quantification of vascular structure and architecture thus holds significant clinical value. In this work, we employ a Lindenmayer system to represent vascular trees from angiographic images and describe a quantitative measure based on the Tokunaga taxonomy to differentiate vascular architectures. Synthetic vessel architectures with varying bifurcation patterns were compared and results showed that this architectural measure is proportional to the level of branching. In real MRA images, this measure was able to differentiate between normal and abnormal intracerebral vasculature containing an aneurysm. Hence, this methodology not only allows for compact representation of vascular architectures but also provides a quantitative metric of bifurcation complexity, which has the potential to characterize different types of vascular abnormalities.

  16. Polycystic ovary syndrome and obesity do not affect vascular parameters related to early atherosclerosis in young women without glucose metabolism disturbances, arterial hypertension and severe abnormalities of lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Cristiano Roberto Grimaldi; Lage, Silvia Helena Gelás; Rocha, Michelle Patrocínio; Hayashida, Sylvia Asaka Yamashita; Baracat, Edmund Chade; Romano, Angela; Brito, Vinicius Nahime; Marcondes, José Antonio Miguel

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and obesity on vascular parameters related to early atherosclerosis (VP-EA) [brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid arterial compliance (CAC)] in women with minor cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). Twenty-five young women with PCOS and 23 eumenorrheic women matched for body mass index (BMI) were studied. The women were subdivided according to BMI and PCOS status, and comparisons were done between PCOS and Control group, regardless of BMI, and between Obese and Lean group, regardless of the presence of PCOS. Insulin resistance was higher in PCOS-group than in control-group and in obese-group than in lean-group. The median of all VP-EA evaluated were similar between PCOS-group and Control-group [FMD: 6.6 versus 8.4% (p = NS); CIMT: 48.0 versus 47.0 mm.10-2 (p = NS); CAC: 6.2 versus 5.6N-1.m4.10-10 (p = NS)] and between obese-group and lean-group [FMD: 7.8 versus 6.6% (p = NS); CIMT: 48.0 versus 47.0 mm.10-2 (p = NS); CAC: 5.7 versus 6.3N-1.m4.10-10 (p = NS)]. These results suggest that PCOS and obesity do not affect VP-EA in women with minor CVRFs.

  17. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  18. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  19. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  20. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 inhibits low shear stress-induced carotid artery remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Cai, Zhaohua; Cui, Mingli; Nie, Peng; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Shiqun; Chu, Shichun; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2015-12-01

    Shear stress, particularly low and oscillatory shear stress, plays a critical pathophysiological role in vascular remodeling-related cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence suggests that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 [also known as TR3 or nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1)] is expressed in diseased human vascular tissue and plays an important role in vascular physiology and pathology. In the present study, we used a mouse model of flow-dependent remodeling by partial ligation of the left common carotid artery (LCCA) to define the exact role of Nur77 in vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Following vascular remodeling, Nur77 was highly expressed in neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the ligated carotid arteries. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in the remodeled arteries in vivo and in primary rat VSMCs in vitro following stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Further in vitro experiments revealed that Nur77 expression was rapidly increased in the VSMCs following stimulation with PDGF and H2O2, whereas treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) reversed the increase in the protein level of Nur77 induced by H2O2. Moreover, Nur77 overexpression markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, induced by PDGF. Finally, to determine the in vivo role of Nur77 in low shear stress-induced vascular remodeling, wild-type (WT) and Nur77-deficient mice were subjected to partial ligation of the LCCA. Four weeks following surgery, in the LCCAs of the Nur77‑deficient mice, a significant increase in the intima-media area and carotid intima-media thickness was noted, as well as more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition compared to the WT mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed an increase in VSMC proliferation [determined by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) production in the Nur77

  1. [The cancer paradigm in pulmonary arterial hypertension: towards anti-remodeling therapies targeting metabolic dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Dumas, Sébastien J; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare, complex and multifactorial disease in which pulmonary vascular remodeling plays a major role ending in right heart failure and death. Current specific therapies of PAH that mainly target the vasoconstriction/vasodilatation imbalance are not curative. Bi-pulmonary transplantation remains the only option in patients resistant to current therapies. It is thus crucial to identify novel vascular anti-remodeling therapeutic targets. This remodeling displays several properties of cancer cells, especially overproliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary vascular cells, hallmarks of cancer related to the metabolic shift known as the "Warburg effect". The latter is characterized by a shift of ATP production, from oxidative phosphorylation to low rate aerobic glycolysis. In compensation, the cancer cells exhibit exacerbated glutaminolysis thus resulting in glutamine addiction, necessary to their overproliferation. Glutamine intake results in glutamate production, a molecule at the crossroads of energy metabolism and cancer cell communication, thus contributing to cell proliferation. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies targeting glutamate production, its release into the extracellular space and its membrane receptors have been suggested to treat different types of cancers, not only in the central nervous system but also in the periphery. We propose that similar strategies targeting glutamatergic signaling may be considered in PAH, especially as they could affect not only the vascular remodeling but also the right heart hypertrophy known to involve the glutaminolysis pathway. Ongoing studies aim to characterize the involvement of the glutamate pathway and its receptors in vascular remodeling, and the therapeutic potential of specific molecules targeting this pathway.

  2. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  3. Exercise training as vascular medicine: direct impacts on the vasculature in humans.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel J

    2009-10-01

    Exercise training decreases cardiovascular risk, but effects on traditional risk factors do not fully account for this benefit. Exercise directly impacts upon arterial shear stress, a stimulus to antiatherogenic adaptation in vascular function and remodeling. This review considers the impact of exercise training on vascular adaptation in large and small arteries in humans.

  4. Vascular biology of ageing-Implications in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adam; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-06-01

    Ageing is associated with functional, structural and mechanical changes in arteries that closely resemble the vascular alterations in hypertension. Characteristic features of large and small arteries that occur with ageing and during the development of hypertension include endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, inflammation, calcification and increased stiffness. Arterial changes in young hypertensive patients mimic those in old normotensive individuals. Hypertension accelerates and augments age-related vascular remodelling and dysfunction, and ageing may impact on the severity of vascular damage in hypertension, indicating close interactions between biological ageing and blood pressure elevation. Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying vascular alterations in ageing and hypertension are common and include aberrant signal transduction, oxidative stress and activation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic transcription factors. Strategies to suppress age-associated vascular changes could ameliorate vascular damage associated with hypertension. An overview on the vascular biology of ageing and hypertension is presented and novel molecular mechanisms contributing to these processes are discussed. The complex interaction between biological ageing and blood pressure elevation on the vasculature is highlighted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CV Ageing.

  5. Vascular biology of ageing—Implications in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Adam; Montezano, Augusto C.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is associated with functional, structural and mechanical changes in arteries that closely resemble the vascular alterations in hypertension. Characteristic features of large and small arteries that occur with ageing and during the development of hypertension include endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, inflammation, calcification and increased stiffness. Arterial changes in young hypertensive patients mimic those in old normotensive individuals. Hypertension accelerates and augments age-related vascular remodelling and dysfunction, and ageing may impact on the severity of vascular damage in hypertension, indicating close interactions between biological ageing and blood pressure elevation. Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying vascular alterations in ageing and hypertension are common and include aberrant signal transduction, oxidative stress and activation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic transcription factors. Strategies to suppress age-associated vascular changes could ameliorate vascular damage associated with hypertension. An overview on the vascular biology of ageing and hypertension is presented and novel molecular mechanisms contributing to these processes are discussed. The complex interaction between biological ageing and blood pressure elevation on the vasculature is highlighted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CV Ageing. PMID:25896391

  6. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  7. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  9. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  10. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  11. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  12. Secrets of the code: do vascular endothelial cells use ion channels to decipher complex flow signals?

    PubMed

    Barakat, Abdul I; Lieu, Deborah K; Gojova, Andrea

    2006-02-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to changes in blood flow is essential for both vasoregulation and arterial wall remodelling, while abnormalities in endothelial responsiveness to flow play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial flow responses also have important implications for the field of vascular tissue engineering. In response to changes in fluid dynamic shear stress, ECs exhibit humoral, metabolic, and structural responses. Significantly, ECs respond differently to different types of shear stress. For instance, steady shear stress elicits a profile of responses that differs drastically from oscillatory shear stress. Although our understanding of flow-induced signaling has advanced greatly over the past two decades, how ECs sense shear forces remains to be established. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which ECs discriminate among different flow waveforms are unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is one of the most rapid known responses to flow in ECs. In this paper, we argue in favor of an important role for ion channels in shear stress sensing in ECs and propose that these channels may endow ECs with the ability to resolve components of a complex flow signal and hence distinguish among different types of flow.

  13. Yolk-sac–derived macrophages regulate fetal testis vascularization and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DeFalco, Tony; Bhattacharya, Indrashis; Williams, Alyna V.; Sams, Dustin M.; Capel, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    Organogenesis of the testis is initiated when expression of Sry in pre-Sertoli cells directs the gonad toward a male-specific fate. The cells in the early bipotential gonad undergo de novo organization to form testis cords that enclose germ cells inside tubules lined by epithelial Sertoli cells. Although Sertoli cells are a driving force in the de novo formation of testis cords, recent studies in mouse showed that reorganization of the vasculature and of interstitial cells also play critical roles in testis cord morphogenesis. However, the mechanism driving reorganization of the vasculature during fetal organogenesis remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that fetal macrophages are associated with nascent gonadal and mesonephric vasculature during the initial phases of testis morphogenesis. Macrophages mediate vascular reorganization and prune errant germ cells and somatic cells after testis architecture is established. We show that gonadal macrophages are derived from primitive yolk-sac hematopoietic progenitors and exhibit hallmarks of M2 activation status, suggestive of angiogenic and tissue remodeling functions. Depletion of macrophages resulted in impaired vascular reorganization and abnormal cord formation. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated role for macrophages in testis morphogenesis and suggest that macrophages are an intermediary between neovascularization and organ architecture during fetal organogenesis. PMID:24912173

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  15. Vascular effects of maternal alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Magness, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a significant field of scientific exploration primarily because of its negative effects on the developing fetus, which is specifically defined as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Though the effects on the mother are less explored compared with those on the fetus, alcohol produces multiple effects on the maternal vascular system. Alcohol has major effects on systemic hemodynamic variables, endocrine axes, and paracrine factors regulating vascular resistance, as well as vascular reactivity. Alcohol is also reported to have significant effects on the reproductive vasculature including alterations in blood flow, vessel remodeling, and angiogenesis. Data presented in this review will illustrate the importance of the maternal vasculature in the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and that more studies are warranted in this field. PMID:22730388

  16. Mechanisms of ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gangaraju, Vamsi K.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    The inter-relationship between DNA repair and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling has begun to become very apparent with recent discoveries. ATP dependent remodeling complexes mobilize nucleosomes along DNA, promote the exchange of histones, or completely displace nucleosomes from DNA. These remodeling complexes are often categorized based on the domain organization of their catalytic subunit. The biochemical properties and structural information of several of these remodeling complexes are reviewed. The different models for how these complexes are able to mobilize nucleosomes and alter nucleosome structure are presented incorporating several recent findings. Finally the role of histone tails and their respective modifications in ATP-dependent remodeling are discussed. PMID:17306844

  17. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response

    PubMed Central

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A.V.; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L.

    2015-01-01

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein–SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  18. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  19. Tissue remodeling investigation in varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Khodaii, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Although the etiology of varicose veins remains unknown, recent studies have focused on endothelial cell integrity and function because the endothelium regulates vessel tone and synthesizes many pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence involving the endothelium in the development of varicose vein disease. In addition, tissue remodeling was investigated in varicose veins to determine the expression of different types of collagen. Tissue specimens of superficial varicose veins and control saphenous vein were used for immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscope (TEM). α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I, III, IV antibodies were applied for immunohistochemical investigation. Findings of this study showed alterations of the intima, such as focal intimal discontinuity and denudation of endothelium; and the media, such as irregular arrangements of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres in varicose veins. Our findings showed some changes in terms of distribution of types I, III and IV collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls compared with controls. These alterations to the media suggest that the pathological abnormality in varicose veins may be due to the loss of muscle tone as a result of the breakup of its regular structure by the collagen fibres. These findings only described some changes in terms of distribution of these types of collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls which may result in venous wall dysfunction in varicosis. PMID:24551759

  20. Nebivolol Attenuates Maladaptive Proximal Tubule Remodeling in Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Melvin R.; Habibi, Javad; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, Dilek; Johnson, Megan; Tilmon, Roger; Jain, Deepika; Ferrario, Carlos; Sowers, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The impact of nebivolol therapy on the renal proximal tubular cell (PTC) structure and function was investigated in a transgenic (TG) rodent model of hypertension and the cardiometabolic syndrome. The TG Ren2 rat develops nephropathy with proteinuria, increased renal angiotensin II levels and oxidative stress, and PTC remodeling. Nebivolol, a β1-antagonist, has recently been shown to reduce albuminuria, in part, through reductions in renal oxidative stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that nebivolol therapy would attenuate PTC damage and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Methods Young Ren2 (R2-N) and SD (SD-N) rats were treated with nebivolol (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (R2-C; SD-C) for 3 weeks. PTC structure and function were tested using transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Results Nebivolol treatment decreased urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, tubulointerstitial ultrastructural remodeling and fibrosis, NADPH oxidase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine levels, and increased megalin and lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 immunostaining in PTCs. Ultrastructural abnormalities that were improved with therapy included altered canalicular structure, reduced endosomes/lysosomes and PTC vacuoles, basement membrane thickening, and mitochondrial remodeling/fragmentation. Conclusion These observations support the notion that nebivolol may improve PTC reabsorption of albumin and other glomerular filtered small molecular weight proteins in association with the attenuation of oxidative stress, tubulointerstitial injury and fibrosis in this rat model of metabolic kidney disease. PMID:20110666

  1. Lung parenchyma remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, P R M; Dos Santos, C; Pelosi, P

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury (ALI), is described as a stereotyped response to lung injury with a transition from alveolar capillary damage to a fibroproliferative phase. Most ARDS patients survive the acute initial phase of lung injury and progress to either reparation of the lesion or evolution of the syndrome. Despite advances in the management of ARDS, mortality remains high (40%) and autopsies show extended pulmonary fibrosis in 55% of patients, suggesting the importance of deregulated repair in the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Factors influencing progression to fibroproliferative ARDS versus resolution and reconstitution of the normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture are poorly understood. Abnormal repair and remodeling may be profoundly affected by both environmental and genetic factors. In this line, mechanical ventilation may affect the macromolecules that constitute the extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans), suffer changes and impact the biomechanical behavior of lung parenchyma. Furthermore, evidence suggests that acute inflammation and fibrosis may be partially independent and/or interacting processes that are autonomously regulated, and thus amenable to individual and specific therapies. In this review, we explore recent advances in the field of fibroproliferative ARDS/ALI, with special emphasis on 1) the physiological properties of the extracellular matrix, 2) the mechanisms of remodeling, 3) the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung fibrotic response, and (4) therapeutic interventions in the remodeling process.

  2. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  3. Induction of Thoracic Aortic Remodeling by Endothelial-Specific Deletion of MicroRNA-21 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing-Yi; Shen, Bao-Rong; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Wan, Xue-Jiao; Yao, Qing-Ping; Wu, Guang-Liang; Wang, Ji-Yao; Chen, Si-Guo; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are known to have an important role in modulating vascular biology. MiR21 was found to be involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative vascular disease. The role of miR21 in endothelial cells (ECs) has well studied in vitro, but the study in vivo remains to be elucidated. In this study, miR21 endothelial-specific knockout mice were generated by Cre/LoxP system. Compared with wild-type mice, the miR21 deletion in ECs resulted in structural and functional remodeling of aorta significantly, such as diastolic pressure dropping, maximal tension depression, endothelium-dependent relaxation impairment, an increase of opening angles and wall-thickness/inner diameter ratio, and compliance decrease, in the miR21 endothelial-specific knockout mice. Furthermore, the miR21 deletion in ECs induced down-regulation of collagen I, collagen III and elastin mRNA and proteins, as well as up-regulation of Smad7 and down-regulation of Smad2/5 in the aorta of miR21 endothelial-specific knockout mice. CTGF and downstream MMP/TIMP changes were also identified to mediate vascular remodeling. The results showed that miR21 is identified as a critical molecule to modulate vascular remodeling, which will help to understand the role of miR21 in vascular biology and the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. PMID:23527070

  4. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN). In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK), a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in concert with

  5. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Hydrogen on Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Down-Regulation of Mitogen/Activated Protein Kinase and Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Xing; Xu, Jing-Ting; You, Xin-Chao; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Ke-Wen; Li, Ping; Sun, Peng; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ting-Huai

    2016-02-29

    Molecular hydrogen (H₂) has recently attracted considerable attention for the prevention of oxidative stress-related vascular diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of hydrogen on proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vitro, and on vascular hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic coarctation (AAC) in vivo. Hydrogen-rich medium (0.6~0.9 ppm) was added 30 min before 10⁻⁷ M Ang II administration, then the proliferation and migration index were determined 24 h after Ang II stimulation. Hydrogen gas (99.999%) was given by intraperitoneal injection at the dose of 1 ml/100 g/day consecutively for one week before AAC and lasted for 6 weeks in vivo. Hydrogen inhibited proliferation and migration of VSMCs with Ang II stimulation in vitro, and improved the vascular hypertrophy induced by AAC in vivo. Treatment with hydrogen reduced Ang II- or AAC-induced oxidative stress, which was reflected by diminishing the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Ang II-stimulated VSMCs, inhibiting the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in vascular and serum malondialdehyde (MDA). Hydrogen treatment also blocked Ang II-induced phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) in vitro. Taken together, our studies indicate that hydrogen prevents AAC-induced vascular hypertrophy in vivo, and inhibits Ang II-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs in vitro possibly by targeting ROS-dependent ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and ERM signaling. It provides the molecular basis of hydrogen on inhibiting the abnormal proliferation and migration of VSMCs and improving vascular remodeling diseases.

  7. Emerging translational approaches to target STAT3 signalling and its impact on vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutzmann, Jochen; Daniel, Jan-Marcus; Bauersachs, Johann; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sedding, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation responses characterize the vascular remodelling processes in atherosclerosis, restenosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and angiogenesis. The functional and phenotypic changes in diverse vascular cell types are mediated by complex signalling cascades that initiate and control genetic reprogramming. The signalling molecule's signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in the initiation and continuation of these pathophysiological changes. This review highlights the pivotal involvement of STAT3 in pathological vascular remodelling processes and discusses potential translational therapies, which target STAT3 signalling, to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, current clinical trials using highly effective and selective inhibitors of STAT3 signalling for distinct diseases, such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis, are discussed with regard to their vascular (side-) effects and their potential to pave the way for a direct use of these molecules for the prevention or treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:25784694

  8. Vascular Abnormalities Associated with Thermal and Electrical Trauma,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    catheters into central veins . Reported me- in whom repeated punctures may result in hema- chanical complication rates of central venous access toma...by Indicator-dilu- 41, Moosman, D.A.: The anatomy of infraclavicular subclavian tion technique. J, Appl. Physiol., 63:907, 1987. vein catheterization ...techniques quate debridement. used to gain central venous access. Additionally, Proper wound care after fasciotomy is important pulmonary infarcts

  9. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  10. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  12. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  13. Compartment-specific remodeling of splenic micro-architecture during experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakul, Pinar; Dalton, Jane; Beattie, Lynette; Brown, Najmeeyah; Erguven, Sibel; Maroof, Asher; Kaye, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    Progressive splenomegaly is a hallmark of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, canids, and rodents. In experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, splenomegaly is accompanied by pronounced changes in microarchitecture, including expansion of the red pulp vascular system, neovascularization of the white pulp, and remodeling of the stromal cell populations that define the B-cell and T-cell compartments. Here, we show that Ly6C/G(+) (Gr-1(+)) cells, including neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, accumulate in the splenic red pulp during infection. Cell depletion using monoclonal antibody against either Ly6C/G(+) (Gr-1; RB6) or Ly6G(+) (1A8) cells increased parasite burden. In contrast, depletion of Ly6C/G(+) cells, but not Ly6G(+) cells, halted the progressive remodeling of Meca-32(+) and CD31(+) red pulp vasculature. Strikingly, neither treatment affected white pulp neovascularization or the remodeling of the fibroblastic reticular cell and follicular dendritic cell networks. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized compartment-dependent selectivity to the process of splenic vascular remodeling during experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, attributable to Ly6C(+) inflammatory monocytes.

  14. Remodeling of blood vessels: responses of diameter and wall thickness to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pries, Axel R; Reglin, Bettina; Secomb, Timothy W

    2005-10-01

    Vascular functions, including tissue perfusion and peripheral resistance, reflect continuous structural adaptation (remodeling) of blood vessels in response to several stimuli. Here, a theoretical model is presented that relates the structural and functional properties of microvascular networks to the adaptive responses of individual segments to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli. All vessels are assumed to respond, according to a common set of adaptation rules, to changes in wall shear stress, circumferential wall stress, and tissue metabolic status (indicated by partial pressure of oxygen). An increase in vessel diameter with increasing wall shear stress and an increase in wall mass with increased circumferential stress are needed to ensure stable vascular adaptation. The model allows quantitative predictions of the effects of changes in systemic hemodynamic conditions or local adaptation characteristics on vessel structure and on peripheral resistance. Predicted effects of driving pressure on the ratio of wall thickness to vessel diameter are consistent with experimental observations. In addition, peripheral resistance increases by approximately 65% for an increase in driving pressure from 50 to 150 mm Hg. Peripheral resistance is predicted to be markedly increased in response to a decrease in vascular sensitivity to wall shear stress, and to be decreased in response to increased tissue metabolic demand. This theoretical approach provides a framework for integrating available information on structural remodeling in the vascular system and predicting responses to changing conditions or altered vascular reactivity, as may occur in hypertension.

  15. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  16. Uterine distension differentially affects remodelling and distensibility of the uterine vasculature in non-pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Osol, George; Barron, Carolyn; Mandalà, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    During pregnancy the mammalian uterine circulation undergoes significant expansive remodelling necessary for normal pregnancy outcome. The underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that myometrial stretch actively stimulates uterine vascular remodelling by developing a new surgical approach to induce unilateral uterine distension in non-pregnant rats. Three weeks after surgery, which consisted of an infusion of medical-grade silicone into the uterine lumen, main and mesometrial uterine artery and vein length, diameter and distensibility were recorded. Radial artery diameter, distensibility and vascular smooth muscle mitotic rate (Ki67 staining) were also measured. Unilateral uterine distension resulted in significant increases in the length of main uterine artery and vein and mesometrial segments but had no effect on vessel diameter or distensibility. In contrast, there were significant increases in the diameter of the radial arteries associated with the distended uterus. These changes were accompanied by reduced arterial distensibility and increased vascular muscle hyperplasia. In summary, this is the first report to show that myometrial stretch is a sufficient stimulus to induce significant remodelling of uterine vessels in non-pregnant rats. Moreover, the results indicate differential regulation of these growth processes as a function of vessel size and type.

  17. Remodeling of left circumflex coronary arterial tree in pacing-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart disease that manifests an imbalance between left ventricle supply and demand. Although the mechanical demand of the failing heart has been well characterized, the systematic remodeling of the entire coronary arterial tree that constitutes the supply of the myocardium is lacking. We hypothesize that the well-known increase in ventricle wall stress during CHF causes coronary vascular rarefaction to increase the vascular flow resistance, which in turn compromises the perfusion of the heart. Morphometric (diameters, length, and numbers) data of the swine left circumflex (LCx) arterial tree were measured in both CHF (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups, from which a computer reconstruction of the entire LCx tree was implemented down to the capillary level to enable a hemodynamic analysis of coronary circulation. The vascular flow resistance was increased by ∼75% due to a significant decrease of vessel numbers (∼45%) and diameters in the first capillary segments (∼10%) of the LCx arterial tree after 3-4 wk of pacing. The structural remodeling significantly changed the wall shear stress in vessel segments of the entire LCx arterial tree of CHF animals. This study enhances our knowledge of coronary arterial tree remodeling in heart failure, which provides a deeper understanding of the deterioration of supply-demand relation in left ventricle. PMID:26159756

  18. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  19. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  20. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  1. Neurovascular abnormalities in brain disorders: highlights with angiogenesis and magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The coupling between neuronal activity and vascular responses is controlled by the neurovascular unit (NVU), which comprises multiple cell types. Many different types of dysfunction in these cells may impair the proper control of vascular responses by the NVU. Magnetic resonance imaging, which is the most powerful tool available to investigate neurovascular structures or functions, will be discussed in the present article in relation to its applications and discoveries. Because aberrant angiogenesis and vascular remodeling have been increasingly reported as being implicated in brain pathogenesis, this review article will refer to this hallmark event when suitable. PMID:23829868

  2. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  3. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma with uncommon vascular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Jammula, Sruti; Panda, Sandip; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas have been described to be associated with rare vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. Coexistence of physiologically significant renal artery lesions is a compounding factor that alters management and prognosis of pheochromocytoma patients. Apart from individual case reports, data on such association in Indian population is not available. The aim of this study is to find the nature and prevalence of associated vascular abnormalities. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50 patients were diagnosed with pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas. Hospital charts of these patients were reviewed retrospectively to identify those with unusual vascular abnormalities. Available literature was also reviewed. Results: Of the 50 patients with pheochromocytoma, 7 (14%) had coexisting vascular lesions including renal artery stenosis in 4, aortoarteritis in 1, aortic aneurysm in 1 and inferior vena cava thrombosis in 1. Pheochromocytoma was adrenal in 42 and extra adrenal in 8. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was done in the patients. One patient with renal artery stenosis due to intimal fibrosis was subjected to percutaneous balloon angioplasty; the other three improved after adrenalectomy and lysis of fibrous adhesive bands. The patient with aortoarteritos was treated with oral steroids. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was reversed with anticoagulants. The patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm was advised for annual follow-up on account of its size of 4.5 cm and asymptomatic presentation. Conclusion: There are multiple mechanisms that can lead to renal artery stenosis and other vascular abnormalities in a case of pheochromocytoma. A high index of suspicion is necessary to enable both entities to be diagnosed preoperatively and allow proper planning of surgical therapy. Incomplete diagnosis may lead to persistent hypertension postoperatively in a case of associated renal artery stenosis. PMID:23226643

  4. Remodeling, Renovation, & Conversion of Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Based on a series of workshops, this collection of papers provides a framework for thought--emphasizing planning within time, flexibility, and maintenance constraints--as well as a practical guide for actual engineering of remodeling/renovation/conversion projects. Is remodeling always less expensive than new construction? Should high initial…

  5. Chromatin remodeling: nucleosomes bulging at the seams.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Craig L

    2002-04-02

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, such as SWI/SNF, hydrolyze thousands of ATPs to regulate gene expression on chromatin fibers. Recent mechanistic studies suggest that these enzymes generate localized changes in DNA topology that drive formation of multiple, remodeled nucleosomal states.

  6. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  7. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation.

  8. The role of stem cells in vein graft remodelling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q

    2007-11-01

    The vessel wall is a dynamic tissue that undergoes positive remodelling in response to altered mechanical stress. A typical example is vein graft remodelling, because veins do not develop arteriosclerosis until a vein segment is grafted on to arteries. In this process, it was observed that vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells of vein grafts die due to suddenly elevated blood pressure. This cell death is followed by endothelial regeneration. Central to this theme is the essential role played by EPCs (endothelial progenitor cells) in regenerating the lost endothelium. The mechanisms by which EPCs attach to the vessel wall and differentiate into mature endothelial cells involve increased chemokine production and laminar shear flow stimulation on the vessel wall. It seems that neo-endothelial cells derived from EPCs lack mature cell functions and express high levels of adhesion molecules resulting in LDL (low-density lipoprotein) penetration and mononuclear cell infiltration into the sub-endothelial space. Among infiltrated mononuclear cells, there are smooth muscle progenitors that proliferate and differentiate into smooth muscle cells. Meanwhile, stem cells present in the media and adventitia may also migrate into arteriosclerotic lesions via the vasa vasorum that are abundant in the diseased vessels. However, the molecular events leading to the homing, differentiation and maturation of stem/progenitor cells still needs elucidation. The present review attempts to update the progress in stem cell research related to the pathogenesis of vein graft arteriosclerosis or remodelling, focusing on the mechanisms by which stem/progenitor cells participate in the development of lesions, and to discuss the controversial issues and the future perspectives surrounding this research area.

  9. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 1D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Ferrero, Jose M.; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a final common pathway or descriptor for various cardiac pathologies. It is associated with sudden cardiac death, which is frequently caused by ventricular arrhythmias. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling, fibrosis and autonomic imbalance have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure etiology and progression. Objective In this study we investigate in silico the role of electrophysiological and structural heart failure remodeling on the modulation of key elements of the arrhythmogenic substrate, i.e., electrophysiological gradients and abnormal impulse propagation. Methods Two different mathematical models of the human ventricular action potential were used to formulate models of the failing ventricular myocyte. This provided the basis for simulations of the electrical activity within a transmural ventricular strand. Our main goal was to elucidate the roles of electrophysiological and structural remodeling in setting the stage for malignant life-threatening arrhythmias. Results Simulation results illustrate how the presence of M cells and heterogeneous electrophysiological remodeling in the human failing ventricle modulate the dispersion of action potential duration and repolarization time. Specifically, selective heterogeneous remodeling of expression levels for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA pump decrease these heterogeneities. In contrast, fibroblast proliferation and cellular uncoupling both strongly increase repolarization heterogeneities. Conduction velocity and the safety factor for conduction are also reduced by the progressive structural remodeling during heart failure. Conclusion An extensive literature now establishes that in human ventricle, as heart failure progresses, gradients for repolarization are changed significantly by protein specific electrophysiological remodeling (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Our simulations illustrate and provide new insights into this

  10. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 1 Influences Vascular Adaptations to Chronic Alterations in Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Erin R; Uchida, Cassandra; Nwadozi, Emmanuel; Makki, Armin; Haas, Tara L

    2017-04-01

    Remodeling of the skeletal muscle microvasculature involves the coordinated actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We hypothesized that the loss of TIMP1 would enhance both ischemia and flow-induced vascular remodeling by increasing MMP activity. TIMP1 deficient (Timp1(-/-) ) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice underwent unilateral femoral artery (FA) ligation or were treated with prazosin, an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, in order to investigate vascular remodeling to altered flow. Under basal conditions, Timp1(-/-) mice had reduced microvascular content as compared to WT mice. Furthermore, vascular remodeling was impaired in Timp1(-/-) mice. Timp1(-/-) mice displayed reduced blood flow recovery in response to FA ligation and no arteriogenic response to prazosin treatment. Timp1(-/-) mice failed to undergo angiogenesis in response to ischemia or prazosin, despite maintaining the capacity to increase VEGF-A and eNOS mRNA. Vascular permeability was increased in muscles of Timp1(-/-) mice in response to both prazosin treatment and FA ligation, but this was not accompanied by greater MMP activity. This study highlights a previously undescribed integral role for TIMP1 in both vascular network maturation and adaptations to ischemia or alterations in flow. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 831-841, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nuclear reprogramming and its role in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaina, Silvio; del Pilar Valencia-Morales, Maria; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Lund, Gertrud

    2013-09-01

    In general terms, "nuclear reprogramming" refers to a change in gene expression profile that results in a significant switch in cellular phenotype. Nuclear reprogramming was first addressed by pioneering studies of cell differentiation during embryonic development. In recent years, nuclear reprogramming has been studied in great detail in the context of experimentally controlled dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation of mammalian cells for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present a perspective on nuclear reprogramming in the context of spontaneous, pathophysiological phenotypic switch of vascular cells occurring in the atherosclerotic lesion. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of epigenetic mechanisms participating in the extraordinary flexibility of the gene expression profile of vascular smooth muscle cells and other cell types participating in atherogenesis. Understanding how epigenetic changes participate in vascular cell plasticity may lead to effective therapies based on the remodelling of the vascular architecture.

  12. Endothelial fluid shear stress sensing in vascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Coon, Brian G.; Yun, Sanguk; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells transduce the frictional force from blood flow (fluid shear stress) into biochemical signals that regulate gene expression and cell behavior via specialized mechanisms and pathways. These pathways shape the vascular system during development and during postnatal and adult life to optimize flow to tissues. The same pathways also contribute to atherosclerosis and vascular malformations. This Review covers recent advances in basic mechanisms of flow signaling and the involvement of these mechanisms in vascular physiology, remodeling, and these diseases. We propose that flow sensing pathways that govern normal morphogenesis can contribute to disease under pathological conditions or can be altered to induce disease. Viewing atherosclerosis and vascular malformations as instances of pathological morphogenesis provides a unifying perspective that may aid in developing new therapies. PMID:26928035

  13. Vascular involvement in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Debendra; Brown, Monica; Postlethwaite, Arnold E

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an acquired multiorgan connective tissue disease with variable mortality and morbidity dictated by clinical subset type. The etiology of the basic disease and pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmunity, fibrosis, and fibroproliferative vasculopathy are unknown and debated. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities and the options currently available to treat the vascular manifestations of SSc are discussed. Also discussed is how the hallmark pathologies (ie, how autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis of the disease) might be effected and interconnected with modulatory input from lysophospholipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid. PMID:22096374

  14. [Ventricular "remodeling" after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, A; Himbert, D; Guéret, P; Gourgon, R

    1991-06-01

    Cardiac failure is the principal medium-term complication of myocardial infarction. Changes in left ventricular geometry are observed after infarction, called ventricular remodeling, which, though compensatory initially, cause ventricular failure in the long-term. Experimental and clinical studies suggest that early treatment by coronary recanalisation, trinitrin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may prevent or limit the expansion and left ventricular dilatation after infarction, so improving ventricular function, and, at least in the animal, reduce mortality. Large scale trials with converting enzyme inhibitors are currently under way to determine the effects of this new therapeutic option. It would seem possible at present, independently of any reduction in the size of the infarction, to reduce or delay left ventricular dysfunction by interfering with the natural process of dilatation and ventricular modeling after infarction.

  15. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes.

  16. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Zika Virus Induced Cellular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Evan D; Peters, Kristen N; Connor, John H; Bullitt, Esther

    2017-03-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with morbidities such as Guillain-Barré, infant microcephaly, and ocular disease. The spread of this positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus and its growing public health threat underscore gaps in our understanding of basic ZIKV virology. To advance knowledge of the virus replication cycle within mammalian cells, we use serial section three-dimensional electron tomography to demonstrate the widespread remodeling of intracellular membranes upon infection with ZIKV. We report extensive structural rearrangements of the endoplasmic reticulum and reveal stages of the ZIKV viral replication cycle. Structures associated with RNA genome replication and virus assembly are observed integrated within the endoplasmic reticulum, and we show viruses in transit through the Golgi apparatus for viral maturation, and subsequent cellular egress. This study characterizes in detail the three-dimensional ultrastructural organization of the ZIKV replication cycle stages. Our results show close adherence of the ZIKV replication cycle to the existing flavivirus replication paradigm.

  18. Class 3 semaphorins control vascular morphogenesis by inhibiting integrin function.

    PubMed

    Serini, Guido; Valdembri, Donatella; Zanivan, Sara; Morterra, Giulia; Burkhardt, Constanze; Caccavari, Francesca; Zammataro, Luca; Primo, Luca; Tamagnone, Luca; Logan, Malcolm; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Püschel, Andreas W; Bussolino, Federico

    2003-07-24

    The motility and morphogenesis of endothelial cells is controlled by spatio-temporally regulated activation of integrin adhesion receptors, and integrin activation is stimulated by major determinants of vascular remodelling. In order for endothelial cells to be responsive to changes in activator gradients, the adhesiveness of these cells to the extracellular matrix must be dynamic, and negative regulators of integrins could be required. Here we show that during vascular development and experimental angiogenesis, endothelial cells generate autocrine chemorepulsive signals of class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3 proteins) that localize at nascent adhesive sites in spreading endothelial cells. Disrupting endogenous SEMA3 function in endothelial cells stimulates integrin-mediated adhesion and migration to extracellular matrices, whereas exogenous SEMA3 proteins antagonize integrin activation. Misexpression of dominant negative SEMA3 receptors in chick embryo endothelial cells locks integrins in an active conformation, and severely impairs vascular remodelling. Sema3a null mice show vascular defects as well. Thus during angiogenesis endothelial SEMA3 proteins endow the vascular system with the plasticity required for its reshaping by controlling integrin function.

  19. Tissue remodelling in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lars; Ruppert, Clemens; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Many lung diseases result in fibrotic remodelling. Fibrotic lung disorders can be divided into diseases with known and unknown aetiology. Among those with unknown aetiology, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common diagnosis. Because of its progressive character leading to a rapid decline in lung function, it is a fatal disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Thus, IPF has motivated many studies in the last few decades in order to increase our mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. The current concept suggests an ongoing injury of the alveolar epithelium, an impaired regeneration capacity, alveolar collapse and, finally, a fibroproliferative response. The origin of lung injury remains elusive but a diversity of factors, which will be discussed in this article, has been shown to be associated with IPF. Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells play a key role in lung fibrosis and their crucial role for epithelial regeneration, stabilisation of alveoli and interaction with fibroblasts, all known to be responsible for collagen deposition, will be illustrated. Whereas mechanisms of collagen deposition and fibroproliferation are the focus of many studies in the field, the awareness of other mechanisms in this disease is currently limited to biochemical and imaging studies including quantitative assessments of lung structure in IPF and animal models assigning alveolar collapse and collapse induration crucial roles for the degradation of the lung resulting in de-aeration and loss of surface area. Dysfunctional AE2 cells, instable alveoli and mechanical stress trigger remodelling that consists of collapsed alveoli absorbed by fibrotic tissue (i.e., collapse induration).

  20. Vascular and Cellular Calcium in Normal and Hypertensive Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Adamova, Zuzana; Ozkan, Sifa; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with significant hemodynamic changes in the cardiovascular system in order to meet the metabolic demands of mother and fetus. These changes include increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, and vascular remodeling in the uterine and systemic circulation. Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy characterized by proteinuria and hypertension. Several risk factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PE including genetic and dietary factors. Ca2+ is an essential dietary element and an important regulator of many cellular processes including vascular function. The importance of adequate dietary Ca2+ intake during pregnancy is supported by many studies. Pregnancy-associated changes in Ca2+ metabolism and plasma Ca2+ have been observed. During pregnancy, changes in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been described in red blood cells, platelets and immune cells. Also, during pregnancy, an increase in [Ca2+]i in endothelial cells (EC) stimulates the production of vasodilator substances such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin. Normal pregnancy is also associated with decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i and possibly the Ca2+-sensitization pathways of VSM contraction including protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Ca2+-dependent matrix metalloproteinases could also promote extracellular matrix degradation and vascular remodeling during pregnancy. Disruption in the balance between dietary, plasma and vascular cell Ca2+ may be responsible for some of the manifestation of PE including procoagulation, decreased vasodilation, and increased vasoconstriction and vascular resistance. The potential benefits of Ca2+ supplements during pregnancy, and the use of modulators of vascular Ca2+ to reduce the manifestations of PE in susceptible women remain an important area for experimental and clinical research. PMID:19500073

  1. Halofuginone Stimulates Adaptive Remodeling and Preserves Re-Endothelialization in Balloon-Injured Rat Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lian-Wang; Wang, Bowen; Goel, Shakti A.; Little, Christopher; Takayama, Toshio; Shi, Xu Dong; Roenneburg, Drew; DiRenzo, Daniel; Kent, K. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Three major processes, constrictive vessel remodeling, intimal hyperplasia and retarded re-endothelialization, contribute to restenosis after vascular reconstructions. Clinically used drugs inhibit intimal hyperplasia but delay re-endothelialization and also cause constrictive remodeling. Here we have examined halofuginone (HF), a herbal derivative, for its beneficial effects on vessel remodeling and differential inhibition of intimal hyperplasia versus re-endothelialization. Methods and Results Two weeks after perivascular application to balloon-injured rat common carotid arteries, HF versus vehicle (n=6 animals) enlarged luminal area 2.14 fold by increasing vessel size (adaptive remodeling, 123%), reducing intimal hyperplasia (74.3%) without inhibiting re-endothelialization. Consistent with its positive effect on vessel expansion, HF reduced collagen type-1 (but not type-3) production in injured arteries as well as that from adventitial fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its differential effects on intimal hyperplasia versus re-endothelialization, HF produced greater inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell versus endothelial cell proliferation at concentrations around 50 nM. Furthermore, HF at 50 nM effectively blocked Smad3 phosphorylation in smooth muscle cells which is known to promote smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration, and intimal hyperplasia, but HF had no effect on phospho-Smad3 in endothelial cells. Conclusions Periadventitial delivery of HF dramatically increased lumen patency via adaptive remodeling and selective inhibition of intimal hyperplasia without affecting endothelium recovery. HF is the first reported small molecule that has favorable effects on all three major processes involved in restenosis. PMID:25074254

  2. Contribution of Vascular Cells to Neointimal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Falei; Wang, Dong; Xu, Kang; Wang, Jixian; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Li; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    The de-differentiation and proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are widely accepted as the major contributor to vascular remodeling. However, recent studies indicate that vascular stem cells (VSCs) also play an important role, but their relative contribution remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used genetic lineage tracing approach to further investigate the contribution of SMCs and VSCs to neointimal thickening in response to endothelium denudation injury or artery ligation. In vitro and in vivo analysis of MYH11-cre/Rosa-loxP-RFP mouse artery showed that SMCs proliferated at a much slower rate than non-SMCs. Upon denudation or ligation injury, two distinct types of neointima were identified: Type-I neointimal cells mainly involved SMCs, while Type II mainly involved non-SMCs. Using Sox10-cre/Rosa-loxP-LacZ mice, we found that Sox10+ cells were one of the cell sources in neointima. In addition, lineage tracing using Tie2-cre/Rosa-LoxP-RFP showed that endothelial cells also contributed to the neointimal formation, but rarely transdifferentiated into mesenchymal lineages. These results provide a novel insight into the contribution of vascular cells to neointima formation, and have significant impact on the development of more effective therapies that target specific vascular cell types. PMID:28060852

  3. Importance of insulin resistance to vascular repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cubbon, Richard M; Mercer, Ben N; Sengupta, Anshuman; Kearney, Mark T

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic insulin resistance is apparent across a spectrum of clinical disorders, including obesity and diabetes, and is characterized by an adverse clustering of cardiovascular risk factors related to abnormal cellular responses to insulin. These disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent and represent a major global public health concern because of their association with significant increases in atherosclerosis-related mortality. Endogenous repair mechanisms are thought to retard the development of vascular disease, and a growing evidence base supports the adverse impact of the insulin-resistant phenotype upon indices of vascular repair. Beyond the impact of systemic metabolic changes, emerging data from murine studies also provide support for abnormal insulin signaling at the level of vascular cells in retarding vascular repair. Interrelated pathophysiological factors, including reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, oxidative stress, altered growth factor activity, and abnormal intracellular signaling, are likely to act in conjunction to impede vascular repair while also driving vascular damage. Understanding of these processes is shaping novel therapeutic paradigms that aim to promote vascular repair and regeneration, either by recruiting endogenous mechanisms or by the administration of cell-based therapies.

  4. Renal vascular lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Katz, S M; Korn, S; Umlas, S L; DeHoratius, R J

    1990-01-01

    In the past, necrotizing vasculitis has been considered to be one of the dominant intrarenal vascular abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test the validity of this statement, 70 consecutive renal biopsies from patients with SLE were reviewed. Light microscopy (LM) and immunofluorescence (IF) studies documented abnormalities, including thrombosis and nephrosclerosis, in 30 patients (43 percent), but no cellular infiltration of the vessel walls or other evidence of acute necrotizing vasculitis was seen. It is concluded that while intrarenal vasculopathy with thrombosis and nephrosclerosis is a common finding in SLE, our data and recently published studies suggest that acute necrotizing vasculitis occurs rarely, if at all, in SLE nephritis.

  5. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  6. Fractal Branching in Vascular Trees and Networks by VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular patterning offers an informative multi-scale, fractal readout of regulatory signaling by complex molecular pathways. Understanding such molecular crosstalk is important for physiological, pathological and therapeutic research in Space Biology and Astronaut countermeasures. When mapped out and quantified by NASA's innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, remodeling vascular patterns become useful biomarkers that advance out understanding of the response of biology and human health to challenges such as microgravity and radiation in space environments.

  7. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  9. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  10. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  11. Functional and molecular mapping of uncoupling between vascular permeability and loss of vascular maturation in ovarian carcinoma xenografts: the role of stroma cells in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Assaf A; Israely, Tomer; Dafni, Hagit; Meir, Gila; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2005-11-01

    Maintaining homogeneous perfusion in tissues undergoing remodeling and vascular expansion requires tight orchestration of the signals leading to endothelial sprouting and subsequent recruitment of perivascular contractile cells and vascular maturation. This regulation, however, is frequently disrupted in tumors. We previously demonstrated the role of tumor-associated myofibroblasts in vascularization and exit from dormancy of human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The aim of this work was to determine the contribution of stroma- and tumor cell-derived angiogenic growth factors to the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and maturation in MLS human ovarian carcinoma tumors. We show by RT-PCR and by in situ hybridization that VEGF was expressed by the tumor cells, while angiopoietin-1 and -2 were expressed only by the infiltrating host stroma cells. Vascular maturation was detected in vivo by vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, measured by BOLD contrast MRI and validated by immunostaining of histologic sections to alpha-smooth muscle actin. Vascular permeability was measured in vivo by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using albumin-based contrast material and validated in histologic sections by fluorescent staining of the biotinylated contrast material. MRI as well as histologic correlation maps between vascular maturation and vascular permeability revealed a wide range of vascular phenotypes, in which the distribution of vascular maturation and vasoreactivity did not overlap spatially with reduced permeability. The large heterogeneity in the degree of vascular maturation and permeability is consistent with the differential expression pattern of VEGF and angiopoietins during tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  13. TRPV1 attenuates intracranial arteriole remodeling through inhibiting VSMC phenotypic modulation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Liu, Yun; Hu, Zi-Cheng; Zhou, Yi; Pi, Yan; Guo, Lu; Wang, Xu; Chen, Xue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2017-04-01

    The phenotypic modulation of contractile vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) is widely accepted as the pivotal process in the arterial remodeling induced by hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the potential role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) on regulating VSMC plasticity and intracranial arteriole remodeling in hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and TRPV1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6J background were used. By microscopic observation of the histopathological sections of vessels from hypertensive SHR and age-matched normotensive WKY control rats, we found that hypertension induced arterial remodeling. Decreased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α while increased osteopontin (OPN) were observed in aorta and VSMCs derived from SHR compared with those in WKY, and VSMCs derived from SHR upregulated inflammatory factors. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin significantly increased expression of α-SMA and SM22α, reduced expression of OPN, retarded proliferative and migratory capacities and inhibited inflammatory status in VSMCs from SHR, which was counteracted by TRPV1 antagonist 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin (iRTX) combined with capsaicin. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin ameliorated intracranial arteriole remodeling in SHR and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive mice. However, the attenuation of arteriole remodeling by capsaicin was not observed in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, TRPV1 activation significantly decreased the activity of PI3K and phosphorylation level of Akt in SHR-derived VSMCs. Taken together, we provide evidence that TRPV1 activation by capsaicin attenuates intracranial arteriole remodeling through inhibiting VSMC phenotypic modulation during hypertension, which may be at least partly attributed to the suppression PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings highlight the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of hypertension.

  14. Simulations of trabecular remodeling and fatigue: is remodeling helpful or harmful?

    PubMed

    van Oers, René F M; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ito, Keita; Huiskes, Rik; Hilbers, Peter A J

    2011-05-01

    Microdamage-targeted resorption is paradoxal, because it entails the removal of bone from a region that was already overloaded. Under continued intense loading, resorption spaces could potentially cause more damage than they remove. To investigate this problem, we incorporated damage algorithms in a computer-simulation model for trabecular remodeling. We simulated damage accumulation and bone remodeling in a trabecular architecture, for two fatigue regimens, a 'moderate' regimen, and an 'intense' regimen with a higher number of loading cycles per day. Both simulations were also performed without bone remodeling to investigate if remodeling removed or exacerbated the damage. We found that remodeling tends to remove damage under the 'moderate' fatigue regimen, but it exacerbates damage under the 'intense' regimen. This harmful effect of remodeling may play a role in the development of stress fractures.

  15. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  16. PHACE Syndrome: Persistent Fetal Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Hrbac, T.; Chmelova, J.; Skoloudik, D.; Prochazka, M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary PHACE(S) syndrome is an acronym for neurocutaneous disease encompassing the expression of (P) posterior cranial fossa malformations, (H) facial haemangiomas, (A) arterial anomalies, (C) aortic coarctaion and other cardiac defects, (E) eye abnormalities and (S) for sternal malformation or stenotic arterial diseases. We report on a case of PHACE syndrome complete expression with persistent fetal vascular anomalies unusually in a 55-year-old women with large bilateral facial and neck haemangioma and posterior fossa circulation insufficiency. PMID:20584448

  17. Maternal homocystinuria and Moebius syndrome? Vascular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Anthony, M Y

    2011-02-14

    A case of Moebius syndrome is reported in an infant of a mother known to have pyridoxine-unresponsive homocystinuria. The authors suggest that Moebius syndrome could result from early vascular insufficiency or disruption occurring early in development related to maternal homocystinuria. Moebius syndrome consists of congenital complete or partial facial nerve palsy with or without paralysis of other cranial nerves and often in association with other malformations of the limbs and orofacial structures, but usually without gross structural brain abnormalities.

  18. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  19. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  20. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis is Associated with Left Ventricular Concentric Remodeling: Results of a Population-based Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Myasoedova, Elena; Davis, John M.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Roger, Véronique L.; Karon, Barry L.; Borgeson, Daniel D.; Therneau, Terry M.; Matteson, Eric L.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have no heart failure (HF) versus subjects without either RA or HF, and to determine the impact of RA on LV remodeling. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted among adult (≥50 years) RA patients and age- and sex-matched non-RA subjects without a history of HF. All participants underwent a standard 2D/Doppler echocardiography. LV geometry was classified into four categories based on relative wall thickness and sex-specific cut-offs for LV mass index: concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or normal geometry. Results The study included 200 RA patients and 600 matched non-RA subjects (mean age 65; 74% female in both cohorts). RA patients were significantly more likely to have abnormal LV geometry than non-RA subjects (odds ratio [OR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 2.00), adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Among those with abnormal LV geometry, RA patients had significantly increased odds of concentric LV remodeling (OR 4.73; 95% CI 2.85, 7.83). In linear regression analyses, LV mass index appeared to be lower in RA patients currently using corticosteroids (Beta +/− standard error: −0.082 +/− 0.027; p=0.002), adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Conclusion RA was strongly associated with abnormal LV remodeling, particularly, with concentric LV remodeling, among patients without HF. This association was significant beyond adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. RA disease related factors may promote changes in LV geometry. The biological mechanisms underlying LV remodeling warrant further investigation. PMID:23553738

  2. Raise the Floor When Remodeling Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A new remodeling idea adopts the concept of raised floor covering gas, water, electrical, and drain lines. The accessible floor has removable panels set into an adjustable support frame 24 inches above a concrete subfloor. (Author)

  3. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  4. B.B. Contracting & Remodeling Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    B.B. Contracting & Remodeling (the Company) is located in St. Louis, Missouri. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in St. Louis, Missouri.

  5. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  6. Effects of vascularization on cancer nanochemotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapy requires anticancer agents capable of efficient and uniform systemic delivery. One promising route to their development is nanotechnology. Here, a previous model for cancer chemotherapy based on a nanosized drug carrier (Paiva et al., 2011) is extended by including tissue vasculature and a three-dimensional growth. We study through computer simulations the therapy against tumors demanding either large or small nutrient supplies growing under different levels of tissue vascularization. Our results indicate that highly vascularized tumors demand more aggressive therapies (larger injected doses administrated at short intervals) than poorly vascularized ones. Furthermore, nanoparticle endocytic rate by tumor cells, not its selectivity, is the major factor that determines the therapeutic success. Finally, our finds indicate that therapies combining cytotoxic agents with antiangiogenic drugs that reduce the abnormal tumor vasculature, instead of angiogenic drugs that normalize it, can lead to successful treatments using feasible endocytic rates and administration intervals.

  7. Intrauterine endotoxin-induced impairs pulmonary vascular function and right ventricular performance in infant rats and improvement with early vitamin D therapy.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Erica; Powers, Kyle N; Harral, Julie W; Seedorf, Gregory J; Hunter, Kendall S; Abman, Steven H; Dodson, R Blair

    2015-12-15

    High pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), proximal pulmonary artery (PA) impedance, and right ventricular (RV) afterload due to remodeling contribute to the pathogenesis and severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Intra-amniotic exposure to endotoxin (ETX) causes sustained PH and high mortality in rat pups at birth, which are associated with impaired vascular growth and RV hypertrophy in survivors. Treatment of ETX-exposed pups with antenatal vitamin D (vit D) improves survival and lung growth, but the effects of ETX exposure on RV-PA coupling in the neonatal lung are unknown. We hypothesized that intrauterine ETX impairs RV-PA coupling through sustained abnormalities of PA stiffening and RV performance that are attenuated with vit D therapy. Fetal rats were exposed to intra-amniotic injections of ETX, ETX+vit D, or saline at 20 days gestation (term = 22 days). At postnatal day 14, pups had pressure-volume measurements of the RV and isolated proximal PA, respectively. Lung homogenates were assayed for extracellular matrix (ECM) composition by Western blot. We found that ETX lungs contain decreased α-elastin, lysyl oxidase, collagen I, and collagen III proteins (P < 0.05) compared control and ETX+vit D lungs. ETX-exposed animals have increased RV mechanical stroke work (P < 0.05 vs. control and ETX+vit D) and elastic potential energy (P < 0.05 vs. control and ETX+vit D). Mechanical stiffness and ECM remodeling are increased in the PA (P < 0.05 vs. control and ETX+vit D). We conclude that intrauterine exposure of fetal rats to ETX during late gestation causes persistent impairment of RV-PA coupling throughout infancy that can be prevented with early vit D treatment.

  8. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  9. Immune mechanisms in hypertension and vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    Over the last 20 years it has become recognized that low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. More recently, participation of the innate and the adaptive immune response in mechanisms that contribute to inflammation in cardiovascular disease has been reported in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Different subsets of lymphocytes and their cytokines are involved in vascular remodelling in hypertension, chronic kidney disease and heart disease. Effector T-cells include Th1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 (interleukin-4 producing) lymphocytes, as well as Th17 (which produce interleukin-17) and T-suppressor lymphocytes such as T(reg)-cells (regulatory T-cells), which express the transcription factor Foxp3 (forkhead box P3) and participate respectively as pro- and anti-inflammatory cells. Pro-inflammatory T-lymphocytes participate in mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in part by mediating the effects of angiotensin II and mineralocorticoids. Involvement of immune mechanisms in cardiac, vascular and renal changes in hypertension has been demonstrated in many experimental models, an example being the Dahl-salt sensitive rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat. How activation of immunity is triggered remains unknown, but neo-antigens could be generated by elevated blood pressure through damage-associated molecular pattern receptors or other mechanisms. Once activated, Th1 cells may contribute to blood pressure elevation by affecting the kidney, vascular remodelling of blood vessels directly via the effects of the cytokines produced or through their effects on perivascular fat. T(reg)-cells protect from blood pressure elevation by acting upon similar targets. Recent data suggests that participation of these mechanisms that have been demonstrated already in murine models also occurs in humans. These novel findings may open the way for new therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes in hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans.

  10. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  11. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  12. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed Central

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release. The thromboxane A2 pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The “Timing Hypothesis,” which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  13. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  14. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  15. Radiotherapy-induced right ventricular remodelling: The missing piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Hering, Dagmara; Venneri, Lucia; Grozdic-Milojevic, Isidora

    2017-02-01

    The number of studies demonstrating that right ventricular structure, function and mechanics are valuable predictors of cardiovascular and total morbidity and mortality in patients with a wide range of cardiovascular conditions is constantly increasing. Most studies that evaluated the influence of radiotherapy on the heart focused on left ventricular remodelling, which is why current guidelines only recommend detailed assessment of the left ventricle. Data regarding right ventricular changes in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy are scarce. Given that radiotherapy more often induces late cardiac impairment - unlike chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity, which is usually acute - it is quite reasonable to follow these patients echocardiographically for a long time (even for 20years after initiation of radiotherapy). Investigations that have followed cancer survivors for at least 10years after radiotherapy agree that right ventricular structure, systolic/diastolic function and mechanics are significantly impaired. The mechanisms of radiation-induced right ventricular remodelling are still unclear, but it is thought that fibrosis is the dominant factor in myocardial remodelling and vascular changes. Many factors may contribute to right ventricular impairment during and after radiotherapy: cumulative radiation dose; dose per treatment; delivery technique; radiation target (chest and mediastinum); and co-morbidities. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the potential mechanisms of radiation-induced right ventricular remodelling, and to summarize clinical studies involving radiotherapy-treated cancer patients.

  16. Bone remodeling as a spatial evolutionary game.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; Murgas, Kevin A

    2017-04-07

    Bone remodeling is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions, biochemical signaling and mechanical stimuli. Early models of the biological aspects of remodeling were non-spatial and focused on the local dynamics at a fixed location in the bone. Several spatial extensions of these models have been proposed, but they generally suffer from two limitations: first, they are not amenable to analysis and are computationally expensive, and second, they neglect the role played by bone-embedded osteocytes. To address these issues, we developed a novel model of spatial remodeling based on the principles of evolutionary game theory. The analytically tractable framework describes the spatial interactions between zones of bone resorption, bone formation and quiescent bone, and explicitly accounts for regulation of remodeling by bone-embedded, mechanotransducing osteocytes. Using tools from the theory of interacting particle systems we systematically classified the different dynamic regimes of the spatial model and identified regions of parameter space that allow for global coexistence of resorption, formation and quiescence, as observed in physiological remodeling. In coexistence scenarios, three-dimensional simulations revealed the emergence of sponge-like bone clusters. Comparison between spatial and non-spatial dynamics revealed substantial differences and suggested a stabilizing role of space. Our findings emphasize the importance of accounting for spatial structure and bone-embedded osteocytes when modeling the process of bone remodeling. Thanks to the lattice-based framework, the proposed model can easily be coupled to a mechanical model of bone loading.

  17. Vascular aging: Chronic oxidative stress and impairment of redox signaling—consequences for vascular homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachschmid, Markus M.; Schildknecht, Stefan; Matsui, Reiko; Zee, Rebecca; Haeussler, Dagmar; Cohen, Richard A.; Pimental, David; van der Loo, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic morphological and molecular alterations such as vessel wall thickening and reduction of nitric oxide occur in the aging vasculature leading to the gradual loss of vascular homeostasis. Consequently, the risk of developing acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases increases with age. Current research of the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial function demonstrates a duality of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in contributing to vascular homeostasis or leading to detrimental effects when formed in excess. Furthermore, changes in function and redox status of vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to age-related vascular remodeling. The age-dependent increase in free radical formation causes deterioration of the nitric oxide signaling cascade, alters and activates prostaglandin metabolism, and promotes novel oxidative posttranslational protein modifications that interfere with vascular and cell signaling pathways. As a result, vascular dysfunction manifests. Compensatory mechanisms are initially activated to cope with age-induced oxidative stress, but become futile, which results in irreversible oxidative modifications of biological macromolecules. These findings support the ‘free radical theory of aging’ but also show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are essential signaling molecules, regulating vascular homeostasis. PMID:22380696

  18. Structural abnormalities of small resistance arteries in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    Regardless of the mechanisms that initiate the increase in blood pressure, the development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, the small arteries smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen, and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, while in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodeling may be detected. Also, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a hypertrophic remodeling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. The results from our own group have suggested that indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, the regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure, both in human and in animal models of genetic and experimental hypertension. A complete normalization of small resistance artery structure is demonstrated in hypertensive patients, after long-term and effective therapy with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and calcium antagonists. Few data are available in diabetic hypertensive patients; however, blockade of the renin-angiotensin system seems to be effective in this regard. In conclusion, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest that small resistance artery structure may be considered an intermediate endpoint in the evaluation of the effects of antihypertensive therapy; however, there are presently no data available about the prognostic impact of the regression of vascular structural alterations in hypertension and diabetes.

  19. Craniofacial abnormalities in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, N J; Silvera, V M; Campbell, S E; Gordon, L B

    2012-09-01

    HGPS is a rare syndrome of segmental premature aging. Our goal was to expand the scope of structural bone and soft-tissue craniofacial abnormalities in HGPS through CT or MR imaging. Using The Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database, 98 imaging studies on 25 patients, birth to 14.1 years of age, were comprehensively reviewed. Eight newly identified abnormalities involving the calvaria, skull base, and soft tissues of the face and orbits were present with prevalences between 43% and 100%. These included J-shaped sellas, a mottled appearance and increased vascular markings of the calvaria, abnormally configured mandibular condyles, hypoplastic articular eminences, small zygomatic arches, prominent parotid glands, and optic nerve kinking. This expanded craniofacial characterization helps link disease features and improves our ability to evaluate how underlying genetic and cellular abnormalities culminate in a disease phenotype.

  20. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  1. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  2. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  3. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  4. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  5. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  6. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  7. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  8. Silencing salusin-β attenuates cardiovascular remodeling and hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xing-Sheng; Ling, Li; Zhou, Bing; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Salusin-β is a bioactive peptide involved in vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular fibrosis and hypertension. The present study was designed to determine the effects of silencing salusin-β on hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Thirteen-week-old male SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were subjected to intravenous injection of PBS, adenoviral vectors encoding salusin-β shRNA (Ad-Sal-shRNA) or a scramble shRNA. Salusin-β levels in plasma, myocardium and mesenteric artery were increased in SHR. Silencing salusin-β had no significant effect on blood pressure in WKY, but reduced blood pressure in SHR. It reduced the ratio of left ventricle weight to body weight, cross-sectional areas of cardiocytes and perivascular fibrosis, and decreased the media thickness and the media/lumen ratio of arteries in SHR. Silencing salusin-β almost normalized plasma norepinephrine and angiotensin II levels in SHR. It prevented the upregulation of angiotensin II and AT1 receptors, and reduced the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and superoxide anion levels in myocardium and mesenteric artery of SHR. Knockdown of salusin-β attenuated cell proliferation and fibrosis in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR. These results indicate that silencing salusin-β attenuates hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling in SHR. PMID:28230187

  9. Comparison of Macitentan and Bosentan on Right Ventricular Remodeling in a Rat Model of Non-vasoreactive Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Landskroner, Kyle; Bauer, Yasmina; Vercauteren, Magali; Rey, Markus; Renault, Berengère; Studer, Rolf; Vezzali, Enrico; Freti, Diego; Hadana, Hakim; Schläpfer, Manuela; Cattaneo, Christophe; Bortolamiol, Céline; Weber, Edgar; Whitby, Brian R.; Delahaye, Stéphane; Wanner, Daniel; Steiner, Pauline; Nayler, Oliver; Hess, Patrick; Clozel, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We compared the efficacy of macitentan, a novel dual endothelin A/endothelin B receptor antagonist, with that of another dual endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, in a rat model of non-vasoreactive pulmonary hypertension (PH) with particular emphasis on right ventricular (RV) remodeling. Methods and Results: Unlike monocrotaline or hypoxic/sugen rats, bleomycin-treated rats presented a non-vasoreactive PH characterized by the absence of pulmonary dilatation to adenosine. We therefore chose the bleomycin rat model to compare the effects of the maximally effective doses of macitentan and bosentan on pulmonary vascular and RV remodeling. Macitentan (100 mg·kg−1·d−1), but not bosentan (300 mg·kg−1·d−1), significantly prevented pulmonary vascular remodeling, RV hypertrophy, and cardiomyocyte diameter increase. Cardiac protection by macitentan was associated with a significant attenuation of genes related to cell hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling. Microautoradiography and high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed greater distribution of macitentan than bosentan in the RV and pulmonary tissue. Conclusions: Macitentan was more efficacious than bosentan in preventing the development of pulmonary and RV hypertrophies in a model of non-vasoreactive PH. Greater ability to distribute into the tissue could contribute to the greater structural improvement by macitentan compared with bosentan. PMID:26230396

  10. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  11. Structural Abnormalities of the Inner Macula in Incontinentia Pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Basilius, Jacob; Young, Marielle P.; Michaelis, Timothy C.; Hobbs, Ronald; Jenkins, Glen; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Importance This report presents evidence from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (sdOCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) of inner foveal structural abnormalities associated with vision loss in Incontinentia pigmenti (IP). Observations Two children had reduced visual behavior in association with abnormalities of the inner foveal layers on sdOCT. FA showed filling defects in retinal and choroidal circulations and irregularities of the foveal avascular zones (FAZ). The foveal/parafoveal ratios were greater than 0.57 in 6 eyes of 3 patients who had extraretinal NV and/or peripheral avascular retina on FA and were treated with laser. Of these, 3 eyes of 2 patients had irregularities in FAZ and poor vision. Conclusions and Relevance Besides traction retinal detachment, visual loss in IP can occur with abnormalities of the inner fovea structure seen on sdOCT, consistent with prior descriptions of foveal hypoplasia. The evolution of abnormalities in the neural and vascular retina suggests a vascular cause of the foveal structural changes. More study is needed to determine any potential benefit of the foveal/parafoveal ratio in children with IP. Even with marked foveal structural abnormalities, vision can be preserved in some patients with IP with vigilant surveillance in the early years of life. PMID:26043102

  12. A Multiscale Computational Framework to Understand Vascular Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Garbey, Marc; Rahman, Mahbubur; Berceli, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The failure rate for vascular interventions (vein bypass grafting, arterial angioplasty/stenting) remains unacceptably high. Over the past two decades, researchers have applied a wide variety of approaches to investigate the primary failure mechanisms, neointimal hyperplasia and aberrant remodeling of the wall, in an effort to identify novel therapeutic strategies. Despite incremental progress, specific cause/effect linkages among the primary drivers of the pathology, (hemodynamic factors, inflammatory biochemical mediators, cellular effectors) and vascular occlusive phenotype remain lacking. We propose a multiscale computational framework of vascular adaptation to develop a bridge between theory and experimental observation and to provide a method for the systematic testing of relevant clinical hypotheses. Cornerstone to our model is a feedback mechanism between environmental conditions and dynamic tissue plasticity described at the cellular level with an agent based model. Our implementation (i) is modular, (ii) starts from basic mechano-biology principle at the cell level and (iii) facilitates the agile development of the model. PMID:25977733

  13. Vascular alterations in the rabbit patellar tendon after surgical incision

    PubMed Central

    DOSCHAK, M. R.; MATYAS, J. R.; HART, D. A.; BRAY, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Open incision of the patellar tendon (PT) is thought to promote acute vascular responses which ultimately result in an enhanced degree of tendon repair. Such a clinical procedure is commonly applied to patients with refractory tendinitis. The objective of this study was to quantify the vascular adaptations (both anatomical and physiological) to longitudinal incision of the PT, and the resultant effects on tendon organisation. Fifty-four New Zealand White rabbits were separated into 3 experimental groups and 2 control groups. Experimental groups underwent surgical incision of the right PT, and were assessed 3 d, 10 d and 42 d following injury; normal unoperated controls were evaluated at time zero, and sham-operated controls were evaluated at 3 d to control for the effects of incising the overlying skin. Quantitative measures of PT blood supply (blood flow, microvascular volume) and geometric properties of PT substance were obtained for each PT. Histomorphology was assessed to evaluate vascular remodelling and matrix organisation in the healing PT. Longitudinal open incision surgery of the PT led to rapid increases in both blood flow and vascular volume. The incision of overlying tissues alone (sham-operated) contributed to this measurable increase, and accounted for 36% and 42% of the elevated blood flow and vascular volume respectively at the 3 d interval. In the incised PT, blood flow significantly increased by 3 d compared with both time zero and sham-operated controls, and remained significantly elevated at the 10 d interval. Similarly, vascular volume of the incised PT increased at 3 d compared both with time zero and sham-operated controls. At the 10 d interval, the increase in vascular volume was greatest in the central PT substance. By 42 d both blood flow and vascular volume of the incised tendon had diminished, with only blood flow remaining significantly different from controls. In the contralateral limb, a significant neurogenically mediated

  14. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  15. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  16. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  17. Haemostasis in ischaemic stroke and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Stott, D J; Spilg, E; Campbell, A M; Rumley, A; Mansoor, M A; Lowe, G D

    2001-12-01

    Abnormalities of coagulation and fibrinolysis may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke and vascular dementia. We aimed to determine whether haemostatic function is altered in acute recent-onset or chronic ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. We studied consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke (n = 74) and vascular dementia (n = 42) compared with healthy controls (n = 40) in a case-control study. The ischaemic stroke group was assessed twice, 3-10 days after the acute stroke and at 1-3 months. Fibrinogen, fibrin D-dimer (marker of fibrin turnover) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) (marker of endothelial disturbance) were elevated acutely (P < 0.0001) and in the convalescent phase after ischaemic stroke (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.01 respectively, compared with controls). Similar results were seen in the vascular dementia group. Stepwise multivariate regression analyses showed that cerebrovascular disease correlated independently with fibrinogen (P < 0.001) and fibrin D-dimer levels (P < 0.001), while vWF correlated independently with electrocardiograph evidence of ischaemic heart disease (P = 0.004). Changes between acute and convalescent phases in ischaemic stroke were slightly inconsistent. However, in the acute stage there were tendencies for fibrinogen, D-dimer and vWF to be increased, and factor VIII was significantly higher. Abnormalities of haemostasis, including increased fibrin turnover and endothelial disturbance, are found in both acute and chronic cerebral ischaemia. Many of these patients have co-existent ischaemic heart disease and this may contribute to some of these changes. Acute ischaemic stroke is associated with transient changes in haemostatic factors; however, most abnormalities persist into the convalescent phase, and are also demonstrable in subjects with vascular dementia.

  18. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  19. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Retinal remodeling in inherited photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W

    2003-10-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations initiated in rods or the retinal pigmented epithelium usually evoke secondary cone death and sensory deafferentation of the surviving neural retina. In the mature central nervous system, deafferentation evokes atrophy and connective re-patterning. It has been assumed that the neural retina does not remodel, and that it is a passive survivor. Screening of advanced stages of human and rodent retinal degenerations with computational molecular phenotyping has exposed a prolonged period of aggressive negative remodeling in which neurons migrate along aberrant glial columns and seals, restructuring the adult neural retina (1). Many neurons die, but survivors rewire the remnant inner plexiform layer (IPL), forming thousands of novel ectopic microneuromas in the remnant inner nuclear layer (INL). Bipolar and amacrine cells engage in new circuits that are most likely corruptive. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas emerges regardless of the molecular defects that initially trigger retinal degenerations. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, the exposure of intrinsic retinal remodeling by the removal of sensory control in retinal degenerations suggests that neuronal organization in the normal retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  1. Temperature-induced cardiac remodelling in fish

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Adam N.; Klaiman, Jordan M.; Shiels, Holly A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermal acclimation causes the heart of some fish species to undergo significant remodelling. This includes changes in electrical activity, energy utilization and structural properties at the gross and molecular level of organization. The purpose of this Review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of temperature-induced structural remodelling in the fish ventricle across different levels of biological organization, and to examine how such changes result in the modification of the functional properties of the heart. The structural remodelling response is thought to be responsible for changes in cardiac stiffness, the Ca2+ sensitivity of force generation and the rate of force generation by the heart. Such changes to both active and passive properties help to compensate for the loss of cardiac function caused by a decrease in physiological temperature. Hence, temperature-induced cardiac remodelling is common in fish that remain active following seasonal decreases in temperature. This Review is organized around the ventricular phases of the cardiac cycle – specifically diastolic filling, isovolumic pressure generation and ejection – so that the consequences of remodelling can be fully described. We also compare the thermal acclimation-associated modifications of the fish ventricle with those seen in the mammalian ventricle in response to cardiac pathologies and exercise. Finally, we consider how the plasticity of the fish heart may be relevant to survival in a climate change context, where seasonal temperature changes could become more extreme and variable. PMID:27852752

  2. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  3. Left ventricular remodeling after experimental myocardial cryoinjury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Michele M; Paliotti, Roberta; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; Esposito, Arturo; Gianelli, Umberto; Busca, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Ugo; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Magrini, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    The standard coronary ligation, the most studied model of experimental myocardial infarction in rats, is limited by high mortality and produces unpredictable areas of necrosis. To standardize the location and size of the infarct and to elucidate the mechanisms of myocardial remodeling and its progression to heart failure, we studied the functional, structural, and ultrastructural changes of myocardial infarction produced by experimental myocardial cryoinjury. The cryoinjury was successful in 24 (80%) of 30 male adult CD rats. A subepicardial infarct was documented on echocardiograms, with an average size of about 21%. Macroscopic examination reflected closely the stamp of the instrument used, without transition zones to viable myocardium. Histological examination, during the acute setting, revealed an extensive area of coagulation necrosis and hemorrhage in the subepicardium. An inflammatory infiltrate was evident since the 7th hour, whereas the reparative phase started within the first week, with proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and myocytes. From the 7th day, deposition of collagen fibers was reported with a reparative scar completed at the 30th day. Ultrastructural study revealed vascular capillary damage and irreversible alterations of the myocytes in the acute setting and confirmed the histological findings of the later phases. The damage was associated with a progressive left ventricular (LV) remodeling, including thinning of the infarcted area, hypertrophy of the noninfarcted myocardium, and significant LV dilation. This process started from the 60th day and progressed over the subsequent 120 days period; at 180 days, a significant increase in LV filling pressure, indicative of heart failure, was found. In conclusion, myocardial cryodamage, although different in respect to ischemic damage, causes a standardized injury reproducing the cellular patterns of coagulation necrosis, early microvascular reperfusion, hemorrhage, inflammation

  4. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  5. Félix Voisin and the genesis of abnormals.

    PubMed

    Doron, Claude-Olivier

    2015-12-01

    This article traces the genealogy of the category of 'abnormals' in psychiatry. It focuses on the French alienist Felix Voisin (1794-1872) who played a decisive role in the creation of alienist knowledge and institutions for problem children, criminals, idiots and lunatics. After a presentation of the category of 'abnormals' as understood at the end of the nineteenth century, I identify in the works of Voisin a key moment in the concept's evolution. I show how, based on concepts borrowed from phrenology and applied first to idiocy, Voisin allows alienism to establish links between the medico-legal (including penitentiary) and medical-educational fields (including difficult childhood). I stress the extent to which this enterprise is related to Voisin's humanism, which claimed to remodel pedagogy and the right to punish on the anthropological particularities of individuals, in order to improve them.

  6. Molecular Aspects of Exercise-induced Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; McMullen, Julie R

    2016-11-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling is typically an adaptive response associated with cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and renewal, increased cardiac myocyte contractility, sarcomeric remodeling, cell survival, metabolic and mitochondrial adaptations, electrical remodeling, and angiogenesis. Initiating stimuli/triggers of cardiac remodeling include increased hemodynamic load, increased sympathetic activity, and the release of hormones and growth factors. Prolonged and strenuous exercise may lead to maladaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling including cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmia. In addition, this article describes novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of heart failure that target mechanisms responsible for adaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling, which are being developed and tested in preclinical models.

  7. Characterization of right ventricular remodeling and failure in a chronic pulmonary hypertension model

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Hadri, Lahouaria; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Fish, Kenneth; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Chaanine, Antoine; Torquato, Samantha; Naim, Charbel; Ibanez, Borja; Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Fuster, Valentin; Sengupta, Partho P.; Leopold, Jane A.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure is the main determinant of a poor prognosis. We aimed to characterize RV structural and functional differences during adaptive RV remodeling and progression to RV failure in a large animal model of chronic PH. Postcapillary PH was created surgically in swine (n = 21). After an 8- to 14-wk follow-up, two groups were identified based on the development of overt heart failure (HF): PH-NF (nonfailing, n = 12) and PH-HF (n = 8). In both groups, invasive hemodynamics, pressure-volume relationships, and echocardiography confirmed a significant increase in pulmonary pressures and vascular resistance consistent with PH. Histological analysis also demonstrated distal pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling in both groups. Diastolic dysfunction, defined by a steeper RV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship and longitudinal strain, was found in the absence of HF as an early marker of RV remodeling. RV contractility was increased in both groups, and RV-PA coupling was preserved in PH-NF animals but impaired in the PH-HF group. RV hypertrophy was present in PH-HF, although there was evidence of increased RV fibrosis in both PH groups. In the PH-HF group, RV sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase2a expression was decreased, and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased. Aldosterone levels were also elevated in PH-HF. Thus, in the swine pulmonary vein banding model of chronic postcapillary PH, RV remodeling occurs at the structural, histological, and molecular level. Diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis are present in adaptive RV remodeling, whereas the onset of RV failure is associated with RV-PA uncoupling, defective calcium handling, and hyperaldosteronism. PMID:25158063

  8. [Microscopic anatomy of abnormal structure in root tuber of Pueraria lobata].

    PubMed

    Duan, Hai-yan; Cheng, Ming-en; Peng, Hua-sheng; Zhang, He-ting; Zhao, Yu-jiao

    2015-11-01

    Puerariae Lobatae Radix, also known as Gegen, is a root derived from Pueraria lobata. Based on field investigation and the developmental anatomy of root tuber, we have elucidated the relationship between the growth of root tuber and the anomalous structure. The results of analysis showed that the root system of P. lobata was developed from seed and adventitious root and there existed root tuber, adventitious root and conductive root according to morphology and function. The root tuber was developed from adventitious root, its secondary structure conformed to the secondary structure of dicotyledon's root. With the development of root, the secondary phloem of root tuber appeared abnormal vascular tissue, which was distributed like ring in the outside of secondary vascular tissue. The root tuber might have 4-6 concentric circular permutation abnormal vascular tissuelobate, and was formed by the internal development of abnormal vascular tissue. The xylem and phloem of abnormal vascular tissue were the main body of the root tuber. The results reveal the abnormal anatomical structure development of P. lobata, also provides the theoretical basis for reasonable harvest medicinal parts and promoting sustainable utilization of resources of P. lobata.

  9. Pulmonary arterial strain- and remodeling-induced stiffening are differentiated in a chronic model of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Golob, Mark J; Tabima, Diana M; Wolf, Gregory D; Johnston, James L; Forouzan, Omid; Mulchrone, Ashley M; Kellihan, Heidi B; Bates, Melissa L; Chesler, Naomi C

    2017-04-11

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a debilitating vascular disease that leads to pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which is a predictor of patient mortality. During PH development, PA stiffening adversely affects right ventricular function. PA stiffening has been investigated through the arterial nonlinear elastic response during mechanical testing using a canine PH model. However, only circumferential properties were reported and in the absence of chronic PH-induced PA remodeling. Remodeling can alter arterial nonlinear elastic properties via chronic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) content and geometry. Here, we used an established constitutive model to demonstrate and differentiate between strain-stiffening, which is due to nonlinear elasticity, and remodeling-induced stiffening, which is due to ECM and geometric changes, in a canine model of chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH). To do this, circumferential and axial tissue strips of large extralobar PAs from control and CTEPH tissues were tested in uniaxial tension, and data were fit to a phenomenological constitutive model. Strain-induced stiffening was evident from mechanical testing as nonlinear elasticity in both directions and computationally by a high correlation coefficient between the mechanical data and model (R(2)=0.89). Remodeling-induced stiffening was evident from a significant increase in the constitutive model stress parameter, which correlated with increased PA collagen content and decreased PA elastin content as measured histologically. The ability to differentiate between strain- and remodeling-induced stiffening in vivo may lead to tailored clinical treatments for PA stiffening in PH patients.

  10. Emerging roles for vascular smooth muscle cell exosomes in calcification and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Shanahan, C M

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to 'synthetic' state contributes to vascular pathologies including restenosis, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. We have recently found that the secretion of exosomes is a feature of 'synthetic' VSMCs and that exosomes are novel players in vascular repair processes as well as pathological vascular thrombosis and calcification. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors as well as mineral imbalance stimulate exosome secretion by VSMCs, most likely by the activation of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3) and cytoskeletal remodelling. Calcium stress induces dramatic changes in VSMC exosome composition and accumulation of phosphatidylserine (PS), annexin A6 and matrix metalloproteinase-2, which converts exosomes into a nidus for calcification. In addition, by presenting PS, VSMC exosomes can also provide the catalytic surface for the activation of coagulation factors. Recent data showing that VSMC exosomes are loaded with proteins and miRNA regulating cell adhesion and migration highlight VSMC exosomes as potentially important communication messengers in vascular repair. Thus, the identification of signalling pathways regulating VSMC exosome secretion, including activation of SMPD3 and cytoskeletal rearrangements, opens up novel avenues for a deeper understanding of vascular remodelling processes.

  11. Vascular Dysfunction in Pneumocystis-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension Is Related to Endothelin Response and Adrenomedullin Concentration.

    PubMed

    Siemsen, Dan W; Dobrinen, Erin; Han, Soo; Chiocchi, Kari; Meissner, Nicole; Swain, Steve D

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension subsequent to an infectious disease can be due to vascular structural remodeling or to functional alterations within various vascular cell types. In our previous mouse model of Pneumocystis-associated pulmonary hypertension, we found that vascular remodeling was not responsible for observed increases in right ventricular pressures. Here, we report that the vascular dysfunction we observed could be explained by an enhanced response to endothelin-1 (20% greater reduction in lumen diameter, P ≤ 0.05), corresponding to an up-regulation of similar magnitude (P ≤ 0.05) of the endothelin A receptor in the lung tissue. This effect was potentially augmented by a decrease in production of the pulmonary vasodilator adrenomedullin of almost 70% (P ≤ 0.05). These changes did not occur in interferon-γ knockout mice similarly treated, which do not develop pulmonary hypertension under these circumstances. Surprisingly, we did not observe any relevant changes in the vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase vasodilatory response, which is a common potential site of inflammatory alterations to pulmonary vascular function. Our results indicate the diverse mechanisms by which inflammatory responses to prior infections can cause functionally relevant changes in vascular responses in the lung, promoting the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  13. Atorvastatin therapy associated with improvement in left ventricular remodeling in a case of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahisa; Node, Koichi; Mine, Takanao; Morita, Takashi; Kioka, Hidetaka; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Tsukamoto, Yasumasa; Masuda, Masaharu; Okuda, Keiji; Fukunami, Masatake

    2006-12-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects such as anti-inflammatory and vascular protective effects that would be beneficial for patients with chronic heart failure. This report describes a patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and a long-standing history of heart failure that was treated with atorvastatin in addition to conventional therapy that included beta-blockers. Atorvastatin therapy for 12 months was associated with an improvement in cardiac function and improved left ventricular remodeling and peak oxygen consumption. This result suggests that statin therapy may be a potential novel treatment strategy for patients with chronic heart failure.

  14. Chronic miR-29 antagonism promotes favorable plaque remodeling in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Victoria; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Luciano, Amelia; Skroblin, Philipp; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Perrotta, Paola; Yin, Xiaoke; Bauer, Ashley; Leslie, Kristen L; Zhang, Pei; Aryal, Binod; Montgomery, Rusty L; Thum, Thomas; Martin, Kathleen; Suarez, Yajaira; Mayr, Manuel; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Sessa, William C

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques can lead to rupture, acute myocardial infarction, and death. Enhancement of plaque extracellular matrix (ECM) may improve plaque morphology and stabilize lesions. Here, we demonstrate that chronic administration of LNA-miR-29 into an atherosclerotic mouse model improves indices of plaque morphology. This occurs due to upregulation of miR-29 target genes of the ECM (col1A and col3A) resulting in reduced lesion size, enhanced fibrous cap thickness, and reduced necrotic zones. Sustained LNA-miR-29 treatment did not affect circulating lipids, blood chemistry, or ECM of solid organs including liver, lung, kidney, spleen, or heart. Collectively, these data support the idea that antagonizing miR-29 may promote beneficial plaque remodeling as an independent approach to stabilize vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions.

  15. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure: Burden of Epigenetic Reprogramming, Synaptic Remodeling, and Adult Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Kyzar, Evan J.; Floreani, Christina; Teppen, Tara L.; Pandey, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence represents a crucial phase of synaptic maturation characterized by molecular changes in the developing brain that shape normal behavioral patterns. Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in these neuromaturation processes. Perturbations of normal epigenetic programming during adolescence by ethanol can disrupt these molecular events, leading to synaptic remodeling and abnormal adult behaviors. Repeated exposure to binge levels of alcohol increases the risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and comorbid psychopathology including anxiety in adulthood. Recent studies in the field clearly suggest that adolescent alcohol exposure causes widespread and persistent changes in epigenetic, neurotrophic, and neuroimmune pathways in the brain. These changes are manifested by altered synaptic remodeling and neurogenesis in key brain regions leading to adult psychopathology such as anxiety and alcoholism. This review details the molecular mechanisms underlying adolescent alcohol exposure-induced changes in synaptic plasticity and the development of alcohol addiction-related phenotypes in adulthood. PMID:27303256

  16. Growth and Remodeling in Blood Vessels Studied In Vivo With Fractal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2003-01-01

    Every cell in the human body must reside in close proximity to a blood vessel (within approximately 200 mm) because blood vessels provide the oxygen, metabolite, and fluid exchanges required for cellular existence. The growth and remodeling of blood vessels are required to support the normal physiology of embryonic development, reproductive biology, wound healing and adaptive remodeling to exercise, as well as abnormal tissue change in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Cardiovascular and hemodynamic (blood flow dynamics) alterations experienced by astronauts during long-term spaceflight, including orthostatic intolerance, fluid shifts in the body, and reduced numbers of red (erythrocyte) and white (immune) blood cells, are identified as risk factors of very high priority in the NASA task force report on risk reduction for human spaceflight, the "Critical Path Roadmap."

  17. Increased vascular density and vitreo-retinal membranes accompany vascularization of the pigment epithelium in the dystrophic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, R B; Roque, R S; Solomon, S W

    1989-09-01

    Observations of vascularization of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and formation of vitreo-retinal membranes (VRMs) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with inherited retinal dystrophy suggest that vascular proliferation occurs in this model. To test this hypothesis, we studied the progression of vascular changes in RCS and age-matched control rats using quantitative light microscope morphometry and electron microscopy. At 2 weeks, prior to photoreceptor degeneration, the dystrophic retina is comparable with the control. By 2 months, extensive degeneration of photoreceptor cells results in significant thinning of the dystrophic retina as compared with the control. Signs of vascular degeneration are evident at the electron microscope level--"ghost" vessels consisting of acellular basal lamina surrounded by amorphous electron-dense material; degenerating endothelial cells and pericytes; and abnormal deposits of extracellular matrix (ECM) material around blood vessels. Vascular degeneration is accompanied by glial changes in the form of necrotic perivascular glial processes and abnormal ECM deposits among the altered Muller cell processes. At 2-4 months in the dystrophic retina, numbers of vessel profiles in dystrophic retinas are decreased as compared with controls. However, vascular degeneration is overshadowed by the formation of numerous capillary tufts within the RPE layer, which together with retinal thinning results in increased vessel density. Between 4-12 months, the retinal thickness diminishes further, vascularization of the RPE increases, vitreo-retinal membranes are formed, and vascular density increases. In summary, following an initial period of vascular degeneration, vascularization of the RPE is accompanied by an increase in retinal vessel density and by the formation of vitreo-retinal membranes.

  18. The Chd Family of Chromatin Remodelers

    PubMed Central

    Marfella, Concetta G.A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes contribute to the dynamic changes that occur in chromatin structure during cellular processes such as transcription, recombination, repair, and replication. Members of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (Chd) family of enzymes belong to the SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. The Chd proteins are distinguished by the presence of two N-terminal chromodomains that function as interaction surfaces for a variety of chromatin components. Genetic, biochemical, and structural studies demonstrate that Chd proteins are important regulators of transcription and play critical roles during developmental processes. Numerous Chd proteins are also implicated in human disease. PMID:17350655

  19. New concepts in vascular nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Oeckler, R A; Wolin, M S

    2000-09-01

    Low levels of nitric oxide (NO) control the activities of guanylate cyclase and mitochondrial respiration. Increasing NO levels interact with multiple signaling systems through the formation of peroxynitrite and other oxidation products. Signaling mechanisms linked to NO participate in the prevention of acute responses such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. In contrast, processes related to vascular remodeling, and responses to injury that are associated with the progression and adaptation to disease processes, are not as well understood. Many of the opposing processes involved in these adaptations may originate from the diverse signaling mechanisms that NO and its oxidized products can regulate in a cell-specific manner in the vessel wall.

  20. Endothelial SIRT1 prevents adverse arterial remodeling by facilitating HERC2-mediated degradation of acetylated LKB1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bo; Man, Andy W.C.; Yang, Kangmin; Guo, Yumeng; Xu, Cheng; Tse, Hung-Fat; Han, Weiping; Bloksgaard, Maria; De Mey, Jo G.R.; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Aims-SIRT1 exerts potent activity against cellular senescence and vascular ageing. By decreasing LKB1 protein levels, it promotes the survival and regeneration of endothelial cells. The present study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT1-mediated LKB1 degradation for the prevention of vascular ageing. Methods and Results-Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that SIRT1, via its amino-terminus, binds to the DOC domain of HERC2 [HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2], which then ubiquitinates LKB1 in the nuclear compartment of endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that acetylation at lysine (K) 64 of LKB1 triggers the formation of SIRT1/HERC2/LKB1 protein complex and subsequent proteasomal degradation. In vitro cellular studies suggested that accumulation of acetylated LKB1 in the nucleus leads to endothelial activation, in turn stimulating the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the production of extracellular matrix proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative PCR confirmed that acetylated LKB1 interacts with and activates TGFβ1 promoter, which is inhibited by SIRT1. Knocking down either SIRT1 or HERC2 results in an increased association of LKB1 with the positive regulatory elements of TGFβ1 promoter. In mice without endothelial nitric oxide synthase, selective overexpression of human SIRT1 in endothelium prevents hypertension and age-related adverse arterial remodeling. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of HERC2 abolishes the beneficial effects of endothelial SIRT1 on both arterial remodeling and arterial blood pressure control. Conclusion-By downregulating acetylated LKB1 protein via HERC2, SIRT1 fine-tunes the crosstalk between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells to prevent adverse arterial remodeling and maintain vascular homeostasis. PMID:27259994

  1. Endothelial SIRT1 prevents adverse arterial remodeling by facilitating HERC2-mediated degradation of acetylated LKB1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bo; Man, Andy W C; Yang, Kangmin; Guo, Yumeng; Xu, Cheng; Tse, Hung-Fat; Han, Weiping; Bloksgaard, Maria; De Mey, Jo G R; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-28

    Aims-SIRT1 exerts potent activity against cellular senescence and vascular ageing. By decreasing LKB1 protein levels, it promotes the survival and regeneration of endothelial cells. The present study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT1-mediated LKB1 degradation for the prevention of vascular ageing.Methods and Results-Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that SIRT1, via its amino-terminus, binds to the DOC domain of HERC2 [HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2], which then ubiquitinates LKB1 in the nuclear compartment of endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that acetylation at lysine (K) 64 of LKB1 triggers the formation of SIRT1/HERC2/LKB1 protein complex and subsequent proteasomal degradation. In vitro cellular studies suggested that accumulation of acetylated LKB1 in the nucleus leads to endothelial activation, in turn stimulating the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the production of extracellular matrix proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative PCR confirmed that acetylated LKB1 interacts with and activates TGFβ1 promoter, which is inhibited by SIRT1. Knocking down either SIRT1 or HERC2 results in an increased association of LKB1 with the positive regulatory elements of TGFβ1 promoter. In mice without endothelial nitric oxide synthase, selective overexpression of human SIRT1 in endothelium prevents hypertension and age-related adverse arterial remodeling. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of HERC2 abolishes the beneficial effects of endothelial SIRT1 on both arterial remodeling and arterial blood pressure control.Conclusion-By downregulating acetylated LKB1 protein via HERC2, SIRT1 fine-tunes the crosstalk between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells to prevent adverse arterial remodeling and maintain vascular homeostasis.

  2. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  3. BIOLOGY OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS OF THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Golanov, Eugene; Awad, Issam A.; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose This review discusses recent research on the genetic, molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the etiology of vascular malformations of the brain (VMBs), including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and the AVMs of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Summary of Review The identification of gene mutations and genetic risk factors associated with CCM, HHT, and sporadic AVM has enabled the development of animal models for these diseases and provided new insights into their etiology. All of the genes associated with VMBs to date have known or plausible roles in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Recent work suggests that the angiogenic process most severely disrupted by VMB gene mutation is that of vascular stabilization, the process whereby vascular endothelial cells form capillary tubes, strengthen their intercellular junctions, and recruit smooth muscle cells to the vessel wall. In addition, there is now good evidence that in some cases CCM lesion formation involves a genetic two-hit mechanism, in which a germline mutation in one copy of a CCM gene is followed by a somatic mutation in the other copy. There is also increasing evidence that environmental second hits can produce lesions when there is a mutation to a single allele of a VMB gene. Conclusions Recent findings begin to explain how mutations in VMB genes render vessels vulnerable to rupture when challenged with other inauspicious genetic or environmental factors, and have suggested candidate therapeutics. Understanding of the cellular mechanisms of VMB formation and progression in humans has lagged behind that in animal models. New knowledge of lesion biology will spur new translational work. Several well-established clinical and genetic database efforts are already in place, and further progress will be facilitated by collaborative expansion and standardization of these. PMID:19834013

  4. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation.

  5. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    -estimated density loss during the first three postoperative months. This suggests that other mechanobiological factors have an influence, including the repair of surgical micro-fractures, thermal damage and vascular interruption. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for pre- to postoperative changes in joint loading and patient activity when predicting periprosthetic bone remodeling. The study's main weakness is the use of an individual patient model; computational expense is a limitation of all previously reported iterative remodeling analysis studies. However, this model showed sufficient computational efficiency for application in probabilistic analysis, and is an easily implemented modification of a well-established technique.

  6. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  7. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  8. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  9. Effect of donor cell type on nuclear remodelling in rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Tian, J; Song, J; Li, H; Yang, D; Li, X; Ouyang, H; Lai, L

    2012-08-01

    Cloned rabbits have been produced for many years by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The efficiency of cloning by SCNT, however, has remained extremely low. Most cloned embryos degenerate in utero, and the few that develop to term show a high incidence of post-natal death and abnormalities. The cell type used for donor nuclei is an important factor in nuclear transfer (NT). As reported previously, NT embryos reconstructed with fresh cumulus cells (CC-embryos) have better developmental potential than those reconstructed with foetal fibroblasts (FF-embryos) in vivo and in vitro. The reason for this disparity in developmental capacity is still unknown. In this study, we compared active demethylation levels and morphological changes between the nuclei of CC-embryos and FF-embryos shortly after activation. Anti-5-methylcytosine immunofluorescence of in vivo-fertilized and cloned rabbit embryos revealed that there was no detectable active demethylation in rabbit zygotes or NT-embryos derived from either fibroblasts or CC. In the process of nuclear remodelling, however, the proportion of nuclei with abnormal appearance in FF-embryos was significantly higher than that in CC-embryos during the first cell cycle. Our study demonstrates that the nuclear remodelling abnormality of cloned rabbit embryos may be one important factor for the disparity in developmental success between CC-embryos and FF-embryos.

  10. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington's disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during neuronal

  11. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington’s disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during

  12. Cervical collagen network remodeling in normal pregnancy and disrupted parturition in Antxr2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Reeves, Claire; Vink, Joy; Kitajewski, Jan; Wapner, Ronald; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Myers, Kristin

    2014-02-01

    The remodeling of the cervix from a rigid barrier into a compliant structure, which dilates to allow for delivery, is a critical process for a successful pregnancy. Changes in the mechanical properties of cervical tissue during remodeling are hypothesized to be related to the types of collagen crosslinks within the tissue. To further understand normal and abnormal cervical remodeling, we quantify the material properties and collagen crosslink density of cervical tissue throughout pregnancy from normal wild-type and Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 knockout (Antxr2-/-) mice. Antxr2-/- females are known to have a parturition defect, in part, due to an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cervix, particularly collagen. In this study, we determined the mechanical properties in gestation-timed cervical samples by osmotic loading and measured the density of mature collagen crosslink, pyridinoline (PYD), by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). The equilibrium material response of the tissue to loading was investigated using a hyperelastic material model where the stresses in the material are balanced by the osmotic swelling tendencies of the glycosaminoglycans and the tensile restoring forces of a randomly-oriented crosslinked collagen fiber network. This study shows that the swelling response of the cervical tissue increased with decreasing PYD density in normal remodeling. In the Antxr2-/- mice, there was no significant increase in swelling volume or significant decrease in crosslink density with advancing gestation. By comparing the ECM-mechanical response relationships in normal and disrupted parturition mouse models this study shows that a reduction of collagen crosslink density is related to cervical softening and contributes to the cervical remodeling process.

  13. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  14. Aortic root remodeling with the "cuff" technique for stentless valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Massetti, M; Bruno, P; Babatasi, G; Le Page, O; Neri, E; Veron, S; Saloux, E; Khayat, A

    2001-03-01

    Aortic root and sinotubular junction dilatation and aneurysm of ascending aorta are considered relative contra-indications to implantation of a stentless valve prosthesis, because the modified aortic geometry leads to aortic incompetence and early failure of the prosthesis. Aortic root reconstruction can be performed according to various techniques. We present a surgical technique in which a tubular graft, replacing an ascending aortic aneurysm, allows sinotubular remodeling and satisfactory implantation of a stentless prosthesis. The native aorta is inserted into the vascular prosthesis at the level of the sinotubular junction which is wrapped in order to prevent commissure spreading. Sizing of the vascular and valve prosthesis is made according to annular diameter. Since October 1999, 6 patients have been operated using this technique with good results.

  15. Human Extravillous Trophoblasts Penetrate Decidual Veins and Lymphatics before Remodeling Spiral Arteries during Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    He, Nannan; van Iperen, Liesbeth; de Jong, Danielle; Szuhai, Karoly; Helmerhorst, Frans M.; van der Westerlaken, Lucette A. J.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2017-01-01

    In humans, the defective invasion of the maternal endometrium by fetal extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs) can lead to insufficient perfusion of the placenta, resulting in pregnancy complications that can put both mother and baby at risk. To study the invasion of maternal endometrium between (W)5.5–12 weeks of gestation by EVTs, we combined fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry to determine the presence of (male) EVTs in the vasculature of the maternal decidua. We observed that interstitial mononuclear EVTs directly entered decidual veins and lymphatics from W5.5. This invasion of decidual veins and lymphatics occurred long before endovascular EVTs remodelled decidual spiral arteries. This unexpected early entrance of interstitial mononuclear EVTs in the maternal circulation does not seem to contribute to the materno-placental vascular connection directly, but rather to establish (and expand) the materno-fetal interface through an alternative vascular route. PMID:28081266

  16. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-22

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight / body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions.

  17. Chronic obstructive sleep apnea accelerates pulmonary remodeling via TGF-β/miR-185/CoLA1 signaling in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xue; Yu, Chengyuan; Liu, Yang; Yan, Sen; Li, Wenpeng; Wang, Dingyu; Sun, Li; Han, Yu; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Song; Yun, Fengxiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Yue

    2016-09-06

    Chronic obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is considered to be associated with pulmonary diseases. However, the roles and mechanisms of OSA in pulmonary remodeling remain ambiguous. Thus, this study was aimed to elucidate the morphological and mechanical action of OSA in lung remodeling. In the present study, we employed a novel OSA model to mimic the OSA patient and investigate the role of OSA in pulmonary remodeling. We showed that pulmonary artery pressure of OSA group has no significant increased compared with the sham group. Nevertheless, we found that fibrotic tissue was predominantly located around the bronchi and vascular in the lung. Additionally, inflammatory cell infiltration was also detected in the peribonchial and perivascular space. The morphological change in OSA canines was ascertained by ultrastructure variation characterized by mitochondrial swelling, lamellar bodies degeneration and vascular smooth muscle incrassation. Moreover, sympathetic nerve sprouting was markedly increased in OSA group. Mechanistically, we showed that several pivotal proteins including collagen type I(CoLA1), GAP-43, TH and NGF were highly expressed in OSA groups. Furthermore, we found OSA could activated the expression of TGF-β, which subsequently suppressed miR-185 and promoted CoL A1 expression. This signaling cascade leads to pulmonary remodeling. In conclusion, Our data demonstrates that OSA can accelerate the progression of pulmonary remodeling through TGF-β/miR-185/CoLA1 signaling, which would potentially provide therapeutic strategies for chronic OSAS.

  18. Why is placentation abnormal in preeclampsia?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The causes of preeclampsia remain one of the great medical mysteries of our time. This syndrome is thought to occur in two stages with abnormal placentation leading to a maternal inflammatory response. Specific regions of the placenta have distinct pathological features. During normal pregnancy, cytotrophoblasts emigrate from the chorionic villi and invade the uterus, reaching the inner third of the myometrium. This unusual process is made even more exceptional by the fact that the placental cells are hemi-allogeneic, co-expressing maternal and paternal genomes. Within the uterine wall, cytotrophoblasts deeply invade the spiral arteries. Cytotrophoblasts migrate up these vessels and replace, in a retrograde fashion, the maternal endothelial lining. They also insert themselves amongst the smooth muscle cells that form the tunica media. As a result, the spiral arteries attain the physiological properties that are required to adequately perfuse the placenta. In comparison, invasion of the venous side of the uterine circulation is minimal, sufficient to enable venous return. In preeclampsia, cytotrophoblast invasion of the interstitial uterine compartment is frequently shallow, although not consistently so. In many locations, spiral artery invasion is incomplete. There are many fewer endovascular cytotrophoblasts and some vessels retain portions of their endothelial lining with relatively intact muscular coats while others are not modified. Work from our group showed that these defects mirror deficits in the differentiation program that enables cytotrophoblast invasion of the uterine wall. During normal pregnancy, invasion is accompanied by downregulation of epithelial-like molecules that are indicative of their ectodermal origin and upregulation of numerous receptors and ligands that are typically expressed by endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. For example, the expression of epithelial-cadherin, the cell-cell adhesion molecule that many ectodermal

  19. Re-Modelling as De-Professionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Meryl

    2006-01-01

    The article sets out the consequences of the British Government's remodelling agenda and its emphasis on less demarcation, for the professional status of teachers in England. It describes how the National Agreement on Raising Standards and Tackling Workload, reached between five of the six trade unions for teachers and headteachers paves the way…

  20. Challenging Modernization: Remodelling the Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Gunter, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This special edition enables an in-depth look at the process of modernization of education in England, in relation to other international developments. In particular we focus on the reform of teachers? work by examining the antecedence of the current policy of remodelling through three articles based on the Evaluation of the Department for…

  1. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  2. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  3. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  4. Retinal vascular tree reconstruction with anatomical realism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Shun; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Chih-Hsiangng; Sofka, Michal; Chen, Shih-Jen; Lin, Wei-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of automatically extracting vessel segments and constructing retinal vascular trees with anatomical realism, this paper presents and analyses an algorithm that combines vessel segmentation and grouping of the extracted vessel segments. The proposed method aims to restore the topology of the vascular trees with anatomical realism for clinical studies and diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases, which manifest abnormalities in either venous and/or arterial vascular systems. Vessel segments are grouped using extended Kalman filter which takes into account continuities in curvature, width, and intensity changes at the bifurcation or crossover point. At a junction, the proposed method applies the minimum-cost matching algorithm to resolve the conflict in grouping due to error in tracing. The system was trained with 20 images from the DRIVE dataset, and tested using the remaining 20 images. The dataset contained a mixture of normal and pathological images. In addition, six pathological fluorescein angiogram sequences were also included in this study. The results were compared against the groundtruth images provided by a physician, achieving average success rates of 88.79% and 90.09%, respectively.

  5. Reversible phosphorylation and regulation of mammalian oocyte meiotic chromatin remodeling and segregation.

    PubMed

    Swain, J E; Smith, G D

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian oocyte is notorious for high rates of chromosomal abnormalities. This results in subsequent embryonic aneuploidy, resulting in infertility and congenital defects. Therefore, understanding regulatory mechanisms involved in chromatin remodeling and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation is imperative to fully understand the complex process and establish potential therapies. This review will focus on major events occurring during oocyte meiosis, critical to ensure proper cellular ploidy. Mechanistic and cellular events such as chromosome condensation, meiotic spindle formation, as well as cohesion of homologues and sister chromatids will be discussed, focusing on the role of reversible phosphorylation in control of these processes.

  6. Vascular anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Weibel, L

    2011-11-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural anomalies representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular anomalies early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes.

  7. Vessel Remodeling after Intima-to-Intima Contact Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyeonjung; Kim, Hyodong; Hong, Changbae; Kwon, Sun Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Intima-to-intima microanastomotic vascular remodeling was explored, utilizing a polylactide-caprolactone absorbable vein coupler model (PAVCM), which was designed to simulate a non-absorbable counterpart system with the sole exception of being absorbable. Methods Six New Zealand white rabbits were used. After transection of the jugular vein, 2 PAVCMs were placed, 1 at each transected end. The stumps were slipped through the PAVCMs, and the venous wall was everted 90° to achieve intima-to-intima contact. Reanastomosis of the transected jugular vein was performed bilaterally in 3 rabbits. In the other 3 rabbits, the jugular vein (20 mm) harvested from one side was interpositionally grafted to the jugular vein on the opposite side to ease the anastomotic tension. Patency testing, ultrasonography, and histologic assessments were conducted postoperatively at weeks 2, 4, 12, 16, 22, and 26. Results All anastomotic sites were patent, without stenosis, occlusion, or dilatation. In the histologic sections, immature endothelial regeneration was observed at week 2, which was completed by week 4. Regeneration of the tunica media was noted at week 12. Between week 22 and week 26, the tunica media fully regenerated and the coupler dissipated entirely. Conclusions Despite the absence of a coupler to act as an anastomotic buttress, the structure and function of all the vessels appeared normal, even histologically. These outcomes are true milestones in the development of an absorbable vein coupler. PMID:28352597

  8. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Brain Synaptic Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip Kumar; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the functional connection between neurons which are necessary for the transfer of electric activity or chemical activity from one cell to another. Synapses are formed by the pre- and postsynaptic membrane which communicates between pre- and postneurons while a neurochemical modulator is operated in this process. H2S has been known as a toxic gas with rotten eggs smell. However, increasing number of researches show that it regulate a variety of physiological and pathological processes in mammals. Hence, H2S is a physiologically important molecule and has been referred to as the third gaseous molecule alongside carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. The previous era has made an exponential development in the physiological and pathological significance of H2S. Specifically, in the central nervous system, H2S facilitates long-term potentiation and regulates intracellular calcium concentration in brain cells. We as well as others have also shown that H2S has antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties against various neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia. In this chapter, we highlight the current knowledge of H2S and its neuroprotective effects with a special emphasis on synaptic remodeling. PMID:25747482

  9. Timing effect of intramyocardial hydrogel injection for positively impacting left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, Tomo; Zhu, Yang; Jiang, Hongbin; D’Amore, Antonio; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Tchao, Jason; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wagner, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Intramyocardial injection of various injectable hydrogel materials has shown benefit in positively impacting the course of left ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). However, since LV remodeling is a complex, time dependent process, the most efficacious time of hydrogel injection is not clear. In this study, we injected a relatively stiff, thermoresponsive and bioabsorbable hydrogel in rat hearts at 3 different time points - immediately after MI (IM), 3 d post-MI (3D), and 2 w post-MI (2W), corresponding to the beginnings of the necrotic, fibrotic and chronic remodeling phases. The employed left anterior descending coronary artery ligation model showed expected infarction responses including functional loss, inflammation and fibrosis with distinct time dependent patterns. Changes in LV geometry and contractile function were followed by longitudinal echocardiography for 10 w post-MI. While all injection times positively affected LV function and wall thickness, the 3D group gave better functional outcomes than the other injection times and also exhibited more local vascularization and less inflammatory markers than the earlier injection time. The results indicate an important role for injection timing in the increasingly explored concept of post-MI biomaterial injection therapy and suggest that for hydrogels with mechanical support as primary function, injection at the beginning of the fibrotic phase may provide improved outcomes. PMID:26774561

  10. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Duprat, Fabrice; Arhatte, Malika; Ranade, Sanjeev Sumant; Peyronnet, Rémi; Martins, Joana Raquel; Jodar, Martine; Moro, Céline; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Demolombe, Sophie; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric

    2015-11-10

    The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  11. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries.

  12. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation.

  13. Mouse stem cells seeded into decellularized rat kidney scaffolds endothelialize and remodel basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Edward A.; Abrahamson, Dale R.; St. John, Patricia; Clapp, William L.; Williams, Matthew J.; Terada, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Takashi; Ellison, Gary W.; Batich, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To address transplant organ shortage, a promising strategy is to decellularize kidneys in a manner that the scaffold retains signals for seeded pluripotent precursor cells to differentiate and recapitulate native structures: matrix-to-cell signaling followed by cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, thereby remodeling and replacing the original matrix. This would reduce scaffold antigenicity and enable xeno-allografts. Results DAPI-labeled cells in arterial vessels and glomeruli were positive for both endothelial lineage markers, BsLB4 and VEGFR2. Rat scaffold’s basement membrane demonstrated immunolabeling with anti-mouse laminin β1. Labeling intensified over time with 14 day incubations. Conclusion We provide new evidence for matrix-to-cell signaling in acellular whole organ scaffolds that induces differentiation of pluripotent precursor cells to endothelial lineage. Production of mouse basement membrane supports remodeling of host (rat)-derived scaffolds and thereby warrants further investigation as a promising approach for xenotransplantation. Methods We previously showed that murine embryonic stem cells arterially seeded into acellular rat whole kidney scaffolds multiply and demonstrate morphologic, immunohistochemical and gene expression evidence for differentiation. Vascular cell endothelialization was now further tested by endothelial specific BsLB4 lectin and anti-VEGFR2 (Flk1) antibodies. Remodeling of the matrix basement membranes from rat to mouse (“murinization”) was assessed by a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse laminin β1 chain. PMID:22692231

  14. Timing effect of intramyocardial hydrogel injection for positively impacting left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Tomo; Zhu, Yang; Jiang, Hongbin; D'Amore, Antonio; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Tchao, Jason; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wagner, William R

    2016-03-01

    Intramyocardial injection of various injectable hydrogel materials has shown benefit in positively impacting the course of left ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). However, since LV remodeling is a complex, time dependent process, the most efficacious time of hydrogel injection is not clear. In this study, we injected a relatively stiff, thermoresponsive and bioabsorbable hydrogel in rat hearts at 3 different time points - immediately after MI (IM), 3 d post-MI (3D), and 2 w post-MI (2W), corresponding to the beginnings of the necrotic, fibrotic and chronic remodeling phases. The employed left anterior descending coronary artery ligation model showed expected infarction responses including functional loss, inflammation and fibrosis with distinct time dependent patterns. Changes in LV geometry and contractile function were followed by longitudinal echocardiography for 10 w post-MI. While all injection times positively affected LV function and wall thickness, the 3D group gave better functional outcomes than the other injection times and also exhibited more local vascularization and less inflammatory markers than the earlier injection time. The results indicate an important role for injection timing in the increasingly explored concept of post-MI biomaterial injection therapy and suggest that for hydrogels with mechanical support as primary function, injection at the beginning of the fibrotic phase may provide improved outcomes.

  15. ED 04-4 RETINAL ARTERIOLAR STRUCTURE AS A MAKER OF VASCULAR HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tien

    2016-09-01

    The vasculature in the retina can be viewed directly and non-invasively in vivo, offers a unique perspective of the human microvasculature, and therefore the ability to understand early changes, processes, pathways and consequences of hypertension. In the past 15 years, advances in high resolution digital retinal photography and automated or semi-automated computer image software have been applied to measure and quantify a variety of retinal microvascular parameter, including retinal arteriolar and venular caliber, tortuosity, branching patterns and fractal dimensions. Clinical and epidemiological studies show that hypertension is strongly associated with many of these retinal microvascular changes. Concurrently, these retinal parameters are associated with a range of systemic conditions, including subclinical target organ damage (e.g., silent cerebral infarctions, myocardial perfusion, vascular remodelling, left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria) as well as clinical outcomes (e.g., clinical stroke, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular mortality). Furthermore, some of the retinal measures are seen in children at risk of hypertension (e.g., higher BMI or low birth weight) and normotensive patients before they subsequently develop hypertension, suggesting that retinal microvascular changes may reflect the vascular remodelling processes in early hypertension. There are increasing data from genome-wide association studies that indicate genetic influence on retinal vascular caliber, possibly providing new genetic markers of systemic vascular diseases. Retinal vascular imaging provides the opportunity to interrogate early, subclinical microcirculatory effects associated with elevated blood pressure, and thus new insights into the pathogenesis and vascular consequences of hypertension.

  16. Mapping and Quantification of Vascular Branching in Plants, Animals and Humans by VESGEN Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Humans face daunting challenges in the successful exploration and colonization of space, including adverse alterations in gravity and radiation. The Earth-determined biology of humans, animals and plants is significantly modified in such extraterrestrial environments. One physiological requirement shared by humans with larger plants and animals is a complex, highly branching vascular system that is dynamically responsive to cellular metabolism, immunological protection and specialized cellular/tissue function. The VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) Analysis has been developed as a mature beta version, pre-release research software for mapping and quantification of the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching. Alterations in vascular branching pattern can provide informative read-outs of altered vascular regulation. Originally developed for biomedical applications in angiogenesis, VESGEN 2D has provided novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other microvascular remodeling phenomena. Vascular trees, networks and tree-network composites are mapped and quantified. Applications include disease progression from clinical ophthalmic images of the human retina; experimental regulation of vascular remodeling in the mouse retina; avian and mouse coronary vasculature, and other experimental models in vivo. We envision that altered branching in the leaves of plants studied on ISS such as Arabidopsis thaliana cans also be analyzed.

  17. Mapping and Quantification of Vascular Branching in Plants, Animals and Humans by VESGEN Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Vickerman, M. B.; Keith, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Humans face daunting challenges in the successful exploration and colonization of space, including adverse alterations in gravity and radiation. The Earth-determined biology of plants, animals and humans is significantly modified in such extraterrestrial environments. One physiological requirement shared by larger plants and animals with humans is a complex, highly branching vascular system that is dynamically responsive to cellular metabolism, immunological protection and specialized cellular/tissue function. VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) Analysis has been developed as a mature beta version, pre-release research software for mapping and quantification of the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching. Alterations in vascular branching pattern can provide informative read-outs of altered vascular regulation. Originally developed for biomedical applications in angiogenesis, VESGEN 2D has provided novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other microvascular remodeling phenomena. Vascular trees, networks and tree-network composites are mapped and quantified. Applications include disease progression from clinical ophthalmic images of the human retina; experimental regulation of vascular remodeling in the mouse retina; avian and mouse coronary vasculature, and other experimental models in vivo. We envision that altered branching in the leaves of plants studied on ISS such as Arabidopsis thaliana cans also be analyzed.

  18. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, conf