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Sample records for abnormal visual evoked

  1. Abnormal visual evoked potentials in children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome due to infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed

    Lahat, E; Berkovitch, M; Barr, J; Paret, G; Barzilai, A

    1999-11-01

    Visual illusions characterized by distortion of form, size, reciprocal position of objects, movement, or color, labeled as "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, were discussed in children with infectious mononucleosis, as well as in other clinical conditions, such as migraine, epilepsy, use of certain hallucinogenic drugs, etc. The purpose of our study was to investigate for the first time visual evoked potential results in children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome associated with infectious mononucleosis. Five children with "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome associated with infectious mononucleosis underwent visual evoked potential studies during and after their clinical symptoms. Visual evoked potential results during the disease demonstrated statistically significant high amplitudes of P100-N145 in all children compared to the control group. A few weeks later, repeated studies after the resolution of the complaints were normal. Since the same findings can be observed in patients with migraine, we postulate that a common pathophysiologic underlying abnormality, which can cause transient focal decreased cerebral perfusion, could be involved in the disease process of these two conditions.

  2. Mathematical impairment associated with high-contrast abnormalities in change detection and magnocellular visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2015-10-01

    The cause of developmental dyscalculia, a specific deficit in acquisition of arithmetic skills, particularly of enumeration, has never been investigated with respect to the patency of the visual magnocellular system. Here, the question of dysfunction of the afferent magnocellular cortical input and its dorsal stream projections was tested directly using nonlinear analysis of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and through the psychophysical ability to rapidly detect visual change. A group of young adults with self-reported deficiencies of arithmetical ability, showed marked impairment in magnitude estimation and enumeration performance-though not in lexical decision reaction times when compared with an arithmetically capable group controlled for age and handedness. Multifocal nonlinear VEPs were recorded at low (24 %) and high (96 %) contrast. First- and second-order VEP kernels were comparable between groups at low contrast, but not at high contrast. The mathematically impaired group showed an abnormal lack of contrast saturation in the shortest latency first-order peak (N60) and a delayed P100 positivity in the first slice of the second-order kernel. Both features have previously been argued to be physiological markers of magnocellular function. Mathematically impaired participants also performed worse on a gap paradigm change detection for digit task showing increased reaction times for high-contrast stimuli but not for low-contrast stimuli compared with controls. The VEP results give direct evidence of abnormality in the occipital processing of magnocellular information in those with mathematical impairment. The anomalous high visual contrast physiological and psychophysical performance suggests an abnormality in the inhibitory processes that normally result in saturation of contrast gain in the magnocellular system.

  3. Abnormal visual-evoked potentials in leukemic children after cranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.; Tomarchio, S.; Pero, G.; Consoli, G.; Marina, R.; Rizzari, C.; Schiliro, G.

    1985-01-01

    Visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) were studied in 55 asymptomatic children with leukemia or solid tumors in remission in order to detect subclinical demyelination of the optic pathway after CNS prophylaxis. In group I (11 patients with ALL studied prospectively), VEP latency was increased in ten after cranial radiation (CR) as compared with previous values. Group II (18 patients with ALL in maintenance) and group III (16 patients with ALL off therapy) were studied retrospectively and VEP latency was found above normal limits in 33 and 31%, respectively. In group IV (four patients with solid tumors and six with leukemia, all of whom received no CR), VEP latency was normal despite periodical intrathecal methotrexate administrations to five of them. The authors conclude that CR determines a slowing of conduction on VEP test, probably due to demyelination of the optic pathway, in a high proportion of patients. The future clinical significance of these findings must be established throughout a prolonged follow-up period.

  4. Abnormal Attention in Autism Shown by Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmonte, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Eight males with autism were required to shift attention between rapidly flashed targets alternating between left and right visual hemifields. When targets were separated by less than 700 ms, steady-state brain electrical response in both hemispheres was augmented and background EEG decreased for rightward shifts as compared with leftward shifts.…

  5. Visual evoked potentials in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Xiong; Wong, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is very standardized. However, there is a lack of an objective method to evaluate the cerebral effects of bilirubin apart from brainstem auditory evoked potentials. There were few studies evaluating the effects of hyperbilirubinemia or phototherapy on the visual pathway in infants with hyperbilirubinemia. Serial visual evoked potentials of two groups of term neonates (N = 24)--group 1 with moderate hyperbilirubinemia (n = 16) and group 2 with severe hyperbilirubinemia (n = 8)--were evaluated prospectively. All infants had regular physical, neurologic, visual, and auditory evaluations until 3 years. Four (16%) had abnormal visual evoked potentials before 1 year, and the abnormalities returned to normal thereafter. There was no significant difference in visual evoked potentials between the two groups. All had normal neurodevelopmental status by 3 years, with the exception of one child from the severe group with ABO incompatibility with transient mild motor delay, hypotonia, and abnormal visual evoked potential. There were no abnormal effects of phototherapy on visual evoked potentials in infants with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia after 1 year of age. Although our sample size was small, the results suggest that the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on visual evoked potentials might be transient. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:58-62).

  6. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.

  7. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  8. [Partial visual seizures induced by non-ketosic hyperglycemia: magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential descriptions. A study of two cases reports with radiologic and electrophysiologic abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Donat, A; Guilloton, L; Bonnet, C; Depreux, G; Lamboley, J-L; Drouet, A

    2013-02-01

    Non-ketosic hyperglycemia (NKH) may increase the likelihood of focal epileptic seizures, including commonly motor expression; rarely, they can have a visual expression. The authors describe the observation of two men, who were hospitalized for visual manifestations; with episodes of homonymous hemianopia and hallucinations, revealing occipital seizure, secondary to NKH. Clinical data and characteristics of the investigations, including radiological imaging (MRI) and electrophysiological results of visual evoked potentials (VEP) are specified. MRI showed transitory low signal on T2 and FLAIR in occipital areas. Spectro-MR identified a moderate diminution of the NAA and lipids spikes, compatible with laminar necrosis. VEP revealed a transient decrease of the P100 amplitude. These two observations underline the existence of acute symptomatic seizures with a visual starting point which is often indicative of diabetes. Through these observations with a review of 28 patients from the literature, MR imaging characteristics and possible anomalies collected on VEP are discussed. Such seizures are resistant to anticonvulsant treatment and respond best to insulin and rehydration. The visual manifestations indicative of seizures with an occipital starting point in the context of NKH are possible enabling rapid initiation of effective symptomatic treatment with insulin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Evoked potentials and head injury. 1. Rating of evoked potential abnormality.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, H K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes a method for rating the degree of abnormality of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potential patterns in head injury (HI) patients. Criteria for judging degree of EP abnormality are presented that allow assessment of the extent and severity of subcortical and cortical dysfunction associated with traumatic brain damage. Interrater reliability data based upon blind ratings of normal and HI patients are presented and shown to be highly significant. Tables of normative values of peak latencies and amplitudes are given and illustrations of EP patterns of different degrees of abnormality are presented.

  10. Combination of blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential recordings for abnormal visual cortex in two types of amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinmei; Cui, Dongmei; Zheng, Ling; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the different neuromechanisms of subjects with strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia compared with normal vision subjects using blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP). Methods Fifty-three subjects, age range seven to 12 years, diagnosed with strabismic amblyopia (17 cases), anisometropic amblyopia (20 cases), and normal vision (16 cases), were examined using the BOLD-fMRI and PR-VEP of UTAS-E3000 techniques. Cortical activation by binocular viewing of reversal checkerboard patterns was examined in terms of the calcarine region of interest (ROI)-based and spatial frequency–dependent analysis. The correlation of cortical activation in fMRI and the P100 amplitude in VEP were analyzed using the SPSS 12.0 software package. Results In the BOLD-fMRI procedure, reduced areas and decreased activation levels were found in Brodmann area (BA) 17 and other extrastriate areas in subjects with amblyopia compared with the normal vision group. In general, the reduced areas mainly resided in the striate visual cortex in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. In subjects with strabismic amblyopia, a more significant cortical impairment was found in bilateral BA 18 and BA 19 than that in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. The activation by high-spatial-frequency stimuli was reduced in bilateral BA 18 and 19 as well as BA 17 in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia, whereas the activation was mainly reduced in BA 18 and BA 19 in subjects with strabismic amblyopia. These findings were further confirmed by the ROI-based analysis of BA 17. During spatial frequency–dependent VEP detection, subjects with anisometropic amblyopia had reduced sensitivity for high spatial frequency compared to subjects with strabismic amblyopia. The cortical activation in fMRI with the calcarine ROI-based analysis of BA 17 was significantly correlated with the P100 amplitude in VEP

  11. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    PubMed

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  12. Clinical aspects of the visually evoked potential.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, G W

    1977-01-01

    The visually evoked potential (VEP) was studied in normal and abnormal human subjects, and in Rhesus monkeys with central, paracentral, and peripheral photocoagulation lesions. A relatively simple protocol for clinical VEP testing is described. The monkeys showed similar VEP responses but these were smaller in amplitude than those obtained from human subjects. Central, but not paracentral or peripheral retinal lesions were associated with VEP abnormalities. For both monkey and human subjects, some variability of responses between normal and subjects was noted. Generally, there are differences in VEP responses obtained from the affected eye of abnormal subjects who had one eye which could serve as a control, as compared to responses from the normal eye. In these subjects as well as in subjects with two abnormal eyes, computer analysis of digitized VEP data from 10 Hz stimulus responses was performed. Fourier transformation analyses showed abnormalities which could be detected easily by evaluating the pattern of the amplitudes of the fundamental and first three harmonics. With this technique, it was possible to group correctly normal VEP's with eyes with normal visual acuity (greater than or equal to 20/30 or 0.67), and abnormal VEP's with eyes with poor visual acuity (less than 20/30 or 0.67) in 72% of cases. Analysis of the data obtained with 1 Hz and 10 Hz stimulation suggests that the components of the VEP related to visual acuity occur within the first 60-100 msec of the response, corresponding to the primary evoked response of Chiganek. The second, smaller wave of the response complex to 10 Hz flash stimuli corresponds to the primary evoked response, and is closely related to visual acuity. This was further supported in another series in which the digitized data was filtered around the stimulating frequency. It was possible to recognize visually this VEP waveform and subjectively interpret the record correctly in 85% of eyes with regard to visual acuity

  13. [The visual evoked potentials in diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Costache, Doina; Damian, Carmen; Iancău, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The recording of Visual Evoked Potential alterations at the patients with diabetic retinopathy. It was performed the Visual Evoked Potential recordings at 24 patients with diabetic retinopathy in different stages of evolution, with or without complications. The type of Visual Evoked Potential recording was pattern reversal with vertical bars. We followed the diagram alterations in correlation with the evolution stages of diabetic retinopathy and the visual parameter alterations. In all cases we recorded alteration of the Visual Evoked Potential. In nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy was noticed the delay of P100 wave with inconstant presence of the N75 and N135 waves. In proliferative diabetic retinopathy and its complications the alterations of the tract were important. The gradual alteration of the Visual Evoked Potential tract at the patients with diabetic retinopathy represents a prognosis of the disease.

  14. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pavel; Zakharov, Sergey; Diblík, Pavel; Pelclová, Daniela; Ridzoň, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP) examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females) was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012-2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test) were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%), 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04). The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1-9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  15. Early visual evoked potentials in callosal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Melodie S; Hamm, Jeff P; Kirk, Ian J; Corballis, Michael C

    2005-11-01

    Three participants with callosal agenesis and 12 neurologically normal participants were tested on a simple reaction time task, with visual evoked potentials collected using a high-density 128-channel system. Independent-components analyses were performed on the averaged visual evoked potentials to isolate the components of interest. Contrary to previous research with acallosals, evidence of ipsilateral activation was present in all 3 participants. Although ipsilateral visual components were present in all 4 unilateral conditions in the 2 related acallosal participants, in the 3rd, these were present only in the crossed visual field-hand conditions and not in the uncrossed conditions. Suggestions are made as to why these results differ from earlier findings and as to the neural mechanisms facilitating this ipsilateral activation.

  16. Short latency visual evoked potentials in man.

    PubMed

    Pratt, H; Bleich, N; Berliner, E

    1982-07-01

    Contrary to auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials, surface recorded visual evoked potentials which arise in subcortical neural elements have rarely been described. Considerable disagreement exists between the reports in the literature on such visual potentials. In this study, flash stimuli were used to evoke the potentials which were recorded from the skin overlying the infra-orbital ridge, outer canthus, middle of the forehead, vertex, mastoid ipsilateral to the stimulated eye and inion, using a non-cephalic reference. The potentials were amplified in a band which was chosen to omit slow retinal and cortical potentials, and to enhance activity which might include compound neural activity. Potentials were recorded from 9 subjects (13 eyes), and for each one the effects of eye position and stimulus intensity were studied. The results indicate that the series of components recorded within the first 100 msec following photic stimulation were volume-conducted activity generated by a subset of the visual system which is activated by luminosity changes. The generators of the first 4 or 5 components seem to be situated within the retina, the subsequent components seem to be generated in the optic nerve or tracts, and the later components may be thalamo-cortical in origin. These potentials may complement pattern evoked potentials in a more accurate definition of sites of lesions along the visual pathway.

  17. A primer on motion visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Sven P

    2007-03-01

    Motion visual evoked potentials (motion VEPs) have been used since the late 1960s to investigate the properties of human visual motion processing, and continue to be a popular tool with a possible future in clinical diagnosis. This review first provides a synopsis of the characteristics of motion VEPs and then summarizes important methodological aspects. A subsequent overview illustrates how motion VEPs have been applied to study basic functions of human motion processing and shows perspectives for their use as a diagnostic tool.

  18. Visual field asymmetries in visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral responses to visual stimuli exhibit visual field asymmetries, but cortical folding and the close proximity of visual cortical areas make electrophysiological comparisons between different stimulus locations problematic. Retinotopy-constrained source estimation (RCSE) uses distributed dipole models simultaneously constrained by multiple stimulus locations to provide separation between individual visual areas that is not possible with conventional source estimation methods. Magnetoencephalography and RCSE were used to estimate time courses of activity in V1, V2, V3, and V3A. Responses to left and right hemifield stimuli were not significantly different. Peak latencies for peripheral stimuli were significantly shorter than those for perifoveal stimuli in V1, V2, and V3A, likely related to the greater proportion of magnocellular input to V1 in the periphery. Consistent with previous results, sensor magnitudes for lower field stimuli were about twice as large as for upper field, which is only partially explained by the proximity to sensors for lower field cortical sources in V1, V2, and V3. V3A exhibited both latency and amplitude differences for upper and lower field responses. There were no differences for V3, consistent with previous suggestions that dorsal and ventral V3 are two halves of a single visual area, rather than distinct areas V3 and VP. PMID:25527151

  19. Influence of rotating shift work on visual reaction time and visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    R V, Hemamalini; N, Krishnamurthy; A, Saravanan

    2014-10-01

    The present day life style is changing the circadian rhythm of the body especially in rotating night shift workers. The impact of this prolongs their reaction time. Night shift also interferes with the circadian variation of pupil size which may affect the visual evoked potential. To compare the visual reaction time, visual evoked potential (VEP) in rotating night shift workers & day workers and also to correlate the changes in visual reaction time with visual evoked potential. Forty healthy male security guards & staff (25 - 35 y) who did rotating night shifts at least for six months & 40 d workers (25 - 35 y) who did not do night shift in last two years were involved in the study. Visual reaction time and the latency & amplitude of VEP were recorded. Kolmogorov- Smirnov test for normalcy showed the latencies & amplitude of VEP to be normally distributed. Student's unpaired t test showed significant difference (p<0.05) in the visual time and in the latencies of VEP between night shift & day workers. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of VEP. Night shift workers who are prone to circadian rhythm alteration will have prolonged visual reaction time & visual evoked potential abnormalities. Implementation of Bright Light Therapy would be beneficial to the night shift worker.

  20. Visual evoked potentials through night vision goggles.

    PubMed

    Rabin, J

    1994-04-01

    Night vision goggles (NVG's) have widespread use in military and civilian environments. NVG's amplify ambient illumination making performance possible when there is insufficient illumination for normal vision. While visual performance through NVG's is commonly assessed by measuring threshold functions such as visual acuity, few attempts have been made to assess vision through NVG's at suprathreshold levels of stimulation. Such information would be useful to better understand vision through NVG's across a range of stimulus conditions. In this study visual evoked potentials (VEP's) were used to evaluate vision through NVG's across a range of stimulus contrasts. The amplitude and latency of the VEP varied linearly with log contrast. A comparison of VEP's recorded with and without NVG's was used to estimate contrast attenuation through the device. VEP's offer an objective, electrophysiological tool to assess visual performance through NVG's at both threshold and suprathreshold levels of visual stimulation.

  1. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  2. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, David M.; George, John S.; Wood, C. C.

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fit the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, we have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG (and EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, we analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. We compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. We also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  3. Assessment of visual disability using visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to validate the use of visual evoked potential (VEP) to objectively quantify visual acuity in normal and amblyopic patients, and determine if it is possible to predict visual acuity in disability assessment to register visual pathway lesions. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients diagnosed with normal vision, unilateral amblyopia, optic neuritis, and visual disability who visited the university medical center for registration from March 2007 to October 2009. The study included 20 normal subjects (20 right eyes: 10 females, 10 males, ages 9–42 years), 18 unilateral amblyopic patients (18 amblyopic eyes, ages 19–36 years), 19 optic neuritis patients (19 eyes: ages 9–71 years), and 10 patients with visual disability having visual pathway lesions. Amplitude and latencies were analyzed and correlations with visual acuity (logMAR) were derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic subjects. Correlation of VEP amplitude and visual acuity (logMAR) of 19 optic neuritis patients confirmed relationships between visual acuity and amplitude. We calculated the objective visual acuity (logMAR) of 16 eyes from 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic eyes. Results Linear regression analyses between amplitude of pattern visual evoked potentials and visual acuity (logMAR) of 38 eyes from normal (right eyes) and amblyopic (amblyopic eyes) subjects were significant [y = −0.072x + 1.22, x: VEP amplitude, y: visual acuity (logMAR)]. There were no significant differences between visual acuity prediction values, which substituted amplitude values of 19 eyes with optic neuritis into function. We calculated the objective visual acuity of 16 eyes of 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations of y = −0.072x + 1.22 (−0.072). This resulted in a prediction reference of visual

  4. [Experimental visual evoked potentials. Interstimuli interval and cortical excitability].

    PubMed

    Díaz Calavia, E; Fernández del Moral, R; Dawid-Milner, S; Jiménez Vargas, J

    1989-01-01

    The excitability of the visual system was studied in ten adult chronic cats. Visual evoked potentials were recorded, using decreasing interstimulus intervals. A decrease of the excitability of the visual system is observed when interstimulus intervals are less than 800 milliseconds. Clinical applications with regard to visual evoked potential recording on comatose patients are suggested.

  5. Effects of exercise on visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ozmerdivenli, Recep; Bulut, Serpil; Bayar, Hale; Karacabey, Kursat; Ciloglu, Figen; Peker, Ismail; Tan, Uner

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute or habitual exercise on visual evoked potentials (VEP). The study group consisted of 9 female and 7 male volleyball players and the control group contained 9 female and 7 male students who were not involved in any sportive activity. The N75, P100, and N145 latency and amplitudes were measured before and after exercise. Intragroup comparison was made to evaluate the acute effects and intergroup comparison for the chronic effects of exercise. Significant differences were noted between athletes and the sedentary subjects in terms of pre-exercise left-N145 latencies and amplitudes and left -P100 amplitudes. Right-eye N145 latencies of inactive female subjects obtained before and after exercise were also statistically different. The results suggest that acute and habitual exercise affects the VEP responses independent from the body temperature and other physiological parameters. Small sized pre-exercise P100 amplitudes in the athletes can be attributed to the effect of rapid visual-activity-demanding sports on the central nervous system. Visual evoked potentials maybe used as neurophysiological criteria in defining the performance of an athlete.

  6. The visual evoked potential in acute primary angle closure glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, K. W.; Wood, C. M.; Howe, J. W.; Church, W. H.; Smith, G. T.; Spencer, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were elicited from 29 patients who had experienced a previous attack of acute primary angle closure glaucoma. The VEPs were shown to be abnormal in at least one of the measures (latency, amplitude, contrast threshold, or slope) in 72.4% of affected eyes, whereas only 41.4% indicated obvious optic nerve damage. It is notable that 48.1% of fellow eyes with no (known) history of acute pressure rise also showed some form of VEP abnormality. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms operating in both affected and fellow eyes are discussed. It is concluded that, despite the presence of possible artefactual influences, the results probably reflect the presence of primary angle closure glaucoma. PMID:2751978

  7. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are abnormal in internuclear ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, S M; Colebatch, J G

    2011-06-01

    The cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) is sensitive to lower brainstem lesions affecting the vestibulo-collic pathway. We wished to determine whether the ocular VEMP (oVEMP), a recently-described otolith-ocular reflex, is also abnormal in patients with brainstem lesions. We tested patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO), caused by a brainstem lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF), to investigate whether the oVEMP is abnormal in patients with a lesion of the otolith-ocular pathway. We describe a patient who developed a right INO during his first episode of demyelination, and report results from 12 additional patients, most of whom had multiple sclerosis. All subjects were stimulated with air-conducted tone bursts. cVEMPs and oVEMPs were measured using surface electrodes placed over the neck and beneath the eyes. Overall, oVEMPs showed significantly more abnormalities (69%) than cVEMPs (8%). Ocular VEMPs were absent with stimulation of 13/26 ears, significantly delayed in 5/26 cases and normal in only 8/26 cases. Ocular VEMPs are often abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis who have an INO, while cVEMPs are usually normal. Ocular VEMPs provide a new, non-invasive method for examining central vestibular pathways in humans and are sensitive to lesions of the MLF. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Lissajous figures of the visual evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, M; Takigawa, M

    1986-03-01

    The value of the visual evoked potential (VEP) technique for diagnosis of epilepsy is limited. Except for photosensitive epilepsies, the visual evoked potentials (VEPs) do not reveal more than a routine EEG. As one of the reasons of that, it is pointed out that a review of VEP literature reveals different "normal values" for peak latencies and amplitudes. Thus in this study, lissajous figures of VEPs (VEP-L) were attempted instead of the measurement of peak latencies and amplitudes of VEPs. Thirty six epileptic subjects (14 have partial seizures, 22 have generalized seizures) and 22 control subjects were investigated. Several EEGs to storoboscopic flashes were recorded from scalp electrodes placed at the frontal (Fz) and occipital (Oz) regions according to the 10-20 electrode system, using a right ear as nonreference with a EEG amplifier (Nihon Kohden ME-175 E) and a data recorder (TEAC R-60). Then the phasic relationships between the VEPs from the two areas were analyzed with a medical computer (Nohon Kohden ATAC-2300) and printed out as VEP-L. The results are summerized as follows: First, as time passes from 100 msec to 200 msec in the VEP-L, the epileptic patient group showed more right-roted types than that of the control group (p less than 0.01). Second, the VEP-L at the periods from 50 msec after photic stimulus, were classified into 5 types inspectively. The 5 types are the right-ascending type, the left-ascending type, the vertical type, the horizontal type, and the circular type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Chirp-modulated visual evoked potential as a generalization of steady state visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tao; Xin, Yi; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2012-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are of great concern in cognitive and clinical neuroscience as well as in the recent research field of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, a chirp-modulated stimulation was employed to serve as a novel type of visual stimulus. Based on our empirical study, the chirp stimuli visual evoked potential (Chirp-VEP) preserved frequency features of the chirp stimulus analogous to the steady state evoked potential (SSVEP), and therefore it can be regarded as a generalization of SSVEP. Specifically, we first investigated the characteristics of the Chirp-VEP in the time-frequency domain and the fractional domain via fractional Fourier transform. We also proposed a group delay technique to derive the apparent latency from Chirp-VEP. Results on EEG data showed that our approach outperformed the traditional SSVEP-based method in efficiency and ease of apparent latency estimation. For the recruited six subjects, the average apparent latencies ranged from 100 to 130 ms. Finally, we implemented a BCI system with six targets to validate the feasibility of Chirp-VEP as a potential candidate in the field of BCIs.

  10. Chirp-modulated visual evoked potential as a generalization of steady state visual evoked potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Tao; Xin, Yi; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2012-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are of great concern in cognitive and clinical neuroscience as well as in the recent research field of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, a chirp-modulated stimulation was employed to serve as a novel type of visual stimulus. Based on our empirical study, the chirp stimuli visual evoked potential (Chirp-VEP) preserved frequency features of the chirp stimulus analogous to the steady state evoked potential (SSVEP), and therefore it can be regarded as a generalization of SSVEP. Specifically, we first investigated the characteristics of the Chirp-VEP in the time-frequency domain and the fractional domain via fractional Fourier transform. We also proposed a group delay technique to derive the apparent latency from Chirp-VEP. Results on EEG data showed that our approach outperformed the traditional SSVEP-based method in efficiency and ease of apparent latency estimation. For the recruited six subjects, the average apparent latencies ranged from 100 to 130 ms. Finally, we implemented a BCI system with six targets to validate the feasibility of Chirp-VEP as a potential candidate in the field of BCIs.

  11. Pattern visual evoked potentials for identifying malingering.

    PubMed

    Sun, I-Ting; Lee, Jong-Jer; Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of pattern visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in evaluating objective visual acuity (VA) and discriminating malingerers. Two hundred and forty-nine eyes of 249 patients aged 20-65 years were included. There were 147 eyes with macular diseases (group 1) and 102 eyes with optic nerve diseases (group 2). Amplitudes and latencies were analyzed and correlated with best-corrected visual acuity by a regression analysis. We found the best-correlated mode of pattern VEP, determined the relations, and then calculated the pattern VEP-estimated VA (PVEP-VA) of all 249 eyes, another 30 malingering eyes, 13 eyes with macular diseases, and 17 eyes with optic nerve diseases, and used a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine a cutoff for acceptable variance between PVEP-VA and subjective VA to discriminate malingerers. The best correlation was between the amplitude of 50' checkerboard size (Amp50') and VA in every group. Significant correlation was between Amp50' and VA, where p < 0.0001 in group 1 and p = 0.020 in group 2. A logarithmic curve best fitted the correlation in the regression analysis, where y = 1.731 - 1.569x (R(2) = 0.611, p < 0.0001) in group 1 and y = 2.413 - 2.169x (R(2) = 0.531, p < 0.0001) in group 2 [x: log(Amp50'), y: PVEP-VA (logMAR)]. By using the relations and ROC curve, we determined a variance value of 0.4041 (logMAR) with 100% sensitivity and 94.0% specificity in group 1 and 0.3658 with 70.6% sensitivity and 50.5% specificity in group 2 to discriminate malingerers. The pattern VEP amplitude of 50' checkerboard size was useful to assess VA and can be helpful in discriminating malingering from real disability.

  12. Visual evoked potentials in the horse.

    PubMed

    Ström, L; Ekesten, B

    2016-06-21

    Electrical potentials generated in the central nervous system in response to brief visual stimuli, flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs), can be recorded non-invasively over the occipital cortex. FVEPs are used clinically in human medicine and also experimentally in a number of animal species, but the method has not yet been evaluated in the horse. The method would potentially allow the ophthalmologist and equine clinician to evaluate visual impairment caused by disorders affecting post-retinal visual pathways. The aim was to establish a method for recording of FVEPs in horses in a clinical setting and to evaluate the waveform morphology in the normal horse. Ten horses were sedated with a continuous detomidine infusion. Responses were recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp. Several positions were evaluated to determine suitable electrode placement. Flash electroretinograms (FERGs) were recorded simultaneously. To evaluate potential contamination of the FVEP from retinal potentials, a retrobulbar nerve block was performed in two horses and transection of the optic nerve was performed in one horse as a terminal procedure. A series of positive (P) and negative (N) peaks in response to light stimuli was recorded in all horses. Reproducible wavelets with mean times-to-peaks of 26 (N1), 55 (P2), 141 (N2) and 216 ms (P4) were seen in all horses in all recordings. Reproducible results were obtained when the active electrode was placed in the midline rostral to the nuchal crest. Recording at lateral positions gave more variable results, possibly due to ear muscle artifacts. Averaging ≥100 responses reduced the impact of noise and artifacts. FVEPs were reproducible in the same horse during the same recording session and between sessions, but were more variable between horses. Retrobulbar nerve block caused a transient loss of the VEP whereas transection of the optic nerve caused an irreversible loss. We describe the waveform of the equine FVEP and our results show

  13. Early clinical and subclinical visual evoked potential and Humphrey's visual field defects in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Anand; Rae, William; Bhigjee, Ahmed; Connolly, Cathy; Devparsad, Natasha; Michowicz, Andrew; Harrison, Thomas; Loyse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcal induced visual loss is a devastating complication in survivors of cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Early detection is paramount in prevention and treatment. Subclinical optic nerve dysfunction in CM has not hitherto been investigated by electrophysiological means. We undertook a prospective study on 90 HIV sero-positive patients with culture confirmed CM. Seventy-four patients underwent visual evoked potential (VEP) testing and 47 patients underwent Humphrey's visual field (HVF) testing. Decreased best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was detected in 46.5% of patients. VEP was abnormal in 51/74 (68.9%) right eyes and 50/74 (67.6%) left eyes. VEP P100 latency was the main abnormality with mean latency values of 118.9 (±16.5) ms and 119.8 (±15.7) ms for the right and left eyes respectively, mildly prolonged when compared to our laboratory references of 104 (±10) ms (p<0.001). Subclinical VEP abnormality was detected in 56.5% of normal eyes and constituted mostly latency abnormality. VEP amplitude was also significantly reduced in this cohort but minimally so in the visually unimpaired. HVF was abnormal in 36/47 (76.6%) right eyes and 32/45 (71.1%) left eyes. The predominant field defect was peripheral constriction with an enlarged blind spot suggesting the greater impact by raised intracranial pressure over that of optic neuritis. Whether this was due to papilloedema or a compartment syndrome is open to further investigation. Subclinical HVF abnormalities were minimal and therefore a poor screening test for early optic nerve dysfunction. However, early optic nerve dysfunction can be detected by testing of VEP P100 latency, which may precede the onset of visual loss in CM.

  14. Early Clinical and Subclinical Visual Evoked Potential and Humphrey's Visual Field Defects in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Anand; Rae, William; Bhigjee, Ahmed; Connolly, Cathy; Devparsad, Natasha; Michowicz, Andrew; Harrison, Thomas; Loyse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcal induced visual loss is a devastating complication in survivors of cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Early detection is paramount in prevention and treatment. Subclinical optic nerve dysfunction in CM has not hitherto been investigated by electrophysiological means. We undertook a prospective study on 90 HIV sero-positive patients with culture confirmed CM. Seventy-four patients underwent visual evoked potential (VEP) testing and 47 patients underwent Humphrey's visual field (HVF) testing. Decreased best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was detected in 46.5% of patients. VEP was abnormal in 51/74 (68.9%) right eyes and 50/74 (67.6%) left eyes. VEP P100 latency was the main abnormality with mean latency values of 118.9 (±16.5) ms and 119.8 (±15.7) ms for the right and left eyes respectively, mildly prolonged when compared to our laboratory references of 104 (±10) ms (p<0.001). Subclinical VEP abnormality was detected in 56.5% of normal eyes and constituted mostly latency abnormality. VEP amplitude was also significantly reduced in this cohort but minimally so in the visually unimpaired. HVF was abnormal in 36/47 (76.6%) right eyes and 32/45 (71.1%) left eyes. The predominant field defect was peripheral constriction with an enlarged blind spot suggesting the greater impact by raised intracranial pressure over that of optic neuritis. Whether this was due to papilloedema or a compartment syndrome is open to further investigation. Subclinical HVF abnormalities were minimal and therefore a poor screening test for early optic nerve dysfunction. However, early optic nerve dysfunction can be detected by testing of VEP P100 latency, which may precede the onset of visual loss in CM. PMID:23285220

  15. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  16. Visual Evoked Potentials in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Choi, Anna L; Weihe, Pal; Grandjean, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to methylmercury can cause both neurobehavioral deficits and neurophysiological changes. However, evidence of neurotoxic effects within the visual nervous system is inconsistent, possibly due to incomplete statistical adjustment for beneficial nutritional factors. We evaluated the effect of prenatal methylmercury exposure on visual evoked potential (VEP) latencies in Faroese children with elevated prenatal methylmercury exposure. A cohort of 182 singleton term births was assembled in the Faroe Islands during 1994–1995. At age 7 years, VEP tracings were obtained from 139 cohort subjects after exclusion of subjects with abnormal vision conditions. We used multiple regression analysis to evaluate the association of mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair at parturition with VEP latencies after adjustment for potential confounders that included the cord-serum phospholipid concentration of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the duration of breastfeeding. Unadjusted correlations between mercury exposure and VEP latencies were equivocal. Multiple regression models showed that increased mercury concentrations, especially in maternal hair, were associated with delayed latencies for VEP peak N145. After covariate adjustment, a delay of 2.22 ms (p=0.02) was seen for each doubling of the mercury concentration in maternal hair. In agreement with neuropsychological findings, the present study suggests that prenatal methylmercury exposure may have an adverse effect on VEP findings despite the absence of clinical toxicity to the visual system. However, this association was apparent only after adjustment for n-3 PUFA status. PMID:23548974

  17. Flash visual evoked potentials in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping; Guo, Shu-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xiu

    2013-03-01

    To describe the development of flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) in preterm infants from 1 to 18 months and to determine if the maturation of FVEPs is similar to that of term infants. Longitudinal follow-up study. Twenty very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants, 42 low birth weight (LBW) preterm infants, and 41 term infants underwent FVEP recordings and neurodevelopmental examinations at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of corrected and chronological ages. The FVEP recordings were carried out with the VikingQuest-IV neuroelectrophysiological device (VikingQuest, Nicolet, WI), and neurodevelopmental assessments were made by the Development Screen Test and Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition. At 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age, neurodevelopment was measured with the Mental Index and Developmental Quotient. At 12 and 18 months, neurodevelopment was assessed using the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Developmental Index. Two FVEP values were analyzed: the P2 amplitude (peak to peak from the preceding N2 wave) and the latency of the P2 wave. There was no significant difference for age-dependent decreased pattern of FVEP P2 latency between preterm infants and the control group. This pattern consisted of a rapid decrease in the first 6 months of life, a gradual decline from 6 to 12 months of age, and a steady reduction from 12 to 18 months of age. The P2 latencies were prolonged significantly at all 6 recorded times in the VLBW group compared with the controls and showed a delay in the LBW group at 1 and 3 months of corrected age. The maturation of P2 latency in LBW infants is similar to that of the controls at 3 months of corrected age, but the maturation of P2 latency in VLBW children remained delayed when compared with the controls until 18 months of corrected age. Although the FVEP development pattern of preterm infants was similar to that of healthy full-term infants, the former had deficits in visual electrophysiologic maturation

  18. Visual evoked potential (VEP): basic concepts and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J

    1979-01-01

    The Visual Evoked Potential is the objective measurement of visual function monitored at the level of the occipital cortex with scalp electrodes. This article summarizes many of the recent clinical applications of the VEP. Included are basic concepts of the VEP and its clinical utilization for the objective assessment of refractive error, visual acuity, amblyopia, binocularity, demyelinating diseases, psychogenic disorders, pre-surgical prediction of post-surgical visual function, visual fields, color blindness and neurological development.

  19. [The visual evoked potentials in open angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Damian, Carmen; Iancău, Maria; Costache, Doina

    2004-01-01

    The study purpose to analyse the variations of Visual Evoked Potentials on a group of patients with Open Angle Glaucoma. It was performed the Visual Evoked Potential recordings on a number of patients with Open Angle Glaucoma in different stages of evolutions. Some of the patients were monitored by the Visual Evoked Potentials recordings in a dynamic way, before and after the law pressure treatment. The type of Visual Evoked Potentials recording was pattern reversal with vertical bars. In incipient stage of Open Angle Glaucoma the alteration of the tract was minimal with inconstant presence of the N75 and N135 waves and just a few variation of the delay of P100. In advanced stages of Open Angle Glaucoma the alterations of the tract were important: the delay of P100 wave. In absolute stage the tract was null. The alterations of Visual Evoked Potentials tract was influenced by the different stages of evolution of Open Angle Glaucoma. The gradual alteration of the Visual Evoked Potential tract represents a prognosis of the disease.

  20. [Visual evoked potential parameters in multiple sclerosis in developmental age].

    PubMed

    Steczkowska, Małgorzata; Kroczka, Sławomir; Biedroń, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal results of visual evoked potentilas (VEP) are typical for demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, including multiple sclerosis. Elongation of P100 latency was the most frquent finding and sometimes changes in the shape of VEP responses or decrease of the amplitudes were observed. Results of VEP in children with multiple sclerosis. 11 patients in the developmental age with multiple sclerosis were included, the age range was 13 to 17 years, 6 girls and 5 boys, hospitalized at Department of Pediatric Neurology Chair of Pediatric and Adolescent Neurology, Jagiellonian University in the years 2004-2009. The control group consisted of 11 children with analogous age range and sex distribution. VEP were recorded during monoocular visual stimulation with black and white checkerboard pattern reversal (pattern reversal VEP). The responses were recorded from three active electrodes O1, O2 and Oz (according to the international 10/20 electrode placement system). Latencies of maximum positive deflection P100, preceding N75 component and following N135 and amplitude of N75/P100 were analyzed. Elongation of P100 latency in the examined group was statistically significant when compared with controls. Differences of N75/P100 amplitudes did not differ statistically between the groups. VEP are one of the most important paraclinic tests used in diagnosis of MS in children.

  1. [Effect of sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials and brain stem auditory evoked potentials in epileptics].

    PubMed

    Urumova, L T; Kovalenko, G A; Tsunikov, A I; Sumskiĭ, L I

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on the first study of the evoked activity of the brain in epileptic patients (n = 20) following sleep deprivation. An analysis of the data obtained has revealed a tendency to the shortening of the peak latent intervals of visual evoked potentials in the range of 100-200 mu sec and the V component and the interpeak interval III-V of evoked auditory trunk potentials in patients with temporal epilepsy. The phenomenon may indicate the elimination of stabilizing control involving the specific conductive pathways and, possibly, an accelerated conduction of a specific sensor signal.

  2. Visual function with acupuncture tested by visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshiko; Fuse, Nobuo; Seimiya, Motohiko; Yokokura, Syunji; Watanabe, Kei; Nakazawa, Toru; Kurusu, Masayuki; Seki, Takashi; Tamai, Makoto

    2006-07-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) testing is used frequently and is an important ophthalmologic physiological test to examine visual functions objectively. The VEP is a complicated waveform consisting of negative waveform named N75 and N135, and positive waveform named P100. Delayed P100 latency and greatly attenuated amplitude on VEP are known characteristics for diagnosing optic nerve disease. Acupuncture has been used to treat wide clinical symptoms with minimal side effects. The confirmation of the efficacy of acupuncture generally relies on subjective symptoms. There is not much scientific evidence supporting the acupuncture treatments for eye diseases up to today. However, the VEP test can evaluate objectively and numerically the efficacy of the treatment by the acupuncture. We analyzed 19 healthy subjects (38 eyes). The P100 latencies in the group of less than 101.7 msec (total average) before acupuncture stimulations were not different than those after treatment (98.2 +/- 3.0 msec, 98.2 +/- 4.0 msec, respectively, p = 0.88, n = 17), but the latencies in those subjects with longer or equal to 101.7 msec were statistically different after acupuncture (104.6 +/- 2.8 msec, 101.9 +/- 3.7 msec, respectively, p = 0.006, n = 21). These results show that the acupuncture stimulation contributes to the P100 latencies of pattern reversal (PR)-VEP to some subjects who have delayed latencies, and this electrophysiological method is a valuable technique in monitoring the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the improvements of visual functions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the physiological effects by acupuncture stimulations using PR-VEP in normal subjects.

  3. Early abnormalities of evoked potentials and future disability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kallmann, B A; Fackelmann, S; Toyka, K V; Rieckmann, P; Reiners, K

    2006-02-01

    Evoked potentials (EP) have a role in making the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) but their implication for predicting the future disease course in MS is under debate. EP data of 94 MS patients examined at first presentation, and after five and ten years were retrospectively analysed. Patients were divided into two groups in relation to the prior duration of disease at the time point of first examination: group 1 patients (n=44) were first examined within two years after disease onset, and group 2 patients (n=50) at later time points. As primary measures sum scores were calculated for abnormalities of single and combined EP (visual (VEP), somatosensory (SEP), magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEP)). In patients examined early after disease onset (group 1), a significant predictive value for abnormal EP was found with MEP and SEP sum scores at first presentation correlating significantly with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) values after five years, while the VEP sum score was not. The cumulative number of abnormal MEP, SEP and VEP results also indicated higher degrees of disability (EDSS > or = 3.5) after five years. Combined pathological SEP and MEP findings at first presentation best predicted clinical disability (EDSS > or = 3.5) after five years (odds ratio 11.0). EP data and EDSS at first presentation were not significantly linked suggesting that EP abnormalities at least in part represented clinically silent lesions not mirrored by EDSS. For patients in later disease phases (group 2), no significant associations between EP data at first presentation and EDSS at five and ten years were detected. Together with clinical findings and MR imaging, combined EP data may help to identify patients at high risk of long-term clinical deterioration and guide decisions as to immunomodulatory treatment.

  4. A Comprehensive Review on Methodologies Employed for Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ruchi; Bokariya, Pradeep; Singh, Smita; Singh, Ramji

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is fundamental to how we appreciate our environment and interact with others. The visual evoked potential (VEP) is among those evoked potentials that are the bioelectric signals generated in the striate and extrastriate cortex when the retina is stimulated with light which can be recorded from the scalp electrodes. In the current paper, we provide an overview of the various modalities, techniques, and methodologies which have been employed for visual evoked potentials over the years. In the first part of the paper, we cast a cursory glance on the historical aspect of evoked potentials. Then the growing clinical significance and advantages of VEPs in clinical disorders have been briefly described, followed by the discussion on the earlier and currently available methods for VEPs based on the studies in the past and recent times. Next, we mention the standards and protocols laid down by the authorized agencies. We then summarize the recently developed techniques for VEP. In the concluding section, we lay down prospective research directives related to fundamental and applied aspects of VEPs as well as offering perspectives for further research to stimulate inquiry into the role of visual evoked potentials in visual processing impairment related disorders. PMID:27034907

  5. Multiple Color Stimulus Induced Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    MULTIPLE COLOR STIMULUS INDUCED STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS M. Cheng, X. Gao, S. Gao, D. Xu Institute of Biomedical Engineering...characteristics of high SNR and effectiveness in short-term identification of evoked responses. In most of the SSVEP experiments, single high...frequency stimuli are used. To characterize the complex rhythms in SSVEP, a new multiple color stimulus pattern is proposed in this paper. FFT and

  6. Assessing Visual Pathway Function in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Multifocal Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Laron, Michal; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Bin; Schiffman, Jade S.; Tang, Rosa A.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) provide topographic measure of visual response amplitude and latency. Objective To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of mfVEP technique in detecting visual abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods mfVEPs were recorded from 74 MS patients with history of optic neuritis (MS-ON, n=74 eyes) or without (MS-no-ON, n=71 eyes), and 50 normal subjects (controls, n=100 eyes) using a 60-sector pattern reversal dartboard stimuli (VERIS). Amplitude and latency for each sector were compared to normative data and assigned probabilities. Size and location of clusters of adjacent abnormal sectors (p < 5%) were examined. Results Mean response amplitudes were 0.39±0.02SE, 0.53±0.02, and 0.60±0.01 for MS-ON, MS-no-ON and control groups, respectively, with significant differences between all groups (p<0.0001). Mean latencies (ms; relative to normative data) were 12.7±1.3SE (MS-ON), 4.3±1.1 (MS-no-ON), and 0.3±0.4 (controls); group differences again significant (p<0.0001). Half the MS-ON eyes had clusters larger than 5 sectors compared to 13% in MS-no-ON and 2% in controls. Abnormal sectors were diffusely distributed, although the largest cluster was smaller than 15 sectors in two thirds of MS-ON eyes. Cluster criteria combining amplitude and latency showed an area of 0.96 under the receiver operating characteristic curve yielding a criterion with 91% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Conclusions The mfVEP provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting abnormalities in visual function in MS patients. PMID:19995841

  7. The electroretinogram and visual evoked potential of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Salfay, O; Pálhalmi, J; Szatmári, E; Barabás, P; Szilágyi, N; Juhász, G

    2001-09-01

    The vascularised rat retina could be one of the most useful experimental objects in visual neuroscience to understand human visual physiological and pathological processes. We report here on a new method of implantation for studying the visual system of freely moving rats that provides a rat model for simultaneous recording at corneal and cortical level and is stable enough to record for months. We implanted light emitting diodes onto the skull behind the eyeball to stimulate the eye with flashes and to light adapt the retina with constant light levels. A multistrand, stainless steel, flexible fine wire electrode placed on the eyeball was used for electroretinogram recording and screw electrodes (left/right visual and parietal cortical) were used to record the visual evoked potential and the electroencephalogram. In the present report we focus on the new method of implantation for recording the corneal flash electroretinogram of normal, freely moving rats simultaneously with the visual evoked cortical potential showing examples in various visual experiments. We also introduce a program for retinogram and visual evoked potential analysis, which defines various measures (latencies, areas, amplitudes, and durations) and draw attention to the benefits of this method for those involved in visual, functional genomic, pharmacological, and human ophthalmologic research.

  8. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  9. Visual perceptual abnormalities: hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Corbett, J J

    2000-01-01

    Visual perceptual abnormalities may be caused by diverse etiologies which span the fields of psychiatry and neurology. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of visual perceptual abnormalities from both a neurological and a psychiatric perspective. Psychiatric etiologies include mania, depression, substance dependence, and schizophrenia. Common neurological causes include migraine, epilepsy, delirium, dementia, tumor, and stroke. The phenomena of palinopsia, oscillopsia, dysmetropsia, and polyopia among others are also reviewed. A systematic approach to the many causes of illusions and hallucinations may help to achieve an accurate diagnosis, and a more focused evaluation and treatment plan for patients who develop visual perceptual abnormalities. This article provides the practicing neurologist with a practical understanding and approach to patients with these clinical symptoms.

  10. Visual evoked potentials and long latency event-related potentials in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S N; Syndulko, K; Rever, B; Kraut, J; Coburn, J; Tourtellotte, W W

    1983-09-01

    We studied auditory event-related potentials elicited in a target detection paradigm (P300) and pattern shift visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) in 22 patients with chronic renal failure and no clinical evidence of cognitive or visual impairment. Thirteen patients were maintained on chronic hemodialysis, and 9 patients were receiving a low-protein diet. Thirty-three percent of patients receiving the low-protein diet and 58% of the dialysis patients had abnormal P300 latencies. Most patients tested had abnormal PVEP. Four hemodialysis patients had elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 9 had normal or slightly elevated values. P300 and PVEP latencies were abnormal in both groups. These observations indicate that elevated PTH levels are not solely responsible for the abnormalities in all patients. P300 and PVEP may be valuable in evaluating neuronal dysfunction in the patient with chronic renal failure.

  11. Postural sway and brain potentials evoked by visual depth stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Takeo; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2008-07-01

    This study measured the postural sway and brain potentials evoked by a visual depth stimulus. Thirteen subjects maintained standing posture on a force platform, and were administered two types of depth stimuli, strong and weak. The latency and amplitude of evoked potentials as well as changes in center of foot pressure (CFP) and the electromyogram (EMG) were examined. CFP displacement was found to change according to stimulus intensity. In the occipital lobe, evoked potentials exhibited a triphasic peak, with the first positive peak at approximately 120 ms (P120), the first negative peak at approximately 160 ms (N200), and the second positive peak at approximately 260 ms (P250). Brain evoked potentials correlated with CFP displacement as well as the latency of onset of EMG response. Onset of EMG response was probably related to the P120 component, whereas CFP displacement was related to the P250 component.

  12. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Automatic classification of visual evoked potentials based on wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiakiewicz, Paweł; Dobrowolski, Andrzej P.; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of part of the visual system, that is responsible for conducting compound action potential, is generally based on visual evoked potentials generated as a result of stimulation of the eye by external light source. The condition of patient's visual path is assessed by set of parameters that describe the time domain characteristic extremes called waves. The decision process is compound therefore diagnosis significantly depends on experience of a doctor. The authors developed a procedure - based on wavelet decomposition and linear discriminant analysis - that ensures automatic classification of visual evoked potentials. The algorithm enables to assign individual case to normal or pathological class. The proposed classifier has a 96,4% sensitivity at 10,4% probability of false alarm in a group of 220 cases and area under curve ROC equals to 0,96 which, from the medical point of view, is a very good result.

  14. Effects of refractive errors on visual evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaya; Nagae, Mizuki; Nagata, Yuko; Kumagai, Naoya; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-11-09

    The latency and amplitude of visual evoked cortical responses are known to be affected by refractive states, suggesting that they may be used as an objective index of refractive errors. In order to establish an easy and reliable method for this purpose, we herein examined the effects of refractive errors on visual evoked magnetic fields (VEFs). Binocular VEFs following the presentation of a simple grating of 0.16 cd/m(2) in the lower visual field were recorded in 12 healthy volunteers and compared among four refractive states: 0D, +1D, +2D, and +4D, by using plus lenses. The low-luminance visual stimulus evoked a main MEG response at approximately 120 ms (M100) that reversed its polarity between the upper and lower visual field stimulations and originated from the occipital midline area. When refractive errors were induced by plus lenses, the latency of M100 increased, while its amplitude decreased with an increase in power of the lens. Differences from the control condition (+0D) were significant for all three lenses examined. The results of dipole analyses showed that evoked fields for the control (+0D) condition were explainable by one dipole in the primary visual cortex (V1), while other sources, presumably in V3 or V6, slightly contributed to shape M100 for the +2D or +4D condition. The present results showed that the latency and amplitude of M100 are both useful indicators for assessing refractive states. The contribution of neural sources other than V1 to M100 was modest under the 0D and +1D conditions. By considering the nature of the activity of M100 including its high sensitivity to a spatial frequency and lower visual field dominance, a simple low-luminance grating stimulus at an optimal spatial frequency in the lower visual field appears appropriate for obtaining data on high S/N ratios and reducing the load on subjects.

  15. Pattern-visual evoked potentials in thinner abusers.

    PubMed

    Poblano, A; Lope Huerta, M; Martínez, J M; Falcón, H D

    1996-01-01

    Organic solvents cause injury to lipids of neuronal and glial membranes. A well known characteristic of workers exposed to thinner is optic neuropathy. We decided to look for neurophysiologic signs of visual damage in patients identified as thinner abusers. Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials was performed on 34 thinner abuser patients and 30 controls. P-100 wave latency was found to be longer on abuser than control subjects. Results show the possibility of central alterations on thinner abusers despite absence of clinical symptoms.

  16. Harmonic coupling of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Krusienski, Dean J; Allison, Brendan Z

    2008-01-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are oscillating components of the electroencephalogram (EEG) that are detected over the occipital areas, having frequencies corresponding to visual stimulus frequencies. SSVEPs have been demonstrated to be reliable control signals for operating a brain-computer interface (BCI). This study uses offline analyses to investigate the characteristics of SSVEP harmonic amplitude and phase coupling and the impact of using this information to construct a matched filter for continuously tracking the signal.

  17. Asymmetric responses in cortical visually evoked potentials to motion are not derived from eye movements.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J R; Noyd, W W; Aiyer, A D; Norcia, A M; Mustari, M J; Boothe, R G

    1999-09-01

    Normal neonates and many adults after abnormal visual development have directional preferences for visual stimulus motions; i.e., they give better responses for optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and visually evoked potentials (VEPs) in one direction than to those in the opposite direction. The authors tested whether the VEP responses were asymmetrical because of abnormal eye movements. VEPs were recorded from the visual cortices of five macaque monkeys: one normal, one neonate, and three reared with alternating monocular occlusion (AMO). They were lightly anesthetized, followed by paralysis to prevent eye movements. They then had "jittered" vertical grating patterns presented in their visual fields. The steady state VEPs were analyzed with discrete Fourier transforms to obtain the amplitudes and phases of the asymmetries. The normal, control monkey had small, insignificant amplitudes of its asymmetrical Fourier component and random phases that were not 180 degrees out of phase across the left and right eyes. The neonatal monkey and the AMO monkeys all had large, significant asymmetries that were approximately 180 degrees out of phase between the left and right eyes. The neonate and abnormally reared monkeys continued to have asymmetrical responses even after their eyes were paralyzed. Therefore, eye movements cannot be the source of the asymmetrical amplitudes of the VEPs, and the visual cortex is at least one source responsible for asymmetries observed in neonates and adults reared under abnormal visual inputs.

  18. Localization of visually evoked cortical activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Srebro, R

    1985-03-01

    The locations of cortical activity evoked by visual stimuli presented at different positions in the visual field are deduced from the scalp topography of visually evoked potentials in humans. To accomplish this, the Laplacian evoked potential is measured using a multi-electrode array. It is shown that the Laplacian response has the following useful attributes for this purpose. It is reference-free. Its spatial resolution is approximately 2 cm referred to the surface of the cortex. Its spatial sensitivity characteristic is that of a spatial band-pass filter. It is relatively insensitive to source--sink configurations that are oriented tangentially to the surface of the scalp. Only modest assumptions about the source--sink configuration are required to obtain a unique inversion of the scalp topography. Stimuli consisting of checkerboard-filled octant or annular octant segments are presented as appearance-disappearance pulses at sixteen different positions in the visual field in randomized order. The locations of evoked cortical activity in the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes are represented on a Mercator projection map for each octant or octant segment stimulated. Lower hemifield stimuli activate cortex which lies mainly on the convexity of the occipital lobe contralateral to the side of stimulus presentation in the visual field. The more peripheral the stimulus is in the visual field, the more rostral is the location of the active cortex. The rostral-to-caudal location of the evoked activity varies from subject to subject by as much as 3 cm on the surface of the occipital cortex. Furthermore, in any single subject there is a substantial amount of hemispheric asymmetry. Upper hemifield stimuli activate cortex that lies on the extreme caudal pole of the occipital lobe. This activity is relatively weak, and in some subjects it is almost unmeasurable. It is suggested that the representation of the upper hemifield in the cortex lies mostly on the inferior and

  19. Submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli evoke electrical brain responses.

    PubMed

    Sperdin, Holger F; Spierer, Lucas; Becker, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Landis, Theodor

    2015-04-01

    Subliminal perception is strongly associated to the processing of meaningful or emotional information and has mostly been studied using visual masking. In this study, we used high density 256-channel EEG coupled with an liquid crystal display (LCD) tachistoscope to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of the brain response to visual checkerboard stimuli (Experiment 1) or blank stimuli (Experiment 2) presented without a mask for 1 ms (visible), 500 µs (partially visible), and 250 µs (subliminal) by applying time-wise, assumption-free nonparametric randomization statistics on the strength and on the topography of high-density scalp-recorded electric field. Stimulus visibility was assessed in a third separate behavioral experiment. Results revealed that unmasked checkerboards presented subliminally for 250 µs evoked weak but detectable visual evoked potential (VEP) responses. When the checkerboards were replaced by blank stimuli, there was no evidence for the presence of an evoked response anymore. Furthermore, the checkerboard VEPs were modulated topographically between 243 and 296 ms post-stimulus onset as a function of stimulus duration, indicative of the engagement of distinct configuration of active brain networks. A distributed electrical source analysis localized this modulation within the right superior parietal lobule near the precuneus. These results show the presence of a brain response to submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli independently of their emotional saliency or meaningfulness and opens an avenue for new investigations of subliminal stimulation without using visual masking.

  20. Visual Evoked Responses During Standing and Walking

    PubMed Central

    Gramann, Klaus; Gwin, Joseph T.; Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Ferris, Daniel P.; Makeig, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Human cognition has been shaped both by our body structure and by its complex interactions with its environment. Our cognition is thus inextricably linked to our own and others’ motor behavior. To model brain activity associated with natural cognition, we propose recording the concurrent brain dynamics and body movements of human subjects performing normal actions. Here we tested the feasibility of such a mobile brain/body (MoBI) imaging approach by recording high-density electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and body movements of subjects standing or walking on a treadmill while performing a visual oddball response task. Independent component analysis of the EEG data revealed visual event-related potentials that during standing, slow walking, and fast walking did not differ across movement conditions, demonstrating the viability of recording brain activity accompanying cognitive processes during whole body movement. Non-invasive and relatively low-cost MoBI studies of normal, motivated actions might improve understanding of interactions between brain and body dynamics leading to more complete biological models of cognition. PMID:21267424

  1. Visual Evoked Potential to Assess Retinopathy in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hari Kumar, K V S; Ahmad, F M H; Sood, Sandeep; Mansingh, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated for early retinopathy using the visual evoked potential (VEP) in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. All patients with GDM and type 2 diabetes seen between June and October of 2014 were included in this cross-sectional, observational study. Patients with secondary diabetes, ocular or major illness were excluded from the study. VEP was recorded in both eyes to derive prominent positive peak latency (P100), amplitude and initial negative deflection (N75) latency. The data were compared with 10 gestational age-matched controls with normal glucose tolerance. Appropriate statistical methods were used for comparison among the 3 groups. The study participants (40 with GDM, 10 with type 2 diabetes, 10 with normal glucose tolerance) had a median (25th to 75th interquartile range) age of 26 (24.3, 30) years, a gestational age of 24.5 (21, 27) weeks and weights of 66.8 (63.4, 71.5) kg. The P100 latencies were comparable among the 3 groups (p=0.0577). However, patients with any diabetes (GDM and type 2 diabetes) had prolonged P100 latencies (p=0.0139) and low P100 amplitudes (p=0.0391) in comparison to controls. P100 latency showed a direct correlation with hyperglycemia (p=0.0118). Our data showed that VEP abnormalities are detectable even in the short-term hyperglycemia of GDM and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Visual evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis before and after two years of interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Anlar, Omer; Kisli, Mesude; Tombul, Temel; Ozbek, Hanefi

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important in the diagnosis of and follow-up for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS); evoked potentials may be important if MRI is normal or cannot be performed. We assessed serial visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and cranial MRI in a group of clinically relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (N = 15) treated with interferon beta-lb (INFB-1b) and in normal subjects (N = 15). The investigations were done 1 week before INFB-lb therapy, 1 year later (N = 15), and 2 years later (N = 10). VEPs were abnormal in most of the patients; MRIs were abnormal in all patients. We used P100 latency as an electrophysiological index for the progress of illness. There were significant differences in VEPs between the beginning and ending of the interferon treatment. We concluded that VEPs would be a reliable index for following up the progress of MS under interferon therapy.

  3. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Visual Evoked Potential in management of optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eajailat, Suha Mikail; Al-Madani Senior, Mousa Victor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To report our experience in management of patients with optic neuritis. The effects of brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential on management were investigated Methods This is a four years clinical trial that included patients presenting with first attack of optic neuritis older than 16 years with visual acuity of less than 6/60 and presentation within first week of illness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potentials were done for all patients. Patients were classified into three groups. First group received placebo, second received oral steroids and third received intravenous and oral steroids. Primary outcome measure was improvement in visual acuity. Results A total number of 150 patients were enrolled in the study. Ocular pain was seen 127 patients Relative afferent pupillary defect in 142 patients and color vision impairment in 131 patients. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 84 patients. Pattern reversal VEP was abnormal in all patients. Using oral or intravenous steroid resulted in faster recovery but did not affect the final visual outcome. Recurrence rate was higher in patients with multiple MRI lesions and diminished VEP amplitude. Using intravenous steroids decreased recurrence rate in patients with three and more MRI lesions and non recordable VEP response. Conclusion MRI and pattern reversal VEP are recommended to be done in all patients presenting with optic neuritis. We advise to give intravenous methyl prednisolone in patients with multiple MRI white matter lesions and non recordable VEP at presentation. PMID:25018804

  4. Visual mismatch response evoked by a perceptually indistinguishable oddball.

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takayoshi; Aoyama, Atsushi; Amano, Kaoru; Takeda, Tsunehiro

    2011-08-03

    Mismatch field (MMF) is an early magnetoencephalographic response evoked by deviant stimuli within a sequence of standard stimuli. Although auditory MMF is reported to be an automatic response, the automaticity of visual MMF has not been clearly demonstrated, partly because of the difficulty in designing an ignore condition. Our modified oddball paradigm had a masking stimulus inserted between briefly presented standard and deviant stimuli (vertical gratings with different spatial frequencies). Perceptual discrimination between masked standard and deviant stimuli was difficult, but the early magnetoencephalographic response for the deviant was significantly larger than that for the standard, when the former had a higher spatial frequency than the latter. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that visual MMF is evoked automatically.

  5. Human Auditory and Visual Unimodal and Biomodal Continuous Evoked Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    to amplitude-modulated light stimuli, have been extensively investigated and applied in various fields: system identification studies ( Tweel and Lund...msec ( Tweel and Lunel, 1965, for MFs > 35 Hz; Regan, 1972; Spekreijse et al., 1977). 4.1.2 Auditory continuous evoked potentials Contrary to the visual...researchers ( Tweel and Lunel, 1965; Regan, 1966, 1972; Spckreijse, 1966; Spekreijse et al., 1977; Diamond, 1977; Junker, 1984; Junker and Peio, 1984

  6. [Effects of nicotine on visually evoked EEG potentials].

    PubMed

    Woodson, P P; Bättig, K; Rosecrans, J A

    1982-10-01

    The effects of nicotine were measured on the averaged visual evoked response (AVER) through the use of two types of experimental cigarettes which differed only in nicotine content (i.e., 0.14 vs. 1.34 mg/cig.). The results indicate that the restorative and/or enhancing effects of cigarette smoking on peak amplitudes are due predominantly to nicotine's psychopharmacologic effects, and support past research indicating that nicotine may enhance visual attentional processes in the quiescent smoker. This contrasts with other reports indicating nicotine to have a depressant effect on auditory processes.

  7. Visual evoked potentials and heart rate during white noise stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, F; Mecacci, L

    1999-03-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded in 12 adult participants as a function of the temporal frequency of a phase-reversed checkerboard, with or without a simultaneously presented white noise. During the VEP recordings also the pulse rate was measured. VEP amplitude changed as function of temporal frequency, but it was not affected by noise. Pulse rate was stable during the session without noise, but it increased during the white noise stimulation at high temporal frequencies. Heart acceleration might be associated to conditions when processing at low levels of visual sensitivity (high temporal frequencies) is furthermore disturbed by interfering stimulation (noise).

  8. Transient visual evoked neuromagnetic responses: Identification of multiple sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Medvick, P.; Flynn, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Supek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements and associated modeling procedures must be able to resolve multiple sources in order to localize and accurately characterize the generators of visual evoked neuromagnetic activity. Workers have identified at least 11 areas in the macaque, throughout occipital, parietal, and temporal cortex, which are primarily or entirely visual in function. The surface area of the human occipital lobe is estimated to be 150--250cm. Primary visual cortex covers approximately 26cm/sup 2/ while secondary visual areas comprise the remaining area. For evoked response amplitudes typical of human MEG data, one report estimates that a two-dipole field may be statistically distinguishable from that of a single dipole when the separation is greater than 1--2 cm. Given the estimated expanse of cortex devoted to visual processes, along with this estimate of resolution limits it is likely that MEG can resolve sources associated with activity in multiple visual areas. Researchers have noted evidence for the existence of multiple sources when presenting visual stimuli in a half field; however, they did not attempt to localize them. We have examined numerous human MEG field patterns resulting from different visual field placements of a small sinusoidal grating which suggest the existence of multiple sources. The analyses we have utilized for resolving multiple sources in these studies differ depending on whether there was evidence of (1) synchronous activation of two spatially discrete sources or (2) two discrete asynchronous sources. In some cases we have observed field patterns which appear to be adequately explained by a single source changing its orientation and location across time. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Auditory Evoked Bursts in Mouse Visual Cortex during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Land, Rüdiger; Engler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    General anesthesia is not a uniform state of the brain. Ongoing activity differs between light and deep anesthesia and cortical response properties are modulated in dependence of anesthetic dosage. We investigated how anesthesia level affects cross-modal interactions in primary sensory cortex. To examine this, we continuously measured the effects of visual and auditory stimulation during increasing and decreasing isoflurane level in the mouse visual cortex and the subiculum (from baseline at 0.7 to 2.5 vol % and reverse). Auditory evoked burst activity occurred in visual cortex after a transition during increase of anesthesia level. At the same time, auditory and visual evoked bursts occurred in the subiculum, even though the subiculum was unresponsive to both stimuli previous to the transition. This altered sensory excitability was linked to the presence of burst suppression activity in cortex, and to a regular slow burst suppression rhythm (∼0.2 Hz) in the subiculum. The effect disappeared during return to light anesthesia. The results show that pseudo-heteromodal sensory burst responses can appear in brain structures as an effect of an anesthesia induced state change. PMID:23185462

  10. Visual evoked potentials, reaction times and eye dominance in cricketers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N G; Harden, L M; Rogers, G G

    2005-09-01

    Few studies have examined the physiology of cricket, including the difference in ability between batsmen to make controlled contact with a ball bowled at high speed. We therefore measured visual evoked potentials and choice reaction times with dominant eyes, non-dominant eyes, and both eyes together, in 15 elite batsmen and 10 elite bowlers (aged 20.9 SD 1.9 years) and 9 control subjects (aged 20.2 SD 1.5 years). The latency and amplitude of waves N70, P100 and N145 were determined for each visual evoked potential (VEP). In addition interpeak latencies and peak to peak amplitudes were measured. The subjects also completed a choice reaction test to a visual stimulus. We found that cricketers were not more likely to have crossed dominance (dominant eye contralateral to dominant hand) than controls. Cricketers had a faster latency for VEP wave N70 than controls (p=0.03). However reaction time was not different between cricketers and the control group. Across all subjects, in comparison to monocular testing, binocular testing led to a faster choice reaction time (p=0.02) and larger amplitudes of VEP wave N70 (p=0.01). Visual processing during the first 100(-1)50 ms of the balls flight together with binocular vision facilitates retinal activation in talented cricketers.

  11. Visual evoked potentials monitoring in a case of transient post-operative visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Capon, Marie; Boven, Michel Van; van Pesch, Vincent; Hantson, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative visual loss (POVL) is a rare, albeit potentially serious complication of general anaesthesia. This report describes the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed transient POVL after general anaesthesia following a left posterior parietal meningioma surgery in the prone position and discusses the usefulness of visual evoked potentials monitoring in such situations. PMID:27601743

  12. Sensitivity of visual evoked potentials and spectral domain optical coherence tomography in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Raed; Ahmed, Samar; Al-Hashel, Jasem; Rousseff, Rossen T; Alroughani, Raed

    2017-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography are common ancillary studies that assess the visual pathways from a functional and structural aspect, respectively. To compare prevalence of abnormalities of Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). A cross-sectional study of 100 eyes with disease duration of less than 5 years since the diagnosis. Correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion-cell/inner plexiform layer with pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials amplitude and latency and contrast sensitivity was performed. The prevalence of abnormalities in pattern-reversal visual VEP was 56% while that of SOCT was 48% in all eyes. There was significant negative correlations between the average RNFL (r=-0.34, p=0.001) and GCIPL (r=-0.39, p<0.001) with VEP latency. In eyes with prior optic neuritis, a significant negative correlation was seen between average RNFL (r=-0.33, p=0.037) and GCIPL (r=-0.40, p=0.010) with VEP latency. We have found higher prevalence of VEP abnormalities than SCOCT in early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This suggests that VEP has a higher sensitivity for detecting lesions of the visual pathway in patients with early RRMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual evoked potentials in a patient with prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Small, M

    1988-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from a 53-year-old man with prosopagnosia during presentation of slides of known and unknown faces and under two control conditions. ANOVA comparisons with a normal male group showed no differences in P100 amplitude, P300 amplitude or P300 latency. There were no significant evoked potential differences between the patient and controls specifically related to the face conditions. There was, however, a significant delay in the latency of P100 from both hemispheres during all types of stimuli. This prolonged latency was asymmetrical, showing a right sided emphasis with the control conditions: pattern reversal and slides of geometric designs. This finding, of a dissociation in the interhemispheric delay, provides physiological evidence of stimulus-specific organisation at an early, sensory level. The fact that the P100 component showed a marked delay, yet P300 fell within normal limits for amplitude and latency, suggests that this patient's problem lies at a perceptual level.

  14. Serial visual evoked potentials in 90 untreated patients with acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, J L; Petrera, J

    1999-10-01

    To establish the value of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) for monitoring disease evolution, we undertook a population-based study of 90 untreated patients 12 to 57 years of age (median, 32 years) at the onset of optic neuritis (ON) and after 2, 4, 12, and 52 weeks. Optic neuritis was monosymptomatic (AMON) in 58 patients and part of the clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in 32 patients. The VEP was abnormal in eyes with acute ON in 69 (77%) of 90 patients at onset and in 80 (89%) of 90 patients at one or more of the follow-up sessions. In eyes with acute ON, normalization of an initially abnormal VEP was observed during 1-year follow-up in 13 (19%) of 69 patients. At onset of ON, VEP was abnormal in 35% of the clinically unaffected eyes. By parametric analysis of variance, the latencies (P = 0.0058), the amplitudes (P = 0.0298), and the combined VEP scores (P = 0.0345) in the eyes with acute ON were significantly associated with the time after onset. The latencies were influenced by the presence of CDMS (P = 0.0033), whereas the amplitudes were influenced by visual acuity (P = 0.0000). When visual acuity was included in a multifactor model, the time after onset was, however, not significantly associated with the amplitude (P = 0.8826). The mean latency of the VEPs in eyes with acute ON was significantly shorter in AMON than in ON as part of CDMS. This study provides evidence that VEP abnormality is often transitory, and that VEP often normalizes during follow-up. The diagnostic yield is increased by repeating VEP in the spontaneous course of acute ON. Visual evoked potential is a sensitive tool for revealing subclinical lesions.

  15. Effects of grating spatial orientation on visual evoked potentials and contrast sensitivity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Logi, F; Pellegrinetti, A; Bonfiglio, L; Baglini, O; Siciliano, G; Ludice, A; Sartucci, F

    2001-02-01

    Previous studies suggest a delay of pattern visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) depending on grating orientation. We examined a group of 14 patients with definite MS recording PVEPs to vertical and horizontal grating and analysing latency and amplitude of P60, N70 and P100 waves. We evaluated contrast sensitivity (CS) to dark and bright bars of several spatial frequencies (SF). The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic value of evoked responses and CS in revealing involvement of cortical structures. PVEPs to 1 degrees cycle/degree (c/d) vertical bars were abnormal in 25% for P60, in 32% for N70 and in 36%, for P100; in 25%, 36% and 42% respectively at 4 c/d; as regards horizontal bars at 1 c/d we found alterations of P60, N70 and P100 in 11%, 19% and 27% respectively; at 4 c/d in 19%, 27%) and 35%. CS resulted more abnormal for vertical grating, with a maximum impairment for 3.7 c/d SF. We may conclude that the use of vertical grating in clinical routine is more reliable both for PVEPs and CS testing; in addition CS can be abnormal even with normal PVEPs: this could mean an early impairment of CS and provide useful indications about a subclinical involvement of visual cortex.

  16. Spatial coincidence modulates interaction between visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Martin; Kolev, Vasil; Menzel, Kristina; Yordanova, Juliana

    2002-05-07

    The time course of interaction between concurrently applied visual and somatosensory stimulation with respect to evoked potentials (EPs) was studied. Visual stimuli, either in the left or right hemifield, and electric stimuli to the left wrist were delivered either alone or simultaneously. Visual and somatosensory EPs were summed and compared to bimodal EPs (BiEP, response to actual combination of both modalities). Temporal coincidence of stimuli lead to sub-additive or over-additive amplitudes in BiEPs in several time windows between 75 and 275 ms. Additional effects of spatial coincidence (left wrist with left hemifield) were found between 75 and 300 ms and beyond 450 ms. These interaction effects hint at a temporo-spatial pattern of multiple brain areas participating in the process of multimodal integration.

  17. Intraoperative monitoring of flash visual evoked potential under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hironobu

    2017-01-01

    In neurosurgical procedures that may cause visual impairment in the intraoperative period, the monitoring of flash visual evoked potential (VEP) is clinically used to evaluate visual function. Patients are unconscious during surgery under general anesthesia, making flash VEP monitoring useful as it can objectively evaluate visual function. The flash stimulus input to the retina is transmitted to the optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation (geniculocalcarine tract), and visual cortical area, and the VEP waveform is recorded from the occipital region. Intraoperative flash VEP monitoring allows detection of dysfunction arising anywhere in the optic pathway, from the retina to the visual cortex. Particularly important steps to obtain reproducible intraoperative flash VEP waveforms under general anesthesia are total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, use of retinal flash stimulation devices using high-intensity light-emitting diodes, and a combination of electroretinography to confirm that the flash stimulus has reached the retina. Relatively major postoperative visual impairment can be detected by intraoperative decreases in the flash VEP amplitude. PMID:28367282

  18. Intraoperative monitoring of flash visual evoked potential under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    In neurosurgical procedures that may cause visual impairment in the intraoperative period, the monitoring of flash visual evoked potential (VEP) is clinically used to evaluate visual function. Patients are unconscious during surgery under general anesthesia, making flash VEP monitoring useful as it can objectively evaluate visual function. The flash stimulus input to the retina is transmitted to the optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation (geniculocalcarine tract), and visual cortical area, and the VEP waveform is recorded from the occipital region. Intraoperative flash VEP monitoring allows detection of dysfunction arising anywhere in the optic pathway, from the retina to the visual cortex. Particularly important steps to obtain reproducible intraoperative flash VEP waveforms under general anesthesia are total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, use of retinal flash stimulation devices using high-intensity light-emitting diodes, and a combination of electroretinography to confirm that the flash stimulus has reached the retina. Relatively major postoperative visual impairment can be detected by intraoperative decreases in the flash VEP amplitude.

  19. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the left temporal pole restores normal visual evoked potential habituation in interictal migraineurs.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Francesca; Pierelli, Francesco; Bove, Ilaria; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Evangelista, Maurizio; Perrotta, Armando; Serrao, Mariano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Coppola, Gianluca

    2017-12-01

    Neuroimaging data has implicated the temporal pole (TP) in migraine pathophysiology; the density and functional activity of the TP were reported to fluctuate in accordance with the migraine cycle. Yet, the exact link between TP morpho-functional abnormalities and migraine is unknown. Here, we examined whether non-invasive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) ameliorates abnormal interictal multimodal sensory processing in patients with migraine. We examined the habituation of visual evoked potentials and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) before and immediately after 20-min anodal tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulation delivered over the left TP in interictal migraineurs. Prior to tDCS, interictal migraineurs did not exhibit habituation in response to repetitive visual or somatosensory stimulation. After anodal tDCS but not sham stimulation, migraineurs exhibited normal habituation responses to visual stimulation; however, tDCS had no effect on SSEP habituation in migraineurs. Our study shows for the first time that enhancing excitability of the TP with anodal tDCS normalizes abnormal interictal visual information processing in migraineurs. This finding has implications for the role of the TP in migraine, and specifically highlights the ventral stream of the visual pathway as a pathophysiological neural substrate for abnormal visual processing in migraine.

  20. Visually-evoked pattern and photomyoclonic responses in video game and television epilepsy: case reports.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, E; Watson, N A

    1996-01-01

    This research paper reports a case study of two male photosensitive epileptic patients, aged 14 and 16 years old respectively, whose epileptic seizures were often triggered by the flickers from television and video games respectively. The 14-year old patient had no family history of epilepsy, while the 16 year old had a family history of epilepsy. A comprehensive electroencephalogram (EEG), including hyperventilation, intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) and pattern stimulation were carried out on them and EEG abnormalities including photoparoxysmal responses (PPR) and generalized myoclonic responses were evoked. A thorough analysis of the EEG morphology of the myclonic responses and the clinical manifestations showed evidence of two separate entitles of seizures namely: visually evoked pattern-myoclonic responses (PTMR) and visually evoked photomyoclonic responses (PMR). PTMR was independent of flash rate and occurred before a PPR and at the same time as the flash rate, while PMR occurred after the PPR and was dependent on flash rate. These findings suggest that "Video Game" epilepsy is probably a pattern sensitive epilepsy, electronic screen being the source of the triggering patterns; hence, the morphology and the family histories and the myoclonic phenomena differ from those of pure photosensitive epilepsy.

  1. Visual evoked potentials and selective attention to points in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Voorhis, S.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded to sequences of flashes delivered to the right and left visual fields while subjects responded promptly to designated stimuli in one field at a time (focused attention), in both fields at once (divided attention), or to neither field (passive). Three stimulus schedules were used: the first was a replication of a previous study (Eason, Harter, and White, 1969) where left- and right-field flashes were delivered quasi-independently, while in the other two the flashes were delivered to the two fields in random order (Bernoulli sequence). VEPs to attended-field stimuli were enhanced at both occipital (O2) and central (Cz) recording sites under all stimulus sequences, but different components were affected at the two scalp sites. It was suggested that the VEP at O2 may reflect modality-specific processing events, while the response at Cz, like its auditory homologue, may index more general aspects of selective attention.

  2. Visual evoked potentials and selective attention to points in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Voorhis, S.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded to sequences of flashes delivered to the right and left visual fields while subjects responded promptly to designated stimuli in one field at a time (focused attention), in both fields at once (divided attention), or to neither field (passive). Three stimulus schedules were used: the first was a replication of a previous study (Eason, Harter, and White, 1969) where left- and right-field flashes were delivered quasi-independently, while in the other two the flashes were delivered to the two fields in random order (Bernoulli sequence). VEPs to attended-field stimuli were enhanced at both occipital (O2) and central (Cz) recording sites under all stimulus sequences, but different components were affected at the two scalp sites. It was suggested that the VEP at O2 may reflect modality-specific processing events, while the response at Cz, like its auditory homologue, may index more general aspects of selective attention.

  3. Hyperglycemia with occipital seizures: images and visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Pang; Hsieh, Peiyuan F; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Lin, Wan-Yu; Hu, Wei-Hsiung; Yang, Dar-Yu; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2005-07-01

    Hyperglycemia may rarely be seen with visual seizures. Observation of both visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in visual status epilepticus (SE) has not been reported. We describe acute and follow-up VEP and MRI findings of a patient with hyperglycemia-related visual SE of occipital origin. In a 59-year-old diabetic woman, complex visual hallucinations and illusions developed with < or =10 seizures per hour as an initial manifestation of nonketotic hyperglycemia. Neurologic examination revealed ictal nystagmus to the right and continuous right hemianopsia. Ictal electroencephalography (EEG) and Tc-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed an epileptogenic focus in the left occipital lobe. MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery showed focal subcortical hypointensity and gyral hyperintensity. Follow-up MRI showed only minimal gyral hyperintensity at 6 months. The P100 amplitude of VEP was significantly higher at the right occipital area during SE, but slightly higher on the left after the patient had been seizure free for 6 months. Occipital seizures and hemianopsia can be caused by hyperglycemia and may be accompanied by special MRI and VEP findings.

  4. Maximally reliable spatial filtering of steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Greaves, Alex S; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and robustness to artifacts, steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are a popular technique for studying neural processing in the human visual system. SSVEPs are conventionally analyzed at individual electrodes or linear combinations of electrodes which maximize some variant of the SNR. Here we exploit the fundamental assumption of evoked responses--reproducibility across trials--to develop a technique that extracts a small number of high SNR, maximally reliable SSVEP components. This novel spatial filtering method operates on an array of Fourier coefficients and projects the data into a low-dimensional space in which the trial-to-trial spectral covariance is maximized. When applied to two sample data sets, the resulting technique recovers physiologically plausible components (i.e., the recovered topographies match the lead fields of the underlying sources) while drastically reducing the dimensionality of the data (i.e., more than 90% of the trial-to-trial reliability is captured in the first four components). Moreover, the proposed technique achieves a higher SNR than that of the single-best electrode or the Principal Components. We provide a freely-available MATLAB implementation of the proposed technique, herein termed "Reliable Components Analysis".

  5. Visual and brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with obesity.

    PubMed

    Akın, Onur; Arslan, Mutluay; Akgün, Hakan; Yavuz, Süleyman Tolga; Sarı, Erkan; Taşçılar, Mehmet Emre; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Ünay, Bülent

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate alterations in visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in children with obesity. A total of 96 children, with a mean age of 12.1±2.0 years (range 9-17 years, 63 obese and 33 age and sex-matched control subjects) were included in the study. Laboratory tests were performed to detect insulin resistance (IR) and dyslipidemia. The latencies and amplitudes of VEP and BAEP were measured in healthy and obese subjects. The VEP P100, BAEP interpeak latency (IPL) I-III and IPL I-V averages of obese children were significantly longer than the control subjects. When the obese group was divided into two subgroups, those with IR and without IR, BAEP wave I, wave III and P100 wave latencies were found to be longer in the group with IR. A statistically significant correlation was observed between BAEP wave I latency, IPL I-V, IPL I-III and the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA IR) index and fasting insulin level. Our findings suggest that VEP and BAEP can be used to determine early subclinical on auditory and visual functions of obese children with insulin resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peripheral neuropathy and visual evoked potential changes in workers exposed to n-hexane.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Gomceli, Yasemin B; Sonmez, Tolga; Inan, Levent E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patients who had peripheral neuropathy and changes to their visual evoked responses resulting from exposure to n-hexane. Eighteen patients with acute or subacute neuropathy, who were working in a shoe factory, were investigated clinically and electrophysiologically. These evaluations were then repeated 9 months to 12 months after cessation of exposure to n-hexane. Results of the nerve conduction studies predominantly showed a decrease in motor and sensory conduction velocities. Between 9 and 12 months after cessation of exposure to n-hexane, 83.3% of patients had a complete clinical recovery. The electrophysiological studies also revealed improvement to the majority of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. The results of the visual evoked potential (VEP) studies were considered normal at admission, however, the P100 latencies at the 9-month to 12-month retest had improved (p < 0.05). As the abnormalities identified with clinical examination and nerve conduction studies, and the subclinical abnormalities revealed through VEP assessment, could be reversed after exposure to n-hexane had ceased, the clinical prognosis was usually good.

  7. Adaptive Acceleration of Visually Evoked Smooth Eye Movements in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The optokinetic response (OKR) consists of smooth eye movements following global motion of the visual surround, which suppress image slip on the retina for visual acuity. The effective performance of the OKR is limited to rather slow and low-frequency visual stimuli, although it can be adaptably improved by cerebellum-dependent mechanisms. To better understand circuit mechanisms constraining OKR performance, we monitored how distinct kinematic features of the OKR change over the course of OKR adaptation, and found that eye acceleration at stimulus onset primarily limited OKR performance but could be dramatically potentiated by visual experience. Eye acceleration in the temporal-to-nasal direction depended more on the ipsilateral floccular complex of the cerebellum than did that in the nasal-to-temporal direction. Gaze-holding following the OKR was also modified in parallel with eye-acceleration potentiation. Optogenetic manipulation revealed that synchronous excitation and inhibition of floccular complex Purkinje cells could effectively accelerate eye movements in the nasotemporal and temporonasal directions, respectively. These results collectively delineate multiple motor pathways subserving distinct aspects of the OKR in mice and constrain hypotheses regarding cellular mechanisms of the cerebellum-dependent tuning of movement acceleration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although visually evoked smooth eye movements, known as the optokinetic response (OKR), have been studied in various species for decades, circuit mechanisms of oculomotor control and adaptation remain elusive. In the present study, we assessed kinematics of the mouse OKR through the course of adaptation training. Our analyses revealed that eye acceleration at visual-stimulus onset primarily limited working velocity and frequency range of the OKR, yet could be dramatically potentiated during OKR adaptation. Potentiation of eye acceleration exhibited different properties between the nasotemporal and

  8. Adaptive Acceleration of Visually Evoked Smooth Eye Movements in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; du Lac, Sascha

    2016-06-22

    The optokinetic response (OKR) consists of smooth eye movements following global motion of the visual surround, which suppress image slip on the retina for visual acuity. The effective performance of the OKR is limited to rather slow and low-frequency visual stimuli, although it can be adaptably improved by cerebellum-dependent mechanisms. To better understand circuit mechanisms constraining OKR performance, we monitored how distinct kinematic features of the OKR change over the course of OKR adaptation, and found that eye acceleration at stimulus onset primarily limited OKR performance but could be dramatically potentiated by visual experience. Eye acceleration in the temporal-to-nasal direction depended more on the ipsilateral floccular complex of the cerebellum than did that in the nasal-to-temporal direction. Gaze-holding following the OKR was also modified in parallel with eye-acceleration potentiation. Optogenetic manipulation revealed that synchronous excitation and inhibition of floccular complex Purkinje cells could effectively accelerate eye movements in the nasotemporal and temporonasal directions, respectively. These results collectively delineate multiple motor pathways subserving distinct aspects of the OKR in mice and constrain hypotheses regarding cellular mechanisms of the cerebellum-dependent tuning of movement acceleration. Although visually evoked smooth eye movements, known as the optokinetic response (OKR), have been studied in various species for decades, circuit mechanisms of oculomotor control and adaptation remain elusive. In the present study, we assessed kinematics of the mouse OKR through the course of adaptation training. Our analyses revealed that eye acceleration at visual-stimulus onset primarily limited working velocity and frequency range of the OKR, yet could be dramatically potentiated during OKR adaptation. Potentiation of eye acceleration exhibited different properties between the nasotemporal and temporonasal OKRs, indicating

  9. Habituation of visual evoked potentials in healthy infants and in infants with periventricular leukomalacia.

    PubMed

    González-Frankenberger, Berta; Harmony, Thalía; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; Porras-Kattz, Eneida; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Santiago, Efraín; Avecilla-Ramírez, Gloria

    2008-12-01

    To investigate whether habituation of flash visual evoked potentials is already present during the first 3 months of life, and to explore differences between healthy infants, term infants with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and preterm infants with PVL. Referential recordings to stimuli consisting of photic stimulation presented in blocks were obtained. A total of 25 blocks, 15-stimuli each, were presented. Intrablock and interblock habituation effects were analyzed. In healthy infants of 42-50 and 51-58 weeks of post-conceptional age (PCA), a negative central component (NCC) showed a significant decrease in amplitude due to stimulus repetition. NCC habituation was also observed in term infants with PVL at 51-58 weeks of PCA, but not in term infants with PVL at 42-50 weeks of PCA. NCC habituation was not apparent in preterm infants with PVL. These results suggest that the neural mechanisms of visual habituation are normally present during the first month of life, but the presence of PVL delays the emergence of these mechanisms, particularly in preterm infants. The habituation of flash visual evoked potentials may be developed into a reliable tool to examine normal and abnormal development of early neural processes.

  10. [Lateralization in dissociated vertical deviation with flash visual evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Suwa, K; Yagasaki, T; Awaya, S

    1996-08-01

    Lateralization, suggesting misrouting of optic nerve fibers in albinism, was examined by the flash visual evoked potentials (flash VEP) test in dissociated vertical deviation (DVD). Eighteen cases of DVD were studied and compared with 5 cases of X-recessive ocular albinism and 4 normal controls. Full-field monocular and binocular stimulation was employed with electroencepharograph electrodes on O1 and O2 (10/20 system), and the latency of P100 was statistically analysed with two-way analysis of variance. The difference in the P100 latency between contralateral and ipsilateral stimulation was significant (p < 0.05) in albinism, but not in DVD and normal controls. Therefore, DVD is probably not associated with misrouting of optic nerve fibers.

  11. Visual evoked potentials in neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Ringelstein, Marius; Kleiter, Ingo; Ayzenberg, Ilya; Borisow, Nadja; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Kraemer, Markus; Cohn, Eva; Wildemann, Brigitte; Jarius, Sven; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Aktas, Orhan; Albrecht, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a key feature of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Recently, NMO patients of predominantly Afro-Brazilian origin were evaluated by visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and showed marked amplitude reductions. Here, we analyzed VEPs in a predominantly Caucasian cohort, consisting of 43 patients with definite NMO, 18 with anti-aquaporin (AQP) 4 antibody-seropositive NMO spectrum disorders and 61 matched healthy controls. We found reduced amplitudes in only 12.3%, prolonged latencies in 41.9% and a lack of response in 14.0% of NMO eyes. Delayed P100 latencies in eyes without prior ON suggested this was a subclinical affection. The data indicate heterogenous patterns in NMO, warranting further investigation.

  12. Transient visually evoked potentials to sinusoidal gratings in optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, G T

    1983-01-01

    Transient visually evoked potentials (VEPs) to sinusoidal gratings over a range of spatial frequencies have been recorded in cases of optic neuritis. The use of the response to pattern onset in addition to the response to pattern reversal extended the range to higher spatial frequencies by up to two octaves. There was an increase in VEP delay and a greater degree of discrimination from a control group at higher spatial frequencies. This finding is discussed in the light of previous reports of luminance and checkerboard VEPs in demyelinating optic nerve disease. An attempt is made to relate amplitude changes in various VEP components to contrast sensitivity measurements in this group of patients. PMID:6663312

  13. Visual evoked potential findings in Behcet's disease without neurological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Anlar, Omer; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Tombul, Temel; Calka, Omer; Bilgili, Serap G

    2006-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, recurrent multisystem inflammatory disorder firstly described by Turkish dermatologist Dr. Hulusi Behçet in 1937. The classic triad consists of recurrent oral and genital ulcerations and uveitis. The article presents the value of visual evoked potential findings of a series of 44 patients with BD without neurological manifestations seen at the Medical Hospital in Neurology and Dermatology clinics over the past 8 years. The mean latency value of positive peak P100 in BD patients was significantly delayed compared to that of control subjects (patients's mean: 105.6 ms in right eye and 107.7 ms in left eye; control subject's mean: 101.4 ms in right eye and 101.7 ms in left eye).

  14. ISCEV standard for clinical visual evoked potentials: (2016 update).

    PubMed

    Odom, J Vernon; Bach, Michael; Brigell, Mitchell; Holder, Graham E; McCulloch, Daphne L; Mizota, Atsushi; Tormene, Alma Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) can provide important diagnostic information regarding the functional integrity of the visual system. This document updates the ISCEV standard for clinical VEP testing and supersedes the 2009 standard. The main changes in this revision are the acknowledgment that pattern stimuli can be produced using a variety of technologies with an emphasis on the need for manufacturers to ensure that there is no luminance change during pattern reversal or pattern onset/offset. The document is also edited to bring the VEP standard into closer harmony with other ISCEV standards. The ISCEV standard VEP is based on a subset of stimulus and recording conditions that provide core clinical information and can be performed by most clinical electrophysiology laboratories throughout the world. These are: (1) Pattern-reversal VEPs elicited by checkerboard stimuli with large 1 degree (°) and small 0.25° checks. (2) Pattern onset/offset VEPs elicited by checkerboard stimuli with large 1° and small 0.25° checks. (3) Flash VEPs elicited by a flash (brief luminance increment) which subtends a visual field of at least 20°. The ISCEV standard VEP protocols are defined for a single recording channel with a midline occipital active electrode. These protocols are intended for assessment of the eye and/or optic nerves anterior to the optic chiasm. Extended, multi-channel protocols are required to evaluate postchiasmal lesions.

  15. Effect of pupil size on multifocal pattern visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandra; Balachandran, Chandra; Klistorner, Alexander I; Graham, Stuart L; Billson, Francis A

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of pupil diameter on the amplitude and latency of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP). The multifocal objective perimeter (Accumap; Objectivision) was used to stimulate the visual field at 56 sites extending to 32 degrees using a pseudo-random pattern stimulus. The mfVEP were recorded using bipolar occipital electrodes, 7 min/eye. Ten normal subjects were recruited from the community and one eye was randomly selected for testing. The mfVEP were recorded at four different pupil diameters (2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm), obtained by applying tropicamide (0.5%) or pilocarpine (2%) in different dilutions. Appropriate refractive correction was provided to overcome cycloplegia and achieve a visual acuity of 6/7.5 or better. Analysis revealed that at most pupil diameters the normalized full field amplitude did not show significant variation, except at the most miotic pupil diameter (2 mm), where the amplitude became reduced, based on 2-way anova and Tukey's T method. There was, however, significant correlation between latency and pupil area (correlation coefficient: upper field -0.63, lower field -0.76). The results suggest that even in the presence of mydriatics or miotics, the mfVEP test can be used to assess diseases that affect amplitude, provided near correction is used. The interpretation of latency, however, must be made with caution, as a borderline conduction defect with a dilated pupil may appear normal.

  16. [Dipole tracing of visual evoked potentials in human brain].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, I A; Mikhaĭlova, E S; Kulikov, M A; Slavutskaia, A V

    2008-01-01

    3D tracing of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) of averaged human visual evoked potentials (VEP) by their distribution across a 34-electrode array was obtained under short presentation of pattern-onset stimuli (sets of 45 horizontal, vertical bars or crosses). Using a 2-dipole spherical three-layer model, we dynamically (step of 1 ms) localized dipoles in four healthy subjects. Dipole locations were matched to anatomical brain regions visualized in structural MRI. Best-fitting source parameters were superimposed on MR images of each subject to identify the anatomical structures giving rise to the surface patterns. It was found that during 50-300 ms following the onset of the stimuli, the ECDs in all subjects were localized in the occipital cortex and demonstrated reliable systematic shift in localization. Two local (1-2 cm3) zones of the preferable dipole attendance were found at 5-6 cm behind zero line: the first one was localized near the midline of the brain, whereas the other zone was situated in the right hemisphere at a distance of 6-7 cm from the first zone. Their localization and strength of activation were reliably different for crosses and lines and changed during VEP generation. Zones of relatively rare dipole attendance were found also. The data are discussed in relation to localization of initial and endpoint of ECDs trajectories, as well as with sensitivity of the visual cortex to line crossing and branching.

  17. Effect of word familiarity on visually evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Harada, N; Iwaki, S; Nakagawa, S; Yamaguchi, M; Tonoike, M

    2004-11-30

    This study investigated the effect of word familiarity of visual stimuli on the word recognizing function of the human brain. Word familiarity is an index of the relative ease of word perception, and is characterized by facilitation and accuracy on word recognition. We studied the effect of word familiarity, using "Hiragana" (phonetic characters in Japanese orthography) characters as visual stimuli, on the elicitation of visually evoked magnetic fields with a word-naming task. The words were selected from a database of lexical properties of Japanese. The four "Hiragana" characters used were grouped and presented in 4 classes of degree of familiarity. The three components were observed in averaged waveforms of the root mean square (RMS) value on latencies at about 100 ms, 150 ms and 220 ms. The RMS value of the 220 ms component showed a significant positive correlation (F=(3/36); 5.501; p=0.035) with the value of familiarity. ECDs of the 220 ms component were observed in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Increments in the RMS value of the 220 ms component, which might reflect ideographical word recognition, retrieving "as a whole" were enhanced with increments of the value of familiarity. The interaction of characters, which increased with the value of familiarity, might function "as a large symbol"; and enhance a "pop-out" function with an escaping character inhibiting other characters and enhancing the segmentation of the character (as a figure) from the ground.

  18. Pattern Visual Evoked Potentials Elicited by Organic Electroluminescence Screen

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Funada, Hideaki; Minoda, Haruka

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether organic electroluminescence (OLED) screens can be used as visual stimulators to elicit pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (p-VEPs). Method. Checkerboard patterns were generated on a conventional cathode-ray tube (S710, Compaq Computer Co., USA) screen and on an OLED (17 inches, 320 × 230 mm, PVM-1741, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) screen. The time course of the luminance changes of each monitor was measured with a photodiode. The p-VEPs elicited by these two screens were recorded from 15 eyes of 9 healthy volunteers (22.0 ± 0.8 years). Results. The OLED screen had a constant time delay from the onset of the trigger signal to the start of the luminescence change. The delay during the reversal phase from black to white for the pattern was 1.0 msec on the cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen and 0.5 msec on the OLED screen. No significant differences in the amplitudes of P100 and the implicit times of N75 and P100 were observed in the p-VEPs elicited by the CRT and the OLED screens. Conclusion. The OLED screen can be used as a visual stimulator to elicit p-VEPs; however the time delay and the specific properties in the luminance change must be taken into account. PMID:25197652

  19. Pattern visual evoked potentials elicited by organic electroluminescence screen.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Funada, Hideaki; Sasaki, Kakeru; Minoda, Haruka; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether organic electroluminescence (OLED) screens can be used as visual stimulators to elicit pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (p-VEPs). Checkerboard patterns were generated on a conventional cathode-ray tube (S710, Compaq Computer Co., USA) screen and on an OLED (17 inches, 320 × 230 mm, PVM-1741, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) screen. The time course of the luminance changes of each monitor was measured with a photodiode. The p-VEPs elicited by these two screens were recorded from 15 eyes of 9 healthy volunteers (22.0 ± 0.8 years). The OLED screen had a constant time delay from the onset of the trigger signal to the start of the luminescence change. The delay during the reversal phase from black to white for the pattern was 1.0 msec on the cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen and 0.5 msec on the OLED screen. No significant differences in the amplitudes of P100 and the implicit times of N75 and P100 were observed in the p-VEPs elicited by the CRT and the OLED screens. The OLED screen can be used as a visual stimulator to elicit p-VEPs; however the time delay and the specific properties in the luminance change must be taken into account.

  20. Case Report of Vestibularly evoked Visual Hallucinations in a Patient with Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Ognyan I

    2016-08-01

    Previous work has shown that caloric vestibular stimulation may evoke elementary visual hallucinations in healthy humans, such as different colored lines or dots. Surprisingly, the present case report reveals that the same stimulation can evoke visual hallucinations in a patient with cortical blindness, but with fundamentally different characteristics. The visual hallucinations evoked were complex and came from daily life experiences. Moreover, they did not include other senses beyond vision. This case report suggests that in conditions of cerebral pathology, vestibular-visual interaction may stimulate hallucinogenic subcortical, or undamaged cortical structures, and arouse mechanisms that can generate visual images exclusively.

  1. The Nature and Process of Development in Averaged Visually Evoked Potentials: Discussion on Pattern Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izawa, Shuji; Mizutani, Tohru

    This paper examines the development of visually evoked EEG patterns in retarded and normal subjects. The paper focuses on the averaged visually evoked potentials (AVEP) in the central and occipital regions of the brain in eyes closed and eyes open conditions. Wave pattern, amplitude, and latency are examined. The first section of the paper reviews…

  2. Effect of body temperature on visual evoked potential delay and visual perception in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Regan, D; Murray, T J; Silver, R

    1977-01-01

    Seven multiple sclerosis patients were cooled and four heated, but evoked potential delay changed in only five out 11 experiments. Control limits were set by cooling eight and heating four control subjects. One patient gave anomalous results in that although heating degraded perceptual delay and visual acuity, and depressed the sine wave grating MTF, double-flash resolution was improved. An explanation is proposed in terms of the pattern of axonal demyelination. The medium frequency flicker evoked potential test seems to be a less reliable means of monitoring the progress of demyelination in multiple sclerosis patients than is double-flash campimetry or perceptual delay campimetry, although in some situations the objectivity of the evoked potential test would be advantageous. PMID:599356

  3. Visual evoked potentials in patients with pineal gland cyst.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Jelena; Mikula, Ivan; Miskov, Snjezana; Budisic, Mislav; Ivkic, Goran; Demarin, Vida

    2012-09-01

    The functional effect of the pineal gland cyst is difficult to evaluate with visual field examination. The aim of this study is to investigate the usefulness of visual evoked potentials (VEP) in patients with pineal gland cyst due to the possible compression on the visual pathway. Black-and-white pattern-reversal checkerboard VEP were recorded in 75 patients (50 females and 25 males, mean age 26.3 ± 15.7 and 25.6 ± 17.6 years, respectively) with pineal gland cyst detected on magnetic resonance of the brain (subject group) and 75 age and sex-matched control subjects (control group). Amplitudes and P100 latencies were collected and later grouped as: (1) normal finding; (2) prechiasmal; (3) prechiasmal and postchiasmal; and (4) postchiasmal dysfunction. P100 latencies differed significantly between subject (110.26 ± 13.23 ms) and control group (101.01 ± 5.36 ms) (p < 0.01). Findings of the VEP differed significantly (p < 0.01) between subject and control group, mainly due to the postchiasmal dysfunction frequency in subject group. Findings of the VEP differed significantly according to the pineal gland cyst volume (p = 0.006) with more frequent postchiasmal dysfunctions among subjects with larger cysts. Postchiasmal changes were significantly more frequent in patients with described compression of the cyst on surrounding brain structures (p = 0.016). Postchiasmal dysfunction on VEP can be seen in patients with pineal gland cyst, mostly with larger cysts and with compression of the cyst on surrounding brain structures. VEP serve as a useful method to determine functional impairment of the visual pathway in patients with pineal gland cyst.

  4. Visual evoked potentials in subgroups of migraine with aura patients.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Gianluca; Bracaglia, Martina; Di Lenola, Davide; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Serrao, Mariano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Di Renzo, Antonio; Martelli, Francesco; Fadda, Antonello; Schoenen, Jean; Pierelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from migraine with aura can have either pure visual auras or complex auras with sensory disturbances and dysphasia, or both. Few studies have searched for possible pathophysiological differences between these two subgroups of patients. Methods - Forty-seven migraine with aura patients were subdivided in a subgroup with exclusively visual auras (MA, N = 27) and another with complex neurological auras (MA+, N = 20). We recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEP: 15 min of arc cheques, 3.1 reversal per second, 600 sweeps) and measured amplitude and habituation (slope of the linear regression line of amplitude changes from the 1st to 6th block of 100 sweeps) for the N1-P1 and P1-N2 components in patients and, for comparison, in 30 healthy volunteers (HV) of similar age and gender distribution. VEP N1-P1 habituation, i.e. amplitude decrement between 1st and 6th block, which was obvious in most HV (mean slope -0.50), was deficient in both MA (slope +0.01, p = 0.0001) and MA+ (-0.0049, p = 0.001) patients. However, VEP N1-P1 amplitudes across blocks were normal in MA patients, while they were significantly greater in MA+ patients than in HVs. Our findings suggest that in migraine with aura patients different aura phenotypes may be underpinned by different pathophysiological mechanisms. Pre-activation cortical excitability could be higher in patients with complex neurological auras than in those having pure visual auras or in healthy volunteers.

  5. Recording Visual Evoked Potentials and Auditory Evoked P300 at 9.4T Static Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N. Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4T were not different from those recorded at 0T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4T when compared to recordings at 0T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses. PMID:23650538

  6. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Arrubla, Jorge; Neuner, Irene; Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  7. Genetic abnormality of the visual pathways in a "white" tiger.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Kaas, J H

    1973-06-22

    "White"tigers show an inherited reduction of pigment, produced by an autosomal recessive gene. The brain of one of these tigers shows an abnormality of the visual pathways similar to abnormalities that are associated with albinism in many other mammals. There is a close relationship between the reduced pigment formation, the pathway abnormality, and strabismus.

  8. Effect of stimulus check size on multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Chandra; Klistorner, Alexander I; Graham, Stuart L

    2003-03-01

    In this study we examined the effects of varying stimulus check size on multifocal visual evoked potential (VEP). We also evaluated the currently used cortical scaling of stimulus segments. The ObjectiVision multifocal objective perimeter stimulates the eye with random check patterns at 56 cortically scaled segments within the visual field extending to a radius of 26 degrees. All cortically scaled segments have equal number of checks, which gradually increase in size from the center to the periphery, proportional to the size of the segment. Stimuli with 9, 16, 25, 36 and 49 checks/segment were tested on 10 eyes belonging to 10 normal subjects. The check size varied inversely with number of checks per segment. VEP was recorded using bipolar occipital cross electrodes (7 min/eye), the amplitude and latency of responses obtained were compared with the check size at different eccentricities. Our findings suggest that the existing setting with 16 checks/segment subtending 26' to 140' from center to periphery, is the most effective amongst all the check sizes. Decreasing the check size prolongs the latency in the central field only. Cortical scaling of segments generates responses of the same order of magnitude throughout the field, but could be improved slightly to enhance the signal from the outer two rings.

  9. Effects of nicotine on the visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Woodson, P P; Baettig, K; Etkin, M W; Kallman, W M; Harry, G J; Kallman, M J; Rosecrans, J A

    1982-11-01

    The effects of smoking cigarettes differing in nicotine content (0.14 vs 1.34 mg/cigarette) on the peak-to-peak amplitude and peak latency of the human averaged visual evoked response (AVER) were measured in 10 male smokers after a 2-hr smoking deprivation period. The AVER was obtained under five different flash intensities. Eight different peaks were involved in the amplitude and latency measurements. The nicotine dosage and flash intensity factors both had significant effects on peak-to-peak amplitudes while only the flash intensity factor affected peak latencies. The general enhancement of peak-to-peak amplitudes by the 1.34 mg cigarette, relative to the 0.14 mg cigarette, indicates that the effects of cigarette smoking on the AVER are predominantly due to nicotine's psychopharmacologic action, as opposed to other elements in tobacco smoke or as opposed to nonpharmacologic mechanisms involving learning processes. Past research, on an electrophysiological and behavioral level, indicating that nicotine, as administered via cigarette smoking, may have enhancing and/or restorative effects on visual attentional processes in the quiescent smoker was supported.

  10. Flash visual evoked potentials in diurnal birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Maurizio; Biaggi, Fabio; Di Ianni, Francesco; Dodi, Pier Luigi; Quintavalla, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of Flash Visual Evoked Potentials (FVEPs) testing in birds of prey in a clinical setting and to describe the protocol and the baseline data for normal vision in this species. FVEP recordings were obtained from 6 normal adult birds of prey: n. 2 Harris's Hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus), n. 1 Lanner Falcon (Falco biarmicus), n. 2 Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) and n. 1 Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug). Before carrying out VEP tests, all animals underwent neurologic and ophthalmic routine examination. Waveforms were analysed to identify reproducible peaks from random variation of baseline. At least three positive and negative peaks were highlighted in all tracks with elevated repeatability. Measurements consisted of the absolute and relative latencies of these peaks (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and N3) and their peak-to-peak amplitudes. Both the peak latency and wave morphology achieved from normal animals were similar to those obtained previously in other animal species. This test can be easily and safely performed in a clinical setting in birds of prey and could be useful for an objective assessment of visual function.

  11. Flash visual evoked potentials in diurnal birds of prey

    PubMed Central

    Biaggi, Fabio; Di Ianni, Francesco; Dodi, Pier Luigi; Quintavalla, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of Flash Visual Evoked Potentials (FVEPs) testing in birds of prey in a clinical setting and to describe the protocol and the baseline data for normal vision in this species. FVEP recordings were obtained from 6 normal adult birds of prey: n. 2 Harris’s Hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus), n. 1 Lanner Falcon (Falco biarmicus), n. 2 Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) and n. 1 Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug). Before carrying out VEP tests, all animals underwent neurologic and ophthalmic routine examination. Waveforms were analysed to identify reproducible peaks from random variation of baseline. At least three positive and negative peaks were highlighted in all tracks with elevated repeatability. Measurements consisted of the absolute and relative latencies of these peaks (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and N3) and their peak-to-peak amplitudes. Both the peak latency and wave morphology achieved from normal animals were similar to those obtained previously in other animal species. This test can be easily and safely performed in a clinical setting in birds of prey and could be useful for an objective assessment of visual function. PMID:27547536

  12. Visual evoked potentials in infants exposed to methadone in utero.

    PubMed

    McGlone, L; Mactier, H; Hamilton, R; Bradnam, M S; Boulton, R; Borland, W; Hepburn, M; McCulloch, D L

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of maternal drug misuse on neonatal visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Flash VEPs were recorded within 4 days of birth from 21 term infants of mothers misusing drugs and prescribed substitute methadone and 20 controls. Waveforms were classified as typical, atypical, immature or non-detectable, and amplitude and latencies were measured. VEPs from drug-exposed infants were less likely to be of typical waveform and more likely to be immature or non-detectable (p<0.01) than those of control infants. They were also smaller in amplitude (median 10.8 vs 24.4 microV, p<0.001). VEPs of drug-exposed infants had matured after 1 week but remained of lower amplitude than VEPs of newborn controls (p<0.01) and were non-detectable in 15%. Flash VEPs differ between maternal drug-exposed and non-drug-exposed newborns. Future research should address the specific effects of maternal methadone and/or other illicit drug misuse on infant VEPs, and associations between neonatal VEPs and subsequent visual development.

  13. Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential (mfVEP) and Pattern-Reversal Visual Evoked Potential Changes in Patients with Visual Pathway Disorders: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Alshowaeir, Daniah; Yiannikas, Con; Klistorner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PVEP) changes in patients with pathology at various levels of the visual pathway determined by other methods. Six patients with different visual pathway disorders, including vascular ischaemic events and compressive optic neuropathy, were reviewed. All patients were tested with both mfVEP and full-field and half-field PVEPs. Results were assessed in relation to other diagnostic tests such as magnetic resonance imaging, Humphrey visual field test, and optical coherence topography. The cases in this study demonstrate a potential higher sensitivity of mfVEP compared with conventional PVEPs in detecting lesions affecting the peripheral field, horizontal hemifields, and lesions of the post-chiasmal pathway. The limitation of the PVEP in this setting is probably due to phase cancellation and overrepresentation of the macular region. mfVEP provides a more accurate assessment of visual defects when compared with conventional PVEP. The independent assessment of different areas of the visual field improves the detection and localization of lesions and provides an objective topographical map that can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests and to assess disease progression. PMID:27928359

  14. Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential (mfVEP) and Pattern-Reversal Visual Evoked Potential Changes in Patients with Visual Pathway Disorders: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Alshowaeir, Daniah; Yiannikas, Con; Klistorner, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PVEP) changes in patients with pathology at various levels of the visual pathway determined by other methods. Six patients with different visual pathway disorders, including vascular ischaemic events and compressive optic neuropathy, were reviewed. All patients were tested with both mfVEP and full-field and half-field PVEPs. Results were assessed in relation to other diagnostic tests such as magnetic resonance imaging, Humphrey visual field test, and optical coherence topography. The cases in this study demonstrate a potential higher sensitivity of mfVEP compared with conventional PVEPs in detecting lesions affecting the peripheral field, horizontal hemifields, and lesions of the post-chiasmal pathway. The limitation of the PVEP in this setting is probably due to phase cancellation and overrepresentation of the macular region. mfVEP provides a more accurate assessment of visual defects when compared with conventional PVEP. The independent assessment of different areas of the visual field improves the detection and localization of lesions and provides an objective topographical map that can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests and to assess disease progression.

  15. Pattern- and motion-related visual evoked potentials in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Szanyi, Jana; Kremlacek, Jan; Kubova, Zuzana; Kuba, Miroslav; Gebousky, Pavel; Kapla, Jaroslav; Szanyi, Juraj; Vit, Frantisek; Langrova, Jana

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the current study was to explore visual function in virally suppressed HIV patients undergoing combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) by using pattern-reversal and motion-onset visual evoked potentials (VEPs). The pattern-reversal and motion-onset VEPs were recorded in 20 adult HIV+ patients with a mean age of 38 years and CD4 cell counts ≥230 × 10(6) cells/L of blood. Nine out of 20 patients displayed VEP abnormalities. Pattern-reversal VEPs pathology was observed in 20% of subjects, and 45% HIV patients had impaired motion-onset VEPs. Five out of 16 neurologically asymptomatic HIV patients had prolonged motion-onset VEP latencies in both eyes. Four neurologically symptomatic patients displayed simultaneously abnormal motion-onset and pattern-reversal VEP latencies: monocular involvement was observed in two patients with Lyme and cytomegalovirus unilateral optic neuritis. Binocular involvement was noted in two patients with cognitive deficits. Correlation analysis between disease duration, CD4 cell count, HIV copies in plasma, MoCA and electrophysiological parameters did not show any significant relationships. The functional changes of the visual system in neurologically asymptomatic virally suppressed HIV patients displayed higher motion-onset VEP sensitivity than in standard pattern-reversal VEP examinations. This promising marker, however, has no significant association with clinical conditions. Further exploration is warranted.

  16. Unilateral and bilateral brainstem auditory-evoked response abnormalities in 900 Dalmatian dogs.

    PubMed

    Holliday, T A; Nelson, H J; Williams, D C; Willits, N

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 900 Dalmatian dogs, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) and clinical observations were used to determine the incidence and sex distribution of bilateral and unilateral BAER abnormalities and their association with heterochromia iridis (HI). To assess the efficacy of BAER testing in guiding breeding programs, data from 749 dogs (subgroup A), considered to be a sample of the population at large, were compared with data from a subgroup (subgroup B; n = 151) in which selection of breeding stock had been based on BAER testing from the beginning of the 4-year survey. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were elicited by applying click stimuli unilaterally, while applying a white noise masking sound to the contralateral ear. Under these conditions, BAER were either normal, unilaterally absent, or bilaterally absent. Dogs with bilaterally absent BAER were clinically deaf; dogs with unilaterally absent BAER were not clinically deaf but appeared dependent on their BAER-normal ears for their auditory-cued behavior. Dogs with unilaterally absent BAER often were misidentified as normal by uninformed observers. Among the 900 dogs, 648 (72.0%) were normal, 189 (21.0%) had unilateral absence of BAER, and 63 (7.0%) had bilateral absence of BAER or were clinically deaf and assumed to have bilaterally absent BAER (n = 4). Total incidence in the population sampled was assumed to be higher, because some bilaterally affected dogs that would have been members of subgroup A undoubtedly did not come to our attention. Among females, 24.0% were unilaterally abnormal and 8.2% were bilaterally abnormal whereas, among males, 17.8% were unilaterally abnormal and 5.7% were bilaterally abnormal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Effect of fixation tasks on multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandra; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart; Billson, Frank

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of cognitive influence on the multifocal visual evoked potential (mVEP) at different levels of eccentricity. Three different foveal fixation conditions were utilized involving varying levels of task complexity. A more complex visual fixation task has been known to suppress peripheral signals in subjective testing. Twenty normal subjects had monocular mVEPs recorded using the AccuMap objective perimeter. This allowed simultaneous stimulation of 58 segments of the visual field to an eccentricity of 24 degrees. The mVEP was recorded using three different fixation conditions in random order. During task 1 the subject passively viewed the central fixation area. For task 2 alternating numbers were displayed within the fixation area; the subject on viewing the number '3' in the central fixation area indicated recognition by pressing a button. Throughout task 3, numbers were displayed as in task 2. The subject had the cognitive task of summating all the numbers. Analysis revealed that the increased attention and concentration demanded by tasks 2 and 3 in comparison with task 1 resulted in significantly enhanced central amplitudes of 9.41% (Mann-Whitney P = 0.0002) and 13.45% (P = 0.0002), respectively. These amplitudes became reduced in the periphery and approached those of task 1, resulting in no significant difference between the three tasks. Latencies demonstrated no significant difference between each task nor at any eccentricity (P > 0.05). As the complexity of each task increased the amount of alpha rhythm was significantly reduced. Our findings indicate that task 1 required a minimal demand of cognition and was associated with the greatest amount of alpha rhythm. It was also the most difficult to perform because of loss of interest. The other two tasks required a greater demand of higher order cognitive skills resulting in significantly enhanced amplitudes centrally and the attenuation of alpha rhythm. Therefore, amplitudes are

  18. Impaired dynamic balance control in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis and abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Lao, Miko L M; Chow, Daniel H K; Guo, Xia; Cheng, Jack C Y; Holmes, Andrew D

    2008-12-01

    Both balance control dysfunction and dysfunction of the central nervous system have been proposed as being causative factors in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), yet the relationship between these factors has not been investigated in detail. An intergroup comparative study was conducted to investigate the effect of abnormal somatosensory function on the dynamic balance parameters of girls with AIS. The relationship between dynamic balance control and abnormal somatosensory function seen in AIS patients was examined by studying the dynamic balance parameters in normal controls, in AIS patients with normal posterior tibial nerve somatosensory cortical evoked potentials (PTN-SCEPs), and in AIS patients with abnormal PTN-SCEPs. Gait parameters were recorded in 18 AIS girls (8 showing abnormal PTN-SCEPs and 10 showing normal PTN-SCEPs). Eight healthy age-matched volunteers served as a control group. No significant left-right asymmetry of gait parameters was found for the controls or the AIS patients with normal PTN-SCEPs, whereas significantly higher gait parameters were found on the side of the curvature in the AIS patients with abnormal PTN-SCEPs. Somatosensory dysfunction in AIS patients shows to have an impact on dynamic balance control. Further studies to examine the association between somatosensory dysfunction and balance control and how they may be related to the etiology of AIS are recommended. Diagnostic study, level IV (case-control study).

  19. Visual evoked potentials in Negro carriers of the gene for tyrosinase positive oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed Central

    Castle, D; Kromberg, J; Kowalsky, R; Moosa, R; Gillman, N; Zwane, E; Fritz, V

    1988-01-01

    Visual evoked potential testing was performed on 15 Negro carriers of the gene for tyrosinase positive oculocutaneous albinism in order to detect whether they have the same visual pathway decussation anomalies as do homozygotes. No subject showed 01-02 asymmetry on monocular testing, indicating that decussation follows the normal pattern. It is concluded that visual evoked potential testing is probably not useful in the detection of Negroes heterozygous for the gene for tyrosinase positive oculocutaneous albinism. PMID:3148727

  20. Evoked and induced oscillatory activity contributes to abnormal auditory sensory gating in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Jordanov, Todor; Weisz, Nathan; Elbert, Thomas; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Miller, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    The ratio of magnetoencephalogram-recorded brain responses occurring 50ms after paired clicks (S2-evoked M50/S1-evoked M50) serves as a measure of sensory gating. An abnormally large ratio is commonly found in schizophrenia. Whether this abnormality indicates impaired gating is debated. Using event-related oscillations the present study sought to elucidate processes contributing to the phenomenon of altered M50 gating ratio. Schizophrenia inpatients (n=50) showed the expected large M50 gating ratio relative to 48 healthy controls, which correlated with less induced frontally generated activity in the 10-15Hz frequency band starting 200ms before the onset of S2. Patients also produced smaller alpha (8-12Hz) and gamma (60-80Hz) responses to S1. Results suggest that the deviant gating ratio in schizophrenia is a consequence of a complex alteration in the processing of incoming information that cannot be attributed to impaired gating alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Software for analysing multifocal visual evoked potential signal latency progression.

    PubMed

    de Santiago, L; Klistorner, A; Ortiz, M; Fernández-Rodríguez, A J; Rodríguez Ascariz, J M; Barea, R; Miguel-Jiménez, J M; Boquete, L

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new non-commercial software application (mfVEP(2)) developed to process multifocal visual-evoked-potential (mfVEP) signals in latency (monocular and interocular) progression studies. The software performs analysis by cross-correlating signals from the same patients. The criteria applied by the software include best channels, signal window, cross-correlation limits and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Software features include signal display comparing different tests and groups of sectors (quadrants, rings and hemispheres). The software's performance and capabilities are demonstrated on the results obtained from a patient with acute optic neuritis who underwent 9 follow-up mfVEP tests. Numerical values and graphics are presented and discussed for this case. The authors present a software application used to study progression in mfVEP signals. It is also useful in research projects designed to improve mfVEP techniques. This software makes it easier for users to manage the signals and allows them to choose various ways of selecting signals and representing results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Visual-evoked potentials in patients with brain circulatory problems.

    PubMed

    Pojda-Wilczek, Dorota

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if local brain circulatory problems may influence visual-evoked potentials (VEP). Thirty-eight patients were divided into the following groups: (I) those with hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia and hemiparesis after brain stroke; (II) those with hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia without paresis after brain stroke; and (III) those with amaurosis fugax. The control group consisted of 38 patients. The VEP pattern (PVEP) and flash VEP (FVEP) were examined monocularly using two electrodes placed at O1 and O2. Latency and amplitude of the N75, P100 and N2, P2 waves were measured. The Newman-Keuls test was used for statistical analysis. In PVEP, no differences between the groups were observed. In FVEP, the mean P2 latency was significantly longer in group I than in group III, and the P2 amplitude was significantly lower in all examined groups when compared with the control group. PVEP and FVEP revealed differences in P latency over 3 ms between brain hemispheres and differences in P amplitude over 30% in all examined groups. In the control group, there were no differences in latency between brain hemispheres and only a small difference in amplitude. Local brain circulatory problems that may lead to brain ischemia cause differences in VEP amplitude and latency between brain hemispheres. Changes in VEPs observed in patients with amaurosis fugax may be considered the result of recurrent brain ischemia.

  3. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential Changes in Diabetic Patients without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Gulten; Yakin, Mehmet; Unlu, Nurten; Balta, Oyku Bezen; Ornek, Firdevs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the different check sizes of pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) in diabetic patients without retinopathy according to HbA1c levels and diabetes duration. Methods. Fifty-eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Only the right eye of each patient was analyzed. All of the patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination, and the PVEPs were recorded. Results. There was a statistically significant difference in P100 latency in 1-degree check size and in N135 latency in 2-degree check size between controls and patient groups which have different HbA1c levels. There were statistically significant, positive, and weak correlations with diabetes duration and P100 latency in 7-minute and 15-minute check sizes and N135 latency in 15-minute check size. Conclusions. It was showed that there were prolongations in P100 latency only in 1-degree check size and in N135 only in 2-degree check size in diabetic patients without retinopathy. There was statistically significant correlation between diabetes duration and P100 and N135 latencies in different check sizes. PMID:28392940

  4. Investigating the mechanisms of visually-evoked tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Kirsten J; Lloyd, Donna M; Brown, Richard J; Plummer, Faye; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    When attempting to detect a near-threshold signal, participants often incorrectly report the presence of a signal, particularly when a stimulus in a different modality is presented. Here we investigated the effect of prior experience of bimodal visuotactile stimuli on the rate of falsely reported touches in the presence of a light. In Experiment 1, participants made more false alarms in light-present than light-absent trials, despite having no experience of the experimental visuotactile pairing. This suggests that light-evoked false alarms are a consequence of an existing association, rather than one learned during the experiment. In Experiment 2, we sought to manipulate the strength of the association through prior training, using supra-threshold tactile stimuli that were given a high or low association with the light. Both groups still exhibited an increased number of false alarms during light-present trials, however, the low association group made significantly fewer false alarms across conditions, and there was no corresponding group difference in the number of tactile stimuli correctly identified. Thus, while training did not affect the boosting of the tactile signal by the visual stimulus, the low association training affected perceptual decision-making more generally, leading to a lower number of illusory touch reports, independent of the light.

  5. Functional symmetry of the primary visual pathway evidenced by steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenghua; Wu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    The primary visual pathway exhibits a symmetrical anatomical structure, initially arising from the left and right retinas, passing through the lateral geniculate nucleus, and finally projecting to the left and right primary visual cortices. However, to our knowledge, studies based on scalp EEG have not provided adequate evidence of the functional symmetry of the primary visual pathway, as the usual visual ERP is often related to other higher-level brain areas. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) can be considered as the direct response of the primary visual pathway to a repetitive stimulus, with a very limited correlation with responses of higher-level brain areas. Therefore, SSVEPs can be used to evaluate the functional symmetry of the primary visual pathway. In this study, we draw a comparison among the powers and distributions of SSVEPs of different frequencies when the left or right eye alone is stimulated, and when both the eyes are stimulated together. Our results indicate that the primary visual pathway is almost symmetrical in generating SSVEPs from either eye and that there is some functional interaction between the left and right primary visual pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploiting individual primary visual cortex geometry to boost steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, M Isabel; Blangero, Annabelle; Kelly, Simon P

    2013-06-01

    The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is an electroencephalographic response to flickering stimuli generated partly in primary visual area V1. The typical 'cruciform' geometry and retinotopic organization of V1 is such that certain neighboring visual regions project to neighboring cortical regions of opposite orientation. Here, we explored ways to exploit this organization in order to boost scalp SSVEP amplitude via oscillatory summation. We manipulated flicker-phase offsets among angular segments of a large annular stimulus in three ways, and compared the resultant SSVEP power to a conventional condition with no temporal phase offsets. (1) We divided the annulus into standard octants for all subjects, and flickered upper horizontal octants with opposite temporal phase to the lower horizontal ones, and left vertical octants opposite to the right vertical ones; (2) we individually adjusted the boundaries between the eight contiguous segments of the standard octants condition to coincide with cruciform-consistent, early-latency topographical shifts in pattern-pulse multifocal visual-evoked potentials (PPMVEP) derived for each of 32 equal-sized segments; (3) we assigned phase offsets to stimulus segments following an automatic algorithm based on the relative amplitudes of vertically- and horizontally-oriented PPMVEP components. The three flicker-phase manipulations resulted in a significant enhancement of normalized SSVEP power of (1) 202%, (2) 383%, and (3) 300%, respectively. We have thus demonstrated a means to obtain more reliable measures of visual evoked activity purely through consideration of cortical geometry. This principle stands to impact both basic and clinical research using SSVEPs.

  7. Visual motion direction evoked potentials are direction specifically influenced by concurrent vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loose, R; Ayan, T; Probst, T

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the influence of vestibular stimulation on visual motion-direction perception using electrophysiological recordings. Visual motion-direction evoked potentials decreased in area during the rotation of subjects about their vertical z-axis, when visual and vestibular motion directions were incongruous (visual and vestibular stimulation in the same directions). Visual pattern onset evoked potentials, however, remained unaffected by vestibular stimulation. For rotations about the interaural y-axis, decreased area of visual-direction evoked potentials was found for both congruous and incongruous combinations of visual and vestibular stimulation. The results are in accordance with previous psychophysically obtained data and discussed in terms of postnatal development and neurophysiological optimization processes. An interaction model focused on reciprocal inhibition of the middle temporal visual (MT) area and the medial superior temporal (MST) area is presented.

  8. Abnormal late visual responses and alpha oscillations in neurofibromatosis type 1: a link to visual and attention deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) affects several areas of cognitive function including visual processing and attention. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the visual deficits of children and adolescents with NF1 by studying visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain oscillations during visual stimulation and rest periods. Methods Electroencephalogram/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) responses were measured during visual processing (NF1 n = 17; controls n = 19) and idle periods with eyes closed and eyes open (NF1 n = 12; controls n = 14). Visual stimulation was chosen to bias activation of the three detection mechanisms: achromatic, red-green and blue-yellow. Results We found significant differences between the groups for late chromatic VEPs and a specific enhancement in the amplitude of the parieto-occipital alpha amplitude both during visual stimulation and idle periods. Alpha modulation and the negative influence of alpha oscillations in visual performance were found in both groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest abnormal later stages of visual processing and enhanced amplitude of alpha oscillations supporting the existence of deficits in basic sensory processing in NF1. Given the link between alpha oscillations, visual perception and attention, these results indicate a neural mechanism that might underlie the visual sensitivity deficits and increased lapses of attention observed in individuals with NF1. PMID:24559228

  9. A method to detect progression of glaucoma using the multifocal visual evoked potential technique

    PubMed Central

    Wangsupadilok, Boonchai; Kanadani, Fabio N.; Grippo, Tomas M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe a method for monitoring progression of glaucoma using the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) technique. Methods Eighty-seven patients diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma were divided into two groups. Group I, comprised 43 patients who had a repeat mfVEP test within 50 days (mean 0.9 ± 0.5 months), and group II, 44 patients who had a repeat test after at least 6 months (mean 20.7 ± 9.7 months). Monocular mfVEPs were obtained using a 60-sector pattern reversal dartboard display. Monocular and interocular analyses were performed. Data from the two visits were compared. The total number of abnormal test points with P < 5% within the visual field (total scores) and number of abnormal test points within a cluster (cluster size) were calculated. Data for group I provided a measure of test–retest variability independent of disease progression. Data for group II provided a possible measure of progression. Results The difference in the total scores for group II between visit 1 and visit 2 for the interocular and monocular comparison was significant (P < 0.05) as was the difference in cluster size for the interocular comparison (P < 0.05). Group I did not show a significant change in either total score or cluster size. Conclusion The change in the total score and cluster size over time provides a possible method for assessing progression of glaucoma with the mfVEP technique. PMID:18830654

  10. Correlation between subjective visual horizontal test and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuei-You; Young, Yi-Ho

    2011-02-01

    The static subjective visual horizontal (SVH) test correlates with the dynamic ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test in healthy and pathological ears, and further confirms that both tests may, at least in part, share the same utricular reflex pathway. This study correlated the SVH test results with those of the oVEMP and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests to investigate their relationships. Twenty healthy subjects underwent the SVH test at a view pattern angle of 30° or 70° horizontal tilt under various background distractions to establish the optimal stimulation mode for SVH test. Thereafter, 20 patients with unilateral Meniere's disease underwent the SVH test using the optimal mode. In addition, oVEMP and cVEMP tests were performed in all subjects. The preliminary study in 20 healthy subjects at a view pattern angle of 70° under counterclockwise square background distraction revealed that the mean deviation degree of the SVH test was -0.61 ± 1.17°. Based on the criteria, abnormal percentages of SVH in 20 Meniere's patients were 40%. All healthy subjects had normal oVEMPs and cVEMPs. In contrast, eight patients (40%) showed abnormal oVEMPs and nine (45%) revealed abnormal cVEMPs. The SVH test results correlated significantly with oVEMP results, but not with cVEMP results.

  11. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Transient Visual Evoked Potentials: Optimisation and Applications.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mei Ying; Henry, Bruce Ian; Chu, Byoung Sun; Basahi, Nour; Suttle, Catherine May; Luu, Chi; Leung, Harry; Hing, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) provides a time series signal response to an external visual stimulus at the location of the visual cortex. The major VEP signal components, peak latency and amplitude, may be affected by disease processes. Additionally, the VEP contains fine detailed and non-periodic structure, of presently unclear relevance to normal function, which may be quantified using the fractal dimension. The purpose of this study is to provide a systematic investigation of the key parameters in the measurement of the fractal dimension of VEPs, to develop an optimal analysis protocol for application. VEP time series were mathematically transformed using delay time, τ, and embedding dimension, m, parameters. The fractal dimension of the transformed data was obtained from a scaling analysis based on straight line fits to the numbers of pairs of points with separation less than r versus log(r) in the transformed space. Optimal τ, m, and scaling analysis were obtained by comparing the consistency of results using different sampling frequencies. The optimised method was then piloted on samples of normal and abnormal VEPs. Consistent fractal dimension estimates were obtained using τ = 4 ms, designating the fractal dimension = D2 of the time series based on embedding dimension m = 7 (for 3606 Hz and 5000 Hz), m = 6 (for 1803 Hz) and m = 5 (for 1000Hz), and estimating D2 for each embedding dimension as the steepest slope of the linear scaling region in the plot of log(C(r)) vs log(r) provided the scaling region occurred within the middle third of the plot. Piloting revealed that fractal dimensions were higher from the sampled abnormal than normal achromatic VEPs in adults (p = 0.02). Variances of fractal dimension were higher from the abnormal than normal chromatic VEPs in children (p = 0.01). A useful analysis protocol to assess the fractal dimension of transformed VEPs has been developed.

  12. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Transient Visual Evoked Potentials: Optimisation and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Mei Ying; Henry, Bruce Ian; Chu, Byoung Sun; Basahi, Nour; Suttle, Catherine May; Luu, Chi; Leung, Harry; Hing, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The visual evoked potential (VEP) provides a time series signal response to an external visual stimulus at the location of the visual cortex. The major VEP signal components, peak latency and amplitude, may be affected by disease processes. Additionally, the VEP contains fine detailed and non-periodic structure, of presently unclear relevance to normal function, which may be quantified using the fractal dimension. The purpose of this study is to provide a systematic investigation of the key parameters in the measurement of the fractal dimension of VEPs, to develop an optimal analysis protocol for application. Methods VEP time series were mathematically transformed using delay time, τ, and embedding dimension, m, parameters. The fractal dimension of the transformed data was obtained from a scaling analysis based on straight line fits to the numbers of pairs of points with separation less than r versus log(r) in the transformed space. Optimal τ, m, and scaling analysis were obtained by comparing the consistency of results using different sampling frequencies. The optimised method was then piloted on samples of normal and abnormal VEPs. Results Consistent fractal dimension estimates were obtained using τ = 4 ms, designating the fractal dimension = D2 of the time series based on embedding dimension m = 7 (for 3606 Hz and 5000 Hz), m = 6 (for 1803 Hz) and m = 5 (for 1000Hz), and estimating D2 for each embedding dimension as the steepest slope of the linear scaling region in the plot of log(C(r)) vs log(r) provided the scaling region occurred within the middle third of the plot. Piloting revealed that fractal dimensions were higher from the sampled abnormal than normal achromatic VEPs in adults (p = 0.02). Variances of fractal dimension were higher from the abnormal than normal chromatic VEPs in children (p = 0.01). Conclusions A useful analysis protocol to assess the fractal dimension of transformed VEPs has been developed. PMID:27598422

  13. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials and subjective visual vertical testing in patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Sanyelbhaa, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Otolith function in subjects with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is investigated through vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) testing. The study group included 62 patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (30 females, 32 males), with age range 24-56 years (40.6 ± 9.1). The control group included 44 healthy volunteers of similar age and gender distribution. The entire study group had: (1) serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D <30 ng/ml; (2) normal bone mineral density as indicated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry with T-score >-1; (3) normal middle ear function; (4) Age is ≤60 years. All subjects enrolled in the current study underwent audiovestibular evaluation consisting of pure-tone audiometry, immittancemetry, cervical VEMP (cVEMP), ocular VEMP (oVEMP), and SSV. The entire control group had normal cVEMP, two subjects had abnormal oVEMP. Thirty-three subjects (53%) in the study group had abnormal oVEMP and 31 subjects (50%) had abnormal cVEMP. Forty-one (66%) had abnormal VEMP when abnormal VEMP was considered as either abnormal oVEMP or cVEMP. The entire control and study groups had normal SSV test results. Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with development of otolith dysfunction affecting both the utricle and saccule. This was suggested by the high prevalence of abnormal ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) in the study group.

  14. Sunlight irradiance and habituation of visual evoked potentials in migraine: The environment makes its mark.

    PubMed

    Lisicki, Marco; D'Ostilio, Kevin; Erpicum, Michel; Schoenen, Jean; Magis, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is a complex multifactorial disease that arises from the interaction between a genetic predisposition and an enabling environment. Habituation is considered as a fundamental adaptive behaviour of the nervous system that is often impaired in migraine populations. Given that migraineurs are hypersensitive to light, and that light deprivation is able to induce functional changes in the visual cortex recognizable through visual evoked potentials habituation testing, we hypothesized that regional sunlight irradiance levels could influence the results of visual evoked potentials habituation studies performed in different locations worldwide. Methods We searched the literature for visual evoked potentials habituation studies comparing healthy volunteers and episodic migraine patients and correlated their results with levels of local solar radiation. Results After reviewing the literature, 26 studies involving 1291 participants matched our inclusion criteria. Deficient visual evoked potentials habituation in episodic migraine patients was reported in 19 studies. Mean yearly sunlight irradiance was significantly higher in locations of studies reporting deficient habituation. Correlation analyses suggested that visual evoked potentials habituation decreases with increasing sunlight irradiance in migraine without aura patients. Conclusion Results from this hypothesis generating analysis suggest that variations in sunlight irradiance may induce adaptive modifications in visual processing systems that could be reflected in visual evoked potentials habituation, and thus partially account for the difference in results between studies performed in geographically distant centers. Other causal factors such as genetic differences could also play a role, and therefore well-designed prospective trials are warranted.

  15. Multifocal visual evoked potential analysis of inflammatory or demyelinating optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Clare L; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Garrick, Raymond; Billson, Francis A; Grigg, John R

    2006-02-01

    To determine the sensitivity of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mVEP) in optic neuritis of an inflammatory or demyelinating nature. Cross-sectional study. Sixty-four patients participated who had a confirmed diagnosis of optic neuritis (ON) (past and acute). Based on the McDonald multiple sclerosis (MS) criteria, 25 patients (27 eyes with ON) were deemed to have isolated optic neuritis and thus not have MS (i.e., the not-MS group), and 19 patients (24 eyes with ON) had a diagnosis of MS (i.e., the MS group). The remaining 20 patients (25 eyes with ON) were at a high risk of MS, but diagnostic evaluation was equivocal, and thus were classified as the possible MS group. A control group of 20 normal patients was enrolled. The mVEP test was performed using the Accumap. All ON patients had recent magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain and spinal cord. Multifocal visual evoked potentials amplitude and latency values were analyzed within each group and were compared with the normal controls. No abnormality was recorded on mVEP in the control group. Of all the ON eyes, 74 (97.3%) were abnormal on mVEP testing. Amplitude values were abnormal in 92.6% of not-MS eyes, 92.0% of possible MS eyes, and 100% of those with MS, and latency was abnormal in 33.3%, 76.0%, and 100%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the mVEP latency z-scores among all ON groups (P<0.01; Kruskal-Wallis test). Although distribution graphs of latency z-scores in the not-MS and MS groups had single peaks and were clearly separate from each other, the latency z-score distribution within the possible MS group in postacute patients was bimodal, with each peak corresponding to the distribution of the not-MS and MS group, respectively. The mVEP latency z-scores had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in detecting patients with ON due to MS when compared with normal patients. The mVEP test is a sensitive and specific tool for detecting optic neuritis. There was a significant

  16. Early signs of visual perception and evoked potentials in radiologically asymptomatic boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furushima, Wakana; Inagaki, Masumi; Gunji, Atsuko; Inoue, Yuki; Kaga, Makiko; Mizutani, Shuki

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to identify the electrophysiological and psychological signs at a very early stage in asymptomatic boys with childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Flash visual evoked potentials, pattern reversal, and visual event-related potentials were recorded in 6 radiologically asymptomatic boys with adrenoleukodystrophy and 22 control boys. The latency and amplitude of P100 of visual evoked potentials and P1 of event-related potentials were evaluated. Though all patients had normal intelligence quotient, performance intelligence quotient was significantly lower than verbal intelligence quotient in 2 patients. Both P100 and P1 amplitudes were significantly greater in adrenoleukodystrophy than in controls. The difference between performance intelligence quotient and verbal intelligence quotient exhibited significant correlation with P100 amplitude. Enlargement of visual evoked potentials might be a sign of cerebral involvement preceding the appearance of abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. Follow-up of asymptomatic boys with both electrophysiological and neuropsychological tests may serve as an aid for deciding the timing of therapeutic intervention.

  17. [Influence of visual stimulation on cerebral blood flow and visual evoked potentials in children with migraine with visual aura].

    PubMed

    Biedroń, Agnieszka; Kaciński, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Visual aura is the most common type of migrainous aura. It may occur as a single symptom or precede sensory or speech disturbances. Aura symptoms and order of their appearance may result from propagation of spreading depression phenomenon. Vascular disorders observed during migraine with aura attacks are probably secondary to neuronal changes. Simultaneous registration of cerebral bioelectric activation and changes evoked in cerebral circulation enables their objective estimation, detection of correlation and better understanding of migraine with aura pathogenesis. Studies with transcranial Doppler revealed impaired cerebrovascular response to various stimulations in migraine, especially migraine with aura patients. Combination of Doppler examination with registration of visual evoked potentials (VEP) enables estimation on neurovascular coupling. Estimation of cerebrovascular response to visual stimulation in migraineurs with visual aura. Examination of correlation between cerebral blood flow and VEP parameters. 50 children at the age range 8-18 years, 8 with migraine with visual aura, 9 with visual and sensory aura, 8 with visual, sensory and dysphasic aura and 25 children from control group. Examination of cerebral blood flow parameters was performed with transcranial Doppler, with the use of continuous monitoring, enabling performance of simultaneous record. ing from vessels of both hemispheres. Systolic (SV), end-diastolic (EDV), mean (MV) velocities and pulsatility (PI) and resistive indexes (RI) were analyzed. Parameters of cerebral blood flow were recorded in middle cerebral arteries, at rest (1 measurement), during visual stimulation (2, 3 measurement) and directly after the end of the stimulation (4 measurement). Black and white checkerboard pattern rebersal was visual stimulator and during stimulation VEP were registered. N75, P100, N135 latencies and N75/P100, P100/N135 amplitudes were analyzed. Moreover correlation between visually evoked changes in

  18. Comparison of visual information processing in school-age dyslexics and normal readers via motion-onset visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kubová, Zuzana; Kuba, Miroslav; Kremláček, Jan; Langrová, Jana; Szanyi, Jana; Vít, František; Chutná, Marie

    2015-06-01

    Standard pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and motion-onset VEPs (M-VEPs) were tested in 19 dyslexics and 19 normal readers aged 7-13 years in order to evaluate the feasibility of M-VEPs for the objective diagnostics of a visual subtype of dyslexia, in which a dysfunction of the magnocellular subsystem/dorsal stream of the visual pathway is suspected. The set of VEPs consisted of the pattern-reversal VEPs with check sizes of 20', two types of translational motion (with low and high contrast) and two types of radial motion (in the full field or the periphery). While the P100 peak parameters in pattern-reversal VEPs did not differ between the group of dyslexics and controls, the group of dyslexics displayed significantly longer N2 latencies in all types of M-VEPs. Abnormal N2 latencies were found in 35-56% of dyslexics in different types of M-VEPs, with translational motion with high contrast being the most sensitive stimulation. A receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the latencies of M-VEPs displayed higher discrimination potential than M-VEPs amplitudes. The study confirms a "magnocellular pathway/dorsal stream deficit" in approximately half of dyslexics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vector analysis of visual evoked potentials in migraineurs with visual aura.

    PubMed

    Coutin-Churchman, P; Padrón de Freytez, A

    2003-11-01

    To assess the capability of vector analysis of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) for revealing alterations in posterior visual pathways in migraineurs with visual aura. VEPs to pattern reversal (PR) and LED goggle stimulation were obtained in 23 patients suffering from migraine with visual aura, in an orthogonal Fpz-Oz and T3-T4 montage and displayed as a two-channel Lissajous' trajectory. VEP latency and amplitude at Fpz-Oz, bc segment amplitude (V) and bc vector orientation angle (theta) were compared with a previously collected normative database for individual assessment, and group comparisons with the previously collected normal sample were made. Electrophysiological measures were also correlated with time from onset of disease and from the last crisis, and with the side of symptoms. No individual alterations in VEP latency or amplitude were observed. However, 36.4% of patients showed alterations in vector orientation to PR and 78% to LED goggles. Group differences with respect to normal subjects were found not only in vector orientation but also in midline VEP and V, only for PR stimulation. A significant relationship was found between the laterality of vector deviation and the laterality of symptoms. Vector analysis of VEP revealed alterations possibly corresponding to asymmetrical visual cortex activation in migraineurs with visual aura, mainly to diffuse light stimulation. An electrophysiological parameter of individual value for revealing asymmetric activation of visual cortex in migraineurs is proposed.

  20. Modulation of Visually Evoked Postural Responses by Contextual Visual, Haptic and Auditory Information: A ‘Virtual Reality Check’

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Georg F.; Shao, Fei; White, Mark D.; Hopkins, Carl; Robotham, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Externally generated visual motion signals can cause the illusion of self-motion in space (vection) and corresponding visually evoked postural responses (VEPR). These VEPRs are not simple responses to optokinetic stimulation, but are modulated by the configuration of the environment. The aim of this paper is to explore what factors modulate VEPRs in a high quality virtual reality (VR) environment where real and virtual foreground objects served as static visual, auditory and haptic reference points. Data from four experiments on visually evoked postural responses show that: 1) visually evoked postural sway in the lateral direction is modulated by the presence of static anchor points that can be haptic, visual and auditory reference signals; 2) real objects and their matching virtual reality representations as visual anchors have different effects on postural sway; 3) visual motion in the anterior-posterior plane induces robust postural responses that are not modulated by the presence of reference signals or the reality of objects that can serve as visual anchors in the scene. We conclude that automatic postural responses for laterally moving visual stimuli are strongly influenced by the configuration and interpretation of the environment and draw on multisensory representations. Different postural responses were observed for real and virtual visual reference objects. On the basis that automatic visually evoked postural responses in high fidelity virtual environments should mimic those seen in real situations we propose to use the observed effect as a robust objective test for presence and fidelity in VR. PMID:23840760

  1. Comparison of multifocal visual evoked potential, standard automated perimetry and optical coherence tomography in assessing visual pathway in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Laron, Michal; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Bin; Schiffman, Jade S.; Tang, Rosa A.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) measure local response amplitude and latency in the field of vision Objective To compare the sensitivity of mfVEP, Humphrey visual field (HVF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting visual abnormality in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods MfVEP, HVF, and OCT (retinal nerve fiber layer [RNFL]) were performed in 47 MS-ON eyes (last optic neuritis (ON) attack ≥ 6 months prior) and 65 MS-no-ON eyes without ON history. Criteria to define an eye as abnormal were: mfVEP 1) amplitude/latency: either amplitude or latency probability plots meeting cluster criteria with 95% specificity 2) amplitude or latency alone (specificity: 97% and 98%, respectively); HVF and OCT, mean deviation and RNFL thickness meeting p < 0.05, respectively. Results MfVEP (amplitude/latency) identified more abnormality in MS-ON eyes (89%) than HVF (72%), OCT (62%), mfVEP amplitude (66%) or latency (67%) alone. 18% of MS-no-ON eyes were abnormal for both mfVEP (amplitude/latency) and HVF compared to 8% with OCT. Agreement between tests ranged from 60% to 79%. MfVEP (amplitude/latency) categorized an additional 15% of MS-ON eyes as abnormal compared to HVF and OCT combined. Conclusions MfVEP, which detects both demyelination (increased latency) and neural degeneration (reduced amplitude) revealed more abnormality than HVF or OCT in MS patients. PMID:20207786

  2. Neonatal visual evoked potentials in infants born to mothers prescribed methadone.

    PubMed

    McGlone, Laura; Hamilton, Ruth; McCulloch, Daphne L; Boulton, Richard; Bradnam, Michael S; Weaver, Lawrence T; Mactier, Helen

    2013-03-01

    Drug misuse in pregnancy is associated with impaired infant visual development. Pilot data showed abnormal flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in neonates exposed to methadone in utero, but results were confounded by intrauterine growth restriction, gestation, and ongoing drug misuse. This large cohort study aimed to clarify the effects on neonatal flash VEPs of maternal drug misuse in pregnancy, including prescription of substitute methadone and subsequent development of neonatal abstinence syndrome. This was a prospective cohort study. Flash VEPs were recorded within 3 days of birth from 100 healthy infants of drug-misusing mothers prescribed substitute methadone during pregnancy and 50 comparison infants matched for birth weight, gestation, and socioeconomic deprivation. VEP morphology was classified as mature, typical, or immature, and amplitudes and implicit times of the major waveform components measured. Drug exposure was determined by maternal history, maternal and infant urine, and meconium toxicology. VEPs from maternal drug-exposed infants were more likely to be of immature waveform (P < .001) and were smaller in overall amplitude (median 27 µV vs 39 µV, P < .001) compared with non-drug-exposed infants. Most infants were exposed to illicit drugs in addition to prescribed methadone; differences in VEP parameters were independently associated with maternal prescribed methadone and persisted after correcting for birth weight, cigarette smoking, and excess in utero alcohol exposure. In utero exposure to prescribed substitute methadone is associated with altered flash VEPs in the newborn period and these infants may warrant early clinical visual assessment.

  3. A case of functional (psychogenic) monocular hemianopia analyzed by measurement of hemifield visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Tsuyoshi; Fukuda, Ken; Nishimura, Mayu; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2013-09-01

    Functional monocular hemianopia is an extremely rare condition, for which measurement of hemifield visual evoked potentials (VEPs) has not been previously described. A 14-year-old boy with functional monocular hemianopia was followed up with Goldmann perimetry and measurement of hemifield and full-field VEPs. The patient had a history of monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye following headache, nausea and ague. There was no relative afferent pupillary defect, and a color perception test was normal. Goldmann perimetry revealed a vertical monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye; the hemianopia on the right was also detected with a binocular visual field test. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography of the brain including the optic chiasm as well as orbital MRI revealed no abnormalities. On the basis of these results, we diagnosed the patient's condition as functional monocular hemianopia. Pattern VEPs according to the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV) standard were within the normal range. The hemifield pattern VEPs for the right eye showed a symmetrical latency and amplitude for nasal and temporal hemifield stimulation. One month later, the visual field defect of the patient spontaneously disappeared. The latency and amplitude of hemifield VEPs for a patient with functional monocular hemianopia were normal. Measurement of hemifield VEPs may thus provide an objective tool for distinguishing functional hemianopia from hemifield loss caused by an organic lesion.

  4. Evaluation of neurodegeneration through visual evoked potentials in restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kısabay, Ayşın; Sarı, Ummu Serpil; Korkmaz, Tuğba; Dinçhorasan, Gönül; Yılmaz, Hikmet; Selçuki, Deniz

    2016-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disease characterized by some type of dysesthesia, an indescribable abnormal sensation in the extremities. Our objective was to determine whether the visual evoked potentials (VEP) can be used as a quantitative monitoring method to evaluate demyelination-remyelination and neurodegeneration in the patients with RLS. The present study was carried out prospectively. It was planned to determine normal or pathological conditions in the form of increased latency or decreased amplitude of VEP and to evaluate possible pathologies in the visual and retinal pathways at early stages and at months 3 and 6 of follow-up in the patients with RLS (with or without iron deficiency anemia), in those without RLS (at the time of diagnosis prior to any medical therapy) without any visual symptoms. It was observed that latency of VEP improved but didn't return to normal limits following treatment with dopamin agonists, iron, or combination of both and that there was no significant difference between the post-treatment data and those of the control group. These results in combination with the fact that the latencies and amplitudes didn't return to normal levels despite the 6-month-treatment but showed a progressive course with partial regeneration suggests that there was incomplete remyelination. It should be kept in mind that this syndrome is likely to be a part of neurodegenerative process.

  5. Visual Evoked Potentials in Infants With Diffuse Periventricular Leukomalacia.

    PubMed

    Carbajal-Valenzuela, Cintli Carolina; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is characterized by necrosis of the cerebral white matter in the dorsolateral portions of the lateral ventricles. PVL causes motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to analyze the conduction characteristics of the visual pathway in infants with diffuse PVL using visual evoked potentials (VEPs). We studied 11 healthy infants (mean age 3.3 ± 1.3 months) and 17 with diffuse PVL (mean age 2.9 ± 0.8 months and mean gestational age 31.9 ± 3.1 weeks). The N75, P100, and N135 wave latencies; the interwave N75-P100 and P100-N135 latencies; and the N75-P100 and P100-N135 amplitudes were measured in the occipital leads. VEPs were recorded during binocular stimulation at an angle of 120' from the Fz-Oz lead. Healthy children had mean N75, P100, and N135 wave latencies of 84.4 ± 5.8, 143.4 ± 30.6 and 222.9 ± 40.4 ms, respectively. The mean interwave N75-P100 and P100-N135 latencies were 59.0 ± 28.6 and 79.5 ± 13.6 ms, respectively. Compared with the healthy group, infants with PVL had longer N75 and N135 latencies at 92.3 ± 15.3 (P = .05) and 265.0 ms ± 60.3 (P = .05), respectively. The interwave latency P100-N135 (105.5 ± 29.1 ms; P = .017) was longer in children with PVL than in healthy infants. Infants with diffuse PVL had mild alterations in their N75, P100 and, particularly, their N135 latencies. These increases in P100-N135 interwave latencies could be because of damage to the geniculocortical pathways and V2-V3 networks. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  6. Basic abnormalities in visual processing affect face processing at an early age in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Vlamings, Petra Hendrika Johanna Maria; Jonkman, Lisa Marthe; van Daalen, Emma; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Kemner, Chantal

    2010-12-15

    A detailed visual processing style has been noted in autism spectrum disorder (ASD); this contributes to problems in face processing and has been directly related to abnormal processing of spatial frequencies (SFs). Little is known about the early development of face processing in ASD and the relation with abnormal SF processing. We investigated whether young ASD children show abnormalities in low spatial frequency (LSF, global) and high spatial frequency (HSF, detailed) processing and explored whether these are crucially involved in the early development of face processing. Three- to 4-year-old children with ASD (n = 22) were compared with developmentally delayed children without ASD (n = 17). Spatial frequency processing was studied by recording visual evoked potentials from visual brain areas while children passively viewed gratings (HSF/LSF). In addition, children watched face stimuli with different expressions, filtered to include only HSF or LSF. Enhanced activity in visual brain areas was found in response to HSF versus LSF information in children with ASD, in contrast to control subjects. Furthermore, facial-expression processing was also primarily driven by detail in ASD. Enhanced visual processing of detailed (HSF) information is present early in ASD and occurs for neutral (gratings), as well as for socially relevant stimuli (facial expressions). These data indicate that there is a general abnormality in visual SF processing in early ASD and are in agreement with suggestions that a fast LSF subcortical face processing route might be affected in ASD. This could suggest that abnormal visual processing is causative in the development of social problems in ASD. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Basis for Evoked Potential Assessment of Certain Visual Functions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    Chromatic adaptation and steady-state evoked potentials. Vision Res., 1968, 8, 149-158. 6. Regan, D. Evoked potentials and sensation. Perception Psycho...D. Evidence for the existence of neural mechanisms selectively sensitive to the direction of movement in space. J. Physiol., 1973, 235, 17-29. 34a...Beverley, K.I. 1 Regan, D. Selective adaptation in stereoscopic depth perception. J. Phvsiol., 1973, 232, 40-41P. 35. Regan, D. & Beverley, K.I

  8. Comparison of somatosensory evoked potentials between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and congenital scoliosis without neural axis abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijun; Qiu, Yong; Ma, Weiwei; Qian, Bangping; Zhu, Zezhang

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) have been documented in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) with different cure severity. However, few studies investigated whether abnormal SEPs were the cause or effect of idiopathic scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of abnormal SEPs in patients with AIS, and to explore its effect on the etiopathogenesis of AIS. This study evaluated SEPs in patients with AIS and congenital scoliosis (CS) with similar curve pattern and severity both in coronal and sagittal planes. Female patients with AIS and CS in our spine surgery center from 2000 to 2009 were recruited for this study. Rate of abnormal SEPs. Posterior tibial nerve SEPs (PTN-SEPs) were performed on female patients with AIS and CS. The inclusion criteria were patients with AIS with a Lenke type 1 curve and patients with CS with right thoracic curve (apex between T5 and T12) and normal sagittal profile (kyphosis less than 50° measured from T2 to T12). All patients were evaluated with total spine magnetic resonance imaging, and those with neural axis abnormalities were excluded. The patients with neurological deficits on detailed physical examination were also excluded. Absence of SEPs waveforms or prolongation of peak latency or asymmetrical peak latency were defined as pathological change. The incidence of pathological SEPs and clinical characteristics were compared between patients with AIS and patients with CS. Forty-six patients with AIS and 33 patients with CS were included in this study. There was no significant difference in coronal and sagittal Cobb angle between the two groups. The rate of abnormal SEPs was 32.6% (15/46) and 12.1% (4/33) in AIS and CS groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p<.05). Somatosensory pathway dysfunction could be found in both AIS and CS without neural axis abnormalities, and the patients with AIS tended to have higher rates of somatosensory

  9. [Visual evoked potentials and the E-UFA test. Laboratory contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Caputo, D; Vanzulli, F; Zibetti, A

    1979-09-29

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and electrophoretic mobility test of erythrocytes (E-UFA test) were compared in 50 multiple sclerosis (M.S.) patients as diagnostic tests. Abnormal VEPs were recorded in 35 patients. E-UFA test was found positive in 31 cases. With respect to Mc Alpine diagnostic criteria, 26 out of 33 definite M.S., 6 out of 9 probable M.S. and 3 out of 8 possible M.S. cases had abnormal VEPs. A positive response in E-UFA test was observed rispectively in 16, 8, 7 patients. Complessively 48 cases (96%) had an abnormal response to the one and/or to the other of the two tests, which apper complementar in early diagnosis of M.S.

  10. Multifocal topographic visual evoked potential: improving objective detection of local visual field defects.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Grigg, J R; Billson, F A

    1998-05-01

    To investigate the relationships between the pattern stimulation of different parts of the visual field (up to 25 degrees of eccentricity), the electrode position, and the cortical response to improve objective detection of local visual field defects. The human visual evoked potential (VEP) was assessed using multifocal pseudorandomly alternated pattern stimuli that were cortically scaled in size. Monopolar and bipolar electrode positions were used. The visual field was investigated up to 26 degrees of eccentricity. Twelve normal subjects and seven subjects with visual field defects of different nature were studied. Although the monopolar response is heavily biased toward the lower hemifield, bipolar leads overlying the active occipital cortex (straddling the inion) demonstrate good signals from all areas of the visual field tested. The amplitude is almost equal for the averaged upper and lower hemifields, but the polarity is opposite, causing partial cancellation of the full-field VEP. The degree of cancellation depends mainly on latency differences between the vertical hemifields. The bipolar VEP corresponded well with Humphrey visual field defects, and it showed a loss of signal in the scotoma area. The multifocal VEP demonstrates good correspondence with the topography of the visual field. Recording with occipital bipolar electrode placement is superior to standard monopolar recording. To avoid a full-field cancellation effect, a separate evaluation of upper and lower hemifields should be used for the best assessment of retinocortical pathways. This technique represents a significant step toward the possible application of the multifocal VEP to objective detection of local defects in the visual field.

  11. Multifocal blue-on-yellow visual evoked potentials in early glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Martins, Alessandra; Grigg, John R; Arvind, Hemamalini; Kumar, Rajesh S; James, Andrew C; Billson, Francis A

    2007-09-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) in early glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. Fifty patients with a confirmed diagnosis of early glaucoma and 60 normal participants. Black-and-white mfVEPs and blue-on-yellow mfVEPs were recorded using the Accumap version 2.0 (ObjectiVision Pty. Ltd., Sydney, Australia). All patients also underwent achromatic standard automated perimetry (SAP). Multifocal VEP amplitude and latency values in glaucoma patients were analyzed and compared with those of the normal controls. Based on the definition of visual field defect, in the group of glaucomatous eyes with SAP defects, amplitude of blue-on-yellow mfVEP was abnormal in all 64 cases (100% sensitivity), whereas black-and-white mfVEP missed 5 cases (92.2% sensitivity). Generally, larger scotomata were noted on blue-on-yellow mfVEP compared with black-and-white mfVEP for the same eyes. There was high topographic correspondence between SAP and amplitude of blue-on-yellow mfVEP and significant (P<0.0001) correlation between them (correlation coefficient, 0.73). Abnormal amplitude was detected in 3 of 60 eyes of control subjects (95% specificity). There was, however, no correlation between visual field defect and latency delay in glaucoma patients. Although there was a significant difference between averaged latency of control and glaucoma eyes, values considerably overlapped. The blue-on-yellow mfVEP is a sensitive and specific tool for detecting early glaucoma based on amplitude analysis.

  12. [Evaluation of the developing human visual system using flash-visual evoked potential].

    PubMed

    Tsuneishi, Syuichi

    2002-03-01

    Flash visual evoked potential (Flash-VEP) is easily recorded in preterm infants. However, its clinical application has not been established due to its great variability in response. Our longitudinal studies on the two components of the N1 wave facilitated peak definition and established normal ranges that are clinically valuable. The N1a (early component of the N1) peak latency decreases at about 4.6 msec/week between 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age. A flash-VEP study in the preterm period enables us to observe the neuronal development in the human visual system that normally proceeds in utero. Flash-VEP analyses on preterm infants demonstrated that the decrease in the N1a peak latency reflects the progress of myelination in the visual pathway according to the developmental program irrespective of preterm birth. The developmental changes of the N1 wave configuration reflect the maturation of the neuronal networks in the visual cortex, which is accelerated by extrauterine visual experience. Using improved methodology and peak denomination that we proposed, flash-VEP can be applied to preterm infants safely, and should provide us with neuro-developmental information of the human cerebrum.

  13. Sweep visually evoked potentials and visual findings in children with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Dotto, Patrícia; Cavascan, Nívea Nunes; Berezovsky, Adriana; Sacai, Paula Yuri; Rocha, Daniel Martins; Pereira, Josenilson Martins; Salomão, Solange Rios

    2014-03-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a type of early childhood epilepsy characterized by progressive neurological development deterioration that includes vision. To demonstrate the clinical importance of grating visual acuity thresholds (GVA) measurement by sweep visually evoked potentials technique (sweep-VEP) as a reliable tool for evaluation of the visual cortex status in WS children. This is a retrospective study of the best-corrected binocular GVA and ophthalmological features of WS children referred for the Laboratory of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision of UNIFESP from 1998 to 2012 (Committee on Ethics in Research of UNIFESP n° 0349/08). The GVA deficit was calculated by subtracting binocular GVA score (logMAR units) of each patient from the median values of age norms from our own lab and classified as mild (0.1-0.39 logMAR), moderate (0.40-0.80 logMAR) or severe (>0.81 logMAR). Associated ophthalmological features were also described. Data from 30 WS children (age from 6 to 108 months, median = 14.5 months, mean ± SD = 22.0 ± 22.1 months; 19 male) were analyzed. The majority presented severe GVA deficit (0.15-1.44 logMAR; mean ± SD = 0.82 ± 0.32 logMAR; median = 0.82 logMAR), poor visual behavior, high prevalence of strabismus and great variability in ocular positioning. The GVA deficit did not vary according to gender (P = .8022), WS type (P = .908), birth age (P = .2881), perinatal oxygenation (P = .7692), visual behavior (P = .8789), ocular motility (P = .1821), nystagmus (P = .2868), risk of drug-induced retinopathy (P = .4632) and participation in early visual stimulation therapy (P = .9010). The sweep-VEP technique is a reliable tool to classify visual system impairment in WS children, in agreement with the poor visual behavior exhibited by them. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Visual Evoked Potential Acuity and Future Behavioral Acuity in Cortical Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Tonya; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) is bilateral visual impairment caused by damage to the posterior visual pathway. Both preferential looking (PL) and sweep visual evoked potential (VEP) can be used to measure visual acuity. The purpose of this study was to determine if an early VEP measure of acuity is related to a young patient’s future behavioral acuity. Methods The visual acuity of 33 patients with CVI was assessed using the sweep VEP and a behavioral measure on two occasions. The median age of the patients at the initial visit was 4.8 years (range: 1.3–19.2 years), and they were followed for an average of 6.9 years (SD: 3.5 years). Results The mean initial VEP acuity was 20/135 (0.735 logMAR), and the mean initial behavioral acuity was 20/475 (1.242 logMAR). The average difference between the two initial measures of acuity was 0.55 log unit, with the behavioral measure reporting a poorer visual acuity in all patients. However, the mean final behavioral acuity was 20/150 (0.741 logMAR), and the average difference between the initial VEP acuity and the final behavioral acuity was only 0.01 log unit. Therefore, the initial VEP measure was not statistically different from the final behavioral measure (t=0.11; df=32; p=0.45). Conclusions Even though the initial VEP measure was much better than the initial behavioral measure, the initial VEP measure was similar to the behavioral visual acuity measured approximately 7 years later. Sweep VEP testing can be used as a predictive tool for at least the lower limit of future behavioral acuity in young patients with CVI. PMID:20016393

  15. Abnormality of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in patients with recurrent benign paroxysmal postitional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don; Lee, Tae Kyeong; Sung, Ki-Bum; Park, Ji Yun

    2013-02-01

    Our results show that cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) or ocular VEMP (oVEMP) abnormalities in the recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) group were significantly higher than those in the non-recurrent BPPV group. Therefore, we can infer that VEMP abnormality is one of risk factors for BPPV recurrence. This prospective study aimed to test the hypothesis that otolith dysfunction using the VEMP test is a cause of recurrence of BPPV. cVEMP and oVEMP tests using 500 Hz tone-burst stimuli were performed on 16 patients with recurrent BPPV between March 2010 and December 2011. Both VEMP tests were performed in 20 patients with non-recurrent BPPV. The differences in age, sex, and involved canal between the recurrent and non-recurrent BPPV groups were not significant. Abnormal cVEMP responses were detected in 5 of 16 (31.3%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group and abnormal oVMEP responses were detected in 4 of 16 (25%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group. When we defined VEMP abnormality as an abnormal cVEMP or abnormal oVEMP, VEMP abnormalities were detected in eight (50%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group and in three (15%) subjects in the non-recurrent BPPV group; the difference between groups was significant.

  16. Visual scanning area is abnormally enlarged in hereditary pure cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shunichi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Furubayashi, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Tsuji, Shoji; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Terao, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of paper was to investigate abnormalities in visual scanning using an eye-tracking device with patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and SCA31, pure cerebellar types of spinocerebellar degeneration. Nineteen SCA patients (12 patients with SCA6 and 7 patients with SCA31) and 19 normal subjects in total participated in the study. While the subjects viewed images of varying complexity for later recall, we compared the visual scanning parameters between SCA patients and normal subjects. SCA patients had lower image recall scores. The scanned area in SCA patients was consistently larger than that in normal subjects. The amplitude of saccades was slightly larger in SCA patients than that in normal subjects, although it did not statistically differ between the two groups and correlated significantly with the scanned area in most images in SCA patients. The instability ratio of fixation, reflecting gaze-evoked nystagmus and downbeat nystagmus, was higher in SCA patients than that in normal subjects. Since SCA patients showed low scores despite wide visual scanning, the scanned area is considered to be abnormally enlarged. The larger scanned area in SCA patients was supposed mainly to result from the slightly larger saccade amplitude. Additionally, SCA patients showed prominent fixation disturbances probably due to gaze-evoked nystagmus and downbeat nystagmus. Consequently, SCA patients suffer from recognizing various objects in daily life, probably due to the impaired saccade control and impaired fixation.

  17. Chromatic visual evoked potentials in young patients with demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Manca Tekavčič; Brecelj, Jelka; Kranjc, Branka Stirn

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate color vision in young patients with demyelinating disease both clinically and electrophysiologically. Thirty young patients (8-28 years, mean age 19 years) with demyelinating disease with or without a history of optic neuritis (ON) were investigated. Color vision was evaluated clinically with the Ishihara test and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue (FM 100 hue) test and electrophysiologically with chromatic visual evoked potentials (cVEPs). Color deficiency axis and error score (ES) obtained with the FM 100 hue test were analyzed. cVEPs to isoluminant red-green (R-G) and blue-yellow (B-Y) stimuli were recorded. The stimulus was a 7 deg circle composed of horizontal sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 2 cycles/deg and 90% chromatic contrast. Onset-offset mode of stimulation (ON:OFF=300∶700  ms) was used. Since the majority of the patients were adults (>18  years), the negative wave (N wave) of the cVEP respones is the prominent part and therefore was analyzed. Sixty eyes were studied-22 with at least one episode of ON (ON group) and 38 without any clinically evident episode of ON (nON group). The average ES in the ON group was 179.18±171.8, whereas in the nON group it was 87.60±65.34. The average N-wave latency in the ON group was 144±44  ms for the R-G stimulus and 146±56  ms for the B-Y stimulus, whereas in the nON group, it was 117±13  ms for the R-G stimulus and 121±22  ms for the B-Y one. The average N-wave amplitude in the ON group was 9.3±7.1  μV for the R-G stimulus and 5.1±3.9  μV for the B-Y one, whereas in the nON group, it was 10.8±8.3  μV for the R-G stimulus and 6.4±4.3  μV for the B-Y one. A significant difference between the ON and the nON group was found: in the ON group, ES was higher (p=0.01) and N-wave latency was longer (p=0.01) compared with those in the nON group. The study showed that color vision is expectedly more affected in the ON

  18. Rapid and Objective Assessment of Neural Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Transient Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Siper, Paige M; Zemon, Vance; Gordon, James; George-Jones, Julia; Lurie, Stacey; Zweifach, Jessica; Tavassoli, Teresa; Wang, A Ting; Jamison, Jesslyn; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Kolevzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need to identify biomarkers and objective outcome measures that can be used to understand underlying neural mechanisms in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) offer a noninvasive technique to evaluate the functional integrity of neural mechanisms, specifically visual pathways, while probing for disease pathophysiology. Transient VEPs (tVEPs) were obtained from 96 unmedicated children, including 37 children with ASD, 36 typically developing (TD) children, and 23 unaffected siblings (SIBS). A conventional contrast-reversing checkerboard condition was compared to a novel short-duration condition, which was developed to enable objective data collection from severely affected populations who are often excluded from electroencephalographic (EEG) studies. Children with ASD showed significantly smaller amplitudes compared to TD children at two of the earliest critical VEP components, P60-N75 and N75-P100. SIBS showed intermediate responses relative to ASD and TD groups. There were no group differences in response latency. Frequency band analyses indicated significantly weaker responses for the ASD group in bands encompassing gamma-wave activity. Ninety-two percent of children with ASD were able to complete the short-duration condition compared to 68% for the standard condition. The current study establishes the utility of a short-duration tVEP test for use in children at varying levels of functioning and describes neural abnormalities in children with idiopathic ASD. Implications for excitatory/inhibitory balance as well as the potential application of VEP for use in clinical trials are discussed.

  19. Visual and somotosensory evoked potentials in asymptomatic patients with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gökçe Çokal, B; Güneş, H N; Güler, S K; Yoldaş, T K

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may be asymptomatic or present with a wide range of neurological and hematological disorders. Our aim in this study is to evaluate visual (VEP) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) parameters in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency who had no clinical evidence of visual impairment or neurological syndrome findings and compare the findings with healthy controls to determine whether there is a correlation between VEP and SEP parameters and serum vitamin B12 levels. 30 patients (6 females [20%], 24 males [80%]; mean age, 52 years [range 17-80 years]), and 15 healthy subjects with vitamin B12 deficiency (3 females [20%], 12 [80%] male; mean age, 49 years [range 17-78 years]) were included in the study. P100 wave latencies and amplitudes were recorded as VEP parameters, and P40 wave latencies and amplitudes were recorded as tibial SEP parameters. Comparison of VEP and SEP parameters in the patient and control groups revealed significantly prolonged SEP latencies and lower SEP amplitudes in the patient group. VEP latencies did not significantly differ between the patient and the control groups while VEP amplitudes were found to be lower in the patient group than in controls. A significant correlation was obtained between serum vitamin B12 levels and tibial SEP latencies (r > 0.5). These findings suggest that asymptomatic patients with vitamin B12 deficiency may have SEP and VEP abnormalities indicating the subclinical optic nerve and spinal cord involvement.

  20. Peripheral and segmental spinal abnormalities of median and ulnar somatosensory evoked potentials in Hirayama's disease

    PubMed Central

    Polo, A; Dossi, M; Fiaschi, A; Zanette, G; Rizzuto, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the origin of juvenile muscle atrophy of the upper limbs (Hirayama's disease, a type of cervical myelopathy of unknown origin). Subjects: Eight male patients were studied; data from 10 normal men were used as control. Methods: Median and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded. Brachial plexus potentials at Erb's point (EP), dorsal horn responses (N13), and subcortical (P14) and cortical potentials (N20) were evaluated. Tibial nerve SEP and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were also recorded from scalp and spinal sites to assess posterior column and pyramidal tract conduction, respectively. Results: The most important SEP findings were: a very substantial attenuation of both the EP potentials and the N13 spinal responses; normal amplitude of the scalp N20; and normal latency of the individual peaks (EP-N9-N13-P14-N20). Although both nerves were involved, abnormalities in response to median nerve stimulation were more significant than those in response to ulnar nerve stimulation. There was little correlation between the degree of alterations observed and the clinical state. Latencies of both spinal and cortical potentials were normal following tibial nerve stimulation. The mean latency of cervical MEP and the central conduction time from the thenar eminence were slightly but significantly longer in patients than in controls. Conclusions: The findings support the hypothesis that this disease, which is clinically defined as a focal spinal muscle atrophy of the upper limb, may also involve the sensory system; if traumatic injury caused by stretching plays a role in the pathogenesis, the damage cannot be confined to the anterior horn of the spinal cord. PMID:12700306

  1. The role of visually evoked potentials in the management of hemispheric arachnoid cyst compressing the posterior visual pathways.

    PubMed

    Raja, Vignesh; Kumar, Anupma; Durnian, Jon; Hagan, Richard; Buxton, Neil; Newman, William

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of an occipital arachnoid cyst in an infant, managed on the basis of changes in visually evoked potentials (VEPs). A significant asymmetry of VEP responses prompted neurosurgical intervention, which improved visual behavior and electrical response to both pattern and flash stimuli.

  2. Induced and evoked neural correlates of orientation selectivity in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Koelewijn, Loes; Dumont, Julie R; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Rich, Anina N; Singh, Krish D

    2011-02-14

    Orientation discrimination is much better for patterns oriented along the horizontal or vertical (cardinal) axes than for patterns oriented obliquely, but the neural basis for this is not known. Previous animal neurophysiology and human neuroimaging studies have demonstrated only a moderate bias for cardinal versus oblique orientations, with fMRI showing a larger response to cardinals in primary visual cortex (V1) and EEG demonstrating both increased magnitudes and reduced latencies of transient evoked responses. Here, using MEG, we localised and characterised induced gamma and transient evoked responses to stationary circular grating patches of three orientations (0, 45, and 90° from vertical). Surprisingly, we found that the sustained gamma response was larger for oblique, compared to cardinal, stimuli. This "inverse oblique effect" was also observed in the earliest (80 ms) evoked response, whereas later responses (120 ms) showed a trend towards the reverse, "classic", oblique response. Source localisation demonstrated that the sustained gamma and early evoked responses were localised to medial visual cortex, whilst the later evoked responses came from both this early visual area and a source in a more inferolateral extrastriate region. These results suggest that (1) the early evoked and sustained gamma responses manifest the initial tuning of V1 neurons, with the stronger response to oblique stimuli possibly reflecting increased tuning widths for these orientations, and (2) the classic behavioural oblique effect is mediated by an extrastriate cortical area and may also implicate feedback from extrastriate to primary visual cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dichoptic stimulation improves detection of glaucoma with multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart; Grigg, John; Goldberg, Ivan; Klistorner, Asya; Billson, Frank A

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether simultaneous binocular (dichoptic) stimulation for multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) detects glaucomatous defects and decreases intereye variability. Twenty-eight patients with glaucoma and 30 healthy subjects underwent mfVEP on monocular and dichoptic stimulation. Dichoptic stimulation was presented with the use of virtual reality goggles (recording time, 7 minutes). Monocular mfVEPs were recorded sequentially for each eye (recording time, 10 minutes). Comparison of mean relative asymmetry coefficient (RAC; calculated as difference in amplitudes between eyes/sum of amplitudes of both eyes at each segment) on monocular and dichoptic mfVEP revealed significantly lower RAC on dichoptic (0.003 +/- 0.03) compared with monocular testing (-0.02 +/- 0.04; P = 0.002). In all 28 patients, dichoptic mfVEP identified defects with excellent topographic correspondence. Of 56 hemifields (28 eyes), 33 had Humphrey visual field (HFA) scotomas, all of which were detected by dichoptic mfVEP. Among 23 hemifields with normal HFA, two were abnormal on monocular and dichoptic mfVEP. Five hemifields (five patients) normal on HFA and monocular mfVEP were abnormal on dichoptic mfVEP. In all five patients, corresponding rim changes were observed on disc photographs. Mean RAC of glaucomatous eyes was significantly higher on dichoptic (0.283 +/- 0.18) compared with monocular (0.199 +/- 0.12) tests (P = 0.0006). Dichoptic mfVEP not only detects HFA losses, it may identify early defects in areas unaffected on HFA and monocular mfVEP while reducing testing time by 30%. Asymmetry was tighter among healthy subjects but wider in patients with glaucoma on simultaneous binocular stimulation, which is potentially a new tool in the early detection of glaucoma.

  4. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  5. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  6. Normal electrocortical facilitation but abnormal target identification during visual sustained attention in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Clementz, Brett A; Wang, Jun; Keil, Andreas

    2008-12-10

    Attentional deficits in schizophrenia have been investigated using target identification tasks which conflate the abilities to successfully (1) attend to possible target locations and (2) detect target events. Whether compromised attentional selectivity or abnormal target detection causes schizophrenia subjects' poor performance on visual attention tasks, therefore, is unknown. To address this issue, we measured the neural activity (using electroencephalography) of 17 schizophrenia and 17 healthy subjects during a target identification task. Participants viewed superimposed images (horizontal and vertical bars differing in color) and attended to one image to identify bar width changes in specific locations. Bars were frequency tagged so attention directed to unique parts of the images could be tracked. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs) were used to quantify attention-related neural activity to specific parts of the visual images. Behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to the target events were used to quantify target detection abilities. For both schizophrenia and healthy subjects, attending to specific parts of the attended image enhanced brain activity related to attended bars and reduced activity evoked by unattended bars. Activity in relation to the spatially overlapping unattended image was unaffected. Schizophrenia patients, however, were impaired on target detection abilities on both behavioral and brain activity measures. Target-related behavioral and brain activity measures were highly correlated in both groups. These findings indicate that deficient target detection rather than compromised attentional selectivity accounts for previously reported visual attention deficits in schizophrenia.

  7. Real-time filtering for the estimation of steady-state visual evoked brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Collura, T F

    1990-06-01

    It is shown that EEG visual evoked potentials elicited by repetitive stimuli in the range of 2 to 20 per second can be readily estimated in real time using a simple filtering approach. This measurement takes advantage of the fact that a comb filter will pass the important Fourier harmonics of the signal to provide an estimate of the evoked activity, plus track time-variations in the signal. Results on human subjects demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  8. The diagnostic significance of the multifocal pattern visual evoked potential in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, S L; Klistorner, A

    1999-04-01

    The concept of objective perimetry is an exciting one because it strives to assess glaucoma damage without relying on psychophysical testing. The recent introduction of multifocal stimulus recording has enhanced our ability to examine the human visual field using electrophysiology. A multifocal pattern visual evoked potential can now be recorded, testing up to 60 sites within the central 25 degrees. The test requires only that the subject fixate on a target, while a cortically scaled dartboard pattern stimulus undergoes pseudorandom alternation within each of the test segments. In its present configuration the test requires at least 8 minutes recording time per eye. Modified bipolar electrode positions are required to ensure that adequate signals are detected from all parts of the visual field. In glaucoma patients, pattern visual evoked potential amplitudes have been shown to reflect visual field loss with reduction of signal amplitude in the affected areas. This technique represents the first major step toward objective detection of visual field defects in glaucoma.

  9. Comparison of objective diagnostic tests in glaucoma: Heidelberg retinal tomography and multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, C; Graham, S L; Klistorner, A; Goldberg, I

    2006-04-01

    To compare sensitivity and specificity of functional and structural changes in glaucoma using two objective tests: the multifocal visual evoked potential (m-VEP) and Heidelberg retinal tomography II (HRT). 41 glaucoma patients and 25 normal individuals participated in the study. One eye per individual was included in the study. Individuals were evaluated with Humphrey visual field (HVF) perimetry, m-VEP, and HRT. Moorfield regression analysis findings of HRT were compared with presence of scotoma on m-VEP. Linear regression analysis of quantitative variables, such as HVF mean deviation (MD), m-VEP discriminant score (Accumap Severity Index) and, global HRT parameters was also performed. m-VEP sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 96% respectively. HRT sensitivity and specificity were 79% and 92% respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) for m-VEP was 0.96 and for HRT varied from 0.79 to 0.86 depending on the parameters used. Linear correlation between MD and Accumap Severity Index score was -77%, while that between HRT global parameters, Accumap Severity Index and MD were at best around 50%. Topographic comparison of the presence of scotoma on HVF and m-VEP in different areas of the visual field showed good agreement. Comparison of optic nerve head structural abnormality with corresponding areas of field defects on HVF and m-VEP showed poor to moderate agreement. The objective test of optic nerve function (m-VEP) and structure (HRT) can detect glaucomatous damage, with limited correlation. The 2 functional tests, HVF and m-VEP correlate better with each other than with HRT. It remains important to look for both functional and structural changes in order to detect all glaucoma cases.

  10. Clinical application of objective perimetry using multifocal visual evoked potentials in glaucoma practice.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stuart L; Klistorner, Alexander I; Goldberg, Ivan

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the role of objective perimetry using multifocal visual evoked potentials (mVEPs) in glaucoma practice, and to assess its utility in patients with inconclusive standard automated perimetry findings. Method A retrospective case series of 436 consecutive subjects referred for glaucoma investigation who underwent testing with the AccuMap V1.3 mVEP system (ObjectiVision Pty, Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) within a defined 12-month period. Sensitivity was determined by comparing this testing with that of standard automated perimetry and that used in a subgroup in whom masked stereoscopic optic disc photographs were used as an alternative reference standard. Overall clinical diagnostic outcomes were assessed. The mVEP changes were correlated with the stage of disease and Humphrey mean deviation (r = 0.78). The overall sensitivity for detecting glaucoma with established subjective field loss was 97.5% (early glaucoma, 95.0%), whereas 92.2% of low-risk suspects had normal mVEPs. When masked disc assessment alone was used for diagnosis of abnormality, sensitivity of mVEP (80.6%) and Humphrey visual field results (81.9%) were similar, but mVEP specificity was better (89.2% vs 79.5%). The mVEP was particularly useful in assessing excessive subjective field loss (45 eyes) by showing a much closer correlation with the clinical picture. Multifocal VEP is an effective method for detecting visual field loss in glaucoma. It provides a valuable aid to the clinician in categorizing patients with unreliable, variable, unconfirmed, or excessive subjective field loss.

  11. Multifocal visual evoked potential latency analysis: predicting progression to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Clare; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart; Garrick, Raymond; Billson, Francis; Grigg, John

    2006-06-01

    To monitor the difference in conversion rates to multiple sclerosis (MS) in 46 patients with optic neuritis between patients with multifocal visual evoked potential latency delay and those with normal latency. Prospective case series. Metropolitan neuro-ophthalmology clinic. Forty-six patients with optic neuritis who did not have a diagnosis of MS on enrollment in the study. Conversion to MS according to the McDonald criteria. Analysis revealed that only 22 subjects had multifocal visual evoked potential latency delay. Over 1 year, 36.4% of patients with optic neuritis with latency delays progressed clinically to MS compared with 0% of those with normal latencies (P = .03, chi2). This may indicate that multifocal visual evoked potential latency delay can assist in predicting progression to future MS.

  12. Development of visual evoked potentials in neonates. A study using light emitting diode goggles.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, K C; Taylor, M J; Menzies, R; Whyte, H

    1985-01-01

    We used a signal averager with light emitting diode goggles as the photostimulator to study the development of the visual evoked potentials in 40 normal neonates of between 23 and 42 weeks' gestation. All except two infants of less than 24 weeks' gestation had replicable visual evoked potentials. A negative peak of latency (mean (SD), 308 (21) msec) was present in all infants, but the development of the primary positive peak depended on maturity. Only infants of 37 weeks or more had a consistent positive peak of latency (mean (SD), 220 (22) msec). The practical simplicity and reliability of this technique has distinct advantages over previous conventional recording systems. Neonatal visual evoked potentials are shown to change with maturity. PMID:4091582

  13. Feasibility and performance evaluation of generating and recording visual evoked potentials using ambulatory Bluetooth based system.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Roger M; Oken, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Report contains the design overview and key performance measurements demonstrating the feasibility of generating and recording ambulatory visual stimulus evoked potentials using the previously reported custom Complementary and Alternative Medicine physiologic data collection and monitoring system, CAMAS. The methods used to generate visual stimuli on a PDA device and the design of an optical coupling device to convert the display to an electrical waveform which is recorded by the CAMAS base unit are presented. The optical sensor signal, synchronized to the visual stimulus emulates the brain's synchronized EEG signal input to CAMAS normally reviewed for the evoked potential response. Most importantly, the PDA also sends a marker message over the wireless Bluetooth connection to the CAMAS base unit synchronized to the visual stimulus which is the critical averaging reference component to obtain VEP results. Results show the variance in the latency of the wireless marker messaging link is consistent enough to support the generation and recording of visual evoked potentials. The averaged sensor waveforms at multiple CPU speeds are presented and demonstrate suitability of the Bluetooth interface for portable ambulatory visual evoked potential implementation on our CAMAS platform.

  14. Enhancement Of Visual Evoked Potentials By Adaptive Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, W.; Appel, U.; Rauner, H.

    1982-11-01

    Transient evoked potentials (EP) are variations of the on-going electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to the application of sensory stimuli. Since their amplitudes are very small in comparison to the spontaneous EEG, signal extraction methods must be applied to them before their characteristics are measureable. Several signal ex-traction methods which are actually used in EP research are outlined, especially those showing an adaptive characteristic. As a further development, a new method is proposed which considers the on-going EEG preceding the stimulus application for the EP processing. The computational procedure will be described and some preliminary results are given.

  15. Objective perimetry using the multifocal visual evoked potential in central visual pathway lesions.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Grigg, J; Balachandran, C

    2005-06-01

    To examine the ability of the multifocal pattern visual evoked potential (mVEP) to detect field loss in neurological lesions affecting the visual pathway from the chiasm to the cortex. The mVEPs recorded in the clinic were retrospectively reviewed for any cases involving central neurological lesions. Recordings had been performed with the AccuMap V1.3 objective perimeter, which used an array of four bipolar occipital electrodes to provide four differently oriented channels for simultaneous recording. 19 patients with hemianopias were identified. Of these there were 10 homonymous hemianopias with hemifield type loss, two bitemporal hemianopias, and seven homonymous hemianopias with quadrantanopic distribution. A comparison with subjective field results and CT/MRI findings was done to determine the relation between the two methods of visual field mapping and any relation with the anatomical location of the lesion and the mVEP results. In all hemianopic type cases (12) the defect was demonstrated on the mVEP and showed good correspondence in location of the scotoma (nine homonymous and two bitemporal). The topographic distribution was similar but not identical to subjective testing. Of the seven quadrantanopic type hemianopias, only four were found to have corresponding mVEP losses in the same areas. In the three cases where the mVEP was normal, the type of quadrantanopia had features consistent with an extra-striate lesion being very congruous, complete, and respecting the horizontal meridian. The mVEP can detect field loss from cortical lesions, but not in some cases of homonymous quadrantanopia, where the lesion may have been in the extra-striate cortex. This supports the concept that the mVEP is generated in V1 striate cortex and that it may be able to distinguish striate from extra-striate lesions. It implies caution should be used when interpreting "functional" loss using the mVEP if the visual field pattern is quadrantic.

  16. The study of visual evoked potentials in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy identifies asymptomatic optic nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Spaggiari, E; Neri, F; Macaluso, C; Gardini, E; Ferrozzi, F; Minelli, R; Wall, J R; Roti, E

    1997-04-01

    In the present study we have recorded visual evoked cortical potentials (VECP) in 88 patients affected by autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) without clinical signs of optic neuropathy. At the time of ophthalmological examination, 37 of these patients were hyperthyroid, 41 were euthyroid, and 8 were hypothyroid; 2 were not assessed. Twenty-nine normal subjects served as controls. We performed pattern reversal visual stimulation and recorded the amplitude and latency of the cortical electric response at 100 ms (P100 wave). There were no differences in the mean P100 amplitude of TAO patients and normal subjects. The mean P100 latency in patients was 105.6 +/- 0.5 ms, significantly higher than that in normal subjects (102.0 +/- 0.5 ms; P < 0.00003). Latency in euthyroid patients did not differ from that in either hypo- or hyperthyroid patients. The VECP test was positive (latency, > or = 110.0 ms) in 21 (23.8%) TAO patients. In patients with proptosis greater than 21 mm, latency was 106.7 +/- 0.7 ms, significantly higher than that in patients with normal Hertel measurements (104.3 +/- 0.6 ms; P < 0.01). Latency was not increased in patients with acute inflammatory signs compared to those with inactive eye disease and in patients with altered extrinsic motility. In patients with an abnormal visual field study, the mean latency was 110.3 +/- 1.5 ms, significantly higher than that in patients with a normal visual field (104.7 +/- 0.4; by t test, P < 0.000003). In conclusion, we observed a prolongation of the latency of the evoked cortical response in patients with TAO without subjective visual complaints and without optic nerve compression. We believe that the study of VECP in TAO is complementary to the study of the visual field in identifying early optic nerve dysfunction in the absence of decreased visual acuity.

  17. Abnormal sympathetic overactivity evoked by insulin in the skeletal muscle of patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, G; Napoli, R; Capaldo, B; Rendina, V; Iaccarino, G; Volpe, M; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L

    1992-01-01

    The reason why hyperinsulinemia is associated with essential hypertension is not known. To test the hypothesis of a pathophysiologic link mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we measured the changes in forearm norepinephrine release, by using the forearm perfusion technique in conjunction with the infusion of tritiated NE, in patients with essential hypertension and in normal subjects receiving insulin intravenously (1 mU/kg per min) while maintaining euglycemia. Hyperinsulinemia (50-60 microU/ml in the deep forearm vein) evoked a significant increase in forearm NE release in both groups of subjects. However, the response of hypertensives was threefold greater compared to that of normotensives (2.28 +/- 45 ng.liter-1.min-1 in hypertensives and 0.80 +/- 0.27 ng.liter-1 in normals; P less than 0.01). Forearm glucose uptake rose to 5.1 +/- .7 mg.liter-1.min-1 in response to insulin in hypertensives and to 7.9 +/- 1.3 mg.liter-1.min-1 in normotensives (P less than 0.05). To clarify whether insulin action was due to a direct effect on muscle NE metabolism, in another set of experiments insulin was infused locally into the brachial artery to expose only the forearm tissues to the same insulin levels as in the systemic studies. During local hyperinsulinemia, forearm NE release remained virtually unchanged both in hypertensive and in normal subjects. Furthermore, forearm glucose disposal was activated to a similar extent in both groups (5.0 +/- 0.6 and 5.2 +/- 1.1 mg.liter-1.min-1 in hypertensives and in normals, respectively). These data demonstrate that: (a) insulin evokes an abnormal muscle sympathetic overactivity in essential hypertension which is mediated by mechanisms involving the central nervous system; and (b) insulin resistance associated with hypertension is demonstrable in the skeletal muscle tissue only with systemic insulin administration which produces muscle sympathetic overactivity. The data fit the hypothesis that the sympathetic system mediates

  18. The steady-state visual evoked potential in vision research: A review

    PubMed Central

    Norcia, Anthony M.; Appelbaum, L. Gregory; Ales, Justin M.; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Periodic visual stimulation and analysis of the resulting steady-state visual evoked potentials were first introduced over 80 years ago as a means to study visual sensation and perception. From the first single-channel recording of responses to modulated light to the present use of sophisticated digital displays composed of complex visual stimuli and high-density recording arrays, steady-state methods have been applied in a broad range of scientific and applied settings.The purpose of this article is to describe the fundamental stimulation paradigms for steady-state visual evoked potentials and to illustrate these principles through research findings across a range of applications in vision science. PMID:26024451

  19. Optic disc abnormalities - diagnosis, evolution and influence on visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Cekić, Sonja; Stanković-Babić, Gordana; Višnjić, Zlatica; Jovanović, Ivan; Risimić, Dijana

    2010-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the optic disc are not so rare. The etiology for the most of them is unknown. Visual acuity of affected eye may be minimally or severely affected, depending on the extent of lesion. All of these conditions can be unilateral or bilateral. Chíldren who have unilateral optic disc abnormalities generally present during the preschool years with sensory esotropia. Visual acuity may be unaffected like in optic disc pit, optic disc drusen, fibre medullares, ect. However, during the evolution they may cause a decrease in visual acuity like serous retinal detachment in optic disc pit, atrophy or subretinal neovascularisation in optic disc drusen. Some of them like fibre medullares needs only a good diagnose and they do not have any evolution. Fluorescein angiography and ultrasonography may be crucial diagnostic procedures to discover some of them, like optic disc drusen. Optic disc abnormalities may be associated with other congenital disorders of the eye and often central nervous system malformations. Secondary they may be associated retinal detachment, retinochisis, macular edema, choroid neovascularisation and lipid exudation. Some of these conditions may be found on routine ophthalmologic exam such as optic disc drusen and fibre medullares and often are diagnostically problem. The aim of our study was to present some of our cases with different optic disc abnormalities such as fibre medullares, optic disc coloboma, hypoplasio disci, optic disc drusen and optic disc pit. PMID:20507293

  20. Visual and brainstem auditory evoked potentials in infants with severe vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Koç, Ahmet; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Calik, Mustafa; Işcan, Akin

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 plays an important role in the development of mental, motor, cognitive, and social functions via its role in DNA synthesis and nerve myelination. Its deficiency in infants might cause neuromotor retardation as well as megaloblastic anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of infantile vitamin B12 deficiency on evoked brain potentials and determine whether improvement could be obtained with vitamin B12 replacement at appropriate dosages. Thirty patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and 30 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Hematological parameters, visual evoked potentials, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials tests were performed prior to treatment, 1 week after treatment, and 3 months after treatment. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) were found to be prolonged in 16 (53.3%) and 15 (50%) patients, respectively. Statistically significant improvements in VEP and BAEP examinations were determined 3 months after treatment. Three months after treatment, VEP and BAEP examinations returned to normal in 81.3% and 53.3% of subjects with prolonged VEPs and BAEPs, respectively. These results demonstrate that vitamin B12 deficiency in infants causes significant impairment in the auditory and visual functioning tests of the brain, such as VEP and BAEP.

  1. Abnormal movement-related suppression of sensory evoked potentials in upper limb dystonia.

    PubMed

    Macerollo, A; Chen, J C; Parees, I; Sadnicka, A; Kassavetis, P; Bhatia, K P; Kilner, J M; Rothwell, J C; Edwards, M J

    2016-03-01

    Gating of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) around the onset of a voluntary movement is a physiological phenomenon with centripetal and central components, and may reflect sensorimotor integration required for normal movement control. Our objective was the investigation of SEP suppression at the onset of movement and the interaction between SEP suppression and vibration of the limb. Fourteen patients with primary focal/segmental dystonia and 17 age-matched healthy volunteers were studied. SEPs were elicited after electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded over the scalp at three sites according to the International 10-20 System (F3, C3 and P3). SEPs were recorded in four conditions: at rest, at the onset of movement (a self-paced abduction movement of the right thumb), both in the absence and in the presence of vibration of the limb. Repeated measures anova revealed that there was a significant main effect of group [F(1, 11.1) = 0.471, P = 0.002]. Post hoc exploration of this effect revealed it to be due to an absence of SEP suppression at movement onset in patients (mean ratio SEP movement onset/rest 1.15 at F3, 1.13 at C3, 1.01 at P3) compared to controls, who had SEP suppression at movement onset (mean ratio SEP movement onset/rest 0.79 at F3, 0.78 at C3, 0.77 at P3). With vibration, SEP suppression reduced in both patients and controls to a similar extent. These results demonstrate abnormal SEP suppression at the onset of movement in patients with primary dystonia, and in addition that vibration of the limb reduces SEP suppression in patients and controls. © 2016 EAN.

  2. Identifying preperimetric functional loss in glaucoma: a blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials study.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Graham, Stuart; Leaney, John; Grigg, John; Goldberg, Ivan; Billson, Frank; Klistorner, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    To determine the ability of blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials (BonY mfVEP) to identify functional loss in preperimetric glaucoma. Prospective case series. Thirty patients with glaucomatous optic discs and normal standard visual fields. All patients underwent BonY mfVEP, dilated optic disc stereophotography, and optical coherence tomography (Fast RNFL protocol). Optic disc photographs were assessed by 2 independent examiners in a masked fashion. The mfVEP amplitude asymmetry and latency values were analyzed and compared topographically with findings of disc assessment. Average retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, RNFL asymmetry, and sectors with RNFL thinning were compared between patients with and without mfVEP defects. Fourteen (46.7%) patients demonstrated significant abnormality on amplitude asymmetry deviation plots of BonY mfVEP. In all 14 cases, the defect was monocular and corresponded to the eye with the worse disc. In 13 of 14 patients, the defect also corresponded to the location of the worst affected rim. Average RNFL thickness of eyes with mfVEP defects was 81.2+/-9.9 microm, significantly lower than that of patients without defects (90+/-10.5 microm; P = 0.035). Mean asymmetry of RNFL (better minus worse eye) also was significantly higher for patients with mfVEP defects compared with those without such defects (9.0+/-6.4 microm vs. 3.0+/-7 microm; P = 0.03). Average latency of both eyes of glaucomatous patients was delayed compared with that of controls, with no difference in latency between worse and better eyes of glaucoma patients. There was no association of latency delay with either the location of disc changes or mfVEP amplitude defects. Amplitude asymmetry of the BonY mfVEP seems to be a promising tool to identify functional loss in preperimetric glaucoma. Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.

  3. Rapid and Objective Assessment of Neural Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Transient Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Siper, Paige M.; Zemon, Vance; Gordon, James; George-Jones, Julia; Lurie, Stacey; Zweifach, Jessica; Tavassoli, Teresa; Wang, A. Ting; Jamison, Jesslyn; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Kolevzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a critical need to identify biomarkers and objective outcome measures that can be used to understand underlying neural mechanisms in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) offer a noninvasive technique to evaluate the functional integrity of neural mechanisms, specifically visual pathways, while probing for disease pathophysiology. Methods Transient VEPs (tVEPs) were obtained from 96 unmedicated children, including 37 children with ASD, 36 typically developing (TD) children, and 23 unaffected siblings (SIBS). A conventional contrast-reversing checkerboard condition was compared to a novel short-duration condition, which was developed to enable objective data collection from severely affected populations who are often excluded from electroencephalographic (EEG) studies. Results Children with ASD showed significantly smaller amplitudes compared to TD children at two of the earliest critical VEP components, P60-N75 and N75-P100. SIBS showed intermediate responses relative to ASD and TD groups. There were no group differences in response latency. Frequency band analyses indicated significantly weaker responses for the ASD group in bands encompassing gamma-wave activity. Ninety-two percent of children with ASD were able to complete the short-duration condition compared to 68% for the standard condition. Conclusions The current study establishes the utility of a short-duration tVEP test for use in children at varying levels of functioning and describes neural abnormalities in children with idiopathic ASD. Implications for excitatory/inhibitory balance as well as the potential application of VEP for use in clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27716799

  4. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  5. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  6. Electrode position and the multi-focal visual-evoked potential: role in objective visual field assessment.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Grigg, J R; Billson, F A

    1998-05-01

    To improve the performance of visual-evoked potentials (VEP) in the assessment of the human visual field, the multi-focal cortically scaled pattern VEP was recorded up to 250 of eccentricity in normal subjects. Monopolar and varying bipolar electrode positions were used. The monopolar response was strongly biased towards the lower hemifield. Bipolar leads straddling the inion (2 cm above and below) achieved approximately equal signals from the upper and lower visual field. Division into sectors of similar wave-form augments the analysis compared with summed full-field responses. With this technique, the multi-focal VEP can be used to objectively assess the visual field.

  7. A Steady State Visually Evoked Potential Investigation of Memory and Ageing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Helen; Pipingas, Andrew; Silberstein, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Old age is generally accompanied by a decline in memory performance. Specifically, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have revealed that there are age-related changes in the neural correlates of episodic and working memory. This study investigated age-associated changes in the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and…

  8. Effects of Form Perception and Meaning on the Visual Evoked Potential with Author’s Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    interpretations of reversible figures, simple geometrical forms, and consonant- vowel -consonant (cvc) trigrams with differently ordered consonants were...employed. Why, then, look at visual evoked potentials resulting from ambiguous figures and consonant- vowel -consonant (cvc) trigrams? When I was...ability to investigate the brain mechanisms for processing information, attention, perception, emotion , and consciousness, the hardware did not tell what

  9. Negative Component of Visual Evoked Potential in Children with Cognitive Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanagihara, Masafumi; Sako, Akihito

    This study investigates a negative component (N220) of visual evoked potential (VEP) which increases as certain cognitive processes are activated. Nine experimental conditions were designed by combining three stimulus and three task conditions. Letters were used as verbal stimuli, matrix patterns were used as nonverbal stimuli, and white light was…

  10. Effects of Visual Information on Wind-Evoked Escape Behavior of the Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Kanou, Masamichi; Matsuyama, Akane; Takuwa, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of visual information on wind-evoked escape behavior in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Most agitated crickets were found to retreat into a shelter made of cardboard installed in the test arena within a short time. As this behavior was thought to be a type of escape, we confirmed how a visual image of a shelter affected wind-evoked escape behavior. Irrespective of the brightness of the visual background (black or white) or the absence or presence of a shelter, escape jumps were oriented almost 180° opposite to the source of the air puff stimulus. Therefore, the direction of wind-evoked escape depends solely depended on the direction of the stimulus air puff. In contrast, the turning direction of the crickets during the escape was affected by the position of the visual image of the shelter. During the wind-evoked escape jump, most crickets turned in the direction in which a shelter was presented. This behavioral nature is presumably necessary for crickets to retreat into a shelter within a short time after their escape jump.

  11. Attentional Modulation of Visual-Evoked Potentials by Threat: Investigating the Effect of Evolutionary Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher; El-Deredy, Wael; Blanchette, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    In dot-probe tasks, threatening cues facilitate attention to targets and enhance the amplitude of the target P1 peak of the visual-evoked potential. While theories have suggested that evolutionarily relevant threats should obtain preferential neural processing, this has not been examined empirically. In this study we examined the effects of…

  12. Attentional Modulation of Visual-Evoked Potentials by Threat: Investigating the Effect of Evolutionary Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher; El-Deredy, Wael; Blanchette, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    In dot-probe tasks, threatening cues facilitate attention to targets and enhance the amplitude of the target P1 peak of the visual-evoked potential. While theories have suggested that evolutionarily relevant threats should obtain preferential neural processing, this has not been examined empirically. In this study we examined the effects of…

  13. A Steady State Visually Evoked Potential Investigation of Memory and Ageing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Helen; Pipingas, Andrew; Silberstein, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Old age is generally accompanied by a decline in memory performance. Specifically, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have revealed that there are age-related changes in the neural correlates of episodic and working memory. This study investigated age-associated changes in the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and…

  14. Moonwalker Descending Neurons Mediate Visually Evoked Retreat in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sen, Rajyashree; Wu, Ming; Branson, Kristin; Robie, Alice; Rubin, Gerald M; Dickson, Barry J

    2017-03-06

    Insects, like most animals, tend to steer away from imminent threats [1-7]. Drosophila melanogaster, for example, generally initiate an escape take-off in response to a looming visual stimulus, mimicking a potential predator [8]. The escape response to a visual threat is, however, flexible [9-12] and can alternatively consist of walking backward away from the perceived threat [11], which may be a more effective response to ambush predators such as nymphal praying mantids [7]. Flexibility in escape behavior may also add an element of unpredictability that makes it difficult for predators to anticipate or learn the prey's likely response [3-6]. Whereas the fly's escape jump has been well studied [8, 9, 13-18], the neuronal underpinnings of evasive walking remain largely unexplored. We previously reported the identification of a cluster of descending neurons-the moonwalker descending neurons (MDNs)-the activity of which is necessary and sufficient to trigger backward walking [19], as well as a population of visual projection neurons-the lobula columnar 16 (LC16) cells-that respond to looming visual stimuli and elicit backward walking and turning [11]. Given the similarity of their activation phenotypes, we hypothesized that LC16 neurons induce backward walking via MDNs and that turning while walking backward might reflect asymmetric activation of the left and right MDNs. Here, we present data from functional imaging, behavioral epistasis, and unilateral activation experiments that support these hypotheses. We conclude that LC16 and MDNs are critical components of the neural circuit that transduces threatening visual stimuli into directional locomotor output.

  15. Objective perimetry using the multifocal visual evoked potential in central visual pathway lesions

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Grigg, J; Balachandran, C

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To examine the ability of the multifocal pattern visual evoked potential (mVEP) to detect field loss in neurological lesions affecting the visual pathway from the chiasm to the cortex. Method: The mVEPs recorded in the clinic were retrospectively reviewed for any cases involving central neurological lesions. Recordings had been performed with the AccuMap V1.3 objective perimeter, which used an array of four bipolar occipital electrodes to provide four differently oriented channels for simultaneous recording. 19 patients with hemianopias were identified. Of these there were 10 homonymous hemianopias with hemifield type loss, two bitemporal hemianopias, and seven homonymous hemianopias with quadrantanopic distribution. A comparison with subjective field results and CT/MRI findings was done to determine the relation between the two methods of visual field mapping and any relation with the anatomical location of the lesion and the mVEP results. Results: In all hemianopic type cases (12) the defect was demonstrated on the mVEP and showed good correspondence in location of the scotoma (nine homonymous and two bitemporal). The topographic distribution was similar but not identical to subjective testing. Of the seven quadrantanopic type hemianopias, only four were found to have corresponding mVEP losses in the same areas. In the three cases where the mVEP was normal, the type of quadrantanopia had features consistent with an extra-striate lesion being very congruous, complete, and respecting the horizontal meridian. Conclusions: The mVEP can detect field loss from cortical lesions, but not in some cases of homonymous quadrantanopia, where the lesion may have been in the extra-striate cortex. This supports the concept that the mVEP is generated in V1 striate cortex and that it may be able to distinguish striate from extra-striate lesions. It implies caution should be used when interpreting “functional” loss using the mVEP if the visual field pattern is quadrantic

  16. Neurotoxic effects of n-hexane on the human central nervous system: evoked potential abnormalities in n-hexane polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y C

    1987-01-01

    An outbreak of n-hexane polyneuropathy as a result of industrial exposure occurred in printing factories in Taipei area from December 1983 to February 1985. Multimodality evoked potentials study was performed on 22 of the polyneuropathy cases, five of the subclinical cases, and seven of the unaffected workers. The absolute and interpeak latencies of patterned visual evoked potential (pVEP) in both the polyneuropathy and subclinical groups were longer than in the normal controls. The pVEP interpeak amplitude was also decreased in the polyneuropathy cases. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP), showed no difference of wave I latency between factory workers and normal controls, but prolongation of the wave I-V interpeak latencies was noted, corresponding with the severity of the polyneuropathy. In somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), both the absolute latencies and central conduction time (CCT) were longer in subclinical and polyneuropathy cases than in the unaffected workers and normal controls. From this evoked potentials study, chronic toxic effects of n-hexane on the central nervous system were shown. PMID:3031221

  17. Study of the human visual cortex: direct cortical evoked potentials and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Donald F; Leeman, Stephanie; Ojemann, George A

    2007-02-01

    The authors studied the visual cortex of 15 patients undergoing studies for medically intractable epilepsy. Although the subdural and strip electrode placement varied in each of these patients, there were enough electrodes over the visual cortex to complete studies involving evoked potentials and direct cortical stimulation. Visual evoked potentials were elicited using two check sizes (50 and 16 min) for pattern reversal studies, 50 min checks for on-off stimulation, 50 min checks for horizontal and vertical hemifields and simple flash for the VEP. These studies demonstrated that the pattern reversal and on-off stimuli caused very complex, multipotential waveforms in striate and vision associational cortex that do not resemble the response obtained at the scalp. Different volumes of visual cortex are activated by stimulation with 16 min checks, 50 min checks and simple flash. Flash activates the largest volume of visual cortex and it is likely that this finding is what makes this test of so little value clinically. Direct cortical stimulation shows that colored responses are generated primarily in the posterior striate cortex and inferior occipital lobe, while movement is primarily generated by the visual association cortex. No complex visual images were obtained by stimulation of either the striate cortex or visual association cortex. The brain mechanisms that lead to formed visual images remain to be identified.

  18. Temporal Tuning Effects in the Visually Evoked Response,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    the studies conducted by Regan (1977, 1978), Tyler, Apkarian, and Nakayama (1978), .Spekreijse, Estevez and Reits (1977), and van der Tweel and...Using steady- state presentations, Spekreijse (1966) and van der Tweel and Spekreijse (1968) demonstrated that, when the borders between spatial stimuli... Tweel and Verduyn Lunel (1965) and Regan (1970), visual responses to modulated Lmpatterned stimili have been categorized according to the temporal

  19. The VERRUN and VERNAL software systems for steady-state visual evoked response experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two digital computer programs were developed for use in experiments involving steady-state visual evoked response (VER): VERRUN, whose primary functions are to generate a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus and to digitize and store electro-cortical response; and VERNAL, which provides both time- and frequency-domain metrics of the evoked response. These programs were coded in FORTRAN for operation on the PDP-11/34, using the RSX-11 Operating System, and the PDP-11/23, using the RT-11 Operating System. Users' and programmers' guides to these programs are provided, and guidelines for model analysis of VER data are suggested.

  20. Visual evoked potentials and dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Faldella, G; Govoni, M; Alessandroni, R; Marchiani, E; Salvioli, G P; Biagi, P L; Spano, C

    1996-01-01

    The influence of dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCP) supply, and especially of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on evoked potential maturation, was studied in 58 healthy preterm infants using flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs), flash electroretinography (ERG), and brainstem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEPs) at 52 weeks of postconceptional age. At the same time, the fatty acid composition of red blood cell membranes was examined. The infants were fed on breast milk (n = 12), a preterm formula supplemented with LCP (PF-LCP) (n = 21), or a traditional preterm formula (PF) (n = 25). In the breast milk and PF-LCP groups the morphology and latencies of the waves that reflect the visual projecting system were similar; in the PF group the morphology was quite different and the wave latencies were significantly longer. This could mean that the maturation pattern of VEPs in preterm infants who did not receive LCP was slower. Moreover, a higher level of erythrocyte LCP, especially DHA, was found in breast milk and PF-LCP groups compared with the PF group. ERG and BAEP recordings were the same in all three groups. These results suggest that a well balanced LCP supplement in preterm formulas can positively influence the maturation of visual evoked potentials in preterm infants when breast milk is not available. PMID:8949693

  1. Visual evoked potentials in dementia: a meta-analysis and empirical study of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pollock, V E; Schneider, L S; Chui, H C; Henderson, V; Zemansky, M; Sloane, R B

    1989-04-15

    A meta-analytic review of flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potential research indicates that elderly demented patients have longer P100 latencies than age-matched control subjects. In the present empirical research, patients with research diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease were compared with sex- and age-matched control subjects using P100 latencies of visual evoked potentials (VEP) elicited by flash and pattern reversal. As compared to control subjects, Alzheimer's disease patients showed significantly longer P100 latencies of the VEP elicited by pattern reversal; the flash P100 only marginally distinguished them. These findings are discussed within the context of VEP recording practices, patient selection, sex and age matching of control subjects, and the visual system.

  2. Steady-state visually evoked potentials: focus on essential paradigms and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vialatte, François-Benoît; Maurice, Monique; Dauwels, Justin; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    After 40 years of investigation, steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs) have been shown to be useful for many paradigms in cognitive (visual attention, binocular rivalry, working memory, and brain rhythms) and clinical neuroscience (aging, neurodegenerative disorders, schizophrenia, ophthalmic pathologies, migraine, autism, depression, anxiety, stress, and epilepsy). Recently, in engineering, SSVEPs found a novel application for SSVEP-driven brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. Although some SSVEP properties are well documented, many questions are still hotly debated. We provide an overview of recent SSVEP studies in neuroscience (using implanted and scalp EEG, fMRI, or PET), with the perspective of modern theories about the visual pathway. We investigate the steady-state evoked activity, its properties, and the mechanisms behind SSVEP generation. Next, we describe the SSVEP-BCI paradigm and review recently developed SSVEP-based BCI systems. Lastly, we outline future research directions related to basic and applied aspects of SSVEPs.

  3. Visual Evoked Potentials as a Readout of Cortical Function in Infants With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Varcin, Kandice J; Nelson, Charles A; Ko, Jordan; Sahin, Mustafa; Wu, Joyce Y; Jeste, Shafali Spurling

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that confers a high risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Studies have demonstrated specific delays in visual reception skills that may predict the development of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Based on evidence for alterations in the retinogeniculate pathway in animal models of tuberous sclerosis complex, we asked whether children with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrate alterations in early visual processing that may undermine the development of higher-level visual behaviors. Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials were recorded in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (n = 16) and typically developing infants (n = 18) at 12 months of age. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrated remarkably intact visual evoked potentials even within the context of intellectual disability and epilepsy. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex show intact visual cortical processing, suggesting that delays in visually mediated behaviors in tuberous sclerosis complex may not be rooted in early visual processing deficits.

  4. Associating spontaneous with evoked activity in a neural mass model of visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Trong, Manh; Bojak, Ingo; Knösche, Thomas R

    2013-02-01

    Spontaneous activity of the brain at rest frequently has been considered a mere backdrop to the salient activity evoked by external stimuli or tasks. However, the resting state of the brain consumes most of its energy budget, which suggests a far more important role. An intriguing hint comes from experimental observations of spontaneous activity patterns, which closely resemble those evoked by visual stimulation with oriented gratings, except that cortex appeared to cycle between different orientation maps. Moreover, patterns similar to those evoked by the behaviorally most relevant horizontal and vertical orientations occurred more often than those corresponding to oblique angles. We hypothesize that this kind of spontaneous activity develops at least to some degree autonomously, providing a dynamical reservoir of cortical states, which are then associated with visual stimuli through learning. To test this hypothesis, we use a biologically inspired neural mass model to simulate a patch of cat visual cortex. Spontaneous transitions between orientation states were induced by modest modifications of the neural connectivity, establishing a stable heteroclinic channel. Significantly, the experimentally observed greater frequency of states representing the behaviorally important horizontal and vertical orientations emerged spontaneously from these simulations. We then applied bar-shaped inputs to the model cortex and used Hebbian learning rules to modify the corresponding synaptic strengths. After unsupervised learning, different bar inputs reliably and exclusively evoked their associated orientation state; whereas in the absence of input, the model cortex resumed its spontaneous cycling. We conclude that the experimentally observed similarities between spontaneous and evoked activity in visual cortex can be explained as the outcome of a learning process that associates external stimuli with a preexisting reservoir of autonomous neural activity states. Our findings

  5. Abnormal visual gain control in a Parkinson's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Afsari, Farinaz; Christensen, Kenneth V.; Smith, Garrick Paul; Hentzer, Morten; Nippe, Olivia M.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Wade, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been revolutionized by the discovery of disease-causing genetic mutations. The most common of these is the G2019S mutation in the LRRK2 kinase gene, which leads to increased kinase activity. However, the link between increased kinase activity and PD is unclear. Previously, we showed that dopaminergic expression of the human LRRK2-G2019S transgene in flies led to an activity-dependent loss of vision in older animals and we hypothesized that this may have been preceded by a failure to regulate neuronal activity correctly in younger animals. To test this hypothesis, we used a sensitive measure of visual function based on frequency-tagged steady-state visually evoked potentials. Spectral analysis allowed us to identify signals from multiple levels of the fly visual system and wild-type visual response curves were qualitatively similar to those from human cortex. Dopaminergic expression of hLRRK2-G2019S increased contrast sensitivity throughout the retinal network. To test whether this was due to increased kinase activity, we fed Drosophila with kinase inhibitors targeted at LRRK2. Contrast sensitivity in both day 1 and day 14 flies was normalized by a novel LRRK2 kinase inhibitor ‘BMPPB-32’. Biochemical and cellular assays suggested that BMPPB-32 would be a more specific kinase inhibitor than LRRK2-IN-1. We confirmed this in vivo, finding that dLRRK− null flies show large off-target effects with LRRK2-IN-1 but not BMPPB-32. Our data link the increased Kinase activity of the G2019S-LRRK2 mutation to neuronal dysfunction and demonstrate the power of the Drosophila visual system in assaying the neurological effects of genetic diseases and therapies. PMID:24718285

  6. Brain Growth Rate Abnormalities Visualized in Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Thompson, Paul M.; Leow, Alex D.; Madsen, Sarah K.; Caplan, Rochelle; Alger, Jeffry R.; O’Neill, Joseph; Joshi, Kishori; Smalley, Susan L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Levitt, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous disorder of brain development with wide-ranging cognitive deficits. Typically diagnosed before age 3, ASD is behaviorally defined but patients are thought to have protracted alterations in brain maturation. With longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we mapped an anomalous developmental trajectory of the brains of autistic compared to those of typically developing children and adolescents. Using tensor-based morphometry (TBM), we created 3D maps visualizing regional tissue growth rates based on longitudinal brain MRI scans of 13 autistic and 7 typically developing boys (mean age/inter-scan interval: autism 12.0 ± 2.3 years/2.9 ± 0.9 years; control 12.3 ± 2.4/2.8 ± 0.8). The typically developing boys demonstrated strong whole-brain white matter growth during this period, but the autistic boys showed abnormally slowed white matter development (p = 0.03, corrected), especially in the parietal (p = 0.008), temporal (p = 0.03) and occipital lobes (p =0.02). We also visualized abnormal overgrowth in autism in some gray matter structures, such as the putamen and anterior cingulate cortex. Our findings reveal aberrant growth rates in brain regions implicated in social impairment, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors in autism, suggesting that growth rate abnormalities persist into adolescence. TBM revealed persisting growth rate anomalies long after diagnosis, which has implications for evaluation of therapeutic effects. PMID:22021093

  7. Brain growth rate abnormalities visualized in adolescents with autism.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xue; Thompson, Paul M; Leow, Alex D; Madsen, Sarah K; Caplan, Rochelle; Alger, Jeffry R; O'Neill, Joseph; Joshi, Kishori; Smalley, Susan L; Toga, Arthur W; Levitt, Jennifer G

    2013-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a heterogeneous disorder of brain development with wide ranging cognitive deficits. Typically diagnosed before age 3, autism spectrum disorder is behaviorally defined but patients are thought to have protracted alterations in brain maturation. With longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we mapped an anomalous developmental trajectory of the brains of autistic compared with those of typically developing children and adolescents. Using tensor-based morphometry, we created 3D maps visualizing regional tissue growth rates based on longitudinal brain MRI scans of 13 autistic and seven typically developing boys (mean age/interscan interval: autism 12.0 ± 2.3 years/2.9 ± 0.9 years; control 12.3 ± 2.4/2.8 ± 0.8). The typically developing boys demonstrated strong whole brain white matter growth during this period, but the autistic boys showed abnormally slowed white matter development (P = 0.03, corrected), especially in the parietal (P = 0.008), temporal (P = 0.03), and occipital lobes (P = 0.02). We also visualized abnormal overgrowth in autism in gray matter structures such as the putamen and anterior cingulate cortex. Our findings reveal aberrant growth rates in brain regions implicated in social impairment, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors in autism, suggesting that growth rate abnormalities persist into adolescence. Tensor-based morphometry revealed persisting growth rate anomalies long after diagnosis, which has implications for evaluation of therapeutic effects.

  8. Functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and musical consonance in schizophrenia: evidence from an evoked potential study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated functional and structural temporal lobe abnormalities located close to the auditory cortical regions in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to determine whether functional abnormalities exist in the cortical processing of musical sound in schizophrenia. Methods Twelve schizophrenic patients and twelve age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited, and participants listened to a random sequence of two kinds of sonic entities, intervals (tritones and perfect fifths) and chords (atonal chords, diminished chords, and major triads), of varying degrees of complexity and consonance. The perception of musical sound was investigated by the auditory evoked potentials technique. Results Our results showed that schizophrenic patients exhibited significant reductions in the amplitudes of the N1 and P2 components elicited by musical stimuli, to which consonant sounds contributed more significantly than dissonant sounds. Schizophrenic patients could not perceive the dissimilarity between interval and chord stimuli based on the evoked potentials responses as compared with the healthy controls. Conclusion This study provided electrophysiological evidence of functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and music consonance in schizophrenia. The preliminary findings warrant further investigations for the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23721126

  9. Visual evoked potential: a diagnostic tool for the assessment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Zeneroli, M L; Pinelli, G; Gollini, G; Penne, A; Messori, E; Zani, G; Ventura, E

    1984-01-01

    Visual evoked potential recordings were examined in 45 liver cirrhosis patients with (n = 29) and without (n = 16) encephalopathy, in 15 normal volunteers, and in one patient with an opioid induced stupor state. Visual evoked potential parameters were classified on the basis of EEG recordings. Plasma concentrations of amino acids, octopamine, and ammonia were assayed in order to document the metabolic change of hepatic encephalopathy. Latencies and wave patterns recorded after flash stimulation differentiated the four degrees of the coma one from another according to EEG classification in the 29 patients with encephalopathy. In the group of 16 patients without clinical and EEG evidence of encephalopathy the visual potential recordings discriminated a group of patients (n = 10) in a preclinical stage of encephalopathy. Biochemical parameters and subsequent clinical observation of patients confirmed our judgement of a preclinical stage of encephalopathy. These results suggest that visual evoked potentials are a simple, suitable and objective method for differentiating the degrees of encephalopathy and for identifying the preclinical stage of encephalopathy. PMID:6421664

  10. Brainstem stimulation during sleep evokes abnormal rhythmic activity in thalamic neurons in feline penicillin epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szymusiak, R; Shouse, M N; McGinty, D

    1996-03-25

    Some periods in the sleep-waking cycle are more seizure prone than others. In absence epilepsy, transition periods between nonrapid-eye-movement (nonREM) sleep and waking or REM sleep can be more seizure prone that stable states. One feature of transition periods that is hypothesized to promote seizure activity is the presence of coincident activity in ascending brainstem reticular formation (RF) arousal systems with synchronized thalamo-cortical activity. To evaluate this hypothesis we examined the state-dependent effects of low intensity RF stimulation on thalamic single unit activity in control conditions and following systemic penicillin-G administration to adult cats. In control conditions, RF stimulation during waking and REM sleep typically evoked a short-latency action potential in thalamic neurons. The same stimulation during nonREM sleep commonly evoked a high frequency burst of action potentials followed by a period of suppressed discharge. In 16/26 neurons, a second rebound burst of action potentials followed the period of discharge suppression. The average interval between the initial and rebound bursts was 75.1 +/- 6.0 ms, which was similar to the interburst interval recorded in these same cells during spontaneous EEG spindles. Following administration of penicillin-G, RF stimulation during nonREM sleep evoked high frequency burst firing, followed by 1-2 rebound bursts in 21/22 thalamic neurons. The average evoked interburst interval was 152.5 +/- 7.3 ms, a value comparable to the interburst interval displayed by these same cells during spontaneous spike-wave seizure activity (157.8 +/- 8.7 ms). RF-evoked rhythmic discharges were dependent upon the presence of thalamocortical synchronization, as responses evoked during waking and REM sleep in penicillin treated cats were similar to those observed in control conditions.

  11. Inattentional Deafness: Visual Load Leads to Time-Specific Suppression of Auditory Evoked Responses

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Katharine; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Lavie, Nilli

    2015-01-01

    Due to capacity limits on perception, conditions of high perceptual load lead to reduced processing of unattended stimuli (Lavie et al., 2014). Accumulating work demonstrates the effects of visual perceptual load on visual cortex responses, but the effects on auditory processing remain poorly understood. Here we establish the neural mechanisms underlying “inattentional deafness”—the failure to perceive auditory stimuli under high visual perceptual load. Participants performed a visual search task of low (target dissimilar to nontarget items) or high (target similar to nontarget items) load. On a random subset (50%) of trials, irrelevant tones were presented concurrently with the visual stimuli. Brain activity was recorded with magnetoencephalography, and time-locked responses to the visual search array and to the incidental presence of unattended tones were assessed. High, compared to low, perceptual load led to increased early visual evoked responses (within 100 ms from onset). This was accompanied by reduced early (∼100 ms from tone onset) auditory evoked activity in superior temporal sulcus and posterior middle temporal gyrus. A later suppression of the P3 “awareness” response to the tones was also observed under high load. A behavioral experiment revealed reduced tone detection sensitivity under high visual load, indicating that the reduction in neural responses was indeed associated with reduced awareness of the sounds. These findings support a neural account of shared audiovisual resources, which, when depleted under load, leads to failures of sensory perception and awareness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present work clarifies the neural underpinning of inattentional deafness under high visual load. The findings of near-simultaneous load effects on both visual and auditory evoked responses suggest shared audiovisual processing capacity. Temporary depletion of shared capacity in perceptually demanding visual tasks leads to a momentary reduction in

  12. Analytical comparison of transient and steady state visual evoked cortical potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K. M.; Kleinman, D. L.; Mcclurg, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    To better describe the linear-dynamic properties of the human visual-cortical response system, transient and steady state Visual Evoked Response Potentials (VERP) were observed. The stimulus presentation device provided both the evoking stimulus (flickering or pulsing lights) and a video task display. The steady state stimulus was modulated by a complex, ten frequency, sum-of-sines, wave. The transient VERP was the time-locked average of the EEG to a series of narrow light pulses (pulse width of 10 msec). The Fourier transform of the averaged pulses had properties that approximate band limited white noise, i.e., a flat spectrum over the frequency region spanned by the 10 summed sines. The Fourier transform of both the steady state and the transient evoked potentials resulted in transfer that are equivalent and therefore comparable. To investigate the effects of task loading on evoked potentials, a grammatical reasoning task was provided. Results support the relevancy of continued application of a systems engineering approach for describing neurosensory functioning.

  13. Stimulus novelty, task relevance and the visual evoked potential in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchesne, E.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of task relevance on P3 (waveform of human evoked potential) waves and the methodologies used to deal with them are outlined. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from normal adult subjects performing in a visual discrimination task. Subjects counted the number of presentations of the numeral 4 which was interposed rarely and randomly within a sequence of tachistoscopically flashed background stimuli. Intrusive, task-irrelevant (not counted) stimuli were also interspersed rarely and randomly in the sequence of 2s; these stimuli were of two types: simples, which were easily recognizable, and novels, which were completely unrecognizable. It was found that the simples and the counted 4s evoked posteriorly distributed P3 waves while the irrelevant novels evoked large, frontally distributed P3 waves. These large, frontal P3 waves to novels were also found to be preceded by large N2 waves. These findings indicate that the P3 wave is not a unitary phenomenon but should be considered in terms of a family of waves, differing in their brain generators and in their psychological correlates.

  14. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

    PubMed

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  15. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern.

    PubMed

    Duncum, A J F; Atkins, K J; Beilharz, F L; Mundy, M E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder.

  16. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, A. J. F.; Atkins, K. J.; Beilharz, F. L.; Mundy, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder. PMID:27152128

  17. Bogus visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain in people with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Daniel S; Broecker, Markus; Smith, Ross T; Meulders, Ann; Madden, Victoria J; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2015-04-01

    Pain is a protective perceptual response shaped by contextual, psychological, and sensory inputs that suggest danger to the body. Sensory cues suggesting that a body part is moving toward a painful position may credibly signal the threat and thereby modulate pain. In this experiment, we used virtual reality to investigate whether manipulating visual proprioceptive cues could alter movement-evoked pain in 24 people with neck pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur at a lesser degree of head rotation when visual feedback overstated true rotation and at a greater degree of rotation when visual feedback understated true rotation. Our hypothesis was clearly supported: When vision overstated the amount of rotation, pain occurred at 7% less rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback, and when vision understated rotation, pain occurred at 6% greater rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback. We concluded that visual-proprioceptive information modulated the threshold for movement-evoked pain, which suggests that stimuli that become associated with pain can themselves trigger pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Altering Visual Perception Abnormalities: A Marker for Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, Anna J. F.; Mundy, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    The body image concern (BIC) continuum ranges from a healthy and positive body image, to clinical diagnoses of abnormal body image, like body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). BDD and non-clinical, yet high-BIC participants have demonstrated a local visual processing bias, characterised by reduced inversion effects. To examine whether this bias is a potential marker of BDD, the visual processing of individuals across the entire BIC continuum was examined. Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ; quantified BIC) scores were expected to correlate with higher discrimination accuracy and faster reaction times of inverted stimuli, indicating reduced inversion effects (occurring due to increased local visual processing). Additionally, an induced global or local processing bias via Navon stimulus presentation was expected to alter these associations. Seventy-four participants completed the DCQ and upright-inverted face and body stimulus discrimination task. Moderate positive associations were revealed between DCQ scores and accuracy rates for inverted face and body stimuli, indicating a graded local bias accompanying increases in BIC. This relationship supports a local processing bias as a marker for BDD, which has significant assessment implications. Furthermore, a moderate negative relationship was found between DCQ score and inverted face accuracy after inducing global processing, indicating the processing bias can temporarily be reversed in high BIC individuals. Navon stimuli were successfully able to alter the visual processing of individuals across the BIC continuum, which has important implications for treating BDD. PMID:27003715

  19. [A preliminary study of synchronous evoked potential in newborn-infant auditory and visual function test].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Yi-sheng; Han, De-min; Nie, Wen-ying; Lin, Qian; Gong, Lu-xia

    2003-08-25

    The purpose of this study is to bring out the consultable laboratory values of synchronous evoked potential in normal neonates and infants, investigate the characteristic of the electric response waveform, and explore its feasibility on applying to newborn auditory and visual function test as an electric physiology detection method. It was applied to go on measuring 19 cases of mature normal neonate (< or =4 days) and 11 cases of infants (< or =5 months), also comparing with the study of ABRs, FVEPs independently. Get the electric response wave form results of synchronous electric evoked potential in both groups of newborn-infants, through comparing with the result of independent ABRs and FVEPs, the monitoring result demonstrated that there were an extreme significant changes of the corresponding parameters (wave I, III, V latency) (P<0.01), and there were no significant changes of I-III, III-V interwave latency (P>0.05); it also shows that ABRs impact on FVEPs in N2 wave latency of newborn group and P1 wave latency of infant group (P<0.01). Auditory and vision pathway may be had communicated information by the neuron in the center. The technology of the auditory and visual synchronous evoked potential brings out the whole new electric physiology detection tools, it will definitely offer powerful technical support in step for newborn-infant auditory and visual function test.

  20. Lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials in analytic information processing style: evidence in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Toscano, M; Puledda, F; Avanzini, G; Di Clemente, L; Di Sabato, F; Di Piero, V

    2015-03-01

    Habituation is considered one of the most basic mechanisms of learning. Habituation deficit to several sensory stimulations has been defined as a trait of migraine brain and also observed in other disorders. On the other hand, analytic information processing style is characterized by the habit of continually evaluating stimuli and it has been associated with migraine. We investigated a possible correlation between lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials and analytic cognitive style in healthy subjects. According to Sternberg-Wagner self-assessment inventory, 15 healthy volunteers (HV) with high analytic score and 15 HV with high global score were recruited. Both groups underwent visual evoked potentials recordings after psychological evaluation. We observed significant lack of habituation in analytical individuals compared to global group. In conclusion, a reduced habituation of visual evoked potentials has been observed in analytic subjects. Our results suggest that further research should be undertaken regarding the relationship between analytic cognitive style and lack of habituation in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Lateral geniculate body evoked potentials elicited by visual and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Wook; Kim, Pan Sang; Shin, Sun Ae; Yang, Ji Yeon; Yang, Yun Sik

    2014-08-01

    Blind individuals who have photoreceptor loss are known to perceive phosphenes with electrical stimulation of their remaining retinal ganglion cells. We proposed that implantable lateral geniculate body (LGB) stimulus electrode arrays could be used to generate phosphene vision. We attempted to refine the basic reference of the electrical evoked potentials (EEPs) elicited by microelectrical stimulations of the optic nerve, optic tract and LGB of a domestic pig, and then compared it to visual evoked potentials (VEPs) elicited by short-flash stimuli. For visual function measurement, VEPs in response to short-flash stimuli on the left eye of the domestic pig were assessed over the visual cortex at position Oz with the reference electrode at Fz. After anesthesia, linearly configured platinum wire electrodes were inserted into the optic nerve, optic track and LGB. To determine the optimal stimulus current, EEPs were recorded repeatedly with controlling the pulse and power. The threshold of current and charge density to elicit EEPs at 0.3 ms pulse duration was about ±10 µA. Our experimental results showed that visual cortex activity can be effectively evoked by stimulation of the optic nerve, optic tract and LGB using penetrating electrodes. The latency of P1 was more shortened as the electrical stimulation was closer to LGB. The EEPs of two-channel in the visual cortex demonstrated a similar pattern with stimulation of different spots of the stimulating electrodes. We found that the LGB-stimulated EEP pattern was very similar to the simultaneously generated VEP on the control side, although implicit time deferred. EEPs and VEPs derived from visual-system stimulation were compared. The LGB-stimulated EEP wave demonstrated a similar pattern to the VEP waveform except implicit time, indicating prosthetic-based electrical stimulation of the LGB could be utilized for the blind to perceive vision of phosphenes.

  2. Optical imaging of visual cortical responses evoked by transcorneal electrical stimulation with different parameters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zengguang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Pengcheng; Li, Liming; Lu, Yiliang; Yan, Yan; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2014-07-31

    The use of phosphenes evoked by transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) has been proposed as a means of residual visual function evaluation and candidate selection before implantation of retinal prostheses. Compared to the subjective measures, measurement of neuronal activity in visual cortex can objectively and quantitatively explore their response properties to electrical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate systematically the properties of cortical responses evoked by TcES. The visual cortical responses were recorded using a multiwavelength optical imaging of intrinsic signals (OIS) combining with electrophysiological recording by a multichannel electrode array. The effects of different parameters of TcES on cortical responses, including the changes of hemoglobin oxygenation and cerebral blood volume, were examined. We found consistent OIS activation regions in visual cortex after TcES, which also showed strong evoked field potentials according to electrophysiological results. The OIS response regions were located mainly in cortical areas representing peripheral visual field. The extent of activation areas and strength of intrinsic signals were increased with higher current intensities and longer pulse widths, and the largest responses were acquired in the frequency range 10 to 20 Hz. Use of TcES through the ERG-jet corneal electrode may preferentially activate peripheral retina. Revealing the hemodynamic changes in visual cortex occurred after electrical stimulation can contribute to comprehension of neurophysiological underpinnings underlying prosthetic vision. This study provided an objective foundation for optimizing parameters of TcES and would bring considerable benefits in the application of TcES for assessment and screening in patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  3. Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potential (SSMVEP) Based on Equal Luminance Colored Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenqiang; Xu, Guanghua; Li, Min; Xie, Jun; Han, Chengcheng; Zhang, Sicong; Luo, Ailing; Chen, Chaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the typical stimulation paradigms of brain-computer interface (BCI). It has become a research approach to improve the performance of human-computer interaction, because of its advantages including multiple objectives, less recording electrodes for electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, and strong anti-interference capacity. Traditional SSVEP using light flicker stimulation may cause visual fatigue with a consequent reduction of recognition accuracy. To avoid the negative impacts on the brain response caused by prolonged strong visual stimulation for SSVEP, steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP) stimulation method was used in this study by an equal-luminance colored ring-shaped checkerboard paradigm. The movement patterns of the checkerboard included contraction and expansion, which produced less discomfort to subjects. Feature recognition algorithms based on power spectrum density (PSD) peak was used to identify the peak frequency on PSD in response to visual stimuli. Results demonstrated that the equal-luminance red-green stimulating paradigm within the low frequency spectrum (lower than 15 Hz) produced higher power of SSMVEP and recognition accuracy than black-white stimulating paradigm. PSD-based SSMVEP recognition accuracy was 88.15±6.56%. There was no statistical difference between canonical correlation analysis (CCA) (86.57±5.37%) and PSD on recognition accuracy. This study demonstrated that equal-luminance colored ring-shaped checkerboard visual stimulation evoked SSMVEP with better SNR on low frequency spectrum of power density and improved the interactive performance of BCI.

  4. Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potential (SSMVEP) Based on Equal Luminance Colored Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengcheng; Zhang, Sicong; Luo, Ailing; Chen, Chaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the typical stimulation paradigms of brain-computer interface (BCI). It has become a research approach to improve the performance of human-computer interaction, because of its advantages including multiple objectives, less recording electrodes for electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, and strong anti-interference capacity. Traditional SSVEP using light flicker stimulation may cause visual fatigue with a consequent reduction of recognition accuracy. To avoid the negative impacts on the brain response caused by prolonged strong visual stimulation for SSVEP, steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP) stimulation method was used in this study by an equal-luminance colored ring-shaped checkerboard paradigm. The movement patterns of the checkerboard included contraction and expansion, which produced less discomfort to subjects. Feature recognition algorithms based on power spectrum density (PSD) peak was used to identify the peak frequency on PSD in response to visual stimuli. Results demonstrated that the equal-luminance red-green stimulating paradigm within the low frequency spectrum (lower than 15 Hz) produced higher power of SSMVEP and recognition accuracy than black-white stimulating paradigm. PSD-based SSMVEP recognition accuracy was 88.15±6.56%. There was no statistical difference between canonical correlation analysis (CCA) (86.57±5.37%) and PSD on recognition accuracy. This study demonstrated that equal-luminance colored ring-shaped checkerboard visual stimulation evoked SSMVEP with better SNR on low frequency spectrum of power density and improved the interactive performance of BCI. PMID:28060906

  5. Influence of body temperature on the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Kalatsky, Valery A

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals and conventional electrophysiological methods were used to investigate the correlation between the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex and core body temperature. The results show that hypothermia (25-36 °C) decreases the intensity of optical imaging in the visual cortex and the imaging signal reversibly disappears at 25 °C. Hyperthermia (39-41 °C) increases the intensity but decreases the quality of cortical imaging when body temperature is above 40 °C. The change of optical imaging was in line with that of neuronal activities and local field potentials (LFPs) directly recorded from the visual cortex at 25-39 °C. Hypothermia decreases neuron firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Most of the recorded neurons ceased firing to visual stimulation at 25 °C. Hyperthermia increases neuronal firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Both are reduced when body temperature is above 40 °C, though neither change was statistically significant. These results suggest: (1) Body temperature has an important impact on the visual cortical evoked activities and optical imaging generally reflects these effects when body temperature is between 25 and 39 °C; (2) Optical imaging may not properly reflect the neuronal activity when body temperature is over 40 °C. It is important to maintain core body temperature within 3 °C of the normal body temperature to obtain verifiable results.

  6. Steady-state visual evoked potentials in the low frequency range in migraine: a study of habituation and variability phenomena.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Schoffelen, Jan Mathijs; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Sardaro, Michele; Pellicoro, Mario; Puca, Franco Michele

    2003-08-01

    Previous studies have revealed that migraine patients display an increased photic driving to flash stimuli in the medium frequency range. The aim of this study was to perform a topographic analysis of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SVEPs) in the low frequency range (3-9 Hz), evaluating the temporal behaviour of the F1 amplitude by investigating habituation and variability phenomena. The main component of SVEPs, the F1, demonstrated an increased amplitude in several channels at 3 Hz. Behaviour of F1 amplitude was rather variable over time, and the wavelet-transform standard deviation was increased in migraine patients at a low stimulus rate. The discriminative value of the F1 mean amplitude and variability index, tested by both an artificial neural network classifier and a support vector machine, were high according to both methods. The increased photic driving in migraine should be subtended by a more generic abnormality of visual reactivity instead of a selective impairment of a visual subsystem. Temporal behaviour of SVEPs is not influenced by a clear tendency to habituation, but the F1 amplitude seemed to change in a complex way, which is better described by variability phenomena. An increased variability in response to flicker stimuli in migraine patients could be interpreted as an overactive regulation mechanism, prone to instability and consequently to headache attacks, whether spontaneous or triggered.

  7. Isolation of components due to intracortical processing in the visual evoked potential.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, J D

    1986-01-01

    A class of stochastic visual textures are used to analyze the components of the visual evoked potential (VEP). This procedure exploits the differential sensitivity of populations of visual neurons to aspects of contrast and pattern. A simple transformation of VEP responses elicited by these stimuli separates components that reflect complex aspects of visual processing from those that reflect elementary aspects. Simultaneous recordings of the VEP and cellular activity in the cat lateral geniculate nucleus are obtained. Responses to traditional VEP stimuli contain a mixture of intracortically generated and precortically generated components. A theoretical and experimental analysis demonstrates that the present approach cleanly separates intracortical generators of the VEP from precortical generators. Images PMID:3464015

  8. A periodogram-based method for the detection of steady-state visually evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Liavas, A P; Moustakides, G V; Henning, G; Psarakis, E Z; Husar, P

    1998-02-01

    The task of objective perimetry is to scan the visual field and find an answer about the function of the visual system. Flicker-burst stimulation--a physiological sensible combination of transient and steady-state stimulation--is used to generate deterministic sinusoidal responses or visually evoked potentials (VEP's) at the visual cortex, which are derived from the electroencephalogram by a suitable electrode array. In this paper we develop a new method for the detection of VEP's. Based on the periodogram of a time-series, we test the data for the presence of hidden periodic components, which correspond to steady-state VEP's. The method is applied successfully to real data.

  9. Does athletic training in volleyball modulate the components of visual evoked potentials? A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Zwierko, Teresa; Lubiński, Wojciech; Lesiakowski, Piotr; Steciuk, Hanna; Piasecki, Leszek; Krzepota, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 11 young female volleyball players who participated in extensive training for 2 years. The control group consisted of 7 age-matched female students who were not involved in any regular sports activity. Recordings of VEPs were performed twice: baseline recording (i.e., before training began) and after 2 years of systematic, volleyball-specific athletic training. The effect of athletic training on visual signal conductivity was assessed by recording the latency of N75, P100 and N135 components of the VEPs waveform. Extensive experience with volleyball training reduced signal conductivity time through visual pathway. Specifically, the latency of P100 was reduced on average by 2.2 ms during binocular viewing. Moreover, athletes had reduced N75 latency (difference of 3.3 ms) for visual stimuli that generated greater response from peripheral retina. These results indicate that sport training can affect very early sensory processing in athletes.

  10. Abnormalities in visual processing amongst students with body image concerns

    PubMed Central

    Mundy E., Matthew; Sadusky, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they observe and discriminate visual information. A pre-occupation with perceived defects in appearance has been attributed to a local visual processing bias. We studied the nature of visual bias in individuals who may be at risk of developing BDD – those with high body image concerns (BICs) – by using inverted stimulus discrimination. Inversion disrupts global, configural information in favor of local, feature-based processing. 40 individuals with high BIC and 40 low BIC controls performed a discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, bodies, and scenes. Individuals with high BIC discriminated inverted faces and bodies faster than controls, and were also more accurate when discriminating inverted bodies and scenes. This reduction in inversion effect for high BIC individuals may be due to a stimulus-general local, detail-focused processing bias, which may be associated with maladaptive fixation on small features in their appearance. PMID:25157299

  11. Trajectories of shifting dipole sources of visual evoked potentials across the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, E S; Zhila, A V; Slavutskaya, A V; Kulikov, M A; Shevelev, I A

    2008-11-01

    Visual evoked potentials in response to images of a set of horizontal and vertical lines or crosses were recorded from the brains of 18 human subjects in 34 leads. Inverse EEG analyses were used for the dynamic location of the dipole current sources of the N1, P1, and N2 waves using a two-dipole spherical model with a 1-msec step. The occipital lobes of all subjects showed significant displacement of the dipoles of evoked potential waves along predominantly arc-shaped trajectories (75.8% of cases). Trajectory durations (average about 25 msec) were characterized by insignificant interindividual variability and were independent of the type of stimulus and the phase of the evoked potential. A characteristic (occurring in 85% of cases) "jump" in the coordinates of the dipole, which constituted a rapid, sharp, and significant medial displacement, was seen between the first and second trajectories of the equivalent current dipoles (at 110-120 msec after stimulus onset). The possible significance of these data for understanding the dynamics and kinetics of processing of local image features in the human visual cortex is discussed.

  12. Color vision in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A pilot visual evoked potential study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyeon; Banaschewski, Tobias; Tannock, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are reported to manifest visual problems (including ophthalmological and color perception, particularly for blue–yellow stimuli), but findings are inconsistent. Accordingly, this study investigated visual function and color perception in adolescents with ADHD using color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which provides an objective measure of color perception. Method Thirty-one adolescents (aged 13–18), 16 with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD, and 15 healthy peers, matched for age, gender, and IQ participated in the study. All underwent an ophthalmological exam, as well as electrophysiological testing color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which measured the latency and amplitude of the neural P1 response to chromatic (blue–yellow, red–green) and achromatic stimuli. Result No intergroup differences were found in the ophthalmological exam. However, significantly larger P1 amplitude was found for blue and yellow stimuli, but not red/green or achromatic stimuli, in the ADHD group (particularly in the medicated group) compared to controls. Conclusion Larger amplitude in the P1 component for blue–yellow in the ADHD group compared to controls may account for the lack of difference in color perception tasks. We speculate that the larger amplitude for blue–yellow stimuli in early sensory processing (P1) might reflect a compensatory strategy for underlying problems including compromised retinal input of s-cones due to hypo-dopaminergic tone. PMID:25435188

  13. Color vision in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot visual evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeon; Banaschewski, Tobias; Tannock, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are reported to manifest visual problems (including ophthalmological and color perception, particularly for blue-yellow stimuli), but findings are inconsistent. Accordingly, this study investigated visual function and color perception in adolescents with ADHD using color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which provides an objective measure of color perception. Thirty-one adolescents (aged 13-18), 16 with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD, and 15 healthy peers, matched for age, gender, and IQ participated in the study. All underwent an ophthalmological exam, as well as electrophysiological testing color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which measured the latency and amplitude of the neural P1 response to chromatic (blue-yellow, red-green) and achromatic stimuli. No intergroup differences were found in the ophthalmological exam. However, significantly larger P1 amplitude was found for blue and yellow stimuli, but not red/green or achromatic stimuli, in the ADHD group (particularly in the medicated group) compared to controls. Larger amplitude in the P1 component for blue-yellow in the ADHD group compared to controls may account for the lack of difference in color perception tasks. We speculate that the larger amplitude for blue-yellow stimuli in early sensory processing (P1) might reflect a compensatory strategy for underlying problems including compromised retinal input of s-cones due to hypo-dopaminergic tone. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Visual Speech on Early Auditory Evoked Fields - From the Viewpoint of Individual Variance.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Izumi; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    The effects of visual speech (the moving image of the speaker's face uttering speech sound) on early auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were examined using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 12 healthy volunteers (9 males, mean age 35.5 years). AEFs (N100m) in response to the monosyllabic sound /be/ were recorded and analyzed under three different visual stimulus conditions, the moving image of the same speaker's face uttering /be/ (congruent visual stimuli) or uttering /ge/ (incongruent visual stimuli), and visual noise (still image processed from speaker's face using a strong Gaussian filter: control condition). On average, latency of N100m was significantly shortened in the bilateral hemispheres for both congruent and incongruent auditory/visual (A/V) stimuli, compared to the control A/V condition. However, the degree of N100m shortening was not significantly different between the congruent and incongruent A/V conditions, despite the significant differences in psychophysical responses between these two A/V conditions. Moreover, analysis of the magnitudes of these visual effects on AEFs in individuals showed that the lip-reading effects on AEFs tended to be well correlated between the two different audio-visual conditions (congruent vs. incongruent visual stimuli) in the bilateral hemispheres but were not significantly correlated between right and left hemisphere. On the other hand, no significant correlation was observed between the magnitudes of visual speech effects and psychophysical responses. These results may indicate that the auditory-visual interaction observed on the N100m is a fundamental process which does not depend on the congruency of the visual information.

  15. Effects of Visual Speech on Early Auditory Evoked Fields - From the Viewpoint of Individual Variance

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Izumi; Kanno, Akitake; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    The effects of visual speech (the moving image of the speaker’s face uttering speech sound) on early auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were examined using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 12 healthy volunteers (9 males, mean age 35.5 years). AEFs (N100m) in response to the monosyllabic sound /be/ were recorded and analyzed under three different visual stimulus conditions, the moving image of the same speaker’s face uttering /be/ (congruent visual stimuli) or uttering /ge/ (incongruent visual stimuli), and visual noise (still image processed from speaker’s face using a strong Gaussian filter: control condition). On average, latency of N100m was significantly shortened in the bilateral hemispheres for both congruent and incongruent auditory/visual (A/V) stimuli, compared to the control A/V condition. However, the degree of N100m shortening was not significantly different between the congruent and incongruent A/V conditions, despite the significant differences in psychophysical responses between these two A/V conditions. Moreover, analysis of the magnitudes of these visual effects on AEFs in individuals showed that the lip-reading effects on AEFs tended to be well correlated between the two different audio-visual conditions (congruent vs. incongruent visual stimuli) in the bilateral hemispheres but were not significantly correlated between right and left hemisphere. On the other hand, no significant correlation was observed between the magnitudes of visual speech effects and psychophysical responses. These results may indicate that the auditory-visual interaction observed on the N100m is a fundamental process which does not depend on the congruency of the visual information. PMID:28141836

  16. Effect of higher frequency on the classification of steady-state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Dong-Ok; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Dähne, Sven; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Most existing brain-computer interface (BCI) designs based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) primarily use low frequency visual stimuli (e.g., <20 Hz) to elicit relatively high SSVEP amplitudes. While low frequency stimuli could evoke photosensitivity-based epileptic seizures, high frequency stimuli generally show less visual fatigue and no stimulus-related seizures. The fundamental objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on the usability of an SSVEP-based BCI system. Approach. We developed an SSVEP-based BCI speller using multiple LEDs flickering with low frequencies (6-14.9 Hz) with a duty-cycle of 50%, or higher frequencies (26-34.7 Hz) with duty-cycles of 50%, 60%, and 70%. The four different experimental conditions were tested with 26 subjects in order to investigate the impact of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on performance and visual fatigue, and evaluated with a questionnaire survey. Resting state alpha powers were utilized to interpret our results from the neurophysiological point of view. Main results. The stimulation method employing higher frequencies not only showed less visual fatigue, but it also showed higher and more stable classification performance compared to that employing relatively lower frequencies. Different duty-cycles in the higher frequency stimulation conditions did not significantly affect visual fatigue, but a duty-cycle of 50% was a better choice with respect to performance. The performance of the higher frequency stimulation method was also less susceptible to resting state alpha powers, while that of the lower frequency stimulation method was negatively correlated with alpha powers. Significance. These results suggest that the use of higher frequency visual stimuli is more beneficial for performance improvement and stability as time passes when developing practical SSVEP-based BCI applications.

  17. Optical and electrical recording of neural activity evoked by graded contrast visual stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rovati, Luigi; Salvatori, Giorgia; Bulf, Luca; Fonda, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Background Brain activity has been investigated by several methods with different principles, notably optical ones. Each method may offer information on distinct physiological or pathological aspects of brain function. The ideal instrument to measure brain activity should include complementary techniques and integrate the resultant information. As a "low cost" approach towards this objective, we combined the well-grounded electroencephalography technique with the newer near infrared spectroscopy methods to investigate human visual function. Methods The article describes an embedded instrumentation combining a continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy system and an electroencephalography system to simultaneously monitor functional hemodynamics and electrical activity. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal depends on the light absorption spectra of haemoglobin and measures the blood volume and blood oxygenation regulation supporting the neural activity. The NIRS and visual evoked potential (VEP) are concurrently acquired during steady state visual stimulation, at 8 Hz, with a b/w "windmill" pattern, in nine human subjects. The pattern contrast is varied (1%, 10%, 100%) according to a stimulation protocol. Results In this study, we present the measuring system; the results consist in concurrent recordings of hemodynamic changes and evoked potential responses emerging from different contrast levels of a patterned stimulus. The concentration of [HbO2] increases and [HHb] decreases after the onset of the stimulus. Their variation shows a clear relationship with the contrast value: large contrast produce huge difference in concentration, while low contrast provokes small concentration difference. This behaviour is similar to the already known relationship between VEP response amplitude and contrast. Conclusion The simultaneous recording and analysis of NIRS and VEP signals in humans during visual stimulation with a b/w pattern at variable contrast, demonstrates a

  18. Spatial smoothing of canonical correlation analysis for steady state visual evoked potential based brain computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shingo; Higashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Nakauchi, Shigeki; Minami, Tetsuto

    2016-08-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is a system for communication between people and computers via brain activity. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), a brain response observed in EEG, are evoked by flickering stimuli. SSVEP is one of the promising paradigms for BCI. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is widely used for EEG signal processing in SSVEP-based BCIs. However, the classification accuracy of CCA with short signal length is low. In order to solve the problem, we propose a regularization which works in such a way that the CCA spatial filter becomes spatially smooth to give robustness in short signal length condition. The spatial filter is designed in a parameter space spanned by a spatially smooth basis which are given by a graph Fourier transform of three dimensional electrode coordinates. We compared the classification accuracy of the proposed regularized CCA with the standard CCA. The result shows that the proposed CCA outperforms the standard CCA in short signal length condition.

  19. Grating visual evoked cortical potentials in the evaluation of laser bioeffects: instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Randolph, D I; Lund, D J; Van Sice, C W; Esgandarian, G E

    1982-12-01

    A system was designed to permit simultaneous viewing of the ocular fundus of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the accurate placement of laser radiation on the retina, and the stimulation of the site to produce a grating visual evoked cortical potential (VECP). A fundus camera was modified to incorporate a grating whose image was projected onto the retina at specific locations. The evoked potential could thus be obtained for any rate of alternation before, during, and after the exposure of the fovea to any one of many laser sources. An example is shown of the use of this system to monitor the grating VECP before and after exposure of the animal's fundus to a 900 nm gallium arsenide laser source for 60 sec. In this case, changes were observed in the variability of the latency of components of the VECP when compared to the prelaser exposure potentials.

  20. Grating visual evoked cortical potentials in the evaluation of laser bioeffects: instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, D.I.; Lund, D.J.; Van Sice, C.W.; Esgandarian, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    A system was designed to permit simultaneous viewing of the ocular fundus of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the accurate placement of laser radiation on the retina, and the stimulation of the site to produce a grating visual evoked cortical potential (VECP). A fundus camera was modified to incorporate a grating whose image was projected onto the retina at specific locations. The evoked potential could thus be obtained for any rate of alternation before, during, and after the exposure of the fovea to any one of many laser sources. An example is shown of the use of this system to monitor the grating VECP before and after exposure of the animal's fundus to a 900 nm gallium arsenide laser source for 60 sec. In this case, changes were observed in the variability of the latency of components of the VECP when compared to the prelaser exposure potentials.

  1. Stimulus novelty, task relevance and the visual evoked potential in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchesne, E.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) to rare, task-relevant (counted) numerical stimuli was compared with VEPs to rare, task-irrelevant stimuli, both being randomly interspersed within a sequence of tachistoscopically-flashed background numbers. These task-irrelevant stimuli were of two classes: (1) easily recognizable (e.g., simple geometric shapes) and (2) completely novel (i.e., complex, colorful abstract-type drawings which were unrecognizable). It was found that such novel stimuli did, in fact, evoke large P3 waves, but they had different scalp distributions from those which followed the task-relevant stimuli. This indicates that at least two types of late positive P3 waves exist, differing both in brain source and psychological correlates.

  2. Single sweep analysis of visual evoked potentials through a model of parametric identification.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, S; Baselli, G; Liberati, D; Pavesi, G

    1987-01-01

    An original method is presented for the single sweep analysis of visual evoked potentials (VEP's). The introduced algorithm bases upon an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) modeling. A Least Squares procedure estimates the coefficients of the model and allows to obtain a complete black-box description of the signal generation mechanism, besides providing a filtered version of the single sweep potential. The performance of the algorithm is verified on proper simulation tests and the experimental results put into evidence the noticeable improvement of signal-to-noise ratio with a consequent better recognition of the classical parameters of the peaks (latencies and amplitudes). The possibility of measuring these parameters on a single sweep basis enables to evaluate the dynamics of the Central Nervous System response during the entire course of the examination. A classification of the estimated evoked potentials in a small number of subsets, on the basis of their morphology, is also possible.

  3. Sparse Coding Can Predict Primary Visual Cortex Receptive Field Changes Induced by Abnormal Visual Input

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Jonathan J.; Dayan, Peter; Goodhill, Geoffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Receptive fields acquired through unsupervised learning of sparse representations of natural scenes have similar properties to primary visual cortex (V1) simple cell receptive fields. However, what drives in vivo development of receptive fields remains controversial. The strongest evidence for the importance of sensory experience in visual development comes from receptive field changes in animals reared with abnormal visual input. However, most sparse coding accounts have considered only normal visual input and the development of monocular receptive fields. Here, we applied three sparse coding models to binocular receptive field development across six abnormal rearing conditions. In every condition, the changes in receptive field properties previously observed experimentally were matched to a similar and highly faithful degree by all the models, suggesting that early sensory development can indeed be understood in terms of an impetus towards sparsity. As previously predicted in the literature, we found that asymmetries in inter-ocular correlation across orientations lead to orientation-specific binocular receptive fields. Finally we used our models to design a novel stimulus that, if present during rearing, is predicted by the sparsity principle to lead robustly to radically abnormal receptive fields. PMID:23675290

  4. Comparison of visual evoked potentials elicited by light-emitting diodes and TV monitor stimulation in patients with multiple sclerosis and potentially related conditions.

    PubMed

    Andersson, T; Sidén, A

    1994-11-01

    Visual evoked potentials elicited by reversal of a checkerboard pattern constructed of square, red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were compared with a conventional black and white pattern displayed on a TV monitor in control subjects and in 71 patients with established or suspected multiple sclerosis. Both stimuli elicited distinct responses in the control groups: the latencies were longer with LED stimulation while the amplitudes of the various components were differently altered. The frequency of abnormal responses among the patients was higher with LED stimulation than with TV stimulation, but the highest diagnostic yield was obtained when both methods were combined.

  5. The Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Visual Evoked Potentials in Professional Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melinda L.; Croft, Rodney J.; Owens, Katherine; Pierce, Robert J.; Kennedy, Gerard A.; Crewther, David; Howard, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    RJ; Kennedy GA; Crewther D; Howard ME. The effect of acute sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials in professional drivers. SLEEP 2008;31(9):1261-1269. PMID:18788651

  6. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7–36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs. PMID:24828128

  7. The mouse model of Down syndrome Ts65Dn presents visual deficits as assessed by pattern visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Scott-McKean, Jonah Jacob; Chang, Bo; Hurd, Ronald E; Nusinowitz, Steven; Schmidt, Cecilia; Davisson, Muriel T; Costa, Alberto C S

    2010-06-01

    The Ts65Dn mouse is the most complete widely available animal model of Down syndrome (DS). Quantitative information was generated about visual function in the Ts65Dn mouse by investigating their visual capabilities by means of electroretinography (ERG) and patterned visual evoked potentials (pVEPs). pVEPs were recorded directly from specific regions of the binocular visual cortex of anesthetized mice in response to horizontal sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency, contrast, and luminance generated by a specialized video card and presented on a 21-in. computer display suitably linearized by gamma correction. ERG assessments indicated no significant deficit in retinal physiology in Ts65Dn mice compared with euploid control mice. The Ts65Dn mice were found to exhibit deficits in luminance threshold, spatial resolution, and contrast threshold, compared with the euploid control mice. The behavioral counterparts of these parameters are luminance sensitivity, visual acuity, and the inverse of contrast sensitivity, respectively. DS includes various phenotypes associated with the visual system, including deficits in visual acuity, accommodation, and contrast sensitivity. The present study provides electrophysiological evidence of visual deficits in Ts65Dn mice that are similar to those reported in persons with DS. These findings strengthen the role of the Ts65Dn mouse as a model for DS. Also, given the historical assumption of integrity of the visual system in most behavioral assessments of Ts65Dn mice, such as the hidden-platform component of the Morris water maze, the visual deficits described herein may represent a significant confounding factor in the interpretation of results from such experiments.

  8. Visual Field Abnormalities among Adolescent Boys with Hearing Impairments

    PubMed Central

    KHORRAMI-NEJAD, Masoud; HERAVIAN, Javad; SEDAGHAT, Mohamad-Reza; MOMENI-MOGHADAM, Hamed; SOBHANI-RAD, Davood; ASKARIZADEH, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the visual field (VF) categorizations (based on the severity of VF defects) between adolescent boys with hearing impairments and those with normal hearing. This cross-sectional study involved the evaluation of the VF of 64 adolescent boys with hearing impairments and 68 age-matched boys with normal hearing at high schools in Tehran, Iran, in 2013. All subjects had an intelligence quotient (IQ) > 70. The hearing impairments were classified based on severity and time of onset. Participants underwent a complete eye examination, and the VFs were investigated using automated perimetry with a Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer. This device was used to determine their foveal threshold (FT), mean deviation (MD), and Glaucoma Hemifield Test (GHT) results. Most (50%) of the boys with hearing impairments had profound hearing impairments. There was no significant between-group difference in age (P = 0.49) or IQ (P = 0.13). There was no between-group difference in the corrected distance visual acuity (P = 0.183). According to the FT, MD, and GHT results, the percentage of boys with abnormal VFs in the hearing impairment group was significantly greater than that in the normal hearing group: 40.6% vs. 22.1%, 59.4% vs. 19.1%, and 31.2% vs. 8.8%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The mean MD in the hearing impairment group was significantly worse than that in the normal hearing group (-0.79 ± 2.04 and -4.61 ± 6.52 dB, respectively, P < 0.0001), and the mean FT was also significantly worse (38.97 ± 1.66 vs. 35.30 ± 1.43 dB, respectively, P <0.0001). Moreover, there was a significant between-group difference in the GHT results (P < 0.0001). Thus, there were higher percentages of boys with VF abnormalities and higher mean MD, FT, and GHT results among those with hearing impairments compared to those with normal hearing. These findings emphasize the need for detailed VF assessments for patients with hearing impairments. PMID:28293650

  9. Visual evoked potentials to an illusory change in brightness: the Craik-Cornsweet-O'Brien effect.

    PubMed

    Suter, Steve; Crown, Nik

    2016-07-06

    Can brain electrical activity associated with the Craik-Cornsweet-O'Brien effect (CCOB) be identified in humans? Opposing luminance gradients met in the middle of a square image to create a luminance contrast-defined vertical border. The resulting rectangles on each side of the border were otherwise equiluminant, but appeared to differ in brightness, the CCOB effect. When the contrast gradients were swapped, the participants perceived darker and lighter rectangles trading places. This dynamic CCOB stimulus was reversed 1/s to elicit visual evoked potentials. The CCOB effect was absent in two control conditions. In one, the immediate contrast border, where the gradients met, was replaced by a dark vertical stripe; in the other, the outer segments of both rectangles, where the illusion would otherwise occur, were replaced by dark rectangles, leaving only the contrast-reversing gradients. Visual evoked potential components P1 and N2 were present for the CCOB stimuli, but not the control stimuli. Results are consistent with functional MRI and single unit evidence, suggesting that the brightness of the CCOB effect becomes dissociated from the luminance falling on the eye early in visual processing. These results favor explanations of brightness induction invoking rapid, early amplification of very low spatial-frequency information in the image to approximate natural scenes as opposed to a sluggish brightness adjustment spreading from the contrast border.

  10. Mottle camouflage patterns in cuttlefish: quantitative characterization and visual background stimuli that evoke them.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Chubb, Charles; Buresch, Kendra C; Barbosa, Alexandra; Allen, Justine J; Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T

    2010-01-15

    Cuttlefish and other cephalopods achieve dynamic background matching with two general classes of body patterns: uniform (or uniformly stippled) patterns and mottle patterns. Both pattern types have been described chiefly by the size scale and contrast of their skin components. Mottle body patterns in cephalopods have been characterized previously as small-to-moderate-scale light and dark skin patches (i.e. mottles) distributed somewhat evenly across the body surface. Here we move beyond this commonly accepted qualitative description by quantitatively measuring the scale and contrast of mottled skin components and relating these statistics to specific visual background stimuli (psychophysics approach) that evoke this type of background-matching pattern. Cuttlefish were tested on artificial and natural substrates to experimentally determine some primary visual background cues that evoke mottle patterns. Randomly distributed small-scale light and dark objects (or with some repetition of small-scale shapes/sizes) on a lighter substrate with moderate contrast are essential visual cues to elicit mottle camouflage patterns in cuttlefish. Lowering the mean luminance of the substrate without changing its spatial properties can modulate the mottle pattern toward disruptive patterns, which are of larger scale, different shape and higher contrast. Backgrounds throughout nature consist of a continuous range of spatial scales; backgrounds with medium-sized light/dark patches of moderate contrast are those in which cuttlefish Mottle patterns appear to be the most frequently observed.

  11. Appetitive long-term taste conditioning enhances human visually evoked EEG responses.

    PubMed

    Viemose, Ida; Møller, Per; Laugesen, Jakob L; Schachtman, Todd R; Manoharan, Thukirtha; Christoffersen, Gert R J

    2013-09-15

    Long-term effects of learned associations between an image and a taste have not been studied with electromagnetic brain scanning techniques. The possibility that taste conditioning may change sensory image processing was investigated in young adult subjects. EEG-responses evoked by images were recorded before and after a training session using an image as conditioned stimulus and a pleasant taste as unconditioned stimulus. The results showed that in posterior electrodes placed over visual cortex areas, the following changes occurred after conditioning: (1) the amplitude and duration of the N2-P3 waves in the visual evoked potentials were enhanced; (2) the N2 and P3 peak delays were shortened; (3) power induced by image presentation was enhanced in the delta and theta frequency bands; (4) cross-hemispheric delta and theta coherences among the posterior electrodes were enhanced; (5) calculations of the underlying whole brain distribution of currents using swLORETA showed elevated current densities in posterior voxels. None of the above changes occurred in a sham-trained control group. In electrodes placed over the prefrontal cortex, delta and theta power also rose significantly. It is suggested that the appetitive taste conditioning potentiated synaptic activity in visual cortex networks and that this led to an increased speed of image processing.

  12. Isolating early cortical generators of visual-evoked activity: a systems identification approach.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jeremy W; Kelly, Simon P; Foxe, John J; Lalor, Edmund C

    2012-07-01

    The VESPA (visual-evoked spread spectrum analysis) method estimates the impulse response of the visual system using a continuously varying stimulus. It has been used recently to address both basic cognitive and neurophysiologic questions as well as those surrounding clinical populations. Although the components of the average VESPA response are highly reminiscent of the early components of the visual-evoked potential (VEP) when measured over midline occipital locations, the two responses are acquired in different ways and, thus, they cannot be regarded as being equivalent. To further characterize the relationship between the VESPA and the VEP and the generative mechanisms underlying them, we recorded EEG from 31 subjects in response to checkerboard-based VEP and VESPA stimuli. We found that, across subjects, the amplitudes of the VEP C1 component and the VESPA C1 component were highly correlated, whereas the VEP P1 and the VESPA P1 bore no statistical relationship. Furthermore, we found that C1 and P1 amplitudes were significantly correlated in the VESPA but not in the VEP. We believe these findings point to the presence of common generators underlying the VESPA C1 and the VEP C1. We argue further that the VESPA P1, in light of its strong relationship to the VESPA C1, likely reflects further activation of the same cortical generators. Given the lack of correlation between the VEP P1 and each of these three other components, it is likely that the underlying generators of this particular component are more varied and widespread, as suggested previously. We discuss the implications of these relationships for basic and clinical research using the VESPA and for the assessment of additive-evoked versus phase-reset contributions to the VEP.

  13. Visually evoked blood flow responses and interaction with dynamic cerebral autoregulation: correction for blood pressure variation.

    PubMed

    Gommer, Erik D; Bogaarts, Guy; Martens, Esther G H J; Mess, Werner H; Reulen, Jos P H

    2014-05-01

    Visually evoked flow responses recorded using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography are often quantified using a dynamic model of neurovascular coupling. The evoked flow response is seen as the model's response to a visual step input stimulus. However, the continuously active process of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) compensating cerebral blood flow for blood pressure fluctuations may induce changes of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) as well. The effect of blood pressure variability on the flow response is evaluated by separately modeling the dCA-induced effects of beat-to-beat measured blood pressure related CBFV changes. Parameters of 71 subjects are estimated using an existing, well-known second order dynamic neurovascular coupling model proposed by Rosengarten et al., and a new model extending the existing model with a CBFV contributing component as the output of a dCA model driven by blood pressure as input. Both models were evaluated for mean and systolic CBFV responses. The model-to-data fit errors of mean and systolic blood pressure for the new model were significantly lower compared to the existing model: mean: 0.8%±0.6 vs. 2.4%±2.8, p<0.001; systolic: 1.5%±1.2 vs. 2.2%±2.6, p<0.001. The confidence bounds of all estimated neurovascular coupling model parameters were significantly (p<0.005) narrowed for the new model. In conclusion, blood pressure correction of visual evoked flow responses by including cerebral autoregulation in model fitting of averaged responses results in significantly lower fit errors and by that in more reliable model parameter estimation. Blood pressure correction is more effective when mean instead of systolic CBFV responses are used. Measurement and quantification of neurovascular coupling should include beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement.

  14. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J.; Cawthraw, Saira; Simmons, Marion M.; Chaplin, Melanie J.; González, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), which causes neurological signs in sheep, but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways. BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie (CS) without disease confirmation (test group 1) and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2). Abnormal BAEPs were found in 7 sheep (23%) of group 1 and 42 sheep (23%) of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or PrPSc gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrPSc or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrPSc scores depending on the TSE strain because PrPSc scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE, but not with CS. The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs and that neither vacuolation nor PrPSc accumulation appears to be

  15. Visual information processing in recently abstaining methamphetamine-dependent individuals: evoked potentials study.

    PubMed

    Kremlácek, Jan; Hosák, Ladislav; Kuba, Miroslav; Libiger, Jan; Cízek, Jirí

    2008-11-01

    Methamphetamine (MAP) is an indirect dopamine agonist that can temporarily increase cognitive performance. However, its long-term abuse may cause dopamine depletion and consequent cognitive and attentional impairment. The worsening of visual functions in Parkinson's disease and their improvement after levodopa administration implicates the role of dopamine in the physiology of vision. This provides the rationale for the investigation of visual functions in abstaining MAP abusers. We investigated changes in visually evoked potentials (VEPs) to pattern-reversal and motion-onset stimuli. Such changes serve as indices of visual information processing in the primary and associative areas in a group of recently abstaining MAP abusers (5 females, 18 males, MAP abuse 5.3 +/- 2.8 years) and in 23 age- and gender-paired controls. We did not find differences between the groups in visual acuity. In the group of MAP abusers we observed an attenuation of the early responses around 80 ms and a prolongation of the P1 peak latency after the reversal of high spatial frequency checkerboards (10 and 20 arcmin checks). Furthermore, an attenuation of the latter positive response (170-250 ms) was observed among all the stimuli in parieto-frontal derivations for the MAP abusers. This is the first report suggesting a slowing and attenuation of VEP responses during visual processing in abstaining methamphetamine abusers.

  16. Laser acupuncture - innovative basic research: visual and laser-induced evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-12-26

    Laser acupuncture is a therapeutic medical method. Innovative basic research is necessary within this fascinating area of research. This publication focuses on visual evoked potentials (VEP) elucidated by non-invasive and partially non-perceptible laser stimulation. Materials (Subjects) and Methods: The first part of this study presents systematic VEP-monitoring in connection with laser acupuncture and manual needle acupuncture in 40 healthy volunteers. The second part deals with bilateral non-perceptible laser needle (658 nm, 40 mW, 500 µm, 1 Hz) irradiation of the Neiguan acupoint (PC6) in a 26-year-old female healthy volunteer using a new 32-channel evoked potential analysis technique. We were not able to find significant changes in latency or amplitudes of VEPs during laser acupuncture within the first part of the study. However in the second part we report about human cerebral evoked potentials after non-perceptible laser stimulation. The findings indicate that exposure to laser needle stimulation with a frequency of 1 Hz can modulate the ascending reticular activating system. Further studies are necessary to confirm or refute the very interesting findings.

  17. Correspondences in the Behavior of the Electroretinogram and of the Potentials Evoked at the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Crescitelli, Frederick; Gardner, Ernest

    1961-01-01

    Electrical potentials from the eye (ERG) and from the contralateral visual cortex were recorded in response to flashes of white and of colored light of various intensities and durations. The evoked potentials were found to parallel the behavior of the ERG in several significant respects. Selective changes in the ERG brought about by increasing the light intensity and by light adaptation led to parallel selective changes in the cortical responses. The dual waves (b1, b2) of the ERG were found to have counterparts in two cortical waves (c1, c2) which, in respect to changes in light intensity and to light adaptation, behaved analogously to the two retinal components. The responses evoked at high intensity showed only the diphasic c1-potential. As stimulus intensity was lowered the c1-wave decreased in magnitude and a delayed c2-component appeared. The c2-potential increased in amplitude as light intensity of the flash was further reduced. Eventually the c2-wave, too, decreased as stimulus reduction continued. There was no wave length specificity in regard to either the duplex b-waves or duplex cortical waves. Both appeared at all wave lengths from 454 mµ to 630 mµ. The two cortical waves evoked by brief flashes of colored light showed all the behavior to changes in stimulus intensity and to light adaptation that occurred with white light. PMID:13696406

  18. Altered Automatic Face Processing in Individuals with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita, Takako; Kamio, Yoko; Yamasaki, Takao; Yasumoto, Sawa; Hirose, Shinichi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have different automatic responses to faces than typically developing (TD) individuals. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 10 individuals with high-functioning ASD (HFASD) and 10 TD individuals. Visual stimuli consisted of upright and inverted faces (fearful and neutral) and objects…

  19. Habituation of steady-state visual evoked potentials in response to high-frequency polychromatic foveal visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Heng-Yuan; Chiu, George C; Zao, John K; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Gruber, Allen; Chien, Yu-Yi; Chou, Ching-Chi; Lu, Chih-Kai; Liu, Wen-Hao; Huang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Albert C; Wang, Yijun; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to develop safe and robust methods for monitoring migraineurs' brain states, we explores the feasibility of using white, red, green and blue LED lights flickering around their critical flicker fusion (CFF) frequencies as foveal visual stimuli for inducing steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) and causing discernible habituation trends. After comparing the habituation indices, the multi-scale entropies and the time dependent intrinsic correlations of their SSVEP signals, we reached a tentative conclusion that sharp red and white light pulses flickering barely above their CFF frequencies can replace commonly used 13Hz stimuli to effectively cause SSVEP habituation among normal subjects. Empirical results showed that consecutive short bursts of light can produce more consistent responses than a single prolonged stimulation. Since these high frequency stimuli do not run the risk of triggering migraine or seizure attacks, further tests of these stimuli on migraine patients are warranted in order to verify their effectiveness.

  20. Contrast sensitivity in humans with abnormal visual experience.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, R D; Thibos, L N

    1975-01-01

    1. Grating contrast sensitivities have been determined over a range of spatial frequencies for a normal subject and for subjects who are visually biased in that they have a lower resolution capacity for targets of specific orientations. The bias si only found in astigmatic subjects and the grating orientation yielding poorest acuity coincides with the most defocused astigmatic meridian. However this resolution anisotropy remains when optical factors are accounted for. 2. For the normal subject, high and low frequency attenuation is found and a typical reduction in contrast sensitivity is exhibited for oblique target orientations. 3. The biased subjects, called meridional amblyopes because they have reduced acuity for a given grating orientation, show markedly abnormal contrast sensitivity functions. Their cut-off spatial frequencies are different for various target orientations and this difference applies also to contrast sensitivity over nearly the entire spatial frequency range tested (0-5-16 cycles/deg). The differences are of about the same magnitude for most frequencies and they are found in all types of meridional amblyopes. 4. Optical explanations of these differences are ruled out by laser-interference fringe tests and by varying effective pupil size. 5. Theoretical effects of defocus have been calculated to compare predicted visual deprivation with performance. Results indicate that reduced contrast sensitivity functions can be equivalent to a small defocus effect. 6. To examine the results in the spatial domain, inverse Fourier transforms of representative contrast sensitivity functions have been computed. The optical portion of the resulting spatial weighting functions has been parcelled out to obtain neural spatial weighting functions. PMID:1142303

  1. [Visual evoked potentials and recognizing depths during changes in gaze direction].

    PubMed

    Fujita, S; Nikara, T

    2000-06-01

    The neurophysiological mechanism underlying a phenomenon of depth perception that can not be explained by only the horizontal binocular retinal disparity was analyzed by means of visual evoked cortical potentials (VECPs). A pair of pictures showing fourteen vertical lines with the same magnitude of horizontal retinal disparity were presented to eight normal subjects stereoscopically. Subjects were required to view the pair while changing the visual line direction. VECPs were measured while changing both the visual line directions and the sizes of the horizontal retinal disparity. The subjects perceived all lines as having the same magnitude of depth when they viewed the center position of the pictures stereoscopically (centro-version viewing). Shifting their visual line direction to the left end (laevo-version viewing), the depth magnitude of each line decreased gradually with increase of retinal eccentricity. Next, while maintaining the laevo-version the subjects were asked to make all lines of the same depth by changing the disparity magnitude of each line manually. Viewing this new version of the picture in the centro-version, the further each line was separated from the line located in the center, the greater was the magnitude of its depth. However, no significant differences in amplitudes of VECPs, corresponding to those pictures were found. Our results suggest that differences of recognizable depth perception between the centro- and the laevo-version viewing occur in a higher order visual center than in the occipital and parietal zone when analyzing horizontal retinal disparity.

  2. Distinct Visual Evoked Potential Morphological Patterns for Apparent Motion Processing in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Measures of visual cortical development in children demonstrate high variability and inconsistency throughout the literature. This is partly due to the specificity of the visual system in processing certain features. It may then be advantageous to activate multiple cortical pathways in order to observe maturation of coinciding networks. Visual stimuli eliciting the percept of apparent motion and shape change is designed to simultaneously activate both dorsal and ventral visual streams. However, research has shown that such stimuli also elicit variable visual evoked potential (VEP) morphology in children. The aim of this study was to describe developmental changes in VEPs, including morphological patterns, and underlying visual cortical generators, elicited by apparent motion and shape change in school-aged children. Forty-one typically developing children underwent high-density EEG recordings in response to a continuously morphing, radially modulated, circle-star grating. VEPs were then compared across the age groups of 5–7, 8–10, and 11–15 years according to latency and amplitude. Current density reconstructions (CDR) were performed on VEP data in order to observe activated cortical regions. It was found that two distinct VEP morphological patterns occurred in each age group. However, there were no major developmental differences between the age groups according to each pattern. CDR further demonstrated consistent visual generators across age and pattern. These results describe two novel VEP morphological patterns in typically developing children, but with similar underlying cortical sources. The importance of these morphological patterns is discussed in terms of future studies and the investigation of a relationship to visual cognitive performance. PMID:27445738

  3. Identification of visual evoked response parameters sensitive to pilot mental state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Systems analysis techniques were developed and demonstrated for modeling the electroencephalographic (EEG) steady state visual evoked response (ssVER), for use in EEG data compression and as an indicator of mental workload. The study focused on steady state frequency domain stimulation and response analysis, implemented with a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus generator and an off-line describing function response analyzer. Three major tasks were conducted: (1) VER related systems identification material was reviewed; (2) Software for experiment control and data analysis was developed and implemented; and (3) ssVER identification and modeling was demonstrated, via a mental loading experiment. It was found that a systems approach to ssVER functional modeling can serve as the basis for eventual development of a mental workload indicator. The review showed how transient visual evoked response (tVER) and ssVER research are related at the functional level, the software development showed how systems techniques can be used for ssVER characterization, and the pilot experiment showed how a simple model can be used to capture the basic dynamic response of the ssVER, under varying loads.

  4. [Experience with flash-evoked visual potentials in unconscious patients in the neurologic intensive care station].

    PubMed

    Krieger, D; Adams, H P; Hacke, W

    1991-12-01

    Evoked potential monitoring has become a widely used procedure in the evaluation of stuporous patients on neurological intensive care units. Currently BAEP and SEP are preferentially employed. VEP monitoring is a relatively uncommon procedure, because late evoked potentials tend to be relatively unstable, varying in amplitude to a moderate extend from changes of temperature, drugs, attention and the level of consciousness. A valuable approach of VEP monitoring on intensive care units are structures of the visual system at risk in vascular disease of the vertebrobasilar system or during evaluated intracranial pressure (EIP). This study uses the data of 20 stuporous patients presenting with either intracranial mass lesions or vascular diseases of the vertebrobasilar system and 20 control persons. Light emitting diode (LED)-VEP are compared with checkerboard stimulation in control persons using the technique of cross-correlation. The comparison of the control group with patients using LED-VEP allows definition of limits for normal variation as a base for identification of significant changes. Despite methodical restrictions of LED-VEP, our results are in favour of serial studies in patients with EIP. There are no corresponding findings in LED-VEP and vascular lesions of the retrochiasmatic visual system.

  5. Normalization of visual evoked potentials using underlying electroencephalogram levels improves amplitude reproducibility in rats.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Thie, Johnson; Klistorner, Alexander; Gupta, Vivek K; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-03-15

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) is a frequently used noninvasive measurement of visual function. However, high-amplitude variability has limited its potential for evaluating axonal damage in both laboratory and clinical research. This study was conducted to improve the reliability of VEP amplitude measurement in rats by using electroencephalogram (EEG)-based signal correction. VEPs of Sprague-Dawley rats were recorded on three separate days within 2 weeks. The original VEP traces were normalized by EEG power spectrum, which was evaluated by Fourier transform. A comparison of intersession reproducibility and intersubject variability was made between the original and corrected signals. Corrected VEPs showed lower amplitude intersession within-subject SD (Sw), coefficient of variation (CoV), and repeatability (R(95)) than the original signals (P < 0.001). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of the corrected traces (0.90) was also better than the original potentials (0.82). For intersubject variability, the EEG-based normalization improved the CoV from 44.64% to 30.26%. A linear correlation was observed between the EEG level and the VEP amplitude (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001). Underlying EEG signals should be considered in measuring the VEP amplitude. In this study, a useful technique was developed for VEP data processing that could also be used for other cortical evoked potential recordings and for clinical VEP interpretation in humans.

  6. Effect of color of flash stimulus on variability of flash visual evoked potential latencies.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Senthil Kumar; Gaur, Giriwar Singh; Narayan, Sunil K

    2012-01-01

    Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) are evoked potentials generated in response to visual stimuli. The flash VEP (FVEP) is used less frequently than pattern-reversal VEP (PR-VEP) because; it shows great variations in both latency and amplitude in normal subjects. The advantage of FVEP is its feasibility in non-cooperative subjects, which circumvents the major limitation of PR-VEP. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of change of color of flashlight on variability of FVEP latencies. Healthy subjects in the age group of 18-30 years underwent the standard stimulus using white light, followed by altered stimuli done with red and blue light. 2 trials were given for each eye, for each type of stimulus. The same set of studies was repeated at the same clock time the following day. The inter-individual and intra-individual variability in the peak latency of P2 and N2 waveforms was assessed using coefficient of variation (COV). Both inter-individual and intra-individual variability was less when monochromatic light was used. Between red and blue FVEP, inter-individual variability was less in blue FVEP and the results of intra-individual variability was inconclusive. Monochromatic stimulation preferably with blue light reduced both inter-individual and intra-individual variability seen in latency of P2 and N2 waveforms in FVEP and hence recommended in preference to standard white stimulus for FVEP recording.

  7. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Perception of self-motion from peripheral optokinetic stimulation suppresses visual evoked responses to central stimuli.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Kai V; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; Gresty, Michael A

    2003-08-01

    In a previous functional neuroimaging study we found that early visual areas deactivated when a rotating optical flow stimulus elicited the illusion of self-motion (vection) compared with when it was perceived as a moving object. Here, we investigated whether electrical cortical responses to an independent central visual probe stimulus change as a function of whether optical flow stimulation in the periphery induces the illusion of self-motion or not. Visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) were obtained in response to pattern-reversals in the central visual field in the presence of a constant peripheral large-field optokinetic stimulus that rotated around the naso-occipital axis and induced intermittent sensations of vection. As control, VEPs were also recorded during a stationary peripheral stimulus and showed no difference than those obtained during optokinetic stimulation. The VEPs during constant peripheral stimulation were then divided into two groups according to the time spans where the subjects reported object- or self-motion, respectively. The N70 VEP component showed a significant amplitude reduction when, due to the peripheral stimulus, subjects experienced self-motion compared to when the peripheral stimulus was perceived as object-motion. This finding supplements and corroborates our recent evidence from functional neuroimaging that early visual cortex deactivates when a visual flow stimulus elicits the illusion of self-motion compared with when the same sensory input is interpreted as object-motion. This dampened responsiveness might reflect a redistribution of sensorial and attentional resources when the monitoring of self-motion relies on a sustained and veridical processing of optic flow and may be compromised by other sources of visual input.

  9. Pattern visual evoked potential performance in preterm preschoolers with average intelligence quotients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-Jing; Xu, Xiu; Wang, Wei-Ping; Guo, Shu-juan; Yang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Preterm infants are more likely to develop visual perceptual and visual-motor impairments. Visual perceptual deficiencies may contribute to significant difficulties in daily life, but few reports are available relating electrophysiological assessment of the visual system to spatial information problems in premature preschoolers with average intelligence quotients. This study was designed to investigate preterm preschoolers' responses to various spatial frequencies of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) and compare them to normal children. Participants were 20 very low birth weight (VLBW), 41 low birth weight (LBW) and 41 normal children who were 4 to 6 years old and were free from major disability and developmentally appropriate for gestational age at birth. They were evaluated using the Chinese population adaptation of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI) and recorded PRVEP at five levels of spatial frequency (checkerboard pattern (check) sizes of 108', 54', 27', 13' and 7') using a VikingQuest-IV neuroelectrophysiological device (Nicolet, Madison, WI, USA). Compared with normal children, the LBW and VLBW groups had significantly lower level in the tests of verbal, performance and overall intelligence quotients, particularly in performance, although the levels were within the average range. The PRVEP P100 wave latencies were significantly prolonged at all five degrees of spatial frequency in the VLBW group compared with the controls, while showing delay in the LBW with 13' and 7' check size. In the meanwhile, the amplitudes of P100 at all five spatial frequencies were significantly smaller in the VLBW and LBW groups than in the normal children. And VLBW group had even lower P100 amplitudes than the LBW group. Preterm preschoolers with average cognition capability are at risk of defect in visual-spatial perception, especially when they are confronted with more complicated information. PRVEP may provide an objective and

  10. Visual evoked potentials in migraine patients: alterations depend on pattern spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, R; Grosser, K; Lang, E; Geisslinger, G; Kobal, G; Brune, K; Lötsch, J

    1999-06-01

    Visual information is conducted by two parallel pathways (luminance- and contour-processing pathways) which are thought to be differentially affected in migraine and can be investigated by means of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Components and habituation of VEPs at four spatial frequencies were compared between 26 migraineurs (13 without aura, MO; 13 with aura, MA) and 28 healthy volunteers. Migraineurs were recorded in the headache-free interval (at least 72 h before and after an attack). Five blocks of 50 responses to chequerboards of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 cycles per degree (c.p.d.) were sequentially averaged and analysed for latency and amplitude. Differences in VEPs were dependent on spatial frequency. Only when small checks were presented, i.e. at high spatial frequency (2 and 4 c.p.d.), was the latency of N2 significantly prolonged in MA and did it tend to be delayed in MO subjects. Habituation behaviour was not significantly different between groups under the stimulating conditions employed. Prolonged N2 latency might be explained by the lack or attenuation of a contour-specific component N130 in migraineurs, indicating an imbalance of the two visual pathways with relative predominance of the luminance-processing Y system. These results reflect an interictally persisting dysfunction of precortical visual processing which might be relevant in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  11. Optical Recording of Retinal and Visual Cortical Responses Evoked by Electrical Stimulation on the Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanai, Makoto; Sakaehara, Haruko; Sawai, Hajime; Song, Wen-Jie; Yagi, Tetsuya

    To develop a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using an implanted multielectrode array, it is important to study the response properties of retinal ganglion cells and of the visual cortex to localized retinal electrical stimulation. Optical imaging can reveal the spatio-temporal properties of neuronal activity. Therefore, we conducted a calcium imaging study to investigate response properties to local current stimulation in frog retinas, and a membrane potential imaging study to explore the visual cortical responses to retinal stimulation in guinea pigs. In the retina, local current stimuli evoked transient responses in the ganglion cells located near the stimulus electrode. The spatial pattern of the responding area was altered by changing the location of the stimulation. Local electrical stimulation to the retina also caused transient responses in the visual cortex. The responding cortical areas in the primary visual cortex were localized. A spatially different cortical response was observed to stimulation of a different position on the retina. These results suggest that the imaging study has great potential in revealing the spatio-temporal properties of the neuronal response for the retinal prosthesis.

  12. The VESPA: a method for the rapid estimation of a visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Edmund C; Pearlmutter, Barak A; Reilly, Richard B; McDarby, Gary; Foxe, John J

    2006-10-01

    Faster and less obtrusive means for measuring a Visual Evoked Potential would be valuable in clinical testing and basic neuroscience research. This study presents a method for accomplishing this by smoothly modulating the luminance of a visual stimulus using a stochastic process. Despite its visually unobtrusive nature, the rich statistical structure of the stimulus enables rapid estimation of the visual system's impulse response. The profile of these responses, which we call VESPAs, correlates with standard VEPs, with r=0.91, p<10(-28) for the group average. The time taken to obtain a VESPA with a given signal-to-noise ratio compares favorably to that required to obtain a VEP with a similar level of certainty. Additionally, we show that VESPA responses to two independent stimuli can be obtained simultaneously, which could drastically reduce the time required to collect responses to multiple stimuli. The new method appears to provide a useful alternative to standard VEP methods, and to have potential application both in clinical practice and to the study of sensory and perceptual functions.

  13. Prey Capture Behavior Evoked by Simple Visual Stimuli in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Isaac H.; Kampff, Adam R.; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how the nervous system recognizes salient stimuli in the environment and selects and executes the appropriate behavioral responses is a fundamental question in systems neuroscience. To facilitate the neuroethological study of visually guided behavior in larval zebrafish, we developed “virtual reality” assays in which precisely controlled visual cues can be presented to larvae whilst their behavior is automatically monitored using machine vision algorithms. Freely swimming larvae responded to moving stimuli in a size-dependent manner: they directed multiple low amplitude orienting turns (∼20°) toward small moving spots (1°) but reacted to larger spots (10°) with high-amplitude aversive turns (∼60°). The tracking of small spots led us to examine how larvae respond to prey during hunting routines. By analyzing movie sequences of larvae hunting paramecia, we discovered that all prey capture routines commence with eye convergence and larvae maintain their eyes in a highly converged position for the duration of the prey-tracking and capture swim phases. We adapted our virtual reality assay to deliver artificial visual cues to partially restrained larvae and found that small moving spots evoked convergent eye movements and J-turns of the tail, which are defining features of natural hunting. We propose that eye convergence represents the engagement of a predatory mode of behavior in larval fish and serves to increase the region of binocular visual space to enable stereoscopic targeting of prey. PMID:22203793

  14. Frequency domain dipole localization: extensions of the method and applications to auditory and visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Raz, J; Biggins, C A; Turetsky, B; Fein, G

    1993-09-01

    We describe a statistical frequency domain approach to localizing equivalent dipole generators of human brain evoked potentials. The frequency domain representation allows considerable data reduction, constrains the magnitude function of the dipoles to be smooth, and accounts for the statistical properties of the background EEG. A previous paper described a restrictive model in which the dipole orientations were assumed to be fixed over time, and only one dipole was allowed. In this paper, we consider the more general model in which the orientation can vary over time, and which includes multiple dipole generators. The varying orientation model has the practical advantage of being more nearly linear and more flexible than the fixed orientation model, which facilitates convergence of the iterative fitting algorithm. We suggest a measure of goodness-of-fit that compares the likelihood of the dipole model with the likelihoods of saturated and null models. We report the results of fitting the model to recorded auditory and visual evoked potentials. A single dipole with fixed orientation seems to be an adequate model of the auditory midlatency response, while two dipoles with varying orientation are needed to fit the later P200 component. Analysis of the visual P100 response to unilateral stimulation localized a generator in the contralateral occipital cortex, as expected from anatomical considerations. A two-dipole model fit the visual P100 response of bilateral stimulations, and the locations of the two dipoles were similar to the locations obtained by single-dipole fits to the responses to left and right unilateral stimuli.

  15. Improved method for retinotopy constrained source estimation of visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.; Dale, Anders M.

    2011-01-01

    Retinotopy constrained source estimation (RCSE) is a method for non-invasively measuring the time courses of activation in early visual areas using magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). Unlike conventional equivalent current dipole or distributed source models, the use of multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations to simultaneously constrain the solutions allows for the estimation of independent waveforms for visual areas V1, V2, and V3, despite their close proximity to each other. We describe modifications that improve the reliability and efficiency of this method. First, we find that increasing the number and size of visual stimuli results in source estimates that are less susceptible to noise. Second, to create a more accurate forward solution, we have explicitly modeled the cortical point spread of individual visual stimuli. Dipoles are represented as extended patches on the cortical surface, which take into account the estimated receptive field size at each location in V1, V2, and V3 as well as the contributions from contralateral, ipsilateral, dorsal, and ventral portions of the visual areas. Third, we implemented a map fitting procedure to deform a template to match individual subject retinotopic maps derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This improves the efficiency of the overall method by allowing automated dipole selection, and it makes the results less sensitive to physiological noise in fMRI retinotopy data. Finally, the iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) method was used to reduce the contribution from stimulus locations with high residual error for robust estimation of visual evoked responses. PMID:22102418

  16. A brain-computer interface using motion-onset visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) based on motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEPs). mVEP has never been used in BCI research, but has been widely studied in basic research. For the BCI application, the brief motion of objects embedded into onscreen virtual buttons is used to evoke mVEP that is time locked to the onset of motion. EEG data registered from 15 subjects are used to investigate the spatio-temporal pattern of mVEP in this paradigm. N2 and P2 components, with distinct temporo-occipital and parietal topography, respectively, are selected as the salient features of the brain response to the attended target that the subject selects by gazing at it. The computer determines the attended target by finding which button elicited prominent N2/P2 components. Besides a simple feature extraction of N2/P2 area calculation, the stepwise linear discriminant analysis is adopted to assess the target detection accuracy of a five-class BCI. A mean accuracy of 98% is achieved when ten trials data are averaged. Even with only three trials, the accuracy remains above 90%, suggesting that the proposed mVEP-based BCI could achieve a high information transfer rate in online implementation.

  17. Control of humanoid robot via motion-onset visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates controlling humanoid robot behavior via motion-onset specific N200 potentials. In this study, N200 potentials are induced by moving a blue bar through robot images intuitively representing robot behaviors to be controlled with mind. We present the individual impact of each subject on N200 potentials and discuss how to deal with individuality to obtain a high accuracy. The study results document the off-line average accuracy of 93% for hitting targets across over five subjects, so we use this major component of the motion-onset visual evoked potential (mVEP) to code people's mental activities and to perform two types of on-line operation tasks: navigating a humanoid robot in an office environment with an obstacle and picking-up an object. We discuss the factors that affect the on-line control success rate and the total time for completing an on-line operation task. PMID:25620918

  18. An objective method for color vision deficiencies measurement based on visual evoked potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Kai; Hou, Minxian; Ye, Guanrong

    2005-07-01

    The equi-luminance of color stimulus in normal subjects is characterized by L-cone and M-cone activation in retina. For the protanopes and deuternopes, only the activations of one relevant remaining cone type should be considered. The equi-luminance turning curve was established for the recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) of the luminance changes of the red and green color stimulus, and the position of the equi-luminance was used to define the kind and degree of color vision deficiencies. In the test of 47 volunteers we got the VEP traces and the equi-luminance turning curves, which was in accordance with the judgment by the pseudoisochromatic plate used in clinic. The method fulfills the objective and quantitative requirements in color vision deficiencies test.

  19. Measurement and definition of changes in the visual evoked potential to different stimulus intensities.

    PubMed

    Dragutinovich, S

    1987-07-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from the vertex to 5 intensities of light flashes. Measures were taken of peak-to-trough, prestimulus baseline-to-peak, and timeband amplitude for P1, N1, and P2 waveforms. Augmenting/reducing was defined by traditional (amplitude/intensity slope, monotonicity) and non-traditional (strength of the nervous system, combined amplitude response) criteria. In support of Connolly and Gruzelier ([1982) Psychophysiology, 19: 599-608], analyses showed that data collected by traditional methods contravened assumptions underlying VEP augmenting/reducing methodology. Specifically, 20% of total peaks occurred outside designated timebands, amplitude/intensity slopes explained only 30-46% variance, and levels of agreement between different definitions were low. Researchers ought to ensure that VEPs are admissible before using them or consider employing non-traditional criteria to avoid rejecting large numbers of inadmissible data.

  20. Effect of refractive error on visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Yosuke; MAEHARA, Seiya; ITOH, Yoshiki; MATSUI, Ai; HAYASHI, Miri; KUBO, Akira; UCHIDE, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of refractive error on canine visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation (P-VEP). Six normal beagle dogs were used. The refractive power of the recorded eyes was measured by skiascopy. The refractive power was corrected to −4 diopters (D) to +2 D using contact lens. P-VEP was recorded at each refractive power. The stimulus pattern size and distance were 50.3 arc-min and 50 cm. The P100 appeared at almost 100 msec at −2 D (at which the stimulus monitor was in focus). There was significant prolongation of the P100 implicit time at −4, −3, 0 and +1 D compared with −2 D, respectively. We concluded that the refractive power of the eye affected the P100 implicit time in canine P-VEP recording. PMID:26655769

  1. Visual Evoked Potential Recording in a Rat Model of Experimental Optic Nerve Demyelination.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Chitranshi, Nitin; Reedman, Brittany; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2015-07-29

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) recording is widely used in clinical practice to assess the severity of optic neuritis in its acute phase, and to monitor the disease course in the follow-up period. Changes in the VEP parameters closely correlate with pathological damage in the optic nerve. This protocol provides a detailed description about the rodent model of optic nerve microinjection, in which a partial demyelination lesion is produced in the optic nerve. VEP recording techniques are also discussed. Using skull implanted electrodes, we are able to acquire reproducible intra-session and between-session VEP traces. VEPs can be recorded on individual animals over a period of time to assess the functional changes in the optic nerve longitudinally. The optic nerve demyelination model, in conjunction with the VEP recording protocol, provides a tool to investigate the disease processes associated with demyelination and remyelination, and can potentially be employed to evaluate the effects of new remyelinating drugs or neuroprotective therapies.

  2. Control of humanoid robot via motion-onset visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates controlling humanoid robot behavior via motion-onset specific N200 potentials. In this study, N200 potentials are induced by moving a blue bar through robot images intuitively representing robot behaviors to be controlled with mind. We present the individual impact of each subject on N200 potentials and discuss how to deal with individuality to obtain a high accuracy. The study results document the off-line average accuracy of 93% for hitting targets across over five subjects, so we use this major component of the motion-onset visual evoked potential (mVEP) to code people's mental activities and to perform two types of on-line operation tasks: navigating a humanoid robot in an office environment with an obstacle and picking-up an object. We discuss the factors that affect the on-line control success rate and the total time for completing an on-line operation task.

  3. Frequency detection with stability coefficient for steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenghua; Yao, Dezhong

    2008-03-01

    Due to the relative noise and artifact insensitivity, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) has been used increasingly in the study of a brain-computer interface (BCI). However, SSVEP is still influenced by the same frequency component in the spontaneous EEG, and it is meaningful to find a parameter that can avoid or decrease this influence to improve the transfer rate and the accuracy of the SSVEP-based BCI. In this work, with wavelet analysis, a new parameter named stability coefficient (SC) was defined to measure the stability of a frequency, and then the electrode with the highest stability was selected as the signal electrode for further analysis. After that, the SC method and the traditional power spectrum (PS) method were used comparatively to recognize the stimulus frequency from an analogous BCI data constructed from a real SSVEP data, and the results showed that the SC method is better for a short time window data.

  4. Electroretinogram and visual evoked response in a form of `neuronal lipidosis' with diagnostic EEG features

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Ann; Pampiglione, G.; Picton-Robinson, N.

    1973-01-01

    Combined recordings of the electroretinogram (ERG) and the cortical visual evoked response (VER) have been made together with the electroencephalogram (EEG) in 16 children suffering from a `late infantile' form of `neuronal lipidosis'. The ERG was not usually recordable, in keeping with a gross loss of function of the retinal receptor elements. However, in all the 16 children, at whatever stage of the disease, a grossly enlarged VER was seen (some 12 to 20 times higher in amplitude than in a control group) and visible as a discharge on the primary EEG tracing. The first components of the VER were, however, of fairly similar wave form and latency to those seen in the control children. This unusual combination of ERG and VER findings together with the EEG features have not been found in other groups of diseases. PMID:4691692

  5. Effect of raising body temperature on visual and somatosensory evoked potentials in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, W B; Read, D J; Pountney, E

    1979-01-01

    The effects of raising body temperature on the visual (VEP) and somatosensory (SEP) evoked potentials were observed in normal subjects and in patients with multiple sclerosis. The amplitude of the VEP was significantly reduced to the same degree after heating in normal subjects and in patients with multiple sclerosis but there was no effect on the latency of the potential. Changes in amplitude could not be related to reduction in acuity. In contrast, the cervical SEP was greatly disorganised after heating in many patients with multiple sclerosis while the only effect in normal subjects was to reduce the latency by increasing peripheral conduction velocity. These results suggest that heat caused conduction block in demyelinated axons in the sensory pathways of the cervical spinal cord. PMID:438834

  6. [Focal evoked potentials in the rabbit visual cortex: density analysis of current sources].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1981-01-01

    Focal evoked potentials were elicited in the rabbit visual cortex by punctiform light stimuli and analyzed by the current source density technique. They contained two main components. The first component was generated by local sink at depths form 0.6 to 1.0 mm (layer IV) with 30 ms latency and peak time about 50 ms. The second one was generated by less local sink at depths form 0.2-0.3 to 1.3-1.5 mm (layers III-VI) with peak time 90-100 ms. These two sinks are considered as active and indicating the localization of depolarizing synapses. Passive sources are dissipated around the zone of the active sinks.

  7. Linking perception to neural activity as measured by visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-11-01

    Linking propositions have played an important role in refining our understanding of the relationship between neural activity and perception. Over the last 40 years, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) have been used in many different ways to address questions of the relationship between neural activity and perception. This review organizes and discusses this research within the linking proposition framework developed by Davida Teller, and her colleagues. A series of examples from the VEP literature illustrates each of the five classes of linking propositions originally proposed by Davida Teller. The related concept of the bridge locus-the site at which neural activity can be said to first be proscriptive of perception-is discussed and a suggestion is made that the concept be expanded to include an evolution over time and cortical area.

  8. Foveal xenon flash disruption of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, E T

    1984-05-01

    The effects of foveal exposure to near maximum permissible levels of broad-band light from lamps of differing flash durations and visual angle subtense on steady-state visual evoked potentials ( SSVEP 's) were measured in four human volunteers. SSVEP 's in response to a counterphasing checkerboard pattern were recorded with a two-phase vector voltmeter used as an analog fourier analyzer and were averaged across repeated presentation of the flash from each lamp. Two microsecond flashes of approximately 0.4 degrees have minimal, although significant effects on early visual processing of a 2.77 degrees diameter 6/24 (20/80) target. Five hundred microsecond flashes of equivalent size have greater effects; larger flashes (11.3, degrees 500 mus) produced afterimages that totally obscured the target for approximately 3.4 s and also reduced the SSVEP to near zero. Recovery of the SSVEP was subjectively correlated with afterimage duration rather than target obscuration . Therefore, single short small retinal image flashes may have minimal transient effects on photopic suprathreshold vision.

  9. Visual Evoked Potential Using Head-Mounted Display Versus Cathode Ray Tube: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo Seon; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present a new stimulation method based on the use of a head-mounted display (HMD) during pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) testing and to compare variables of HMD to those of conventional cathode ray tube (CRT). Methods Twenty-three normal subjects without visual problems were recruited. PR-VEPs were generated using CRT or HMD stimuli. VEP outcome measures included latencies (N75, P100, and N145) and peak-to-peak amplitudes (N75–P100 and P100–N145). Subjective discomfort associated with HMD was determined using a self-administered questionnaire. Results PR-VEPs generated by HMD stimuli showed typical triphasic waveforms, the components of which were found to be correlated with those obtained using conventional CRT stimuli. Self-administered discomfort questionnaires revealed that HMD was more comfortable in some aspects. It allowed subjects to concentrate better than CRT. Conclusion The described HMD stimulation can be used as an alternative to the standard CRT stimulation for PR-VEPs. PR-VEP testing using HMD has potential applications in clinical practice and visual system research because HMD can be used on a wider range of subjects compared to CRT. PMID:27152285

  10. Effects of narcotics, including morphine, on visual evoked potential in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Ken; Fujiwara, Akinori; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Kamei, Chiaki

    2009-01-14

    The side effects of narcotics, including morphine, on the visual system are still unclear; therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effects of narcotics on the visual system at each antinociceptive dose by using the evoked potential (VEP) in rats. Morphine (2 or 5 mg/kg) caused a significant increase in the amplitude of early and late VEP components (P(1)-N(1), N(1)-P(2), P(3)-N(3) and N(3)-P(4)). Fentanyl (0.02 mg/kg) also showed a significant increase in the amplitude of late VEP components (P(3)-N(3), N(3)-P(4)). The effects of morphine and fentanyl on VEP components were antagonized by naloxone (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, (+/-)-pentazocine (20 mg/kg) reduced the amplitude of the late VEP component (N(3)-P(4)), and this effect was not antagonized by naloxone. Butorphanol showed no significant changes in early and late VEP components. In conclusion, morphine stimulated the retino-geniculate-cortex pathway and the thalamus-cortical circuit through the opioid receptors, and fentanyl stimulated the thalamus-cortical circuit through the opioid receptors. It can therefore be assumed that VEP is a useful tool for examining the side effects of drugs, including narcotics, on the visual system.

  11. Stimulus Specificity of Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Code Modulation Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingguo; Feng, Siwei; Lu, Zongwu

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) based on code modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEP) is among the fastest BCIs that have ever been reported, but it has not yet been given a thorough study. In this study, a pseudorandom binary M sequence and its time lag sequences are utilized for modulation of different stimuli and template matching is adopted as the method for target recognition. Five experiments were devised to investigate the effect of stimulus specificity on target recognition and we made an effort to find the optimal stimulus parameters for size, color and proximity of the stimuli, length of modulation sequence and its lag between two adjacent stimuli. By changing the values of these parameters and measuring classification accuracy of the c-VEP BCI, an optimal value of each parameter can be attained. Experimental results of ten subjects showed that stimulus size of visual angle 3.8°, white, spatial proximity of visual angle 4.8° center to center apart, modulation sequence of length 63 bits and the lag of 4 bits between adjacent stimuli yield individually superior performance. These findings provide a basis for determining stimulus presentation of a high-performance c-VEP based BCI system. PMID:27243454

  12. Attenuated Fast Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials During Human Sleep.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Omer; Nir, Yuval

    2017-02-25

    During sleep, external sensory events rarely elicit a behavioral response or affect perception. However, how sensory processing differs between wakefulness and sleep remains unclear. A major difficulty in this field stems from using brief auditory stimuli that often trigger nonspecific high-amplitude "K-complex" responses and complicate interpretation. To overcome this challenge, here we delivered periodic visual flicker stimulation across sleep and wakefulness while recording high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in humans. We found that onset responses can be separated from frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) selectively observed over visual cortex. Sustained SSVEPs in response to fast (8/10 Hz) stimulation are substantially stronger in wakefulness than in both nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep, whereas SSVEP responses to slow (3/5 Hz) stimulation are stronger in both NREM and REM sleep than in wakefulness. Despite wake-like spontaneous activity, responses in REM sleep were similar to those in NREM sleep and different than wakefulness, in accordance with perceptual disconnection during REM sleep. Finally, analysis of amplitude and phase in single trials revealed that stronger fast SSVEPs in wakefulness are driven by more consistent phase locking and increased induced power. These results suggest that the sleeping brain is unable to effectively synchronize large neuronal populations in response to rapid sensory stimulation.

  13. Alterations in visual and auditory processing in hemispatial neglect: an evoked potential follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tarkka, Ina M; Luukkainen-Markkula, Riitta; Pitkänen, Kauko; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-02-01

    Hemispatial neglect is common after cerebrovascular stroke in the right hemisphere. Cortical electrophysiological studies, especially investigations of both visual and auditory processing in subjects with neglect are sparse. Our purpose was to assess whether and to which extent subjects with neglect may show impairments in both visual and auditory processing. Thereby, we assessed the evolution of changes in sensory processing and neglect symptoms over a 6 month follow-up period. Twenty-one stroke subjects with hemispatial neglect were studied at baseline, 3 weeks later and at 6 months follow-up. At enrollment, 12 patients were in Acute/subacute and 9 were in the chronic stage of stroke. Visual and auditory evoked potentials (EP) were elicited with unilateral stimulations and electrophysiologic data were registered with high-density EEG. Primary visual and auditory cortex activations seen in EP components were analyzed at three time points in order to detect alterations. Both sensory modalities revealed differences between hemispheres in processing stimuli coming from a unilateral source. Amplitudes of visual and auditory EP components elicited by left-sided stimuli were smaller compared to those elicited by right-sided stimuli in the Acute/subacute group. The behavioral neglect was more severe in those who had smaller EP amplitudes (e.g. EP amplitude after the right auditory stimulus was significantly associated with total behavioral neglect score, r=0.57). The main hemispheric differences diminished by the follow-up 6 months later along with the decreasing severity of neglect in the Acute/subacute group.

  14. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokashiki, Naoyuki; Daigaku, Reiko; Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG) and visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics. PMID:27257864

  15. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  16. Time-varying bispectral analysis of visually evoked multi-channel EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical foundations of higher order spectral analysis are revisited to examine the use of time-varying bicoherence on non-stationary signals using a classical short-time Fourier approach. A methodology is developed to apply this to evoked EEG responses where a stimulus-locked time reference is available. Short-time windowed ensembles of the response at the same offset from the reference are considered as ergodic cyclostationary processes within a non-stationary random process. Bicoherence can be estimated reliably with known levels at which it is significantly different from zero and can be tracked as a function of offset from the stimulus. When this methodology is applied to multi-channel EEG, it is possible to obtain information about phase synchronization at different regions of the brain as the neural response develops. The methodology is applied to analyze evoked EEG response to flash visual stimulii to the left and right eye separately. The EEG electrode array is segmented based on bicoherence evolution with time using the mean absolute difference as a measure of dissimilarity. Segment maps confirm the importance of the occipital region in visual processing and demonstrate a link between the frontal and occipital regions during the response. Maps are constructed using bicoherence at bifrequencies that include the alpha band frequency of 8Hz as well as 4 and 20Hz. Differences are observed between responses from the left eye and the right eye, and also between subjects. The methodology shows potential as a neurological functional imaging technique that can be further developed for diagnosis and monitoring using scalp EEG which is less invasive and less expensive than magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding.

    PubMed

    Gurariy, Gennadiy; Killebrew, Kyle W; Berryhill, Marian E; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1-4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes.

  18. Modulatory effect of locus coeruleus stimulation on visually evoked potentials in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Heller, U; Klingberg, F

    1989-01-01

    Interactions between light-flash stimulation and electrical single impulse stimulation of locus coeruleus (LC) were investigated in 9 freely moving rats with chronically implanted electrodes during different behavioral states. The interaction of both showed different immediate and long-lasting effects. Simultaneous visual and electrical stimulation caused a clear decrease of trigger rate of photically evoked after-discharges from 60% to 15% and a reduction of the early primary component of visually evoked potentials (VEP) in area 17 compared with the values without LC stimulation during relaxed wakefulness (RW). On the contrary, the simultaneous LC stimulation was ineffective during exploratory behavioral states (E). At 100 ms stimulus interval and more there was no detectable LC stimulus effect on VEP components during RW, whereas the LC stimulation under beta-blockade (2.5 mg/kg propranolol i.p.) during RW-like behavior clearly reduced the early VEP component to 75% compared with values without LC stimulation. On the other hand, LC stimulation facilitated mainly the primary VEP component to about 160% during E compared with the flash response alone. This effect was observed from 100 to 300 ms after LC stimulus and was unaffected by muscarinic blockade (0.5 mg/kg scopolamine i.p.). We conclude from these data that the short-time effects are comparable with the influence of spontaneous behavioral activation and probably result from a costimulation of cholinergic neurons around LC, whereas the long-lasting effects may be attributed to the influence of noradrenergic LC cells. The noradrenergic-dependent facilitation of early VEP component counteracts the cholinergically-induced reduction.

  19. Electrically Elicited Visual Evoked Potentials in Argus II Retinal Implant Wearers

    PubMed Central

    Stronks, H. Christiaan; Barry, Michael P.; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We characterized electrically elicited visual evoked potentials (eVEPs) in Argus II retinal implant wearers. Methods. eVEPs were recorded in four subjects, and analyzed by determining amplitude and latency of the first two positive peaks (P1 and P2). Subjects provided subjective feedback by rating the brightness and size of the phosphenes. We established eVEP input–output relationships, eVEP variability between and within subjects, the effect of stimulating different areas of the retina, and the maximal pulse rate to record eVEPs reliably. Results. eVEP waveforms had low signal-to-noise ratios, requiring long recording times and substantial signal processing. Waveforms varied between subjects, but showed good reproducibility and consistent parameter dependence within subjects. P2 amplitude overall was the most robust outcome measure and proved an accurate indicator of subjective threshold. Peak latencies showed small within-subject variability, yet their correlation with stimulus level and subjective rating were more variable than that of peak amplitudes. Pulse rates of up to 2/3 Hz resulted in reliable eVEP recordings. Perceived phosphene brightness declined over time, as reflected in P1 amplitude, but not in P2 amplitude or peak latencies. Stimulating-electrode location significantly affected P1 and P2 amplitude and latency, but not subjective percepts. Conclusions. While recording times and signal processing are more demanding than for standard visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, the eVEP has proven to be a reliable tool to verify retinal implant functionality. eVEPs correlated with various stimulus parameters and with perceptual ratings. In view of these findings, eVEPs may become an important tool in functional investigations of retinal prostheses. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00407602.) Dutch Abstract PMID:23611993

  20. Electrically elicited visual evoked potentials in Argus II retinal implant wearers.

    PubMed

    Stronks, H Christiaan; Barry, Michael P; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2013-06-06

    We characterized electrically elicited visual evoked potentials (eVEPs) in Argus II retinal implant wearers. eVEPs were recorded in four subjects, and analyzed by determining amplitude and latency of the first two positive peaks (P1 and P2). Subjects provided subjective feedback by rating the brightness and size of the phosphenes. We established eVEP input-output relationships, eVEP variability between and within subjects, the effect of stimulating different areas of the retina, and the maximal pulse rate to record eVEPs reliably. eVEP waveforms had low signal-to-noise ratios, requiring long recording times and substantial signal processing. Waveforms varied between subjects, but showed good reproducibility and consistent parameter dependence within subjects. P2 amplitude overall was the most robust outcome measure and proved an accurate indicator of subjective threshold. Peak latencies showed small within-subject variability, yet their correlation with stimulus level and subjective rating were more variable than that of peak amplitudes. Pulse rates of up to (2)/3 Hz resulted in reliable eVEP recordings. Perceived phosphene brightness declined over time, as reflected in P1 amplitude, but not in P2 amplitude or peak latencies. Stimulating-electrode location significantly affected P1 and P2 amplitude and latency, but not subjective percepts. While recording times and signal processing are more demanding than for standard visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, the eVEP has proven to be a reliable tool to verify retinal implant functionality. eVEPs correlated with various stimulus parameters and with perceptual ratings. In view of these findings, eVEPs may become an important tool in functional investigations of retinal prostheses. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00407602.) Dutch Abstract.

  1. Induced and Evoked Human Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Working Memory Set-Size Effects at Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM asymptotes at a small number of items. Research into the neural correlates of set size effects and VWM capacity limits in general largely focus on the maintenance period of VWM. However, we previously reported that neural resources allocated to individual items during VWM encoding correspond to successful VWM performance. Here we expand on those findings by investigating neural correlates of set size during VWM encoding. We hypothesized that neural signatures of encoding-related VWM capacity limitations should be differentiable as a function of set size. We tested our hypothesis using High Density Electroencephalography (HD-EEG) to analyze frequency components evoked by flickering target items in VWM displays of set size 2 or 4. We found that set size modulated the amplitude of the 1st and 2nd harmonic frequencies evoked during successful VWM encoding across frontal and occipital-parietal electrodes. Frontal sites exhibited the most robust effects for the 2nd harmonic (set size 2 > set size 4). Additionally, we found a set-size effect on the induced power of delta-band (1–4 Hz) activity (set size 2 > set size 4). These results are consistent with a capacity limited VWM resource at encoding that is distributed across to-be-remembered items in a VWM display. This resource may work in conjunction with a task-specific selection process that determines which items are to be encoded and which are to be ignored. These neural set size effects support the view that VWM capacity limitations begin with encoding related processes. PMID:27902738

  2. Binocular summation in normal, monocularly deprived, and strabismic cats: visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Sclar, G; Ohzawa, I; Freeman, R D

    1986-01-01

    We have studied visual evoked potentials (VEP) in the cat using dichoptically presented sinusoidal gratings. Our goals were to determine if binocular disparity causes differential responses in the VEP, and to examine the effects of monocular deprivation and convergent or divergent strabismus on the degree of binocular summation. Binocular disparity in stimuli causes no regular alterations of visual evoked responses, except at very low spatial frequencies. However, this apparent selectivity is probably due to luminance modulation in the central retina at low frequencies. The insensitivity to binocular disparity establishes that binocular summation in the VEP may be estimated without regard to the relative phase of gratings presented to the two eyes. Binocular summation of the VEP was examined in normal animals. We found that the ratio of the binocularly evoked response to the largest monocular response (averaged across spatial frequency) ranged from 1.27 to 2.12 (4 animals) and had a mean of 1.48. These values fall within the range which has been reported for human subjects. The degree of summation might be expected to be greatly reduced in strabismic and monocularly deprived animals, in which the majority of the cells are functionally monocular. While summation was found to be reduced in 5 esotropic (convergent) animals (range = 1.13-1.24; mean = 1.18) it was approximately normal in three exotropic (divergent) animals (range = 1.29-2.12; mean = 1.61). However, single unit recordings carried out on the same animals show similar reductions of cells that can be driven through either eye for both groups of animals. Recordings from three monocularly deprived animals, on the other hand, show evidence of binocular interaction in the form of suppression. In this case, response amplitudes obtained using binocular stimulation were consistently and substantially smaller than those obtained from the normal eye alone (range = 0.76-0.85; mean = 0.80). We conclude that convergent

  3. Anxiety affects the amplitudes of red and green color-elicited flash visual evoked potentials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Yuki; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Urushihara, Ryo; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that negative emotional changes and conditions affect the visual faculties of humans at the neural level. On the other hand, the effects of emotion on color perception in particular, which are based on evoked potentials, are unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether different anxiety levels affect the color information processing for each of 3 wavelengths by using flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. In results, significant positive correlations were observed between FVEP amplitudes and state or trait anxiety scores in the long (sensed as red) and middle (sensed as green) wavelengths. On the other hand, short-wavelength-evoked FVEPs were not correlated with anxiety level. Our results suggest that negative emotional conditions may affect color sense processing in humans.

  4. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE USING PATTERN ELICITED VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, as well as other channels. This has led to the hypothesis that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity, CNS depression, and altered visual evoked ...

  5. Stimulus intensity affects early sensory processing: visual contrast modulates evoked gamma-band activity in human EEG.

    PubMed

    Schadow, Jeanette; Lenz, Daniel; Thaerig, Stefanie; Busch, Niko A; Fründ, Ingo; Rieger, Jochem W; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2007-10-01

    We studied the effect of different contrast levels on the visual evoked gamma-band response (GBR) in order to investigate whether the GBR is modulated in a similar manner as previously reported for visual evoked potentials. Previous studies showed that the GBR can be modulated by individual characteristics (age) and experimental conditions (task difficulty, attention). However, stimulus properties, such as size and spatial frequency, also have a large impact on the GBR, which necessitates identification and control of relevant stimulus properties for optimal experimental setups. Twenty-one healthy participants were investigated during a forced-choice discrimination task. Sinusoidal gratings were presented at three contrast levels with a constant spatial frequency of 5 cycles per degree visual arc (cpd). The present data replicate the results reported for visual evoked potentials and exhibit a contrast dependent modulation of the GBR. Gamma activity is increased for higher contrast levels. These results demonstrate the importance of stimulus contrast for evoked gamma activity. Thus, it appears meaningful to control the contrast of stimuli in experiments investigating the role of gamma activity in perception and information processing.

  6. Binocular interaction in normal vision studied by pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEPS).

    PubMed

    di Summa, A; Polo, A; Tinazzi, M; Zanette, G; Bertolasi, L; Bongiovanni, L G; Fiaschi, A

    1997-04-01

    Monocular and binocular visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in response to different check size (15-21-38-84 minutes or arc) were studied in 14 subjects with normal visual acuity and stereopsis. The binocular VEP amplitude is slightly higher than the VEP amplitude on stimulation of the "better eye" and significantly higher than the VEP amplitude on stimulation of the "worse eye"; this effect is observed using small checks and almost exclusively involved N75-P100. Both the N75 and P100 peaks occur earlier after binocular than monocular stimulation. The shortening of the N75 mean latency is significantly greater than that of the P100 mean latency when larger check sizes are used. The mean latency of the N145 potential is not significantly different in monocular and binocular stimulus conditions. The slight summation effect and latency shortening in the binocular VEPs are not consistent with the hypothesis that it is the sum of separate monocular signals originating from the visual cortex that gives rise to the response. The early components of both monocular and binocular VEPs are thought to be of post-synaptic origin (outside layer 4c of area 17), where the inputs become mixed so that most cells receive information from both eyes. The amplitude enhancement of binocular VEPs, which mainly occurs when using small checks, may be related to the increase in the total amount of cortical activity representing the macular region; this may account for binocular superiority in fine spatial resolution. The latency shortening in binocular conditions can be explained by considering that the critical determinant of the latency is the fundamental spatial frequency of the pattern. When coarse patterns are used, their effectiveness in parafoveal stimulation may affect the VEPs, with a significant contribution coming from the more peripheral retina. The enlargement of the visual field when the eyes see simultaneously may therefore further reduce the latency of the response when using the

  7. Steady-state sweep visual evoked potential processing denoised by wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Yamamoto, Jorge F.; Salomão, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Pereira, Josenilson M.; Sacai, Paula Y.; de Oliveira, José P.; Costa, Marcio A.; Burattini, Marcelo N.

    2008-03-01

    Visually evoked potential (VEP) is a very small electrical signal originated in the visual cortex in response to periodic visual stimulation. Sweep-VEP is a modified VEP procedure used to measure grating visual acuity in non-verbal and preverbal patients. This biopotential is buried in a large amount of electroencephalographic (EEG) noise and movement related artifact. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) plays a dominant role in determining both systematic and statistic errors. The purpose of this study is to present a method based on wavelet transform technique for filtering and extracting steady-state sweep-VEP. Counter-phase sine-wave luminance gratings modulated at 6 Hz were used as stimuli to determine sweep-VEP grating acuity thresholds. The amplitude and phase of the second-harmonic (12 Hz) pattern reversal response were analyzed using the fast Fourier transform after the wavelet filtering. The wavelet transform method was used to decompose the VEP signal into wavelet coefficients by a discrete wavelet analysis to determine which coefficients yield significant activity at the corresponding frequency. In a subsequent step only significant coefficients were considered and the remaining was set to zero allowing a reconstruction of the VEP signal. This procedure resulted in filtering out other frequencies that were considered noise. Numerical simulations and analyses of human VEP data showed that this method has provided higher SNR when compared with the classical recursive least squares (RLS) method. An additional advantage was a more appropriate phase analysis showing more realistic second-harmonic amplitude value during phase brake.

  8. [Evaluation of preclinical onset in patients with the childhood form of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy--usefulness of visual cognitive function and evoked potential tests].

    PubMed

    Furushima, Wakana; Inagaki, Masumi; Gunji, Atsuko; Kaga, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroko; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2008-07-01

    We examined both visual evoked potential (VEP) and neuropsychological tests in 18 patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). Patients consisted of 10 boys with apparent lesions in the posterior white matter on MR imaging, 3 with lesions in the frontal white matter area and 5 that were neurologically asymptomatic with no apparent brain MRI abnormalities. Almost all patients with posterior WM lesion showed patterns of lower PIQ than VIQ on WISC-III and lower scores on scales for simultaneous processing than for sequential processing on Kaufman Assesment Battery for Children (K-ABC). Four of 5 asymptomatic patients showed PIQ/VIQ patterns similar to those in the posterior group. Patients with a difference more than 13 between PIQ and VIQ also showed poor results on Frostig developmental test of visual perception (DTVP). There was a prolongation of the peak latency of P100 on flash VEP in many patients with posterior whitematter lesions, however, asymptomatic patients did not show any abnormality of P100 latency but there was an increased amplitude of N75-P100 on flash and pattern reversal stimuli VEP. One patient with abnormally high VEP (31.4 microV; + 3.6 SD) gradually improved to the normal range (11.4 microV; 0SD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These cognitive and neurophysiological examinations could be useful in the detection of preclinical onset of childhood ALD before the appearance of MRI lesions on MRI.

  9. The steady-state visual evoked potential reveals neural correlates of the items encoded into visual working memory

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Dwight J.; Gurariy, Gennadiy; Gennadiy, Gabriella G.; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) capacity limitations are estimated to be ~4 items. Yet, it remains unclear why certain items from a given memory array may be successfully retrieved from VWM and others are lost. Existing measures of the neural correlates of VWM cannot address this question because they measure the aggregate processing of the entire stimulus array rather than neural signatures of individual items. Moreover, this cumulative processing is usually measured during the delay period, thereby reflecting the allocation of neural resources during VWM maintenance. Here, we use the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) to identify the neural correlates of individual stimuli at VWM encoding and test two distinct hypotheses: the focused-resource hypothesis and the diffuse-resource hypothesis, for how the allocation of neural resources during VWM encoding may contribute to VWM capacity limitations. First, we found that SSVEP amplitudes were larger for stimuli that were later remembered than for items that were subsequently forgotten. Second, this pattern generalized so that the SSVEP amplitudes were also larger for the unprobed stimuli in correct compared to incorrect trials. These data are consistent with the diffuse-resource view in which attentional resources are broadly allocated across the whole stimulus array. These results illustrate the important role encoding mechanisms play in limiting the capacity of VWM. PMID:25173712

  10. The effect of progressively increased physical efforts on visual evoked potentials in volleyball players and non-athletes.

    PubMed

    Zwierko, Teresa; Lubiński, Wojciech; Lubkowska, Anna; Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Czepita, Damian

    2011-11-01

    We assessed the effect of physical effort with increasing intensity on neural activity in the visual pathway in volleyball players (n = 10) and non-athletes (n = 10). Participants performed three 10-min tests of increasing intensity on a cycle ergometer. Each participant was assigned individual workloads below the lactate threshold (40% [Vdot]O(2max)), at the lactate threshold (65-75% [Vdot]O(2max)), and above the lactate threshold (80% [Vdot]O(2max)). Four recordings of visual evoked potentials were made: pre-exercise and immediately after each of the three subsequent tests. We assessed neural activity of the visual pathway by examining the amplitude and latency of the N75, P100, and N135 components of the visual evoked potentials waveform. Pre-exercise P100 wave latency was shorter (P < 0.05) in volleyball players than in non-athletes. In non-athletes, the latency of P100 following the first and second effort (40% and 65-75% [Vdot]O(2max)) was reduced compared with pre-exercise (P < 0.01). However, P100 latency increased and P100 amplitude decreased after the third test (80% [Vdot]O(2max)) in non-athletes. In contrast, no significant changes in the latency or amplitude of visual evoked potentials were observed in the athletes in the three tests. Neural conductivity in the visual pathway after exercise might be at least partially dependent on the individual's personal training adaptation status.

  11. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  12. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  13. Primary generators of visually evoked field potentials recorded in the macaque auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Smiley, John F; Schroeder, Charles E

    2017-09-18

    Prior studies have reported "local" field potential (LFP) responses to faces in the macaque auditory cortex and have suggested that such face-LFPs may be substrates of audiovisual integration. However, while field potentials (FPs) may reflect the synaptic currents of neurons near the recording electrode, due to the use of a distant reference electrode, they often reflect those of synaptic activity occurring in distant sites as well. Thus, FP recordings within a given brain region (e.g., auditory cortex) may be "contaminated" by activity generated elsewhere in the brain. To determine if face responses are in fact generated within macaque auditory cortex, we recorded FPs and concomitant multiunit activity (MUA) with linear array multielectrodes across auditory cortex in three macaques (one female), and applied current source density (CSD) analysis to the laminar FP profile. CSD analysis revealed no appreciable local generator contribution to the visual FP in auditory cortex, though we did note an increase in the amplitude of visual FP with cortical depth, suggesting that their generators are located below auditory cortex. In the underlying inferotemporal cortex we found polarity inversions of the main visual FP components accompanied by robust CSD responses and large amplitude MUA. These results indicate that face-evoked FP responses in auditory cortex are not generated locally, but are volume conducted from other face-responsive regions. In broader terms, our results underscore the caution that unless far-field contamination is removed, LFPs in general may reflect such "far field" activity, in addition to or in absence of local synaptic responses.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTField potentials (FPs) can index neuronal population activity that is not evident in action potentials. However, due to volume conduction, field potentials may reflect activity in distant neurons superimposed upon that of neurons close to the recording electrode. This is problematic as the default

  14. Modulation of visual evoked potentials by high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in migraineurs.

    PubMed

    Omland, Petter M; Uglem, Martin; Engstrøm, Morten; Linde, Mattias; Hagen, Knut; Sand, Trond

    2014-10-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates cortical excitability. We investigated its effect on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in migraine. Thirty-two headache-free controls (CO), 25 interictal (MINT) and 7 preictal migraineurs (MPRE) remained after exclusions. VEPs to 8' and 65' checks were averaged in six blocks of 100 single responses. VEPs were recorded before, directly after and 25min after 10Hz rTMS. The study was blinded for diagnosis during recording and for diagnosis and block number during analysis. First block amplitudes and habituation (linear amplitude change over blocks) were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA. With 65' checks, N70-P100 habituation was reduced in MINT compared to CO after rTMS (p=0.013). With 8' checks, habituation was reduced in MPRE compared to MINT and CO after rTMS (p<0.016). No effects of rTMS on first block amplitudes were found. RTMS reduced habituation only in migraineurs, indicating increased responsivity to rTMS. The magnocellular visual subsystem may be affected interictally, while the parvocellular system may only be affected preictally. Migraineurs may have increased responsiveness to rTMS because of a cortical dysfunction that changes before a migraine attack. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  16. Neurophysiological assessment of perceived image quality using steady-state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, Sebastian; Acqualagna, Laura; Porbadnigk, Anne K.; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin; Wiegand, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    An approach to the neural measurement of perceived image quality using electroencephalography (EEG) is presented. 6 different images were tested on 6 different distortion levels. The distortions were introduced by a hybrid video encoder. The presented study consists of two parts: In a first part, subjects were asked to evaluate the quality of the test stimuli behaviorally during a conventional psychophysical test using a degradation category rating procedure. In a second part, subjects were presented undistorted and distorted texture images in a periodically alternating fashion at a fixed frequency. This alternating presentation elicits so called steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) as a brain response that can be measured on the scalp. The amplitude of modulations in the brain signals is significantly and strongly negatively correlated with the magnitude of visual impairment reported by the subjects. This neurophysiological approach to image quality assessment may potentially lead to a more objective evaluation, as behavioral approaches suffer from drawbacks such as biases, inter-subject variances and limitations to test duration.

  17. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    Objective. We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). Approach. By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Main results. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. Significance. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  18. Steady-state visually evoked potential topography during the Wisconsin card sorting test.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, R B; Ciorciari, J; Pipingas, A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes, for the first time, changes in steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) topography associated with the performance of a computerised version of the Wisconsin card sort test (WCS). The SSVEP was recorded from 64 scalp sites and was elicited by a 13 Hz spatially uniform visual flicker presented continuously while 16 subjects performed the WCS. in the WCS, the sort criterion was automatically changed after subjects had sorted 10 cards correctly. Feedback on the 11th card always constituted a cue for a change in the sort criterion. It was found that in the 1-2 sec interval after the occurrence of the cue to change sort criterion, the prefrontal, central and right parieto-temporal regions showed a pronounced attenuation in SSVEP amplitude and an increase in phase lag. These changes, interpreted as an increase in regional cortical activity, are not apparent in the equivalent portions of the WCS when the sort criterion does not need to be changed. These results indicate that the levels of prefrontal and right parieto-temporal activity varied during the performance of the WCS, peaking at the times a change in sort criterion was required.

  19. Effects of caffeine on visual evoked potential (P300) and neuromotor performance.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Andréa Camaz; Veiga, Heloisa; Cagy, Maurício; Piedade, Roberto; Pompeu, Fernando; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2004-06-01

    The stimulant effects of caffeine on cognitive performance have been widely investigated. The visual evoked potential, specially the P300 component, has been used in studies that explain the stimulant mechanisms of caffeine through neurophysiological methods. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate electrophysiological changes (P300 latency) and modification of cognitive and motor performance produced by caffeine. Fifteen healthy volunteers, 9 women and 6 men (26 +/- 5 years, 67 +/- 12.5 kg) were submitted three times to the following procedure: electroencefalographic recording, Word Color Stroop Test, and visual discrimination task. Subjects took a gelatin caffeine capsule (400 mg) or a placebo (P1 and P2), in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. A one-factor ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test were used to compare dependent variables on the C, P1 and P2 moments. The statistical analyses indicated a non-significant decrease in reaction time, Stroop execution time and latency at Cz on the caffeine moment when compared to the others. Moreover, a non-significant increase in Stroop raw score and latency at Pz could be observed. The only significant result was found at Fz. These findings suggest that the positive tendency of caffeine to improve cognitive performance is probably associated with changes in the frontal cortex, a widely recognized attention area.

  20. Steady-state visually evoked potential correlates of human body perception.

    PubMed

    Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie; Jurilj, Verena; Gruber, Thomas; Vocks, Silja

    2016-11-01

    In cognitive neuroscience, interest in the neuronal basis underlying the processing of human bodies is steadily increasing. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, it is assumed that the processing of pictures of human bodies is anchored in a network of specialized brain areas comprising the extrastriate and the fusiform body area (EBA, FBA). An alternative to examine the dynamics within these networks is electroencephalography, more specifically so-called steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs). In SSVEP tasks, a visual stimulus is presented repetitively at a predefined flickering rate and typically elicits a continuous oscillatory brain response at this frequency. This brain response is characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio-a major advantage for source reconstructions. The main goal of present study was to demonstrate the feasibility of this method to study human body perception. To that end, we presented pictures of bodies and contrasted the resulting SSVEPs to two control conditions, i.e., non-objects and pictures of everyday objects (chairs). We found specific SSVEPs amplitude differences between bodies and both control conditions. Source reconstructions localized the SSVEP generators to a network of temporal, occipital and parietal areas. Interestingly, only body perception resulted in activity differences in middle temporal and lateral occipitotemporal areas, most likely reflecting the EBA/FBA.

  1. Effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mehmet; Dönmez, Barış Özgür; Öztürk, Nihal; Başaranlar, Göksun; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Derin, Narin; Özdemir, Semir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in diabetic rats. METHODS Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups as normal control, diabetic control and diabetic rats treated with sodium tungstate. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Sodium tungstate [40 mg/(kg·d)] was administered for 12wk and then VEPs were recorded. Additionally, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels were measured in brain tissues. RESULTS The latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2 and P3 waves were significantly prolonged in diabetic rats compared with control group. Diabetes mellitus caused an increase in the lipid peroxidation process that was accompanied by changes in VEPs. However, prolonged latencies of VEPs for all components returned to control levels in sodium tungstate-treated group. The treatment of sodium tungstate significantly decreased brain TBARS levels and depleted the prolonged latencies of VEP components compared with diabetic control group. CONCLUSION Sodium tungstate shows protective effects on visual pathway in diabetic rats, and it can be worthy of further study for potential use. PMID:27275420

  2. Visual Evoked Potential Response Among Drug Abusers- A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajeev; Thapar, Satish; Mittal, Shilekh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is important preclinical evidence that substance abuse may produce neurophysiological disturbances particularly in relation to altered neural synchronization in Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP). Aim The purpose of current study was to compare the latencies and amplitudes of different waveforms of VEP among different drug abusers and controls and also to identify early neurological damage so that proper counseling and timely intervention can be undertaken. Materials and Methods VEP was assessed by Data Acquisition and Analysis system in a sample of 58 drug abusers, all males, within age group of 15-45 years as well as in age matched 30 healthy controls. The peak latencies and peak to peak amplitudes of different waveforms were measured by applying one-way Anova test and unpaired t-test using SPSS version 16. Results In between drug abusers and controls, the difference in the duration of N75 and P100 waveform of VEP was found to be statistically highly significant (p<0.001) in both the eyes. Also the amplitude of wave P100 was found to be decreased among drug abusers in both eyes. Conclusion Chronic intoxication by different drugs has been extensively associated with amplitude reduction of P100 and prolonged latency of N75 and P100 reflecting an adverse effects of drug dependence on neural transmission within primary visual areas of brain. PMID:27042456

  3. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming.

  4. Three-channel Lissajous' trajectory of the human short latency visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Pratt, H; Bleich, N; Har'el, Z; Golos, E

    1986-05-01

    Three orthogonally derived voltage-time records, when plotted simultaneously on three-dimensional voltage-voltage-voltage coordinates, produce a 3-Channel Lissajous' Trajectory (3CLT). 3CLTs of short latency visual evoked potentials (SVEP) were obtained for 8 adult humans (16 eyes) in response to monocular flash stimulation. Intersubject variability of 3CLT of SVEP was small enough to enable identification along the trajectory of comparable planar-segments of approx. 3-5 ms duration across subjects. In each planar-segment, the point at which the trajectory exhibited marked bending was noted. These points were called apices and they corresponded to maxima in the trajectory's distance from the origin (Trajectory Amplitude). Intersubject variability in apex latencies was comparable to, or smaller than, peak latency variability of single-channel records. 3CLT of SVEP consisted of 8 planar-segments in each of the latency ranges of 0-40, 40-70 and 70-100 ms. Analysis of 3CLT, combining the criteria of segment planarity, apices and trajectory amplitude peaks, enabled differentiation between components that had been considered the same in surface distribution studies. 3CLT of SVEP seemed to be influenced by the direction of propagation along the visual pathway.

  5. Comparison of Visual Evoked Potentials and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kromer, Robert; Serbecic, Nermin; Hausner, Lucrezia; Froelich, Lutz; Beutelspacher, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a long term progressive neurodegenerative disease and might affect the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) of the eye. There is increasing evidence that visual evoked potentials (VEP), which are an objective way to indicate visual field loss, might be affected by the disease as well. Materials and Methods: About 22 patients (mean age: 75.9 ± 6.1 years; 14 women) with mild-to-moderate AD and 22 sex-matched healthy patients were examined. We compared the use of VEP and RNFLT using the latest high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography with eye-tracking capabilities for optimized peripapillary scan centering for the first time in AD patients. Results: The mean MMSE score was 22.59 ± 5.47 in the AD group, and did not significantly correlate with the VEP latencies. We found no significant difference between the VEP latencies of the AD patients and those of the control patients. No peripapillary sector of the retina had a RNFLT significantly correlated with the VEP latencies. Discussion: We demonstrated that pattern VEP did not show any significant correlation despite subtle loss in RNFLT. It remains open whether additional flash VEP combined with RNFLT analysis may be useful in diagnosing AD, particularly for mild-to-moderate stages of the disease. PMID:24379800

  6. [Hemispheric asymmetry of visual evoked potentials during human recognition of facial emotional expressions].

    PubMed

    Davydov, D V; Mikhaĭlova, E S; Logunova, N N; Nikitaeva, E S

    2002-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEP) in standard 16 EEG derivations were recorded in 26 young men and 20 women during recognition of facial emotional expressions and geometric figures. The stimuli were presented on a computer screen in the center of the visual field or randomly in the right or left vision hemifields. Peak VEP latency and mean amplitude in 50-ms epochs were measured; spatiotemporal VEP dynamics was analyzed in a series of topographic maps. The right hemisphere was shown to be more important in processing emotional faces. The character of the asymmetry was dynamic: at earlier stages of emotion processing the electrical activity was higher in the right inferior temporal region compared to the left symmetrical site. Later on the activity was higher in the right frontal and central areas. The dynamic mapping of "face-selective" component N180 of VEPs revealed the onset of activation over the right frontal areas that was followed by the fast activation of symmetrical left zones. Notably, this dynamics didn't correlate with the hemifield of stimuli exposition. The degree of asymmetry was lower during presentation of figures, especially in the inferior temporal and frontal regions. The prominent asymmetry of information processes in the inferior temporal and frontal areas was suggested to be specific for recognition of facial expression.

  7. Simulated nystagmus suppresses pattern-reversal but not pattern-onset visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michael B; Seufert, Petra S; Bach, Michael

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify and compare the effects of simulated horizontal nystagmus on pattern-reversal and pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEPs). In eight visually normal subjects with normal oculomotor behaviour, we monitored eye movements and recorded pattern-reversal and pattern-onset VEPs from occipital electrodes. Subjects viewed the stimulus monocularly via a mirror, which was placed close to the eye and driven by a scanner at four different amplitudes (0, 1, 2, and 3 degrees ) with a 4 Hz saw-tooth waveform to simulate horizontal jerk-nystagmus. Retinal image motion nearly abolished the pattern-reversal VEPs (maximal reduction by 85%; mean reduction by 72%, P<0.001), while there was a non-significant reduction (mean reduction by 15%) of the pattern-onset VEPs. The differential effect of simulated nystagmus on pattern-reversal and pattern-onset VEPs resembles that reported in studies on nystagmus patients. We conclude that the interaction of retinal image motion with the stimulus is sufficient to explain the reduction of pattern-reversal VEPs in patients with nystagmus and propose simulated nystagmus as a useful tool to test the influence of nystagmus on the efficiency of VEP stimuli. This study demonstrates how horizontal jerk-nystagmus can be simulated and suggests possible mechanisms by which nystagmus reduces VEP responses.

  8. Bioreplicated visual features of nanofabricated buprestid beetle decoys evoke stereotypical male mating flights

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Michael J.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Hall, Loyal P.; Badding, John V.; Bischof, Jesse L.; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Imrei, Zoltán; Janik, Gergely; Mastro, Victor C.; Hazen, Missy; Baker, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscale bioreplication processes present the potential for novel basic and applied research into organismal behavioral processes. Insect behavior potentially could be affected by physical features existing at the nanoscale level. We used nano-bioreplicated visual decoys of female emerald ash borer beetles (Agrilus planipennis) to evoke stereotypical mate-finding behavior, whereby males fly to and alight on the decoys as they would on real females. Using an industrially scalable nanomolding process, we replicated and evaluated the importance of two features of the outer cuticular surface of the beetle’s wings: structural interference coloration of the elytra by multilayering of the epicuticle and fine-scale surface features consisting of spicules and spines that scatter light into intense strands. Two types of decoys that lacked one or both of these elements were fabricated, one type nano-bioreplicated and the other 3D-printed with no bioreplicated surface nanostructural elements. Both types were colored with green paint. The light-scattering properties of the nano-bioreplicated surfaces were verified by shining a white laser on the decoys in a dark room and projecting the scattering pattern onto a white surface. Regardless of the coloration mechanism, the nano-bioreplicated decoys evoked the complete attraction and landing sequence of Agrilus males. In contrast, males made brief flying approaches toward the decoys without nanostructured features, but diverted away before alighting on them. The nano-bioreplicated decoys were also electroconductive, a feature used on traps such that beetles alighting onto them were stunned, killed, and collected. PMID:25225359

  9. Bioreplicated visual features of nanofabricated buprestid beetle decoys evoke stereotypical male mating flights.

    PubMed

    Domingue, Michael J; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pulsifer, Drew P; Hall, Loyal P; Badding, John V; Bischof, Jesse L; Martín-Palma, Raúl J; Imrei, Zoltán; Janik, Gergely; Mastro, Victor C; Hazen, Missy; Baker, Thomas C

    2014-09-30

    Recent advances in nanoscale bioreplication processes present the potential for novel basic and applied research into organismal behavioral processes. Insect behavior potentially could be affected by physical features existing at the nanoscale level. We used nano-bioreplicated visual decoys of female emerald ash borer beetles (Agrilus planipennis) to evoke stereotypical mate-finding behavior, whereby males fly to and alight on the decoys as they would on real females. Using an industrially scalable nanomolding process, we replicated and evaluated the importance of two features of the outer cuticular surface of the beetle's wings: structural interference coloration of the elytra by multilayering of the epicuticle and fine-scale surface features consisting of spicules and spines that scatter light into intense strands. Two types of decoys that lacked one or both of these elements were fabricated, one type nano-bioreplicated and the other 3D-printed with no bioreplicated surface nanostructural elements. Both types were colored with green paint. The light-scattering properties of the nano-bioreplicated surfaces were verified by shining a white laser on the decoys in a dark room and projecting the scattering pattern onto a white surface. Regardless of the coloration mechanism, the nano-bioreplicated decoys evoked the complete attraction and landing sequence of Agrilus males. In contrast, males made brief flying approaches toward the decoys without nanostructured features, but diverted away before alighting on them. The nano-bioreplicated decoys were also electroconductive, a feature used on traps such that beetles alighting onto them were stunned, killed, and collected.

  10. Alterations of visual and auditory evoked potentials in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knoth, Inga Sophia; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Major, Philippe; Michaud, Jacques L; Lippé, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic form of intellectual disability and one of the few known monogenic causes of autism. It is caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FMR1 ('Fragile X Mental Retardation 1') gene, which prevents expression of the 'Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein' (FMRP). In FXS, the absence of FMRP leads to altered structural and functional development of the synapse, while preventing activity-based synapse maturation and synaptic pruning, which are essential for normal brain development and cognitive development. Possible impairments in information processing can be non-invasively investigated using electrophysiology. We compared auditory (AEP) and visual (VEP) evoked potentials in twelve adolescents and young adults (10-22 years) affected by FXS to healthy controls matched by chronological age (N=12) and developmental age of cognitive functioning (N=9; 5-7 years), using analysis of variance. In the visual modality, the N70 and N2 amplitude have been found increased in FXS in comparison to the chronological, but not the developmental control group at occipital sites, whereas in the auditory modality N1, P2 and N2 amplitude as well as N2 latency have been found increased in FXS, relative to both chronological and developmental control groups at mid-central sites. The AEP/VEP profile suggests disruptions in sensory processing specific to FXS that exceed immaturity of physiological activity. In addition, the auditory modality seems to be more affected than the visual modality. Results are discussed in light of possible underlying neuronal mechanisms, including deficits in synaptic pruning and neuronal inhibition that might account for a hyperreactive nervous system in FXS. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in early sensory-perceptual processing in synesthesia: a visual evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Kylie J; Foxe, John J; Molholm, Sophie; Kelly, Simon P; Shalgi, Shani; Mitchell, Kevin J; Newell, Fiona N

    2008-11-15

    Synesthesia is a condition where stimulation of a single sensory modality or processing stream elicits an idiosyncratic, yet reliable perception in one or more other modalities or streams. Various models have been proposed to explain synesthesia, which have in common aberrant cross-activation of one cortical area by another. This has been observed directly in cases of linguistic-color synesthesia as cross-activation of the 'color area', V4, by stimulation of the grapheme area. The underlying neural substrates that mediate cross-activations in synesthesia are not well understood, however. In addition, the overall integrity of the visual system has never been assessed and it is not known whether wider differences in sensory-perceptual processing are associated with the condition. To assess whether fundamental differences in perceptual processing exist in synesthesia, we utilised high-density 128-channel electroencephalography (EEG) to measure sensory-perceptual processing using stimuli that differentially bias activation of the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways of the visual system. High and low spatial frequency gratings and luminance-contrast squares were presented to 15 synesthetes and 15 controls. We report, for the first time, early sensory-perceptual differences in synesthetes relative to non-synesthete controls in response to simple stimuli that do not elicit synesthetic color experiences. The differences are manifested in the early sensory components of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to stimuli that bias both magnocellular and parvocellular responses, but are opposite in direction, suggesting a differential effect on these two pathways. We discuss our results with reference to widespread connectivity differences as a broader phenotype of synesthesia.

  12. Interrelationship of optical coherence tomography and multifocal visual-evoked potentials after optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, Alexander; Arvind, Hemamalini; Garrick, Raymond; Graham, Stuart L; Paine, Mark; Yiannikas, Con

    2010-05-01

    Acute optic neuritis (ON) is often followed by recovery of visual function. Although this recovery is mainly attributable to resolution of the acute inflammation, the redistribution of ion channels along the demyelinated membrane, and subsequent remyelination, part of it may be the result of neural plasticity. In the present study, the interrelationship was examined between structural (retinal nerve fiber layer [RNFL] thickness) and functional (amplitude of multifocal visual evoked potentials [mfVEPs]) measures of the integrity of the visual pathway in the postacute stage of ON, to determine whether there was any evidence of ongoing neural reorganization. Twenty-five subjects with acute unilateral ON underwent serial RNFL thickness measurement and mfVEP recording. The inter-eye asymmetry of both measures was analyzed. In the period between 6 and 12 months, the subjects were considered free of optic disc edema, and that period was used to analyze the structure-function relationship. Twenty control subjects were also examined. There were significant but opposite changes in RNFL thickness and mfVEP amplitude. The average asymmetry of RNFL thickness between affected and fellow eyes increased from 17.5 +/- 11.5 to 21.1 +/- 12.8 microm (P = 0.0003), indicating progressive axonal loss, whereas mfVEP amplitude asymmetry decreased from 46.6 +/- 32.4 to 38.3 +/- 31.1 nV (P = 0.0015), indicating continuous functional recovery. In comparison to the 6-month results, the mfVEP amplitude in the ON eye improved by 17.8%, whereas RNFL thickness decreased by 20.8%. The result remained unchanged regardless of the degree of optic nerve remyelination. The finding of structural-functional discrepancy at the postinflammatory stage may support the concept that neural plasticity contributes to functional recovery after acute ON.

  13. Visual Evoked Cortical Potential (VECP) Elicited by Sinusoidal Gratings Controlled by Pseudo-Random Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Carolina S.; Souza, Givago S.; Gomes, Bruno D.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of contrast detection mechanisms to the visual cortical evoked potential (VECP) have been investigated studying the contrast-response and spatial frequency-response functions. Previously, the use of m-sequences for stimulus control has been almost restricted to multifocal electrophysiology stimulation and, in some aspects, it substantially differs from conventional VECPs. Single stimulation with spatial contrast temporally controlled by m-sequences has not been extensively tested or compared to multifocal techniques. Our purpose was to evaluate the influence of spatial frequency and contrast of sinusoidal gratings on the VECP elicited by pseudo-random stimulation. Nine normal subjects were stimulated by achromatic sinusoidal gratings driven by pseudo random binary m-sequence at seven spatial frequencies (0.4–10 cpd) and three stimulus sizes (4°, 8°, and 16° of visual angle). At 8° subtence, six contrast levels were used (3.12–99%). The first order kernel (K1) did not provide a consistent measurable signal across spatial frequencies and contrasts that were tested–signal was very small or absent–while the second order kernel first (K2.1) and second (K2.2) slices exhibited reliable responses for the stimulus range. The main differences between results obtained with the K2.1 and K2.2 were in the contrast gain as measured in the amplitude versus contrast and amplitude versus spatial frequency functions. The results indicated that K2.1 was dominated by M-pathway, but for some stimulus condition some P-pathway contribution could be found, while the second slice reflected the P-pathway contribution. The present work extended previous findings of the visual pathways contribution to VECP elicited by pseudorandom stimulation for a wider range of spatial frequencies. PMID:23940546

  14. Influence of narcotics on luminance and frequency modulated visual evoked potentials in rats.

    PubMed

    Jehle, T; Ehlken, D; Wingert, K; Feuerstein, T J; Bach, M; Lagrèze, W A

    2009-06-01

    Quantification of visual function is essential for the impact of disease models and their treatment. Recently, we introduced a chronic implant model to record visual evoked potentials (VEP) in awake Brown-Norway rats. Here, we investigated the hemispheric distribution of VEP after monocular stimulation, the chronic electrode implantation and the influence of commonly used anesthetics. Potentials were recorded by electrodes, implanted epidurally over the superior colliculus. The entire visual field of the rat was stimulated. Flicker stimuli were modulated in luminance with a modulation depth from 5 to 80% at 7.5 Hz and flashes with a modulation depth of >95% in a frequency range of 2.9-38 Hz. Recordings were constant over 9 days. When one eye was blinded, the potentials recorded from the contralateral side were not affected, while the potentials of the ipsilateral side were markedly reduced. Further, potentials of awake animals were compared with those receiving general anesthetics. For one group of rats (n = 8), we administered isoflurane by inhalation in five concentrations. Four different groups (n = 7-11) were given choralhydrate (200 and 400 mg/kg) and the combination of ketamine/xyaline (65/7 or 130/14 mg/kg, respectively) intraperitoneally. Isoflurane depressed the VEP in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with chloralhydrate and ketamine/xyaline increased the VEP at low concentrations and depressed it in high concentrations. The new VEP paradigm assesses distinct qualities of contrast vision in rats. All tested narcotics alter VEP amplitudes and can be avoided.

  15. Pattern Reversal Visual Evoked Potential and Cognitive Functions in Subclinical Hypothyroid Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Pooja; Saxena, Yogesh; Gupta, Rani; Kaushik, Rajeev Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is insidious and may occur early in subclinical hypothyroid (SCH) state which can be picked up by electrophysiological study. This study aims to record visual evoked potential (VEP), event-related latency and cognitive functions, and find their association with the levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients with SCH. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 36 adult SCH patients and an equal number of age- and sex-matched euthyroid controls were included. Pattern reversal VEP, visual reaction time (RT), digit spanning test, and AB clock test (ABCT) were done in both SCH cases and euthyroid controls. The observed values were analyzed for comparison of mean values between the groups and correlation of recorded variables with the levels of serum TSH. Results: SCH cases showed a higher P100 (VEP) latency in both the right (103.2 ± 12.3 vs. 102.7 ± 6.8 ms) and left eye (101.1 ± 9.1 vs. 96.2 ± 10.7 ms) as compared to controls, but the difference was statistically insignificant. A significant delay in RT was observed on visible spectra of light in SCH cases (P < 0.001). Digit spanning score (forward and backward) in SCH cases was significantly lower than controls (P < 0.001), and a lower standardized score (<124 or <95th percentile) was significantly associated with SCH state (P = 0.027). No significant difference was observed in visuospatial domain by ABCT between both the groups although the median score was lower in SCH cases. Only digit spanning score showed a significant negative correlation with TSH levels (r = −0.4; P = 0.001). Conclusion: Decline in working memory and RT to visual stimuli is an evidence of the involvement of CNS in SCH. Prolonged latency in VEP may depend on the duration of SCH. PMID:28163503

  16. Visual evoked potential in RCS rats with Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis (OUReP™) implantation.

    PubMed

    Alamusi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hosoya, Osamu; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2017-02-08

    Photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, designated Okayama University type-retinal prosthesis or OUReP™, generates light-evoked surface electric potentials and stimulates neurons. The dye-coupled films or plain films were implanted subretinally in both eyes of 10 Royal College of Surgeons rats with hereditary retinal dystrophy at the age of 6 weeks. Visual evoked potentials in response to monocular flashing light stimuli were recorded from cranially-fixed electrodes, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the implantation. After the recording, subretinal film implantation was confirmed histologically in 7 eyes with dye-coupled films and 7 eyes with plain films. The recordings from these 7 eyes in each group were used for statistical analysis. The amplitudes of visual evoked potentials in the consecutive time points from 125 to 250 ms after flash were significantly larger in the 7 eyes with dye-coupled film implantation, compared to the 7 eyes with plain film implantation at 8 weeks after the implantation (P < 0.05, repeated-measure ANOVA). The photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, as retinal prosthesis, gave rise to visual evoked potential in response to flashing light.

  17. Improving test-retest variability of visual-evoked responses in multiple sclerosis: implications for trial design.

    PubMed

    Thomae, Eva; Niklas, Alexander; Sebraoui, Hatifa; Baum, Petra; Wagner, Armin; Then Bergh, Florian

    2010-08-01

    Remyelination is an important repair strategy in multiple sclerosis. Latencies of visual-evoked responses are a suitable surrogate for remyelination of the optic nerve. Their test-retest variability has been incompletely evaluated, especially in pathologically delayed potentials. Visual-evoked potential was recorded twice, 2.1 +/- 3.1 (mean +/- SD) days apart, in 39 patients with definite or evaluated for multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis and current steroid treatment were exclusion criteria. Mean and difference of the two recordings were calculated for latencies and amplitude, both before and after verification of cursor positioning by a physician blinded for the sequence of recordings. Before verification, the difference between first and second visual-evoked potential was -2.07 +/- 9.07 milliseconds for N75 latency, -1.18 +/- 8.02 milliseconds for P100 latency, and -0.06 +/- 2.71 muV for N75/P100 amplitude (n = 77 eyes, mean +/- SD). Independent verification judged two eyes as unsuitable for analysis. The differences in the remaining 75 eyes were reduced to -1.22 +/- 6.86 milliseconds (N75), -0.7 +/- 3.85 milliseconds (P100) and -0.04 +/- 2.53 microV (amplitude). These effects do not differ between delayed and nondelayed eyes. Similar to magnetic resonance imaging, use of evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis remyelination trials will require independent verification, ideally by a central evaluating facility. Reproducibility should be verified individually at screening.

  18. Binasal Occlusion (BNO), Visual Motion Sensitivity (VMS), and the Visually-Evoked Potential (VEP) in mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI/TBI).

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Yadav, Naveen K; Ludlam, Diana P

    2017-08-09

    The diagnosis and treatment of the possible visual sequelae in those with traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents an important area of health care in this special population. One of their most prevalent yet elusive visual symptoms is visual motion sensitivity (VMS). In this review, we present the basic VMS phenomenon and its related symptoms, clinical studies in the area, clinical research investigations using the visual-evoked potential (VEP) as a cortical probe, and possible mechanisms and related neurophysiology that may underlie VMS. Lastly, therapeutic interventions are briefly described, as well as future directions for clinical research and patient care in those with VMS and TBI.

  19. Pattern visual evoked potentials represent an early index for the evolution of optic chiasma syndrome of tumoral etiology.

    PubMed

    Badiu, C; Serbănescu, A; Coculescu, M

    1996-01-01

    The use of visual evoked potentials in the detection of optic chiasma syndrome of tumoral etiology has been controversial in the literature. In our study the pattern visual evoked potentials (PVEP) were recorded in 22 healthy free volunteers and in 32 patients with optic chiasma syndrome (OCS) produced by tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary area, mainly pituitary adenomas with suprasellar extension, proved by CT scan. The PVEP were recorded bilateral after monocular photic stimulation of each atropinized eye, in parallel with a complete ophthalmologic exam consisting in visual field, visual acuity and optic fundus. The main results showed that the latencies P100 recorded bilateral were correlated (p < 0.01) with the types of visual field deficiency, in each hemifield. The changes in P100 latency are more sensitive than the evolution of visual field deficiency by campimetry. The same correlation was observed between the "W" form of P wave with the visual field defect. A significant decrease (p < 0.05) of the amplitude of P100 was observed only if the visual acuity was less than 1/2. It is suggested that the PVEP is a reliable index of diagnosis and evolution for the optic chiasma syndrome aside the usual ophthalmologic exam.

  20. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors.

  1. Latency of multifocal visual evoked potentials in nonoptic neuritis eyes of multiple sclerosis patients associated with optic radiation lesions.

    PubMed

    Alshowaeir, Daniah; Yiannikas, Con; Garrick, Raymond; Parratt, John; Barnett, Michael H; Graham, Stuart L; Klistorner, Alexander

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that latency delay of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) in nonoptic neuritis (NON) eyes of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is related to retrochiasmal demyelinating lesions. A total of 57 MS patients with no history of optic neuritis at least in one eye, and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was enrolled. Probabilistic tractography was used to reconstruct optic radiation (OR) fibers. The MS lesion volume within and outside of OR was calculated. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices were measured along OR fibers. The relationship of the mfVEP latency with OR lesions and DTI indices was examined. Average mfVEP latency in the MS cohort was significantly delayed compared to controls (P < 0.0001). Of the patients, 77% demonstrated OR lesions. Axial, radial, and mean diffusivity were significantly abnormal in MS patients (P < 0.001). Partial correlation demonstrated significant association between mfVEP latency delay and OR lesion load. There was also significant correlation between MfVEP latency and OR DTI. Subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher correlations in patients without a history of ON in either eye compared to the fellow eye of patients with previous ON. The findings of this study support our hypothesis that latency delay of the mfVEP in eyes of MS patients without previous ON is related to retrogenicular demyelinating lesions. Additionally, this study demonstrated that a previous episode of ON in the fellow eye may be a significant confounding factor, masking the relationship between the latency and OR lesions. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  2. Dynamics of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in the guinea pig visual cortex under laser light irradiation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Galina G.

    1995-05-01

    Influence of laser irradiation (wavelength 632.8 nM) of the retina on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in response to flashes of diffuse light have been studied. VEPs were recorded by tungsten-in-glass semimicroelectrode blocks at 700 (mu) M below cortical surface. It was revealed that VEPs were modified at all used doses of laser irradiation (power at cornea from 0.5 to 17 mW, exposure from 0.1 to 1000 s). During the initial 5 - 70 s of laser irradiation VEPs completely disappeared. After this silent period there appeared VEPs splitting into 2 - 4 distinct components and strong suppression or disappearance of VEPs first negative wave was observed. When laser irradiation was switched off VEPs negative waves were restored while the amplitude of splitting components was diminished. Restoration (frequently incomplete) of VEPs passed through a phase of increased negative wave amplitude. After the dose of laser irradiation was increased, this phase was followed by periodic changes in the amplitude of all VEPs components. Besides, the cortical zone that displayed the disturbances of the VEPs, became more extended. Long-lasting disturbances of VEPs occurred at irradiation doses close to those described in literature for ophthalmologically detected injuries. It is supposed that reversible (functional) disturbances may be identified by means of the above-mentioned phenomena. The discovered phenomena suit well the scheme which supposes disbalance and disinhibition of lateral connections between the irradiated retinal loci and the surrounding site.

  3. A convolutional neural network for steady state visual evoked potential classification under ambulatory environment

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2017-01-01

    The robust analysis of neural signals is a challenging problem. Here, we contribute a convolutional neural network (CNN) for the robust classification of a steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) paradigm. We measure electroencephalogram (EEG)-based SSVEPs for a brain-controlled exoskeleton under ambulatory conditions in which numerous artifacts may deteriorate decoding. The proposed CNN is shown to achieve reliable performance under these challenging conditions. To validate the proposed method, we have acquired an SSVEP dataset under two conditions: 1) a static environment, in a standing position while fixated into a lower-limb exoskeleton and 2) an ambulatory environment, walking along a test course wearing the exoskeleton (here, artifacts are most challenging). The proposed CNN is compared to a standard neural network and other state-of-the-art methods for SSVEP decoding (i.e., a canonical correlation analysis (CCA)-based classifier, a multivariate synchronization index (MSI), a CCA combined with k-nearest neighbors (CCA-KNN) classifier) in an offline analysis. We found highly encouraging SSVEP decoding results for the CNN architecture, surpassing those of other methods with classification rates of 99.28% and 94.03% in the static and ambulatory conditions, respectively. A subsequent analysis inspects the representation found by the CNN at each layer and can thus contribute to a better understanding of the CNN’s robust, accurate decoding abilities. PMID:28225827

  4. Steady state visual evoked potential based brain-computer interface for cognitive assessment.

    PubMed

    Westergren, Nicolai; Bendtsen, Rasmus L; Kjaer, Troels W; Thomsen, Carsten E; Puthusserypady, S; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive assessment is of growing importance, with the general population getting older and a rapidly growing incidence of dementia, which is a major public health issue. Treatment of dementia must, to be most effective, start early in the disease process. Thus, early detection of cognitive decline is important. Cognitive decline may be detected using fully-automated computerized assessment. Such systems will provide inexpensive and widely available screenings of cognitive ability. The aim of this pilot study is to develop a real time steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer interface (BCI) for neurological cognitive assessment. It is intended for use by patients who suffer from diseases impairing their motor skills, but are still able to control their gaze. Results are based on 11 healthy test subjects. The system performance have an average accuracy of 100% - 0%. The test subjects achieved an information transfer rate (ITR) of 14.64 bits/min - 7.63 bits/min and a subject test performance of 47.22% - 34.10%. This study suggests that BCI may be applicable in practice as a computerized cognitive assessment tool. However, many improvements are required for the system to be fully valid and of clinical use.

  5. The locus of color sensation: Cortical color loss and the chromatic visual evoked potential

    PubMed Central

    Crognale, Michael A.; Duncan, Chad S.; Shoenhard, Hannah; Peterson, Dwight J.; Berryhill, Marian E.

    2013-01-01

    Color losses of central origin (cerebral achromatopsia and dyschromatopsia) can result from cortical damage and are most commonly associated with stroke. Such cases have the potential to provide useful information regarding the loci of the generation of the percept of color. One available tool to examine this issue is the chromatic visual evoked potential (cVEP). The cVEP has been used successfully to objectively quantify losses in color vision capacity in both congenital and acquired deficiencies of retinal origin but has not yet been applied to cases of color losses of cortical origin. In addition, it is not known with certainty which cortical sites are responsible for the generation of the cVEP waveform components. Here we report psychophysical and electrophysiological examination of a patient with color deficits resulting from a bilateral cerebral infarct in the ventral occipitotemporal region. Although this patient demonstrated pronounced color losses of a general nature, the waveform of the cVEP remains unaffected. Contrast response functions of the cVEP are also normal for this patient. The results suggest that the percept of color arises after the origin of the cVEP and that normal activity in those areas that give rise to the characteristic negative wave of the cVEP are not sufficient to provide for the normal sensation of color. PMID:23986535

  6. Dominant Eye and Visual Evoked Potential of Patients with Myopic Anisometropia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Yili; Liu, Wenwen; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    A prospective nonrandomized controlled study was conducted to explore the association between ocular dominance and degree of myopia in patients with anisometropia and to investigate the character of visual evoked potential (VEP) in high anisometropias. 1771 young myopia cases including 790 anisometropias were recruited. We found no significant relation between ocular dominance and spherical equivalent (SE) refraction in all subjects. On average for subjects with anisometropia 1.0-1.75 D, there was no significant difference in SE power between dominant and nondominant eyes, while, in SE anisometropia ≥1.75 D group, the degree of myopia was significantly higher in nondominant eyes than in dominant eyes. The trend was more significant in SE anisometropia ≥2.5 D group. There was no significant difference in higher-order aberrations between dominant eye and nondominant eye either in the whole study candidates or in any anisometropia groups. In anisometropias >2.0 D, the N75 latency of nondominant eye was longer than that of dominant eye. Our results suggested that, with the increase of anisometropia, nondominant eye had a tendency of higher refraction and N75 wave latency of nondominant eye was longer than that of dominant eye in high anisometropias.

  7. Habituation of visual evoked responses in neonates and fetuses: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Matuz, Tamara; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Preissl, Hubert; Siegel, Eric R; Muenssinger, Jana; Murphy, Pamela; Ware, Maureen; Lowery, Curtis L; Eswaran, Hari

    2012-07-01

    In this study we aimed to develop a habituation paradigm that allows the investigation of response decrement and response recovery and examine its applicability for measuring the habituation of the visually evoked responses (VERs) in neonatal and fetal magnetoencephalographic recordings. Two paradigms, one with a long and one with a short inter-train interval (ITI), were developed and tested in separate studies. Both paradigms consisted of a train of four light flashes; each train being followed by a 500Hz burst tone. Healthy pregnant women underwent two prenatal measurements and returned with their babies for a neonatal investigation. The amplitudes of the neonatal VERs in the long-ITI condition showed within-train response decrement. An increased response to the auditory dishabituator was found confirming response recovery. In the short-ITI condition, neonatal amplitude decrement could not be demonstrated while response recovery was present. In both ITI conditions, the response rate of the cortical responses was much lower in the fetuses than in the neonates. Fetal VERs in the long-ITI condition indicate amplitude decline from the first to the second flash with no further decrease. The long-ITI paradigm might be useful to investigate habituation of the VERs in neonates and fetuses, although the latter requires precaution.

  8. Habituation of visual evoked responses in neonates and fetuses: A MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Matuz, Tamara; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Preissl, Hubert; Siegel, Eric R.; Muenssinger, Jana; Murphy, Pamela; Ware, Maureen; Lowery, Curtis L.; Eswaran, Hari

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to develop a habituation paradigm that allows the investigation of response decrement and response recovery and examine its applicability for measuring the habituation of the visually evoked responses (VERs) in neonatal and fetal magnetoencephalographic recordings. Two paradigms, one with a long and one with a short inter-train interval (ITI), were developed and tested in separate studies. Both paradigms consisted of a train of four light flashes; each train being followed by a 500 Hz burst tone. Healthy pregnant women underwent two prenatal measurements and returned with their babies for a neonatal investigation. The amplitudes of the neonatal VERs in the long-ITI condition showed within-train response decrement. An increased response to the auditory dishabituator was found confirming response recovery. In the short-ITI condition, neonatal amplitude decrement could not be demonstrated while response recovery was present. In both ITI conditions, the response rate of the cortical responses was much lower in the fetuses than in the neonates. Fetal VERs in the long-ITI condition indicate amplitude decline from the first to the second flash with no further decrease. The long-ITI paradigm might be useful to investigate habituation of the VERs in neonates and fetuses, although the latter requires precaution. PMID:22483416

  9. Relationship between vitamin D deficiency and visually evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    López-Méndez, P; Sosa-Henríquez, M; Ruiz-Pérez, Á

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the possible relationship between serum 25-OH vitamin D levels and visually evoked potentials (VEP) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), residents in the south zone of Gran Canaria. The study included 49 patients with MS, on whom 25-OH-vitamin D was determined, along with VEP, and a neurological examination to determine incapacity. Clinical variables, such as a history of optic neuritis were recorded. The mean value of 25-OH-vitamin D of the patients was 28.1±9.5ng/ml. The VEP latency was 119.1±23.2ms and the amplitude, 8.5±4.4 μV. Patients with a higher 25-OH-vitamin D had a greater number of outbreaks in the year prior to the study (P=.049), and those with vitamin D deficiency and previous optic neuritis showed no reduction in the amplitude of the VEP (P=.006). Patients with vitamin D deficiency have lower clinical activity of the MS and show no axonal involvement in VEP after having suffered optic neuritis. These relationships, although statistically significant, do not seem clinically plausible, thus new studies are needed to try and confirm this possible relationship. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual Evoked Potential Recording in a Rat Model of Experimental Optic Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K.; Chitranshi, Nitin; Reedman, Brittany; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) recording is widely used in clinical practice to assess the severity of optic neuritis in its acute phase, and to monitor the disease course in the follow-up period. Changes in the VEP parameters closely correlate with pathological damage in the optic nerve. This protocol provides a detailed description about the rodent model of optic nerve microinjection, in which a partial demyelination lesion is produced in the optic nerve. VEP recording techniques are also discussed. Using skull implanted electrodes, we are able to acquire reproducible intra-session and between-session VEP traces. VEPs can be recorded on individual animals over a period of time to assess the functional changes in the optic nerve longitudinally. The optic nerve demyelination model, in conjunction with the VEP recording protocol, provides a tool to investigate the disease processes associated with demyelination and remyelination, and can potentially be employed to evaluate the effects of new remyelinating drugs or neuroprotective therapies. PMID:26273963

  11. Early magnocellular loss in glaucoma demonstrated using the pseudorandomly stimulated flash visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L

    1999-04-01

    Components of the pseudorandomly stimulated flash visual evoked potential (VEP) have now been identified that appear to arise predominantly from each of the magnocellular (M-cell) and parvocellular (P-cell) systems. In this study, the relative damage to magnocellular and parvocellular systems at different stages of glaucoma using pseudorandomly stimulated flash VEP was investigated. Pseudorandomly stimulated flash VEP was recorded in 15 normal eyes and 28 eyes with different stages of glaucoma using the VERIS-3 recording system (Electro-Diagnostic Imaging, San Francisco, CA). Two levels of luminance contrast of the stimulus (32% and 99%) were tested. The first slice of the second-order kernel from only the central (8 degrees) stimulated area was extracted for analysis. Data recorded from normal eyes demonstrated early saturation of the response/contrast function of the first slice of the second-order kernel. The ratio of the VEP amplitude recorded at 32% and 99% of the luminance contrast was close to unity. In eyes with early glaucoma, although the amplitude of the responses to both low- and high-contrast stimulation decreased, the relative reduction of the low-contrast VEP (M-cell) was more prominent. However, the amplitude of the high-contrast response (P-cell) declined more rapidly later in the disease. These results are consistent with relatively earlier damage of the magnocellular pathway in glaucoma.

  12. Effect of sojourn at 4,300 m altitude on electroencephalogram and visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Forster, H V; Soto, R J; Dempsey, J A; Hosko, M J

    1975-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of sojourn at high altitude on cerebral electrical activity. Electroencephalographic (EEG) and visual evoked responses (VER) were recorded from seven healthy males under the following conditions: 1) during the first 2-3 h at 4,300 m altitude when Pao2 was maintained at 90 mmHg (control condition), 2) during the first 2-3 h of hypoxia (Pao2 = 40 mmHg), and 3) at 24- to 48-h intervals during the first 9-12 days of hypoxia. Electrode placement was according to the 10-20 International Electrode System. The VER was recorded from an electrode at the inion referred to the left ear. We found no significant changes from control cerebral electrical activity during the first 2-3 h of hypoxia. One subject's VER amplitude was greater than control on the 2nd and 3rd days of hypoxia and a similar change from control was consistently evident in a second subject beginning the 5th day of hypoxia. These changes suggest cortical depression. After the 5th day changes occurred in the remaining subjects which would be consistent with cortical excitation. In three subjects, EEG frequency was increased, amplitude decreased, and/or spiking became evident. In four subjects VER amplitude was reduced. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that certain behavioral and physiological changes induced by sojourn at altitude could be caused by alterations in central nervous system function.

  13. Analysis of the visual evoked potential in anesthesia with sevoflurane and chloral hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, AM; Parvu, D; Sava, R; Georgescu, L; Zagrean, L

    2013-01-01

    The visually evoked potential (VEP) is an electrical signal generated by the occipital cortex in response to light stimulation of the retina. The clinical importance of the VEP consists in the diagnosis of optic nerve diseases and others ocular diseases. For experimental studies of VEP in experimental animals anesthesia is frequently required. Our study sought VEP changes depending on the type and depth of anesthesia. Methods: this study evaluated VEPs in 20 Wistar rats under two anesthetics. Ten rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane and ten rats with chloral hydrate. Results: The amplitudes, latencies and morphology of the VEP varied with the depth of anesthesia. The latency of VEP increases with the depth of anesthesia and the amplitude of the waves becomes more positive once the anesthesia decreases under sevoflurane and more negative under chloral hydrate. The variability of VEP was different under the two anesthetics with greater peak latencies under sevoflurane than under chloral hydrate at the same depth of anesthesia. In conclusion: it is important to know the influence of the anesthetic and the depth of anesthesia over VEPS, because they may constitute a confounding factor in studying VEP in different diseases of optic nerve or eyeball. PMID:23904886

  14. Edge detection and surface 'filling in' as shown by texture visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Romani, A; Caputo, G; Callieco, R; Schintone, E; Cosi, V

    1999-01-01

    We designed a stimulation paradigm that was designed to ascertain whether specific components of the texture visual evoked potentials were attributable to edge detection or to surface 'filling-in' processes. The stimuli were textures of parallel line elements, which were either uniform (all horizontal or vertical lines) or segregated (checkerboards in which texture line elements of neighbor checks were oriented orthogonally). A sequence of 4 stimuli, two uniform followed by two segregated stimuli, was repeated cyclically. Accordingly, segregation could appear from a uniform display; it could also be maintained, with the checkerboard illusory margin location unchanged but with alteration in the orientation of all line elements. Each stimulus was presented for 487 ms and instantly replaced by the following one. Segregation-related components for segregation-appearance (Sa) and for segregation-maintenance (Sm) conditions were obtained separately by subtraction. In both conditions, a negative component was obtained with a peak latency of about 140-150 ms. However, the onset of Sa was earlier than that of Sm, whereas the respective offsets were almost identical. We hypothesize that the segregation component in VEPs is composed of two subcomponents: an early part, which is related to the segregation of edges, and a final part, which is related to the 'filling-in' of the homogeneous texture surface within the boundary defined by these edges.

  15. Visual evoked potentials to change in coloration of a moving bar

    PubMed Central

    Murd, Carolina; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Kuldkepp, Nele; Raidvee, Aire; Tamm, Maria; Allik, Jüri

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study we found that it takes less time to detect coloration change in a moving object compared to coloration change in a stationary one (Kreegipuu etal., 2006). Here, we replicated the experiment, but in addition to reaction times (RTs) we measured visual evoked potentials (VEPs), to see whether this effect of motion is revealed at the cortical level of information processing. We asked our subjects to detect changes in coloration of stationary (0°/s) and moving bars (4.4 and 17.6°/s). Psychophysical results replicate the findings from the previous study showing decreased RTs to coloration changes with increase of velocity of the color changing stimulus. The effect of velocity on VEPs was opposite to the one found on RTs. Except for component N1, the amplitudes of VEPs elicited by the coloration change of faster moving objects were reduced than those elicited by the coloration change of slower moving or stationary objects. The only significant effect of velocity on latency of peaks was found for P2 in frontal region. The results are discussed in the light of change-to-change interval and the two methods reflecting different processing mechanisms. PMID:24478683

  16. Dominant Eye and Visual Evoked Potential of Patients with Myopic Anisometropia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Yili; Liu, Wenwen; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    A prospective nonrandomized controlled study was conducted to explore the association between ocular dominance and degree of myopia in patients with anisometropia and to investigate the character of visual evoked potential (VEP) in high anisometropias. 1771 young myopia cases including 790 anisometropias were recruited. We found no significant relation between ocular dominance and spherical equivalent (SE) refraction in all subjects. On average for subjects with anisometropia 1.0–1.75 D, there was no significant difference in SE power between dominant and nondominant eyes, while, in SE anisometropia ≥1.75 D group, the degree of myopia was significantly higher in nondominant eyes than in dominant eyes. The trend was more significant in SE anisometropia ≥2.5 D group. There was no significant difference in higher-order aberrations between dominant eye and nondominant eye either in the whole study candidates or in any anisometropia groups. In anisometropias >2.0 D, the N75 latency of nondominant eye was longer than that of dominant eye. Our results suggested that, with the increase of anisometropia, nondominant eye had a tendency of higher refraction and N75 wave latency of nondominant eye was longer than that of dominant eye in high anisometropias. PMID:27340660

  17. Eliciting steady-state visual evoked potentials by means of stereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calore, Enrico; Gadia, Davide; Marini, Daniele

    2014-03-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) provide users communication and control capabilities by analyzing their brain activity. A technique to implement BCIs, used recently also in Virtual Reality (VR) environments, is based on the Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs) detection. Exploiting the SSVEP response, BCIs could be implemented showing targets flickering at different frequencies and detecting which is gazed by the observer analyzing her/his electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. In this work, we evaluate the use of stereoscopic displays for the presentation of SSVEP eliciting stimuli, comparing their effectiveness between monoscopic and stereoscopic stimuli. Moreover we propose a novel method to elicit SSVEP responses exploiting the stereoscopic displays capability of presenting dichoptic stimuli. We have created an experimental scene to present flickering stimuli on an active stereoscopic display, obtaining reliable control of the targets' frequency independently for the two stereo views. Using an EEG acquisition device, we analyzed the SSVEP responses from a group of subjects. From the preliminary results, we got evidence that stereoscopic displays represent valid devices for the presentation of SSVEP stimuli. Moreover, the use of different flickering frequencies for the two views of a single stimulus proved to elicit non-linear interactions between the stimulation frequencies, clearly visible in the EEG signal. This suggests interesting applications for SSVEP-based BCIs in VR environments able to overcome some limitations imposed by the refresh frequency of standard displays, but also the use of commodity stereoscopic displays to implement binocular rivalry experiments.

  18. A convolutional neural network for steady state visual evoked potential classification under ambulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2017-01-01

    The robust analysis of neural signals is a challenging problem. Here, we contribute a convolutional neural network (CNN) for the robust classification of a steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) paradigm. We measure electroencephalogram (EEG)-based SSVEPs for a brain-controlled exoskeleton under ambulatory conditions in which numerous artifacts may deteriorate decoding. The proposed CNN is shown to achieve reliable performance under these challenging conditions. To validate the proposed method, we have acquired an SSVEP dataset under two conditions: 1) a static environment, in a standing position while fixated into a lower-limb exoskeleton and 2) an ambulatory environment, walking along a test course wearing the exoskeleton (here, artifacts are most challenging). The proposed CNN is compared to a standard neural network and other state-of-the-art methods for SSVEP decoding (i.e., a canonical correlation analysis (CCA)-based classifier, a multivariate synchronization index (MSI), a CCA combined with k-nearest neighbors (CCA-KNN) classifier) in an offline analysis. We found highly encouraging SSVEP decoding results for the CNN architecture, surpassing those of other methods with classification rates of 99.28% and 94.03% in the static and ambulatory conditions, respectively. A subsequent analysis inspects the representation found by the CNN at each layer and can thus contribute to a better understanding of the CNN's robust, accurate decoding abilities.

  19. Visual evoked potentials, heart rate responses and memory to emotional pictorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Palomba, D; Angrilli, A; Mini, A

    1997-07-01

    Although the effects of emotional stimuli on event-related cortical potentials, heart rate, and memory have been extensively studied, the association of these variables in a single study has been neglected. The influence of pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral photographic slides on visual evoked potentials (VEPs), heart rate responses, and free recall, was investigated in 20 normal subjects. VEPs were recorded from Cz and Pz locations, and analyses were performed on both amplitudes and latencies of identifiable endogenous peaks (P2, N2 and P3), and mean amplitude in the 100-200-ms, 400-600-ms, and 600-900-ms latency ranges. An emotional effect was present on VEPs starting from about 282 ms on, as revealed by the N2, P3, and late components. Both pleasant and unpleasant slides yielded larger cortical positivity as compared to neutral ones. Peak latencies did not show any emotional effect. Heart rate data showed a deceleratory response that was larger to unpleasant slides. Free recall of the projected slides showed a better performance for emotional slides compared to neutral ones. VEPs and memory data showed the same pattern: both pleasant and unpleasant slides induced larger positivity in the event-related potentials and were better remembered than neutral slides. Positive correlations were found between the late negative VEPs component (600-900 ms), recorded from Cz, and heart rate deceleration (r = 0.62), and between P3 (at Pz location) and the number of remembered slides (r = 0.53).

  20. [Reaction times (RTS) and cognitive visual evoked potentials during reading--a compared study].

    PubMed

    Dionisie, B; Luca, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of the experiment is to prove the Paivio's theory about the concrete-abstract effect. A psychoverbal stimulation interface, created by us, was experimented as an IT extension of an EEG/EMG device dedicated for the human brain Evoked Potentials acquisitions (EPs) and reaction times techniques in reading mechanisms assessment. The shortest reaction time was achieved in tests at which the reading has no access to the meaning of words, for concrete word, in both hemisphere. But, in left hemisphere the reaction times for abstract words was shorter than for the abstract word in right hemisphere. EPs acquisition exhibits more negativity of N400 for concrete word and more reverberation of P650-N750 for abstract words. The difference in mean reaction times sustain the Paivio's theory and the difference in amplitude of N400, P650-N750 for concrete and abstract nouns show that the electric activities of brain are correlated in time and in amplitude with the same effort of processing the words. The psycho-verbal stimulation interface can be used as a medical research tool for studying and assessment the cognitive processes of reading, memory or learning using the endogenous visual event related potentials and the psychometric reaction times.

  1. Enhancing detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials using individual training data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yu-Te; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Although the performance of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) has improved gradually in the past decades, it still does not meet the requirement of a high communication speed in many applications. A major challenge is the interference of spontaneous background EEG activities in discriminating SSVEPs. An SSVEP BCI using frequency coding typically does not have a calibration procedure since the frequency of SSVEPs can be recognized by power spectrum density analysis (PSDA). However, the detection rate can be deteriorated by the spontaneous EEG activities within the same frequency range because phase information of SSVEPs is ignored in frequency detection. To address this problem, this study proposed to incorporate individual SSVEP training data into canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to improve the frequency detection of SSVEPs. An eight-class SSVEP dataset recorded from 10 subjects in a simulated online BCI experiment was used for performance evaluation. Compared to the standard CCA method, the proposed method obtained significantly improved detection accuracy (95.2% vs. 88.4%, p<0.05) and information transfer rates (ITR) (104.6 bits/min vs. 89.1 bits/min, p<0.05). The results suggest that the employment of individual SSVEP training data can significantly improve the detection rate and thereby facilitate the implementation of a high-speed BCI.

  2. Manipulation of Rat Movement via Nigrostriatal Stimulation Controlled by Human Visually Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bonkon; Koh, Chin Su; Park, Hae-Yong; Lee, Hwan-Gon; Chang, Jin Woo; Choi, Seungjin; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2017-05-24

    Here, we report that the development of a brain-to-brain interface (BBI) system that enables a human user to manipulate rat movement without any previous training. In our model, the remotely-guided rats (known as ratbots) successfully navigated a T-maze via contralateral turning behaviour induced by electrical stimulation of the nigrostriatal (NS) pathway by a brain- computer interface (BCI) based on the human controller's steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs). The system allowed human participants to manipulate rat movement with an average success rate of 82.2% and at an average rat speed of approximately 1.9 m/min. The ratbots had no directional preference, showing average success rates of 81.1% and 83.3% for the left- and right-turning task, respectively. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of NS stimulation for developing a highly stable ratbot that does not require previous training, and is the first instance of a training-free BBI for rat navigation. The results of this study will facilitate the development of borderless communication between human and untrained animals, which could not only improve the understanding of animals in humans, but also allow untrained animals to more effectively provide humans with information obtained with their superior perception.

  3. A high-speed brain speller using steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yijun; Wang, Yu-Te; Mitsukura, Yasue; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Implementing a complex spelling program using a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) remains a challenge due to difficulties in stimulus presentation and target identification. This study aims to explore the feasibility of mixed frequency and phase coding in building a high-speed SSVEP speller with a computer monitor. A frequency and phase approximation approach was developed to eliminate the limitation of the number of targets caused by the monitor refresh rate, resulting in a speller comprising 32 flickers specified by eight frequencies (8-15 Hz with a 1 Hz interval) and four phases (0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°). A multi-channel approach incorporating Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) and SSVEP training data was proposed for target identification. In a simulated online experiment, at a spelling rate of 40 characters per minute, the system obtained an averaged information transfer rate (ITR) of 166.91 bits/min across 13 subjects with a maximum individual ITR of 192.26 bits/min, the highest ITR ever reported in electroencephalogram (EEG)-based BCIs. The results of this study demonstrate great potential of a high-speed SSVEP-based BCI in real-life applications.

  4. n-Hexane-induced changes in visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms of industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Seppäläinen, A M; Raitta, C; Huuskonen, M S

    1979-10-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and averaged extraocular electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded from 15 workers occupationally exposed to n-hexane for 5-21 years and from 10 healthy control persons. The amplitude of the VEP components was clearly smaller among the exposed subjects with the exception of N0, which tended to be larger. In addition, the latencies of P1 and N1 were longer among the exposed workers, while that of P2 was slightly shorter. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the ERGs was also diministed among the exposed subjects. The changes were interpreted to indicate cerebral dysfunction, probably conduction block in intracerebral axons. n-Hexane is an aliphatic hydrocarbon found in gasoline and used in various industrial applications. It has been shown to cause axonal neuropathy of the dying-back type in both experimental animals and humans. According to the present findings the central nervous system is alos susceptible to the toxic effects of n-hexane.

  5. Single Trial Predictors for Gating Motor-Imagery Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Sensorimotor Rhythm and Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Geronimo, Andrew; Kamrunnahar, Mst; Schiff, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    For brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that utilize visual cues to direct the user, the neural signals extracted by the computer are representative of ongoing processes, visual evoked responses, and voluntary modulation. We proposed to use three brain signatures for predicting success on a single trial of a BCI task. The first two features, the amplitude and phase of the pre-trial mu amplitude, were chosen as a correlate for cortical excitability. The remaining feature, related to the visually evoked response to the cue, served as a possible measure of fixation and attention to the task. Of these three features, mu rhythm amplitude over the central electrodes at the time of cue presentation and to a lesser extent the single trial visual evoked response were correlated with the success on the subsequent imagery task. Despite the potential for gating trials using these features, an offline gating simulation was limited in its ability to produce an increase in device throughput. This discrepancy highlights a distinction between the identification of predictive features, and the use of this knowledge in an online BCI. Using such a system, we cannot assume that the user will respond similarly when faced with a scenario where feedback is altered by trials that are gated on a regular basis. The results of this study suggest the possibility of using individualized, pre-task neural signatures for personalized, and asynchronous (self-paced) BCI applications, although these effects need to be quantified in a real-time adaptive scenario in a future study.

  6. Electroencephalogram-based scaling of multifocal visual evoked potentials: effect on intersubject amplitude variability.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L

    2001-08-01

    The interindividual variability of the visual evoked potential (VEP) has been recognized as a problem for interpretation of clinical results. This study examines whether VEP variability can be reduced by scaling responses according to underlying electroencephalogram (EEG) activity. A multifocal objective perimeter provided different random check patterns to each of 58 points extending out to 32 degrees nasally. A multichannel VEP was recorded (bipolar occipital cross electrodes, 7 min/eye). One hundred normal subjects (age 58.9 +/- 10.7 years) were tested. The amplitude and inter-eye asymmetry coefficient for each point of the field was calculated. VEP signals were then normalized according to underlying EEG activity recorded using Fourier transform to quantify EEG levels. High alpha-rhythm and electrocardiogram contamination were removed before scaling. High intersubject variability was present in the multifocal VEP, with amplitude in women on average 33% larger than in men. The variability for all left eyes was 42.2% +/- 3.9%, for right eyes 41.7% +/- 4.4% (coefficient of variability [CV]). There was a strong correlation between EEG activity and the amplitude of the VEP (left eye, r = 0.83; P < 0.001; right eye, r = 0.82; P < 0.001). When this was used to normalize VEP results, the CVs dropped to 24.6% +/- 3.1% (P < 0.0001) and 24.0% +/- 3.2% (P < 0.0001), respectively. The gender difference was effectively removed. Using underlying EEG amplitudes to normalize an individual's VEP substantially reduces intersubject variability, including differences between men and women. This renders the use of a normal database more reliable when applying the multifocal VEP in the clinical detection of visual field changes.

  7. Color visual evoked potentials in children with type 1 diabetes: relationship to metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Elia, Yesmino T; Daneman, Denis; Rovet, Joanne; Abdolell, Mohamed; Lam, Wai-Ching; Till, Christine; Erraguntla, Vasudha; Rubab, Shehla; Lodha, Nidhi; Westall, Carol A

    2005-11-01

    To examine the association between metabolic control (HbA(1c)) and the chromatic mechanisms of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D), by using the color visual evoked potential (VEP). Fifty children with T1D (age range, 6-12.9 years) and 33 age-matched control subjects were tested. VEPs were recorded by placing five electrodes on the scalp according to the International 10/20 System of Electrode Placement. Active electrodes O1, O2, and Oz were placed over the visual cortex. Short-wavelength (S), and long- and medium-wavelength (LM) color stimuli consisted of vertical, photometric isoluminant (1 cyc/deg) gratings presented in a pattern onset (100 ms)-offset (400 ms) mode. Achromatic vertical gratings were presented at 3 cyc/deg. Primary outcome measure was VEP latency. The relationship between S, LM, and achromatic VEP latency, and HbA(1c) was determined by ANCOVA regression. S-, LM-, achromatic VEP latencies were not associated significantly with HbA(1c). Pubertal status, however, was associated significantly (P = 0.0114) and selectively with S-VEP latency. Pubertal children with T1D had delayed (mean delay, 9.5 ms) S-VEP latencies when compared with the prepubertal children with T1D. However, there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.1573) in the effect of pubertal status on S-VEP latency between the T1D and control groups. Pubertal status rather than HbA(1c) appears to affect selectively the S-VEP latency of preteen children with T1D. Further study is warranted to determine whether the delay in S-VEP latency in pubertal children with T1D changes over time and whether this change could be a predictive marker for future development of background diabetic retinopathy.

  8. The time course of pupil dilation evoked by visual sexual stimuli: Exploring the underlying ANS mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Finke, Johannes B; Deuter, Christian E; Hengesch, Xenia; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2017-10-01

    The early processing of visual sexual stimuli shows signs of automaticity. Moreover, there is evidence for sex-specific patterns in cognitive and physiological responding to erotica. However, little is known about the time course of rapid pupillary responses to sexual stimuli and their correspondence with other measures of autonomic activity in women and men. To study pupil dilation as an implicit measure of sexual arousal at various stages of picture processing, we presented 35 heterosexual participants with pictures showing either erotic couples or single (male/female) erotic nudes, contrasted with people involved in everyday situations. Brightness-adjusted grayscale pictures were shown for a duration of 2,500 ms within the central visual field, alternating with perceptually matched patches. Left pupil diameter was recorded at 500 Hz using a video-based eye tracker. Skin conductance and heart rate were coregistered and correlated with latent components of pupil dilation (dissociated by temporal PCA). Whereas stimulus-evoked changes in pupil size indicated virtually no initial constriction, a rapid effect of appetence emerged (dilation to erotica within 500 ms). Responses at early stages of processing were remarkably consistent across both sexes. In contrast, later phases of pupil dilation, subjective ratings, and skin conductance responses showed a sex-specific pattern. Moreover, evidence for an association of early-onset pupil dilation and heart rate acceleration was found, suggestive of parasympathetic inhibition, whereas the late component was mainly related to sympathetically mediated skin conductance. Taken together, our results indicate that different temporal components of pupil responses to erotic stimuli may reflect divergent underlying neural mechanisms. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. Simulated nystagmus reduces pattern-reversal more strongly than pattern-onset multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michael B; Seufert, Petra S

    2005-07-01

    In patients with nystagmus conventional pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials are severely degraded, while sizeable pattern-onset VEPs can often still be obtained. We tested whether this differential effect of retinal image motion on pattern-reversal and pattern-onset responses also applies to multifocal VEPs (mfVEPs). In eight subjects with normal oculomotor behaviour and vision we recorded pattern-reversal and pattern-onset mfVEPs from an occipital electrode pair to 60 locations of a scaled dartboard-pattern, and to 64 locations of a uniform checkerboard-pattern. Subjects viewed the stimulus monocularly via a mirror, which was placed close to the eye and driven by a scanner with a 4 Hz sawtooth waveform at an amplitude of 2 degrees to simulate horizontal jerk nystagmus and of 0 degrees for the reference condition. For the scaled dartboard-stimulus we observed an eccentricity-dependent effect of induced retinal image motion on mfVEP responses: in the central visual field (0-0.5 degrees), pattern-reversal and pattern-onset responses were reduced by 73 and 42%, respectively. In the periphery (10-16 degrees), only pattern-reversal responses were reduced (by 27%), while pattern-onset responses were enhanced by 39%. Pattern-onset responses to the uniform checkerboard stimulus were enhanced by 17%, while pattern-reversal responses were reduced by 27%. Pattern-onset mfVEPs are more efficient than pattern-reversal mfVEPs, if retinal image motion is superimposed onto the stimulus. This is in close correspondence to previous reports on conventional VEPs. This study demonstrates a differential effect of retinal image motion on pattern-reversal and pattern-onset mfVEPs and thus suggests stimulus conditions to enhance the efficiency of mfVEP recordings in patients with moderate nystagmus.

  10. Cross-modal plasticity in deaf child cochlear implant candidates assessed using visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Charroó-Ruíz, Lidia E; Picó, Thais; Pérez-Abalo, María C; Hernández, María del Carmen; Bermejo, Sandra; Bermejo, Beatriz; Álvarez, Beatriz; Paz, Antonio S; Rodríguez, Ulises; Sevila, Manuel; Martínez, Yesi; Galán, Lídice

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal plasticity has been extensively studied in deaf adults with neuroimaging studies, yielding valuable results. A recent study in our laboratory with deaf-blind children found evidence of cross-modal plasticity, revealed in over-representation of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP N20) in left hemisphere parietal, temporal and occipital regions. This finding led to asking whether SEP N20 changes are peculiar to deaf-blindness or are also present in sighted deaf children. Assess cross-modal plasticity in deaf child cochlear implant candidates using neurophysiological techniques (visual evoked potentials and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials). Participants were 14 prelingually deaf children assessed in the Cuban Cochlear Implant Program. Flash visual-evoked potentials and SEP N20 were recorded at 19 scalp recording sites. Topographic maps were obtained and compared to those of control group children with normal hearing. Analysis took into account duration of hearing loss. Topographic maps of flash visual-evoked potentials did not show changes in deaf child cochlear implant candidates. However, SEP N20 from right median nerve stimulation did show changes from expansion of cortical activation into the left temporal region in deaf children aged ≥7 years, which was interpreted as neurophysiological evidence of cross-modal plasticity, not previously described for this technique and type of somatosensory stimulus. We interpret this finding as due in part to duration of deafness, particularly related to handedness, since expansion was selective for the left hemisphere in the children, who were all right-handed. Cortical over-representation of SEP N20 in the left temporal region is interpreted as evidence of cross-modal plasticity that occurs if the deaf child does not receive a cochlear implant early in life-before concluding the critical period of neural development-and relies on sign language for communication.

  11. The Role of Visual Noise in Influencing Mental Load and Fatigue in a Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potential-Based Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Luo, Ailing; Li, Min; Zhang, Sicong; Han, Chengcheng; Yan, Wenqiang

    2017-08-14

    As a spatial selective attention-based brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigm, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) BCI has the advantages of high information transfer rate, high tolerance to artifacts, and robust performance across users. However, its benefits come at the cost of mental load and fatigue occurring in the concentration on the visual stimuli. Noise, as a ubiquitous random perturbation with the power of randomness, may be exploited by the human visual system to enhance higher-level brain functions. In this study, a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP, i.e., one kind of SSVEP)-based BCI paradigm with spatiotemporal visual noise was used to investigate the influence of noise on the compensation of mental load and fatigue deterioration during prolonged attention tasks. Changes in α, θ, θ + α powers, θ/α ratio, and electroencephalography (EEG) properties of amplitude, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and online accuracy, were used to evaluate mental load and fatigue. We showed that presenting a moderate visual noise to participants could reliably alleviate the mental load and fatigue during online operation of visual BCI that places demands on the attentional processes. This demonstrated that noise could provide a superior solution to the implementation of visual attention controlling-based BCI applications.

  12. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  13. The Relationship of Visual Evoked Potential Asymmetries to the Performance of Sonar Operators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-11

    also been related to EP variability. Schizophrenic adults and patients with Korsakoff’s Syndrome have shown higher evoked potential variability than...average evoked response in Korsakoff patients. J. Psychiatry Res. 6: 253-260, 1969. Santoro, T. and D. Fender. Rules for the perception of

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Single and Paired Flash Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Strigaro, Gionata; Mayer, Isabella; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Cantello, Roberto; Rothwell, John C

    2015-07-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the occipital cortex has a controversial effect on the visual cortex excitability. Paired flash visual evoked potentials (paired F-VEPs) offer a unique method to express neural inhibition within the visual system. However, no studies have explored the effects of tDCS on F-VEPs in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of single- and paired-F-VEPs during and after tDCS in healthy humans. Twenty-six healthy volunteers participated. F-VEPs were recorded from occipital electrodes with closed eyes. Stimuli were single flashes, intermingled to flash pairs at the interstimulus interval of 125, 62.5, 50, 33.3, 16.6, and 11.1 ms (internal frequency of 8, 16, 20, 30, 60, and 90 Hz). The single F-VEP was split into a "main complex" and a "late response." As to paired stimuli, the "test" F-VEP emerged from electronic subtraction of the single-F-VEP to the paired-F-VEP. In experiment 1, the return electrode was located on the scalp and we studied changes in F-VEPs after anodal, cathodal (1 mA, 15 min) and sham stimulation. A second experiment was performed in which F-VEPs were recorded before, during and after tDCS stimulation (anodal and cathodal) with the return electrode on the neck. F-VEPs recorded in experiment 1 did not detect any significant change after tDCS. In experiment 2 anodal polarization significantly increased the P2 latency (P = .031) and reduced the amplitude of the "late response" of the single F-VEP (P = .008). As for the paired F-VEPs, no significant changes were detected. In conclusion, low-intensity anodal tDCS has weak inhibitory aftereffects on the single F-VEP and no effects on the paired F-VEPs. Further methodological studies are needed to improve polarization efficacy. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  15. Effect of check size and stimulation rate on blue-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandra; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart; Billson, Frank

    2004-06-01

    To determine the effect of different stimulus frame rates and check sizes on blue-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials (mVEP). Subjects were examined at the Save Sight Institute at the University Sydney. Experiment 1 involved five adult subjects who underwent binocular stimulation by the Accumap multifocal objective perimeter. The eyes were stimulated with a cortically scaled dartboard pattern consisting of isoluminant blue and yellow checks. These were arranged in three concentric rings extending to an eccentricity of 26 degrees in the visual field. The stimulus pattern was driven by binary sequences resulting in pseudorandom binary exchange of two opposite checkerboard patterns at each of the 32 sites in the visual field. The mVEP were recorded at two different rates of display of the pattern stimulus. In experiment 2, mVEP were tested on 10 normal subjects. Each of the 36 stimulation sites contained a checkerboard pattern of 20, 30, 42 or 56 checks/site, the stimulation pattern was displayed at the optimum rate found in experiment 1. The size of the checks was inversely proportional to the number of checks per site. In experiment 1, the slow frame rate significantly increased the average amplitude throughout the field tested by 50 +/- 10.1% (P = 0.001). Latency was significantly shortened by 6.3% (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, the average amplitude peaked at 30 checks per segment; however, this was only calculated to be significantly different from the smallest check size (F(crit range 4,27) = 0.09 P < 0.05, anova, Tukey's T method). A similar difference was found in ring 1 (F(crit range 4,27) = 0.09, P < 0.05, anova, Tukey's T method). In ring 2, however, there was also a significant difference between 56 checks and 20, 30 and 42 (F(crit range 4,27) = 0.09, anova, P < 0.05). Altering the check sizes did not significantly affect the amplitudes in ring 3. The latencies were not significantly modified by altering check size at any eccentricity. These findings

  16. Delayed P100-Like Latencies in Multiple Sclerosis: A Preliminary Investigation Using Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiiski, Hanni S. M.; Ní Riada, Sinéad; Lalor, Edmund C.; Gonçalves, Nuno R.; Nolan, Hugh; Whelan, Robert; Lonergan, Róisín; Kelly, Siobhán; O'Brien, Marie Claire; Kinsella, Katie; Bramham, Jessica; Burke, Teresa; Ó Donnchadha, Seán; Hutchinson, Michael; Tubridy, Niall; Reilly, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Conduction along the optic nerve is often slowed in multiple sclerosis (MS). This is typically assessed by measuring the latency of the P100 component of the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) using electroencephalography. The Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis (VESPA) method, which involves modulating the contrast of a continuous visual stimulus over time, can produce a visually evoked response analogous to the P100 but with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and potentially higher sensitivity to individual differences in comparison to the VEP. The main objective of the study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the utility of the VESPA method for probing and monitoring visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The latencies and amplitudes of the P100-like VESPA component were compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients, and multiple sclerosis subgroups. The P100-like VESPA component activations were examined at baseline and over a 3-year period. The study included 43 multiple sclerosis patients (23 relapsing-remitting MS, 20 secondary-progressive MS) and 42 healthy controls who completed the VESPA at baseline. The follow-up sessions were conducted 12 months after baseline with 24 MS patients (15 relapsing-remitting MS, 9 secondary-progressive MS) and 23 controls, and again at 24 months post-baseline with 19 MS patients (13 relapsing-remitting MS, 6 secondary-progressive MS) and 14 controls. The results showed P100-like VESPA latencies to be delayed in multiple sclerosis compared to healthy controls over the 24-month period. Secondary-progressive MS patients had most pronounced delay in P100-like VESPA latency relative to relapsing-remitting MS and controls. There were no longitudinal P100-like VESPA response differences. These findings suggest that the VESPA method is a reproducible electrophysiological method that may have potential utility in the assessment of visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26726800

  17. Delayed P100-Like Latencies in Multiple Sclerosis: A Preliminary Investigation Using Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Hanni S M; Ní Riada, Sinéad; Lalor, Edmund C; Gonçalves, Nuno R; Nolan, Hugh; Whelan, Robert; Lonergan, Róisín; Kelly, Siobhán; O'Brien, Marie Claire; Kinsella, Katie; Bramham, Jessica; Burke, Teresa; Ó Donnchadha, Seán; Hutchinson, Michael; Tubridy, Niall; Reilly, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Conduction along the optic nerve is often slowed in multiple sclerosis (MS). This is typically assessed by measuring the latency of the P100 component of the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) using electroencephalography. The Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis (VESPA) method, which involves modulating the contrast of a continuous visual stimulus over time, can produce a visually evoked response analogous to the P100 but with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and potentially higher sensitivity to individual differences in comparison to the VEP. The main objective of the study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the utility of the VESPA method for probing and monitoring visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The latencies and amplitudes of the P100-like VESPA component were compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients, and multiple sclerosis subgroups. The P100-like VESPA component activations were examined at baseline and over a 3-year period. The study included 43 multiple sclerosis patients (23 relapsing-remitting MS, 20 secondary-progressive MS) and 42 healthy controls who completed the VESPA at baseline. The follow-up sessions were conducted 12 months after baseline with 24 MS patients (15 relapsing-remitting MS, 9 secondary-progressive MS) and 23 controls, and again at 24 months post-baseline with 19 MS patients (13 relapsing-remitting MS, 6 secondary-progressive MS) and 14 controls. The results showed P100-like VESPA latencies to be delayed in multiple sclerosis compared to healthy controls over the 24-month period. Secondary-progressive MS patients had most pronounced delay in P100-like VESPA latency relative to relapsing-remitting MS and controls. There were no longitudinal P100-like VESPA response differences. These findings suggest that the VESPA method is a reproducible electrophysiological method that may have potential utility in the assessment of visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Auditory- and visual-evoked potentials in Mexican infants are not affected by maternal supplementation with 400 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid in the second half of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Aryeh D; Wang, Meng; Rivera, Juan A; Martorell, Reynaldo; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2012-08-01

    The evidence relating prenatal supplementation with DHA to offspring neurological development is limited. We investigated the effect of prenatal DHA supplementation on infant brainstem auditory-evoked responses and visual- evoked potentials in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Pregnant women were supplemented daily with 400 mg DHA or placebo from gestation wk 18-22 through delivery. DHA and placebo groups did not differ in maternal characteristics at randomization or infant characteristics at birth. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were measured at 1 and 3 mo in 749 and 664 infants, respectively, and visual-evoked potentials were measured at 3 and 6 mo in 679 and 817 infants, respectively. Left-right brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were moderately correlated (range, 0.26-0.43; all P < 0.001) and left-right visual-evoked potentials were strongly correlated (range, 0.79-0.94; all P < 0.001) within any assessment. Correlations across visits were modest to moderate (range, 0.09-0.38; all P < 0.01). The offspring of DHA-supplemented women did not differ from those of control women with respect to any outcome measure (all comparisons P > 0.10). We conclude that DHA supplementation during pregnancy did not influence brainstem auditory-evoked responses at 1 and 3 mo or visual-evoked potentials at 3 and 6 mo.

  19. Abnormal visual field maps in human cortex: a mini-review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Haak, Koen V; Langers, Dave R M; Renken, Remco; van Dijk, Pim; Borgstein, Johannes; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2014-07-01

    Human visual cortex contains maps of the visual field. Much research has been dedicated to answering whether and when these visual field maps change if critical components of the visual circuitry are damaged. Here, we first provide a focused mini-review of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have evaluated the human cortical visual field maps in the face of retinal lesions, brain injury, and atypical retinocortical projections. We find that there is a fair body of research that has found abnormal fMRI activity, but also that this abnormal activity does not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. The abnormal fMRI activity can often be explained in terms of task effects and/or the uncovering of normally hidden system dynamics. We then present the case of a 16-year-old patient who lost the entire left cerebral hemisphere at age three for treatment of chronic focal encephalitis (Rasmussen syndrome) and intractable epilepsy. Using an fMRI retinotopic mapping procedure and population receptive field (pRF) modeling, we found that (1) despite the long period since the hemispherectomy, the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex remained unaffected by the removal of an entire cerebral hemisphere, and (2) the intact lateral occipital cortex contained an exceptionally large representation of the center of the visual field. The same method also indicates that the neuronal receptive fields in these lateral occipital brain regions are extraordinarily small. These features are clearly abnormal, but again they do not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. For example, the abnormal features can also be explained by the notion that the hemispherectomy took place during a critical period in the development of the lateral occipital cortex and therefore arrested its normal development. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting abnormal fMRI activity as a marker of cortical remapping; there are often other explanations.

  20. [Visual evoked potentials produced by monocular flash stimuli in the cerebral cortex of the rabbit. I. Typography].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cobo, J C; Ruiz-Beramendi, M; Pérez-Arroyo, M

    1990-12-01

    The visually evoked potentials in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated eye in rabbit, can be described topographically as follows. While a positive wave (P1) begins forming in the anterior zones and in the V I binocular zone, the N0 wave, at times very large, is produced in a more occipital zone, which corresponds to the visual streak. Immediately afterwards, the positivity, P1, practically invades the whole of the hemisphere. After this, the N1 wave which is produced in the most posterior parts of the V I, begins forming. The whole phenomenon comes to an end when the P2 wave is generated in the most occipital zones.

  1. Research on steady-state visual evoked potentials in 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Yi; Lee, Chia-Ying; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Ko, Li-Wei; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2015-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are intuitive systems for users to communicate with outer electronic devices. Steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the common inputs for BCI systems due to its easy detection and high information transfer rates. An advanced interactive platform integrated with liquid crystal displays is leading a trend to provide an alternative option not only for the handicapped but also for the public to make our lives more convenient. Many SSVEP-based BCI systems have been studied in a 2D environment; however there is only little literature about SSVEP-based BCI systems using 3D stimuli. 3D displays have potentials in SSVEP-based BCI systems because they can offer vivid images, good quality in presentation, various stimuli and more entertainment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two important 3D factors (disparity and crosstalk) on SSVEPs. Twelve participants participated in the experiment with a patterned retarder 3D display. The results show that there is a significant difference (p-value<0.05) between large and small disparity angle, and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of small disparity angles is higher than those of large disparity angles. The 3D stimuli with smaller disparity and lower crosstalk are more suitable for applications based on the results of 3D perception and SSVEP responses (SNR). Furthermore, we can infer the 3D perception of users by SSVEP responses, and modify the proper disparity of 3D images automatically in the future.

  2. [Comparison of the Aulhorn flicker test with visual evoked potentials in the diagnosis of optic neuritis].

    PubMed

    Trauzettel-Klosinski, S; Diener, H C; Fahle, M

    1990-01-01

    The Aulhorn flicker test and visual evoked cortical potentials (VEP) are of great value for the diagnosis of optic neuritis (ON). In the present study, the two methods were compared for the first time within the same group of patients. The study comprised 405 eyes (175 suffering from active or subsided ON). The results were evaluated with a double-blind procedure. With the flicker test, the subjective brightness of flickering light is determined as a function of the flicker frequency. This test gives pathological results only in active ON and normalizes when the active phase is over. The test can discriminate between active and subsided ON as well as between the recurrent and chronic courses of the disease. Differentiation is not possible with the VEP, since the VEP latencies are prolonged even after the end of the active period of the disease. The sensitivity of the flicker test was 84.4%. The sensitivity of the VEP was 72.7% for our group of patients suffering from ON if the criterion of increased latency was used alone. In the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS), the proportion of correctly identified pathological VEP results is increased because of the detection of demyelination of the optic nerve that causes no clinical symptoms. The specificity of the flicker test was 97.8% and that of the VEP 86.5%. If both methods were combined, the sensitivity was 98.4% and specificity 99.6%. The two methods obviously have different characteristics and seem to rely upon different demyelination effects. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages as well as optimal indications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. EEG-based classification of video quality perception using steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs).

    PubMed

    Acqualagna, Laura; Bosse, Sebastian; Porbadnigk, Anne K; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Wiegand, Thomas; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies exploit the neural signal recorded via electroencephalography (EEG) to get a more objective measurement of perceived video quality. Most of these studies capitalize on the event-related potential component P3. We follow an alternative approach to the measurement problem investigating steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as EEG correlates of quality changes. Unlike the P3, SSVEPs are directly linked to the sensory processing of the stimuli and do not require long experimental sessions to get a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, we investigate the correlation of the EEG-based measures with the outcome of the standard behavioral assessment. As stimulus material, we used six gray-level natural images in six levels of degradation that were created by coding the images with the HM10.0 test model of the high efficiency video coding (H.265/MPEG-HEVC) using six different compression rates. The degraded images were presented in rapid alternation with the original images. In this setting, the presence of SSVEPs is a neural marker that objectively indicates the neural processing of the quality changes that are induced by the video coding. We tested two different machine learning methods to classify such potentials based on the modulation of the brain rhythm and on time-locked components, respectively. Results show high accuracies in classification of the neural signal over the threshold of the perception of the quality changes. Accuracies significantly correlate with the mean opinion scores given by the participants in the standardized degradation category rating quality assessment of the same group of images. The results show that neural assessment of video quality based on SSVEPs is a viable complement of the behavioral one and a significantly fast alternative to methods based on the P3 component.

  4. Effect of sevoflurane concentration on visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Yosuke; MAEHARA, Seiya; ITOH, Yoshiki; HAYASHI, Miri; KUBO, Akira; ITAMI, Takaharu; ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; TAMURA, Jun; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sevoflurane concentration on canine visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation (P-VEPs). Six clinically normal laboratory-beagle dogs were used. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was detected from all subjects by tail clamp method. The refractive power of the right eyes of all subjects was corrected to −2 diopters after skiascopy. For P-VEP recording, the recording and reference electrode were positioned at inion and nasion, respectively, and the earth electrode was positioned on the inner surface. To grasp the state of CNS suppression objectively, the bispectral index (BIS) value was used. The stimulus pattern size and distance for VEP recording were constant, 50.3 arc-min and 50 cm, respectively. P-VEPs and BIS values were recorded under sevoflurane in oxygen inhalational anesthesia at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 2.75 sevoflurane MAC. For analysis of P-VEP, the P100 implicit time and N75-P100 amplitude were estimated. P-VEPs were detected at 0.5 to 1.5 MAC in all dogs, and disappeared at 2.0 MAC in four dogs and at 2.5 and 2.75 MAC in one dog each. The BIS value decreased with increasing sevoflurane MAC, and burst suppression began to appear from 1.5 MAC. There was no significant change in P100 implicit time and N75-P100 amplitude with any concentration of sevoflurane. At concentrations around 1.5 MAC, which are used routinely to immobilize dogs, sevoflurane showed no effect on P-VEP. PMID:25373729

  5. EEG-based classification of video quality perception using steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acqualagna, Laura; Bosse, Sebastian; Porbadnigk, Anne K.; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Wiegand, Thomas; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Recent studies exploit the neural signal recorded via electroencephalography (EEG) to get a more objective measurement of perceived video quality. Most of these studies capitalize on the event-related potential component P3. We follow an alternative approach to the measurement problem investigating steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as EEG correlates of quality changes. Unlike the P3, SSVEPs are directly linked to the sensory processing of the stimuli and do not require long experimental sessions to get a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, we investigate the correlation of the EEG-based measures with the outcome of the standard behavioral assessment. Approach. As stimulus material, we used six gray-level natural images in six levels of degradation that were created by coding the images with the HM10.0 test model of the high efficiency video coding (H.265/MPEG-HEVC) using six different compression rates. The degraded images were presented in rapid alternation with the original images. In this setting, the presence of SSVEPs is a neural marker that objectively indicates the neural processing of the quality changes that are induced by the video coding. We tested two different machine learning methods to classify such potentials based on the modulation of the brain rhythm and on time-locked components, respectively. Main results. Results show high accuracies in classification of the neural signal over the threshold of the perception of the quality changes. Accuracies significantly correlate with the mean opinion scores given by the participants in the standardized degradation category rating quality assessment of the same group of images. Significance. The results show that neural assessment of video quality based on SSVEPs is a viable complement of the behavioral one and a significantly fast alternative to methods based on the P3 component.

  6. Visual evoked potentials in relation to factors of imprisonment in detention camps.

    PubMed

    Vrca, A; Bozikov, V; Brzović, Z; Fuchs, R; Malinar, M

    1996-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) of the pattern shift reversal type were determined in a representative group of 57 prisoners of war (POWs) released in 1992 from detention camps in former Yugoslavia. The parameters were correlated with the conditions in four camps (1-4). All subjects were male, with a mean age of 34.75 years (SD +/- 8.92), average length of imprisonment 192.7 days (SD +/- 77.6), mean loss of body mass during imprisonment 19.32% (SD +/- 9.54), and the average number of reported blows to the head and neck was 25.7 (SD +/- 20.3). VEPs were determined on average 290.5 days after the last craniocerebral trauma caused by blows to the head and neck (SD +/- 152.0) i.e., on average 218.5 days after release from the camp (SD +/- 164.3). Although all the 57 POWs reported being maltreated to a certain extent, 14 reported being subjected to particularly brutal forms of torture, 5 had been held in solitary confinement and 25 had lost consciousness at least once. Solitary confinement and loss of consciousness had the most significant effect on VEPs, and the altered VEP parameters correlated significantly with the craniocerebral trauma experienced, loss of body mass and the length of time since the last craniocerebral trauma until examination, and from release until examination. However, the length of imprisonment and treatment in the camps did not have a significant effect on VEP parameters. The study confirmed that under such conditions the age of the subject is a risk factor. The results of this study also confirmed that prisoners in one camp had been subjected to the worst maltreatment.

  7. Multifocal visual evoked responses to dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles: Multifocal VER to dichoptic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Grigg, John R

    2006-05-01

    Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) have demonstrated good diagnostic capabilities in glaucoma and optic neuritis. This study aimed at evaluating the possibility of simultaneously recording mfVEP for both eyes with dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles and also to determine the stimulus characteristics that yield maximum amplitude. ten healthy volunteers were recruited and temporally sparse pattern pulse stimuli were presented dichoptically using virtual reality goggles. Experiment 1 involved recording responses to dichoptically presented checkerboard stimuli and also confirming true topographic representation by switching off specific segments. Experiment 2 involved monocular stimulation and comparison of amplitude with Experiment 1. In Experiment 3, orthogonally oriented gratings were dichoptically presented. Experiment 4 involved dichoptic presentation of checkerboard stimuli at different levels of sparseness (5.0 times/s, 2.5 times/s, 1.66 times/s and 1.25 times/s), where stimulation of corresponding segments of two eyes were separated by 16.7, 66.7,116.7 & 166.7 ms respectively. Experiment 1 demonstrated good traces in all regions and confirmed topographic representation. However, there was suppression of amplitude of responses to dichoptic stimulation by 17.9+/-5.4% compared to monocular stimulation. Experiment 3 demonstrated similar suppression between orthogonal and checkerboard stimuli (p = 0.08). Experiment 4 demonstrated maximum amplitude and least suppression (4.8%) with stimulation at 1.25 times/s with 166.7 ms separation between eyes. It is possible to record mfVEP for both eyes during dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles, which present binocular simultaneous patterns driven by independent sequences. Interocular suppression can be almost eliminated by using a temporally sparse stimulus of 1.25 times/s with a separation of 166.7 ms between stimulation of corresponding segments of the two eyes.

  8. Single-Trial Visual Evoked Potential Extraction Using Partial Least-Squares-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Kristina Yanti, Duma; Zuki Yusoff, Mohd; Sagayan Asirvadam, Vijanth

    2016-01-01

    A single-trial extraction of a visual evoked potential (VEP) signal based on the partial least-squares (PLS) regression method has been proposed in this paper. This paper has focused on the extraction and estimation of the latencies of P100, P200, P300, N75, and N135 in the artificial electroencephalograph (EEG) signal. The real EEG signal obtained from the hospital was only concentrated on the P100. The performance of the PLS has been evaluated mainly on the basis of latency error rate of the peaks for the artificial EEG signal, and the mean peak detection and standard deviation for the real EEG signal. The simulation results show that the proposed PLS algorithm is capable of reconstructing the EEG signal into its desired shape of the ideal VEP. For P100, the proposed PLS algorithm is able to provide comparable results to the generalized eigenvalue decomposition (GEVD) algorithm, which alters (prewhitens) the EEG input signal using the prestimulation EEG signal. It has also shown better performance for later peaks (P200 and P300). The PLS outperformed not only in positive peaks but also in N75. In P100, the PLS was comparable with the GEVD although N135 was better estimated by GEVD. The proposed PLS algorithm is comparable to GEVD given that PLS does not alter the EEG input signal. The PLS algorithm gives the best estimate to multitrial ensemble averaging. This research offers benefits such as avoiding patient's fatigue during VEP test measurement in the hospital, in BCI applications and in EEG-fMRI integration.

  9. Visually Evoked Potential Markers of Concussion History in Patients with Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Lederer, Paul; Cox, Laurie Kopko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated whether differences in the pattern visual evoked potentials exist between patients with convergence insufficiency and those with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion using stimuli designed to differentiate between magnocellular (transient) and parvocellular (sustained) neural pathways. Methods Sustained stimuli included 2-rev/s, 85% contrast checkerboard patterns of 1- and 2-degree check sizes, whereas transient stimuli comprised 4-rev/s, 10% contrast vertical sinusoidal gratings with column width of 0.25 and 0.50 cycles/degree. We tested two models: an a priori clinical model based on an assumption of at least a minimal (beyond instrumentation’s margin of error) 2-millisecond lag of transient response latencies behind sustained response latencies in concussed patients and a statistical model derived from the sample data. Results Both models discriminated between concussed and nonconcussed groups significantly above chance (with 76% and 86% accuracy, respectively). In the statistical model, patients with mean vertical sinusoidal grating response latencies greater than 119 milliseconds to 0.25-cycle/degree stimuli (or mean vertical sinusoidal latencies >113 milliseconds to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli) and mean vertical sinusoidal grating amplitudes of less than 14.75 mV to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli were classified as having had a history of concussion. The resultant receiver operating characteristic curve for this model had excellent discrimination between the concussed and nonconcussed (area under the curve = 0.857; P < .01) groups with sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.80. Conclusions The results suggest a promising electrophysiological approach to identifying individuals with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion. PMID:28609417

  10. The effects of collinearity and orientation on texture visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Romani, Alfredo; Callieco, Roberto; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Cosi, Vittorio

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the research was to study the effects of stimulus orientation at both the local (textons) and the global (segregated elements) level on texture visual evoked potentials (tVEPs). Two tVEP paradigms were presented to 10 volunteers. The paradigms were characterized by alternating uniform textures (random mixture of square dots and lines) and textures in which stripes of randomly disposed lines segregated from a square dots' background. In one paradigm, the stripes were horizontal and in the other, vertical. The lines could be either horizontal or vertical in single stimuli of both paradigms. Thus, two stimuli with local/global collinearity and two stimuli without local/global collinearity were available. tVEPs were derived from Oz referenced to the left earlobe and averaged separately for each condition. Segregation-related components were obtained subtracting the traces without segregation from the traces with segregation. A negative segregation component starting at the latency of P1 and extending until the end of N2 characterized the tVEPs, without significant differences among the 4 stimulus conditions. In the presence of local/global collinearity, we found an early modulation of N1 amplitude. This modulation was orientation-dependent, as vertical collinearity increased N1 negativity and horizontal collinearity reduced N1 negativity. Our experiment confirms previous findings about the segregation negativity, which may depend on contextual modulation of V1 neurons by long-range horizontal and feed-back connections. The early effect of collinearity may depend on more local modulatory connections.

  11. Visually Evoked Potential Markers of Concussion History in Patients with Convergence Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Lederer, Paul; Cox, Laurie Kopko

    2017-07-01

    We investigated whether differences in the pattern visual evoked potentials exist between patients with convergence insufficiency and those with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion using stimuli designed to differentiate between magnocellular (transient) and parvocellular (sustained) neural pathways. Sustained stimuli included 2-rev/s, 85% contrast checkerboard patterns of 1- and 2-degree check sizes, whereas transient stimuli comprised 4-rev/s, 10% contrast vertical sinusoidal gratings with column width of 0.25 and 0.50 cycles/degree. We tested two models: an a priori clinical model based on an assumption of at least a minimal (beyond instrumentation's margin of error) 2-millisecond lag of transient response latencies behind sustained response latencies in concussed patients and a statistical model derived from the sample data. Both models discriminated between concussed and nonconcussed groups significantly above chance (with 76% and 86% accuracy, respectively). In the statistical model, patients with mean vertical sinusoidal grating response latencies greater than 119 milliseconds to 0.25-cycle/degree stimuli (or mean vertical sinusoidal latencies >113 milliseconds to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli) and mean vertical sinusoidal grating amplitudes of less than 14.75 mV to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli were classified as having had a history of concussion. The resultant receiver operating characteristic curve for this model had excellent discrimination between the concussed and nonconcussed (area under the curve = 0.857; P < .01) groups with sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.80. The results suggest a promising electrophysiological approach to identifying individuals with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion.

  12. EEG alpha rhythms and transient chromatic and achromatic pattern visual evoked potentials in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mei Ying; Chan, Kar Ying; Chiang, Jaclyn; Milston, Rebecca; Suttle, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Transient chromatic pattern visual evoked potentials (VEPs) have been found to be less repeatable in morphology in children than in adults at low to moderate chromatic contrasts. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether low repeatability of VEP components can be associated with high alpha power, in a comparison of alpha activity in children and adults. Transient chromatic contrast and achromatic resolution VEPs were recorded in children (n = 14, mean 9.6 years) and adults (n = 12, mean 21.8 years) with normal vision and assessed for repeatability. Isoluminant chromatic (magenta-cyan) and luminance-modulated achromatic grating stimuli were presented at and above psychophysical threshold levels, in pattern onset-offset at 2 Hz temporal frequency. EEGs (eyes closed and open) were recorded as single sweeps (1 s long) over three 30 s periods while facing a uniform computer display. An index of VEP detectability by observation was developed based on VEP component repeatability. The index was examined for correlations with alpha-wave parameters. Alpha power was calculated as the sum of the powers of 8-13 Hz frequencies of the EEG sweeps (using the discrete Fourier transform). Alpha power variability was calculated using the standard deviation of the powers of each sweep in a 30 s time period. The children had significantly higher alpha powers than the adults for both the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Alpha power variability was significantly higher for the eyes-open condition only. There was no relationship between alpha power parameters and index of VEP detectability by observation for both the chromatic and achromatic grating stimuli. Poor repeatability of transient pattern VEPs is not associated with high alpha power or its variability in EEG measurements in older children or young adults at Oz.

  13. Advancing the detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials in brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Peer, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Spatial filtering has proved to be a powerful pre-processing step in detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials and boosted typical detection rates both in offline analysis and online SSVEP-based brain-computer interface applications. State-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby share many common foundations as they all build upon the second order statistics of the acquired Electroencephalographic (EEG) data, that is, its spatial autocovariance and cross-covariance with what is assumed to be a pure SSVEP response. The present study aims at highlighting the similarities and differences between these methods. Approach. We consider the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method as a basis for the theoretical and empirical (with real EEG data) analysis of the state-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby. We build upon the findings of this analysis and prior research and propose a new detection method (CVARS) that combines the power of the canonical variates and that of the autoregressive spectral analysis in estimating the signal and noise power levels. Main results. We found that the multivariate synchronization index method and the maximum contrast combination method are variations of the CCA method. All three methods were found to provide relatively unreliable detections in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. CVARS and the minimum energy combination methods were found to provide better estimates for different SNR levels. Significance. Our theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that the proposed CVARS method outperforms other state-of-the-art detection methods when used in an unsupervised fashion. Furthermore, when used in a supervised fashion, a linear classifier learned from a short training session is able to estimate the hidden user intention, including the idle state (when the user is not attending to any stimulus), rapidly, accurately and reliably.

  14. Effects of cholinergic drugs on neocortical EEG and flash-visual evoked potentials in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tebano, M T; Luzi, M; Palazzesi, S; Pomponi, M; Loizzo, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of single intraperitoneal injection of two cholinesterase inhibitors, physostigmine (PHY; 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0. 1, 0.2 mg/kg) and heptylphysostigmine (HEP; 0.5, 2, 6 mg/kg) on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and flash visual evoked potentials (f-VEP) in the occipital cortex were compared in DBA/2 mice. EEG spectral analysis of awake periods showed that PHY at all doses and HEP at 2 mg/kg induced an increase of power in the 4.25- to 7-Hz frequency band. Furthermore, PHY at the higher doses and HEP at all doses induced a decrease of power in the 7.25- to 12-Hz frequency band, while the lower doses of PHY (0.01, 0.025 mg/kg) produced an increase of this band. EEG effects elicited by the two drugs were similar, when doses displaying analogous biochemical effects (acetylcholinesterase inhibition) were used (i.e. 0.01 and 0. 025 mg/kg of PHY versus 0.5 and 2 mg/kg of HEP). PHY and HEP induced similar changes in f-VEPs. Amplitudes of early and late components (P1N1, N1P2, P4N4 and particularly N1P3) were enhanced, while amplitudes of middle components were depressed after all doses. The peak latency measures were generally delayed, even though, after the lower doses, a trend to a latency reduction was evident in late components. This finding might indicate a possible effect on stimulus speed diffusion by 'low therapeutic' doses, analogous to the ones used in men. Our data show that both drugs are effective in modifying EEG and f-VEP parameters connected with brain cholinergic function, although in a very narrow dose range.

  15. Stimulus specificity of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kian B.; Bradley, Andrew P.; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of neural excitation and inhibition when given a visual stimulus are well studied. It has been established that changing stimulus specificity such as luminance contrast or spatial frequency can alter the neuronal activity and thus modulate the visual-evoked response. In this paper, we study the effect that stimulus specificity has on the classification performance of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). For example, we investigate how closely two visual stimuli can be placed before they compete for neural representation in the cortex and thus influence BCI classification accuracy. We characterize stimulus specificity using the four stimulus parameters commonly encountered in SSVEP-BCI design: temporal frequency, spatial size, number of simultaneously displayed stimuli and their spatial proximity. By varying these quantities and measuring the SSVEP-BCI classification accuracy, we are able to determine the parameters that provide optimal performance. Our results show that superior SSVEP-BCI accuracy is attained when stimuli are placed spatially more than 5° apart, with size that subtends at least 2° of visual angle, when using a tagging frequency of between high alpha and beta band. These findings may assist in deciding the stimulus parameters for optimal SSVEP-BCI design.

  16. Stimulus specificity of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kian B; Bradley, Andrew P; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of neural excitation and inhibition when given a visual stimulus are well studied. It has been established that changing stimulus specificity such as luminance contrast or spatial frequency can alter the neuronal activity and thus modulate the visual-evoked response. In this paper, we study the effect that stimulus specificity has on the classification performance of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). For example, we investigate how closely two visual stimuli can be placed before they compete for neural representation in the cortex and thus influence BCI classification accuracy. We characterize stimulus specificity using the four stimulus parameters commonly encountered in SSVEP-BCI design: temporal frequency, spatial size, number of simultaneously displayed stimuli and their spatial proximity. By varying these quantities and measuring the SSVEP-BCI classification accuracy, we are able to determine the parameters that provide optimal performance. Our results show that superior SSVEP-BCI accuracy is attained when stimuli are placed spatially more than 5° apart, with size that subtends at least 2° of visual angle, when using a tagging frequency of between high alpha and beta band. These findings may assist in deciding the stimulus parameters for optimal SSVEP-BCI design.

  17. Visual-Evoked Potentials to Onset of Chromatic Red-Green and Blue-Yellow Gratings in Parkinson’s Disease Never Treated With L-Dopa

    PubMed Central

    Sartucci, F.; Porciatti, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Summary The differential dysfunction of chromatic and achromatic visual pathways in early Parkinson’s disease (PD) was evaluated by means of visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) recorded in 12 patients (mean age 60.1 ± 8.3 years; range 46 to 74 years) in the early stages of PD and not yet undergoing treatment with L-dopa, and in 12 age-matched controls. Visual stimuli were full-field (14 deg) equiluminant red-green (R-G), blue-yellow (B-Y), and black-white (B-W) sinusoidal gratings of two cycles per degree, presented in onset (300 milliseconds) – offset (700 milliseconds) mode, at two contrast (K) levels (90% and 25%). The VEP mean latencies were significantly more delayed in PD patients than in controls for chromatic than for luminance stimuli, in particular for B-Y stimuli of low contrast (K90%: B-W =6.6 milliseconds, R-G =3.34 milliseconds, B-Y =15.48 milliseconds; K25%: B-W =7.8 milliseconds, R-G =14.8 milliseconds, B-Y =28.9). Latencies of chromatic VEPs were more variable that achromatic VEP latencies in both normal subjects and PD patients. Therefore, the frequency of latency abnormalities (within 30%) was not significantly different for the three visual stimuli. Our results show that, in addition to achromatic VEPs, chromatic VEPs are impaired in early PD patients not yet undergoing L-dopa therapy, indicating an acquired color deficiency in these patients. The greater delay for the B-Y VEPs suggests a higher vulnerability of visual blue-cone pathway in the early stages of the disease. However, the overall sensitivity of chromatic VEPs in detecting early visual impairment in PD is comparable with that of achromatic VEPs. PMID:17016154

  18. Exploring the methods of data analysis in multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Malmqvist, L; De Santiago, L; Fraser, C; Klistorner, A; Hamann, S

    2016-08-01

    The multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) provides a topographical assessment of visual function, which has already shown potential for use in patients with glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. However, the variability in mfVEP measurements has limited its broader application. The purpose of this study was to compare several methods of data analysis to decrease mfVEP variability. Twenty-three normal subjects underwent mfVEP testing. Monocular and interocular asymmetry data were analyzed. Coefficients of variability in amplitude were examined using peak-to-peak, root mean square (RMS), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and logSNR techniques. Coefficients of variability in latency were examined using second peak and cross-correlation methods. LogSNR and peak-to-peak methods had significantly lower intra-subject variability when compared with RMS and SNR methods. LogSNR had the lowest inter-subject amplitude variability when compared with peak-to-peak, RMS and SNR. Average latency asymmetry values for the cross-correlation analysis were 1.7 ms (CI 95 % 1.2-2.3 ms) and for the second peak analysis 2.5 ms (CI 95 % 1.7-3.3 ms). A significant difference was found between cross-correlation and second peak analysis for both intra-subject variability (p < 0.001) and inter-subject variability (p < 0.001). For a comparison of amplitude data between groups of patients, the logSNR or SNR methods are preferred because of the smaller inter-subject variability. LogSNR or peak-to-peak methods have lower intra-subject variability, so are recommended for comparing an individual mfVEP to previous published normative data. This study establishes that the choice of mfVEP data analysis method can be used to decrease variability of the mfVEP results.

  19. Refraction changes during elevation of intraocular pressure by suction cup, their reflection in the pattern visual evoked cortical potential and their compensation.

    PubMed

    Bernd, A; Ulrich, W D; Teubel, H; Rohrwacher, F; Barth, T

    1993-01-01

    Visual evoked cortical potential studies using pattern stimuli with the intraocular pressure raised artificially by the suction cup method have been reported. Possible changes in the refraction of the eye due to the method employed and their influence on the pattern visual evoked cortical potential have not been considered. Changes in the refraction of the eye during artificial intraocular pressure elevation and the influence of such changes on pattern visual evoked cortical potentials were studied. The refraction changes were found to depend on the shape of the suction cup. They could be compensated for by employing properly shaped suction cups and contact lenses. The behavior of amplitude and latency of the pattern visual evoked cortical potential at artificially elevated intraocular pressure with compensation for refraction changes has been studied and found to depend in a characteristic manner on ocular perfusion pressure.

  20. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  1. Effects of spatial selective attention on the steady-state visual evoked potential in the 20-28 Hz range.

    PubMed

    Müller, M M; Picton, T W; Valdes-Sosa, P; Riera, J; Teder-Sälejärvi, W A; Hillyard, S A

    1998-04-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) were recorded from the scalp of subjects who attended to a flickering LED display in one visual field while ignoring a similar display (flickering at a different frequency) in the opposite visual field. The flicker frequencies were 20.8 Hz in the left-field display and 27.8 Hz in the right-field display. The SSVEP to the flicker in either field was enhanced in amplitude when attention was directed to its location. The scalp distribution of this SSVEP enhancement was narrowly focused over the posterior scalp contralateral to the visual field of stimulation. A source analysis using Variable Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (VARETA) indicated that the source current densities for the SSVEP attention effect had a focal origin in the contralateral parieto-occipital cortex.

  2. Spatial summation revealed in the earliest visual evoked component C1 and the effect of attention on its linearity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Yu, Qing; Zhu, Ziyun; Peng, Yujia; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    In natural scenes, multiple objects are usually presented simultaneously. How do specific areas of the brain respond to multiple objects based on their responses to each individual object? Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that the activity induced by a multiobject stimulus in the primary visual cortex (V1) can be predicted by the linear or nonlinear sum of the activities induced by its component objects. However, there has been little evidence from electroencephelogram (EEG) studies so far. Here we explored how V1 responded to multiple objects by comparing the EEG signals evoked by a three-grating stimulus with those evoked by its two components (the central grating and 2 flanking gratings). We focused on the earliest visual component C1 (onset latency of ∼50 ms) because it has been shown to reflect the feedforward responses of neurons in V1. We found that when the stimulus was unattended, the amplitude of the C1 evoked by the three-grating stimulus roughly equaled the sum of the amplitudes of the C1s evoked by its two components, regardless of the distances between these gratings. When the stimulus was attended, this linear spatial summation existed only when the three gratings were far apart from each other. When the three gratings were close to each other, the spatial summation became compressed. These results suggest that the earliest visual responses in V1 follow a linear summation rule when attention is not involved and that attention can affect the earliest interactions between multiple objects. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Cortical configuration by stimulus onset visual evoked potentials (SO-VEPs) predicts performance on a motion direction discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Zalar, Bojan; Martin, Tim; Kavcic, Voyko

    2015-06-01

    The slowing of information processing, a hallmark of cognitive aging, has several origins. Previously we reported that in a motion direction discrimination task, older as compared to younger participants showed prolonged non-decision time, an index of an early perceptual stage, while in motion onset visual evoked potentials (MO-VEPs) the P1 component was enhanced and N2 was diminished. We did not find any significant correlations between behavioral and MO-VEP measures. Here, we investigated the role of age in encoding and perceptual processing of stimulus onset visually evoked potentials (SO-VEPs). Twelve healthy adults (age<55years) and 19 elderly (age>55years) performed a motion direction discrimination task during EEG recording. Prior to motion, the stimulus consisted of a static cloud of white dots on a black background. As expected, SO-VEPs evoked well defined P1, N1, and P2 components. Elderly participants as compared to young participants showed increased P1 amplitude while their P2 amplitude was reduced. In addition elderly participants showed increased latencies for P1 and N1 components. Contrary to the findings with MO-VEPs, SO-VEP parameters were significant predictors of average response times and diffusion model parameters. Our electrophysiological results support the notion that slowing of information processing in older adults starts at the very beginning of encoding in visual cortical processing, most likely in striate and extrastriate visual cortices. More importantly, the earliest SO-VEP components, possibly reflecting configuration of visual cortices and encoding processes, predict subsequent prolonging and tardiness of perceptual and higher-level cognitive processes.

  4. Evoked gamma band response in male adolescent subjects at high risk for alcoholism during a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhapillai, Ajayan; Tang, Yongqiang; Ranganathan, Mohini; Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Jones, Kevin A; Chorlian, David B; Kamarajan, Chella; Stimus, Arthur; Kuperman, Samuel; Rohrbaugh, John; O'Connor, Sean J; Bauer, Lance O; Schuckit, Marc A; Begleiter, Henri; Porjesz, Bernice

    2006-11-01

    This study investigates early evoked gamma band activity in male adolescent subjects at high risk for alcoholism (HR; n=68) and normal controls (LR; n=27) during a visual oddball task. A time-frequency representation method was applied to EEG data in order to obtain stimulus related early evoked (phase-locked) gamma band activity (29-45 Hz) and was analyzed within a 0-150 ms time window range. Significant reduction of the early evoked gamma band response in the frontal and parietal regions during target stimulus processing was observed in HR subjects compared to LR subjects. Additionally, the HR group showed less differentiation between target and non-target stimuli in both frontal and parietal regions compared to the LR group, indicating difficulty in early stimulus processing, probably due to a dysfunctional frontoparietal attentional network. The results indicate that the deficient early evoked gamma band response may precede the development of alcoholism and could be a potential endophenotypic marker of alcoholism risk.

  5. Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging in correlation to visual-evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis: a tract-based spatial statistics analysis.

    PubMed

    Lobsien, D; Ettrich, B; Sotiriou, K; Classen, J; Then Bergh, F; Hoffmann, K-T

    2014-01-01

    Functional correlates of microstructural damage of the brain affected by MS are incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations of visual-evoked potentials with microstructural brain changes as determined by DTI in patients with demyelinating central nervous disease. Sixty-one patients with clinically isolated syndrome or MS were prospectively recruited. The mean P100 visual-evoked potential latencies of the right and left eyes of each patient were calculated and used for the analysis. For DTI acquisition, a single-shot echo-planar imaging pulse sequence with 80 diffusion directions was performed at 3T. Fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity were calculated and correlated with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials by tract-based spatial statistics. Significant negative correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and fractional anisotropy and significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and radial diffusivity were found widespread over the whole brain. The highest significance was found in the optic radiation, frontoparietal white matter, and corpus callosum. Significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and axial diffusivity were less widespread, notably sparing the optic radiation. Microstructural changes of the whole brain correlated significantly with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials. The distribution of the correlations showed clear differences among axial diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and radial diffusivity, notably in the optic radiation. This finding suggests a stronger correlation of mean P100 visual-evoked potentials to demyelination than to axonal damage. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic visualization of fetal chromosome abnormalities: a preliminary experience report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Komwilaisak, Ratana; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan

    2004-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis of fetal malformations in utero can provide both heath care providers and parents a number of management options. Three-dimensional ultrasonography is a new technique of diagnosis which has several potential advantages to allow for evaluation of specific anomalies by permitting high-quality views of body surface. We report 4 cases of fetal chromosomal abnormalities including 2 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 13 and 1 case of 48, XXY/+18. All cases were proved to have abnormal chromosomes by amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. After 3D reconstruction, we can identify specific facial abnormalities which can not be visualized by conventional two-dimensional ultrasound such as low set ear Mongolian's slant eyes, facial dysmorphism of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. We also clearly visualized abnormalities of digits such as overlapping fingers, club hands and sandal gap. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the fetal body surface improves the antenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities characterized by a particular dysmorphism. Our report suggests that three-dimensional ultrasonography has the potential to provide novel informations on the fetal anatomy and be useful in visualization and identification of chromosomal abnormalities in utero.

  7. Investigation of Abnormal Left Temporal Functioning in Dyslexia through rCBF, Auditory Evoked Potentials, and Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Frank; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the proposed left hemisphere dysfunction in dyslexia by reviewing four studies using regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) and combined auditory evoked responses with positron emission tomography. Emphasizes methodological issues. Finds that dyslexics showed a positive correlation between Heschl's gyrus activation and phonemic…

  8. Investigation of Abnormal Left Temporal Functioning in Dyslexia through rCBF, Auditory Evoked Potentials, and Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Frank; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the proposed left hemisphere dysfunction in dyslexia by reviewing four studies using regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) and combined auditory evoked responses with positron emission tomography. Emphasizes methodological issues. Finds that dyslexics showed a positive correlation between Heschl's gyrus activation and phonemic…

  9. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on contrast sensitivity and visual evoked potential amplitude in adults with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaofeng; Li, Jinrong; Spiegel, Daniel P.; Chen, Zidong; Chan, Lily; Luo, Guangwei; Yuan, Junpeng; Deng, Daming; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision that occurs when the visual cortex receives decorrelated inputs from the two eyes during an early critical period of development. Amblyopic eyes are subject to suppression from the fellow eye, generate weaker visual evoked potentials (VEPs) than fellow eyes and have multiple visual deficits including impairments in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. Primate models and human psychophysics indicate that stronger suppression is associated with greater deficits in amblyopic eye contrast sensitivity and visual acuity. We tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex would modulate VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity in adults with amblyopia. tDCS can transiently alter cortical excitability and may influence suppressive neural interactions. Twenty-one patients with amblyopia and twenty-seven controls completed separate sessions of anodal (a-), cathodal (c-) and sham (s-) visual cortex tDCS. A-tDCS transiently and significantly increased VEP amplitudes for amblyopic, fellow and control eyes and contrast sensitivity for amblyopic and control eyes. C-tDCS decreased VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity and s-tDCS had no effect. These results suggest that tDCS can modulate visual cortex responses to information from adult amblyopic eyes and provide a foundation for future clinical studies of tDCS in adults with amblyopia. PMID:26763954

  10. Change in flash visual evoked potentials in New Zealand albino rabbits after sub-tenon's anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofei; Jhanji, Vishal; Chen, Haoyu; Lin, Hongjie; Zhang, Guihua; Brelen, Marten; Chen, Weiqi

    2017-06-01

    The occurrence of amaurosis during ophthalmic anesthesia is well known. The reason for this manifestation has not been studied. To investigate the effect of sub-tenon's anesthesia on visual conduction in rabbit eyes. Fifteen right eyes of 15 New Zealand albino rabbits were included. 2% lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.75% bupivacaine hydrochloride (1 ml, 1:1 mixture) was injected in the sub-tenon's space of 8 eyes while the control group (n = 7) was injected with 1 ml physiological saline. Flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) were performed with Roland reti-scan system before and, 5 min, 15 min, and 5 days after injection. The natural pupillary diameter and minimal pupillary diameter with light reflex were recorded. In the anesthesia group, N1 latency, P1 latency, and P1 amplitude were 17.13 ± 1.13 ms, 28.25 ± 1.83 ms, 13.45 ± 4.36 μv respectively before injection; 21.75 ± 3.06 ms, 29.63 ± 2.67 ms, 7.24 ± 4.64 μv at 5 min after injection; 22.25 ± 1.39 ms, 29.50 ± 2.51 ms, 7.54 ± 4.47 μv at 15 min after injection, and, 17.75 ± 0.71 ms, 28.13 ± 2.42 ms, 13.17 ± 4.08 μv 5 days after injection. When compared with baseline, N1 latency at 5 min and 15 min after injection showed prolongation (p = 0.019 and p = 0.001, respectively). Likewise, P1 amplitude decreased at 5 min and 15 min after injection (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Both N1 latency and P1 amplitude recovered 5 days after the injection. Pupillary light reflex (PLR) constriction amplitude was 35.42% and 0.00% before and at 5 min after injection (p = 0.012). After 5 days it recovered to 33.33%. The FVEP and PLR constriction amplitude did not change significantly after injection in the control group. Sub-tenon's anesthesia was associated with changes in the FVEP and pupullary light reflex in rabbit eyes in our study. The data from this study suggested that sub

  11. Role of inter-hemispheric transfer in generating visual evoked potentials in V1-damaged brain hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Kavcic, Voyko; Triplett, Regina L.; Das, Anasuya; Martin, Tim; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2015-01-01

    Partial cortical blindness is a visual deficit caused by unilateral damage to the primary visual cortex, a condition previously considered beyond hopes of rehabilitation. However, recent data demonstrate that patients may recover both simple and global motion discrimination following intensive training in their blind field. The present experiments characterized motion-induced neural activity of cortically blind (CB) subjects prior to the onset of visual rehabilitation. This was done to provide information about visual processing capabilities available to mediate training-induced visual improvements. Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were recorded from two experimental groups consisting of 9 CB subjects and 9 age-matched, visually-intact controls. VEPs were collected following lateralized stimulus presentation to each of the 4 visual field quadrants. VEP waveforms were examined for both stimulus-onset (SO) and motion-onset (MO) related components in postero-lateral electrodes. While stimulus presentation to intact regions of the visual field elicited normal SO-P1, SO-N1, SO-P2 and MO-N2 amplitudes and latencies in contralateral brain regions of CB subjects, these components were not observed contralateral to stimulus presentation in blind quadrants of the visual field. In damaged brain hemispheres, SO-VEPs were only recorded following stimulus presentation to intact visual field quadrants, via inter-hemispheric transfer. MO-VEPs were only recorded from damaged left brain hemispheres, possibly reflecting a native left/right asymmetry in inter-hemispheric connections. The present findings suggest that damaged brain hemispheres contain areas capable of responding to visual stimulation. However, in the absence of training or rehabilitation, these areas only generate detectable VEPs in response to stimulation of the intact hemifield of vision. PMID:25575450

  12. Role of inter-hemispheric transfer in generating visual evoked potentials in V1-damaged brain hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Kavcic, Voyko; Triplett, Regina L; Das, Anasuya; Martin, Tim; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2015-02-01

    Partial cortical blindness is a visual deficit caused by unilateral damage to the primary visual cortex, a condition previously considered beyond hopes of rehabilitation. However, recent data demonstrate that patients may recover both simple and global motion discrimination following intensive training in their blind field. The present experiments characterized motion-induced neural activity of cortically blind (CB) subjects prior to the onset of visual rehabilitation. This was done to provide information about visual processing capabilities available to mediate training-induced visual improvements. Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were recorded from two experimental groups consisting of 9 CB subjects and 9 age-matched, visually-intact controls. VEPs were collected following lateralized stimulus presentation to each of the 4 visual field quadrants. VEP waveforms were examined for both stimulus-onset (SO) and motion-onset (MO) related components in postero-lateral electrodes. While stimulus presentation to intact regions of the visual field elicited normal SO-P1, SO-N1, SO-P2 and MO-N2 amplitudes and latencies in contralateral brain regions of CB subjects, these components were not observed contralateral to stimulus presentation in blind quadrants of the visual field. In damaged brain hemispheres, SO-VEPs were only recorded following stimulus presentation to intact visual field quadrants, via inter-hemispheric transfer. MO-VEPs were only recorded from damaged left brain hemispheres, possibly reflecting a native left/right asymmetry in inter-hemispheric connections. The present findings suggest that damaged brain hemispheres contain areas capable of responding to visual stimulation. However, in the absence of training or rehabilitation, these areas only generate detectable VEPs in response to stimulation of the intact hemifield of vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Single Trial Predictors for Gating Motor-Imagery Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Sensorimotor Rhythm and Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Geronimo, Andrew; Kamrunnahar, Mst; Schiff, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    For brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that utilize visual cues to direct the user, the neural signals extracted by the computer are representative of ongoing processes, visual evoked responses, and voluntary modulation. We proposed to use three brain signatures for predicting success on a single trial of a BCI task. The first two features, the amplitude and phase of the pre-trial mu amplitude, were chosen as a correlate for cortical excitability. The remaining feature, related to the visually evoked response to the cue, served as a possible measure of fixation and attention to the task. Of these three features, mu rhythm amplitude over the central electrodes at the time of cue presentation and to a lesser extent the single trial visual evoked response were correlated with the success on the subsequent imagery task. Despite the potential for gating trials using these features, an offline gating simulation was limited in its ability to produce an increase in device throughput. This discrepancy highlights a distinction between the identification of predictive features, and the use of this knowledge in an online BCI. Using such a system, we cannot assume that the user will respond similarly when faced with a scenario where feedback is altered by trials that are gated on a regular basis. The results of this study suggest the possibility of using individualized, pre-task neural signatures for personalized, and asynchronous (self-paced) BCI applications, although these effects need to be quantified in a real-time adaptive scenario in a future study. PMID:27199630

  14. Extra-visual functional and structural connection abnormalities in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Pagani, Elisabetta; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Milesi, Jacopo; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2011-02-10

    We assessed abnormalities within the principal brain resting state networks (RSNs) in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) to define whether functional abnormalities in this disease are limited to the visual system or, conversely, tend to be more diffuse. We also defined the structural substrates of fMRI changes using a connectivity-based analysis of diffusion tensor (DT) MRI data. Neuro-ophthalmologic assessment, DT MRI and RS fMRI data were acquired from 13 LHON patients and 13 healthy controls. RS fMRI data were analyzed using independent component analysis and SPM5. A DT MRI connectivity-based parcellation analysis was performed using the primary visual and auditory cortices, bilaterally, as seed regions. Compared to controls, LHON patients had a significant increase of RS fluctuations in the primary visual and auditory cortices, bilaterally. They also showed decreased RS fluctuations in the right lateral occipital cortex and right temporal occipital fusiform cortex. Abnormalities of RS fluctuations were correlated significantly with retinal damage and disease duration. The DT MRI connectivity-based parcellation identified a higher number of clusters in the right auditory cortex in LHON vs. controls. Differences of cluster-centroid profiles were found between the two groups for all the four seeds analyzed. For three of these areas, a correspondence was found between abnormalities of functional and structural connectivities. These results suggest that functional and structural abnormalities extend beyond the visual network in LHON patients. Such abnormalities also involve the auditory network, thus corroborating the notion of a cross-modal plasticity between these sensory modalities in patients with severe visual deficits.

  15. The Effect of Magnesium on Visual Evoked Potentials in L-NAME-Induced Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ulker Karadamar, Pinar; Nasircilar Ulker, Seher; Kocer, Gunnur; Senturk, Umit Kemal; Basrali, Filiz; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Ozyurt, Dilek; Agar, Aysel

    2016-08-01

    In the literature, although there are many studies regarding complications of hypertension, information concerning its influence on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) is limited. This study aims to clarify the possible therapeutic effects of the preferential magnesium (Mg) treatment on VEPs in an experimental hypertension model. Rats were divided into four groups as follows: control, Mg treated (Mg), N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) hypertension, and L-NAME hypertension + Mg treated (L-NAME + Mg). Hypertension was induced by L-NAME which was given to rats orally over 6 weeks (25 mg/kg/day in drinking water). A magnesium-enriched diet (0.8 g/kg) was given to treatment groups for 6 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was determined by using the tail-cuff method. Flash VEPs were recorded. Our results revealed that the SBP was significantly increased in the L-NAME group compared to control. Magnesium treatment significantly attenuated SBP in the hypertensive rats compared to the L-NAME group. The mean latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 components were significantly prolonged in hypertensive rats compared to control. Treatment with Mg provided a significant decrease in the latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 potentials in the L-NAME + Mg group compared to the L-NAME group. Plasma Mg levels were increased in the L-NAME + Mg group compared to the L-NAME group. No change was detected in the Mg levels of the brains in all experimental groups. Magnesium treatment had no effect on the brain nitrate/nitrite and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels in hypertensive rats compared to non-treated rats. There was a positive correlation between the brain TBARS levels and SBP of the rats. The present study suggests that Mg supplementation has the potential to prevent VEP changes in the L-NAME-induced hypertension model.

  16. Abnormalities of Visual Processing and Frontostriatal Systems in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Feusner, Jamie D.; Moody, Teena; Hembacher, Emily; Townsend, Jennifer; McKinley, Malin; Moller, Hayley; Bookheimer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Context Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder in which individuals are preoccupied with perceived defects in their appearance, often related to their face. Little is known about its pathophysiology, although early research provides evidence of abnormal visual processing. Objective To determine whether patients with BDD have abnormal patterns of brain activation when visually processing their own face with high, low, or normal spatial resolution. Design Case-control study. Setting A university hospital. Participants Seventeen right-handed medication-free subjects with BDD and 16 matched healthy control subjects. Intervention Functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing photographs of face stimuli. Stimuli were neutral-expression photographs of the patient’s own face and a familiar face (control stimuli) that were unaltered, altered to include only high spatial frequency (fine spatial resolution), or altered to include only low spatial frequency (low spatial resolution). Main Outcome Measure Blood oxygen level–dependent signal changes in the BDD and control groups during each stimulus type. Results Subjects with BDD showed relative hyperactivity in the left orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral head of the caudate for the unaltered own-face vs familiar-face condition. They showed relative hypoactivity in the left occipital cortex for the low spatial frequency faces. Differences in activity in frontostriatal systems but not visual cortex covaried with aversiveness ratings of the faces. Severity of BDD symptoms correlated with activity in frontostriatal systems and visual cortex. Conclusions These results suggest abnormalities in visual processing and frontostriatal systems in BDD. Hypoactivation in the occipital cortex for low spatial frequency faces may indicate either primary visual system abnormalities for configural face elements or top-down modulation of visual processing. Frontostriatal hyperactivity may be associated both with

  17. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Dysmorphic Disorder are Associated with Abnormalities in Processing Visual Information

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Lai, Tsz Man; Bohon, Cara; Loo, Sandra K; McCurdy, Danyale; Strober, Michael; Bookheimer, Susan; Feusner, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are characterized by distorted body image and are frequently comorbid with each other, although their relationship remains little studied. While there is evidence of abnormalities in visual and visuospatial processing in both disorders, no study has directly compared the two. We used two complementary modalities – event-related potentials (ERP) and fMRI – to test for abnormal activity associated with early visual signaling. Methods We acquired fMRI and ERP data in separate sessions from 15 unmedicated individuals in each of three groups (weight-restored AN, BDD, and healthy controls) while they viewed images of faces and houses of different spatial frequencies. We used joint independent component analyses to compare activity in visual systems. Results AN and BDD groups demonstrated similar hypoactivity in early secondary visual processing regions and the dorsal visual stream when viewing low spatial frequency faces, linked to the N170 component, as well as in early secondary visual processing regions when viewing low spatial frequency houses, linked to the P100 component. Additionally, the BDD group exhibited hyperactivity in fusiform cortex when viewing high spatial frequency houses, linked to the N170 component. Greater activity in this component was associated with lower attractiveness ratings of faces. Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence of similar abnormal spatio-temporal activation in AN and BDD for configural/holistic information for appearance- and nonappearance-related stimuli. This suggests a common phenotype of abnormal early visual system functioning, which may contribute to perceptual distortions. PMID:25652023

  18. Repeatability of short-duration transient visual evoked potentials in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V.; Prata, Tiago S.; Derr, Peter; Patel, Jayson; Siegfried, John; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the within-session and inter-session repeatability of a new, short-duration transient visual evoked potential (SD-tVEP) device on normal individuals, we tested 30 normal subjects (20/20 visual acuity, normal 24-2 SITA Standard VF) with SD-tVEP. Ten of these subjects had their tests repeated within 1–2 months from the initial visit. Synchronized single-channel EEG was recorded using a modified Diopsys Enfant™ System (Diopsys, Inc., Pine Brook, New Jersey, USA). A checkerboard stimulus was modulated at two reversals per second. Two different contrasts of checkerboard reversal patterns were used: 85% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 66.25 cd/m2 and 10% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 112 cd/m2. Each test lasted 20 s. Both eyes, independently and together, were tested 10 times (5 times at each contrast level). The following information was identified from the filtered N75-P100-N135 complex: N75 amplitude, N75 latency, P100 amplitude, P100 latency, and Delta Amplitude (N75-P100). The median values for each eye’s five SD-tVEP parameters were calculated and grouped into two data sets based on contrast level. Mean age was 27.3 ± 5.2 years. For OD only, the median (95% confidence intervals) of Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitudes at 10% and 85% contrast were 4.6 uV (4.1–5.9) and 7.1 uV (5.15–9.31). The median P100 latencies were 115.2 ms (112.0–117.7) and 104.0 ms (99.9–106.0). There was little within-session variability for any of these parameters. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.64 and 0.98, and within subject coefficients of variation were 3–5% (P100 latency) and 15–30% (Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitude). Bland–Altman plots showed good agreement between the first and fifth test sessions (85% contrast Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) delta amplitude, mean difference, 0.48 mV, 95% CI, −0.18–1.12; 85% contrast P100 latency delay, −0.82 ms, 95% CI, −3.12–1.46; 10% contrast

  19. Visual performance and ocular abnormalities in deaf children and young adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Richard; Ludlow, Amanda K; Wilkins, Arnold; Calver, Richard; Allen, Peter M

    2014-06-01

    Visual defects are common in deaf individuals. Refractive error and ocular motor abnormalities are frequently reported, with hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism and anomalies of binocular vision, all showing a greater prevalence in deaf individuals compared with the general population. Near visual function in deaf individuals has been relatively neglected in the literature to date. Comparisons between studies are problematic due to differences in methodology and population characteristics. Any untreated visual defect has the potential to impair the development of language, with consequences for education more generally, and there is a need to improve screening and treatments of deaf children.

  20. [The Effect of the Disease Duration on the Changes of the Visual Evoked Potentials and Contrast Sensitivity in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Murav'eva, S V; Bisaga, G N; Pronin, S V; Bryakileva, T V; Shelepin, Y E

    2015-01-01

    The most sensitive methods to detect pathological changes in the visual system are the method of recording visual evoked potentials and the psychophysical method of measuring contrast sensitivity. Described in the literature features of functional disorders of the visual system in patients with multiple sclerosis are controversial. The results of the study allowed us to make an assumption about the depen-dence of the nature and severity of changes of the evoked potentials and contrast sensitivity and the duration of disease in patients with multiple sclerosis. In some patients with disease duration from 3 to 10 years there are irregularities in the magno-channels (reduced amplitude component P1), in others-- parvo-channels (amplitude reduction N 1) without increasing the latency, in patients with a disease duration of 10 to 14 years--both channels dysfunction (decreased amplitude components P1 and N1) with an increase of latency. The data indicate heterogeneity of pathophysiological changes upon increase of the degree of demyelination and damage of optic nerve fibers in multiple sclerosis.

  1. Relative diagnostic value of ocular vestibular evoked potentials and the subjective visual vertical during tilt and eccentric rotation.

    PubMed

    Valko, Yulia; Hegemann, Stefan C A; Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik; Bockisch, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    We compared vibration-induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) with the visual vertical during whole-body roll tilt and eccentric rotation in healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular loss, to determine which test was most sensitive in discriminating impaired utricle function. OVEMPs and the visual vertical were measured in 11 patients and 11 healthy subjects. Visual vertical was measured during roll tilts between -9.6° and 9.6°, and during rotation at 400°/s with the head upright and the vertical rotation axis located between ±3.5 cm from the head center. OVEMPs in patients were strikingly asymmetric, whereas they were approximately symmetric in healthy subjects. Patients showed impaired visual vertical gain during eccentric rotation and increased errors for both roll tilt and eccentric rotation tests. OVEMPs were superior at discriminating between patients and healthy subjects, although eccentric rotation performed nearly as well. OVEMPs provide a powerful test for discriminating between healthy subjects and patients with chronic unilateral vestibular loss, and testing the visual vertical testing during eccentric rotation was superior to testing during whole-body roll tilt. OVEMPs are easier to administer, less demanding on patients, and in general are more effective at identifying chronic unilateral vestibular loss than visual vertical measurements. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of a visual guide to improve the quality of VOR responses evoked by high-velocity rotational stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gianna-Poulin, C.C.; Peterka, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    High-velocity rotational stimuli have the potential to improve the diagnostic capabilities of clinical rotation testing by revealing nonlinear vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) responses that are indicative of asymmetric vestibular function. However, eye movements evoked by high-velocity rotations often are inconsistent over time and therefore do not yield reliable diagnostic measures. This study investigated whether use of a novel “visual guide” could improve the consistency and quality of VORs obtained during testing with pulse-step-sine (PSS) stimuli providing periodic high-velocity, horizontal-plane rotations with peak velocities up to 290 deg/s. The visual guide (narrow phosphorescent line spanning 180° field of view) was mounted horizontally on the rotation chair at the subject's eye level. Eight healthy human subjects were tested either in complete darkness while performing an alerting task, or while viewing the visual guide in an otherwise dark room. We found that the visual guide improved the quality of VOR responses as shown by an increased proportion of slow-phase velocity data segments retained for analysis, by a decreased variance of the processed eye velocity data, and by a reduction of outlying VOR response measures. We also found that the visual guide did not induce visual suppression because VOR gain measures were not diminished. PMID:18776595

  3. Evidence of Visual Memory in the Cortical Evoked Potential of Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Martin J.; And Others

    Averaged evoked potential (AEP) is an event-related brain response obtained by averaging the scalp electrical potentials elicited by repeated presentations of the same event. It has proven to be an accurate measure of the activity of the mature human brain when involved in a wide variety of psychological tasks. Distinct psychological processes…

  4. Towards an Optimization of Stimulus Parameters for Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Radzikowska, Zofia; Milanowski, Piotr; Kuś, Rafał; Suffczyński, Piotr; Michalska, Magdalena; Łabęcki, Maciej; Zwoliński, Piotr; Durka, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to construct an effective brain-computer interface (BCI) system based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP) commonly focus on sophisticated mathematical methods for data analysis. The role of different stimulus features in evoking strong SSVEP is less often considered and the knowledge on the optimal stimulus properties is still fragmentary. The goal of this study was to provide insight into the influence of stimulus characteristics on the magnitude of SSVEP response. Five stimuli parameters were tested: size, distance, colour, shape, and presence of a fixation point in the middle of each flickering field. The stimuli were presented on four squares on LCD screen, with each square highlighted by LEDs flickering with different frequencies. Brighter colours and larger dimensions of flickering fields resulted in a significantly stronger SSVEP response. The distance between stimulation fields and the presence or absence of the fixation point had no significant effect on the response. Contrary to a popular belief, these results suggest that absence of the fixation point does not reduce the magnitude of SSVEP response. However, some parameters of the stimuli such as colour and the size of the flickering field play an important role in evoking SSVEP response, which indicates that stimuli rendering is an important factor in building effective SSVEP based BCI systems. PMID:25398134

  5. Functional source separation improves the quality of single trial visual evoked potentials recorded during concurrent EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Porcaro, Camillo; Ostwald, Dirk; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    EEG quality is a crucial issue when acquiring combined EEG-fMRI data, particularly when the focus is on using single trial (ST) variability to integrate the data sets. The most common method for improving EEG data quality following removal of gross MRI artefacts is independent component analysis (ICA), a completely blind source separation technique. In the current study, a different approach is proposed based on the functional source separation (FSS) algorithm. FSS is an extension of ICA that incorporates prior knowledge about the signal of interest into the data decomposition. Since in general the part of the EEG signal that will contain the most relevant information is known beforehand (i.e. evoked potential peaks, spectral bands), FSS separates the signal of interest by exploiting this prior knowledge without renouncing the advantages of using only information contained in the original signal waveforms. A reversing checkerboard stimulus was used to generate visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in healthy control subjects. Gradient and ballistocardiogram artefacts were removed with template subtraction techniques to form the raw data, which were then subjected to ICA denoising and FSS. The resulting EEG data sets were compared using several metrics derived from average and ST data and correlated with fMRI data. In all cases, ICA was an improvement on the raw data, but the most obvious improvement was provided by FSS, which consistently outperformed ICA. The results show the benefit of FSS for the recovery of good quality single trial evoked potentials during concurrent EEG-fMRI recordings.

  6. The hybrid BCI system for movement control by combining motor imagery and moving onset visual evoked potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Deng, Lili; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Li, Fali; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Movement control is an important application for EEG-BCI (EEG-based brain–computer interface) systems. A single-modality BCI cannot provide an efficient and natural control strategy, but a hybrid BCI system that combines two or more different tasks can effectively overcome the drawbacks encountered in single-modality BCI control. Approach. In the current paper, we developed a new hybrid BCI system by combining MI (motor imagery) and mVEP (motion-onset visual evoked potential), aiming to realize the more efficient 2D movement control of a cursor. Main result. The offline analysis demonstrates that the hybrid BCI system proposed in this paper could evoke the desired MI and mVEP signal features simultaneously, and both are very close to those evoked in the single-modality BCI task. Furthermore, the online 2D movement control experiment reveals that the proposed hybrid BCI system could provide more efficient and natural control commands. Significance. The proposed hybrid BCI system is compensative to realize efficient 2D movement control for a practical online system, especially for those situations in which P300 stimuli are not suitable to be applied.

  7. On determining the intracranial sources of visual evoked potentials from scalp topography: a reply to Kelly et al. (this issue).

    PubMed

    Ales, Justin M; Yates, Jacob L; Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    The cruciform model posits that if a Visual Evoked Potential component originates in cortical area V1, then stimuli placed in the upper versus lower visual field will generate responses with opposite polarity at the scalp. In our original paper (Ales et al., 2010b) we showed that the cruciform model provides an insufficient criterion for identifying V1 sources. This conclusion was reached on the basis of simulations that used realistic 3D models of early visual areas to simulate scalp topographies expected for stimuli of different sizes and shapes placed in different field locations. The simulations indicated that stimuli placed in the upper and lower visual field produce polarity inverting scalp topographies for activation of areas V2 and V3, but not for area V1. As a consequence of the non-uniqueness of the polarity inversion criterion, we suggested that past studies using the cruciform model had not adequately excluded contributions from sources outside V1. In their comment on our paper, Kelly et al. (this issue) raise several concerns with this suggestion. They claim that our initial results did not use the proper stimulus locations to constitute a valid test of the cruciform model. Kelly et al., also contend that the cortical source of the initial visually evoked component (C1) can be identified based on latency and polarity criteria derived from intracranial recordings in non-human primates. In our reply we show that simulations using the suggested critical stimulus locations are consistent with our original findings and thus do not change our conclusions regarding the use of the polarity inversion criterion. We further show that the anatomical assumptions underlying the putatively optimal locations are not consistent with available V1 anatomical data. We then address the non-human primate data, describing how differences in stimuli across studies and species confound an effective utilization of the non-human primate data for interpreting human evoked

  8. Abnormal contextual modulation of visual contour detection in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Sponheim, Scott R; Olman, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients demonstrate perceptual deficits consistent with broad dysfunction in visual context processing. These include poor integration of segments forming visual contours, and reduced visual contrast effects (e.g. weaker orientation-dependent surround suppression, ODSS). Background image context can influence contour perception, as stimuli near the contour affect detection accuracy. Because of ODSS, this contextual modulation depends on the relative orientation between the contour and flanking elements, with parallel flankers impairing contour perception. However in schizophrenia, the impact of abnormal ODSS during contour perception is not clear. It is also unknown whether deficient contour perception marks genetic liability for schizophrenia, or is strictly associated with clinical expression of this disorder. We examined contour detection in 25 adults with schizophrenia, 13 unaffected first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, and 28 healthy controls. Subjects performed a psychophysics experiment designed to quantify the effect of flanker orientation during contour detection. Overall, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer contour detection performance than relatives or controls. Parallel flankers suppressed and orthogonal flankers enhanced contour detection performance for all groups, but parallel suppression was relatively weaker for schizophrenia patients than healthy controls. Relatives of patients showed equivalent performance with controls. Computational modeling suggested that abnormal contextual modulation in schizophrenia may be explained by suppression that is more broadly tuned for orientation. Abnormal flanker suppression in schizophrenia is consistent with weaker ODSS and/or broader orientation tuning. This work provides the first evidence that such perceptual abnormalities may not be associated with a genetic liability for schizophrenia.

  9. A brain computer interface for robust wheelchair control application based on pseudorandom code modulated Visual Evoked Potential.

    PubMed

    Mohebbi, Ali; Engelsholm, Signe K D; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan; Kjaer, Troels W; Thomsen, Carsten E; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2015-08-01

    In this pilot study, a novel and minimalistic Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based wheelchair control application was developed. The system was based on pseudorandom code modulated Visual Evoked Potentials (c-VEPs). The visual stimuli in the scheme were generated based on the Gold code, and the VEPs were recognized and classified using subject-specific algorithms. The system provided the ability of controlling a wheelchair model (LEGO(®) MINDSTORM(®) EV3 robot) in 4 different directions based on the elicited c-VEPs. Ten healthy subjects were evaluated in testing the system where an average accuracy of 97% was achieved. The promising results illustrate the potential of this approach when considering a real wheelchair application.

  10. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing; Xu, Guang-Hua

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Auditory and Visual Evoked Potentials as a Function of Sleep Deprivation and Irregular Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-15

    Broughton, 1968). If the cyclicity of REM sleep is a sleep -dependent phenomenon as purported by Moses et al. (1977), rather than the sleeping ...1977). The auditory evoked brain response during adult human sleep . Waking and Sleeping , 1, 189-194. Aserinsky, E., & Kleitman, N. (1953). Regularly...wave versus REM sleep . Psychophysiology, 5, 231. Globus, G.G., Drury, R. L., Phoebus, E.C., & Boyd, R. (1971). Ultradian rhythms in human performance

  12. Improving the ensemble average of visual evoked potentials. II. Simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, M H; Thijssen, J M

    1995-03-01

    Ensemble averaging is generally used for the estimation of Evoked Potentials. This paper deals with the assessment of correction procedures for the time variability of the ensemble components, this time variability reduces the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by averaging. Evoked potentials were estimated by ensemble averaging, synchronized to a periodic stimulus. It is assumed that VEP-instability is partly caused by time-variability of the evoked potentials. Two time-variate models were used, from which procedures were derived to correct the single VEP-responses prior to ensemble averaging. The models are: (1) variation in response delay (jitter), (2) variable compression/expansion of the time scale of the response (wow). The Spectral Phase Difference method was applied to estimate both the delay time jitter and the wow factor of single responses with respect to a template (conventional ensemble average). The effects of the devised correction on the average VEP waveform and on the SNR of the ensemble were investigated by using data from realistic simulations and from experiments (n = 23) with a number of healthy human volunteers (n = 17). Jitter- and wow-corrections were effective on simulations with time variability due to delay time jitter and time scale distortion (wow), respectively. Both wow- and jitter correction of the single responses improved the SNR of the VEP measurements significantly and to the same amount. A combined wow-jitter approach resulted in significantly better results than the exclusive application of jitter- or wow correction.

  13. Mitochondrial abnormality in sensory, but not motor, axons in paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W H; Zheng, H; Zheng, F Y; Nuydens, R; Meert, T F; Bennett, G J

    2011-12-29

    The dose-limiting side effect of the anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, is a chronic distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy that produces sensory dysfunction (hypoesthesia and neuropathic pain) but little or no distal motor dysfunction. Similar peripheral neuropathies are seen with chemotherapeutics in the vinca alkaloid, platinum-complex, and proteasome inhibitor classes. Studies in rats suggest that the cause is a mitotoxic effect on axonal mitochondria. If so, then the absence of motor dysfunction may be due to mitotoxicity that affects sensory axons but spares motor axons. To investigate this, paclitaxel exposure levels in the dorsal root, ventral root, dorsal root ganglion, peripheral nerve, and spinal cord were measured, and the ultrastructure and the respiratory function of mitochondria in dorsal roots and ventral roots were compared. Sensory and motor axons in the roots and nerve had comparably low exposure to paclitaxel and exposure in the spinal cord was negligible. However, sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion had a very high and remarkably persistent (up to 10 days or more after the last injection) exposure to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel evoked a significant increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in the myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons of the dorsal root (as seen previously in the peripheral nerve) but not in the motor axons of the ventral root. Stimulated mitochondrial respiration in the dorsal root was significantly depressed in paclitaxel-treated animals examined 2-4 weeks after the last injection, whereas respiration in the ventral root was normal. We conclude that the absence of motor dysfunction in paclitaxel-evoked peripheral neuropathy may be due to the absence of a mitotoxic effect in motor neuron axons, whereas the sensory dysfunction may be due to a mitotoxic effect resulting from the primary afferent neuron's cell body being exposed to high and persistent levels of paclitaxel.

  14. Changes in the visual-evoked P1 potential as a function of schizotypy and background color in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S; Chan, Chi C; Trachik, Benjamin J; Rassovsky, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    Research has suggested a hypoactive visual magnocellular (M) pathway in individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and traits, along with a unique response of this pathway to red light. As these abnormalities only appear in a subset of these samples, they may reflect unknown subtypes with unique etiologies and corresponding neuropathologies. The P1 transient visual-evoked component has been found to be influenced by M-pathway activity; therefore, the current study assessed the P1 component in response to a 64% contrast checker stimulus on white, red, and green background conditions. The sample consisted of 28 undergraduate participants (61% male) who endorsed a continuous range of total scores from the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Participants with higher total SPQ scores had a reduced P1 mean amplitude with the white (baseline) background, which was primarily related to the SPQ Magical Thinking subscale score. In addition, while participants with lower total SPQ scores showed the expected reduction in P1 amplitude to the red (vs. green) background, participants with higher total SPQ scores showed no change, which was primarily related to the SPQ Ideas of Reference subscale. This differential change to the red background remained after covarying for the P1 amplitude to the green background, thus representing a relatively independent effect. Further confirmation of these early visual processing relationships to particular clusters of symptoms in related psychiatric samples may assist in revealing unique, currently unknown, subtypes of particular psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. This can direct treatment efforts toward more homogeneous neuropathology targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparative study of the usefulness of color vision, photostress recovery time, and visual evoked potential tests in early detection of ocular toxicity from hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Heravian, Javad; Saghafi, Massoud; Shoeibi, Naser; Hassanzadeh, Samira; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sharepoor, Maria

    2011-08-01

    Ocular toxicity from hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is rare, but its potential permanence and severity makes it imperative to employ measures and screening protocols to minimize its occurrence. This study was performed to assess the usefulness of color vision, photo stress recovery time (PSRT), and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in early detection of ocular toxicity of HCQ, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). 86 patients were included in the study and divided into three groups: (1) with history of HCQ use: interventional 1 (Int.1) without fundoscopic changes and Int.2 with fundoscopic changes; and (2) without history of HCQ use, as control. Visual field, color vision, PSRT and VEP results were recorded for all patients and the effect of age, disease duration, treatment duration and cumulative dose of HCQ on each test was assessed in each group. There was a significant relationship among PSRT and age, treatment duration, cumulative dose of HCQ and disease duration (P<0.001 for all). Color vision was normal in all the cases. P100 amplitude was not different between the three groups (P=0.846), but P100 latency was significantly different (P=0.025) and for Int.2 it was greater than the others. The percentage of abnormal visual fields for Int.2 was more than Int.1 and control groups (P=0.002 and P=0.005 respectively), but Int.1 and control groups were not significantly different (P>0.50). In the early stages of maculopathy, P100 latencies of VEP and PSRT are useful predictors of HCQ ocular toxicity. In patients without ocular symptoms and fundoscopic changes, the P100 latency of VEP predicts more precisely than the others.

  16. Visual sensor based abnormal event detection with moving shadow removal in home healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sook; Chung, Wan-Young

    2012-01-01

    Vision-based abnormal event detection for home healthcare systems can be greatly improved using visual sensor-based techniques able to detect, track and recognize objects in the scene. However, in moving object detection and tracking processes, moving cast shadows can be misclassified as part of objects or moving objects. Shadow removal is an essential step for developing video surveillance systems. The goal of the primary is to design novel computer vision techniques that can extract objects more accurately and discriminate between abnormal and normal activities. To improve the accuracy of object detection and tracking, our proposed shadow removal algorithm is employed. Abnormal event detection based on visual sensor by using shape features variation and 3-D trajectory is presented to overcome the low fall detection rate. The experimental results showed that the success rate of detecting abnormal events was 97% with a false positive rate of 2%. Our proposed algorithm can allow distinguishing diverse fall activities such as forward falls, backward falls, and falling asides from normal activities.

  17. Steady-state motion visual evoked potentials produced by oscillating Newton's rings: implications for brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we utilize a special visual stimulation protocol, called motion reversal, to present a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI paradigm that relied on human perception of motions oscillated in two opposite directions. Four Newton's rings with the oscillating expansion and contraction motions served as visual stimulators to elicit subjects' SSMVEPs. And four motion reversal frequencies of 8.1, 9.8, 12.25 and 14 Hz were tested. According to Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), the offline accuracy and ITR (mean ± standard deviation) over six healthy subjects were 86.56 ± 9.63% and 15.93 ± 3.83 bits/min, respectively. All subjects except one exceeded the level of 80% mean accuracy. Circular Hotelling's T-Squared test (T2 circ) also demonstrated that most subjects exhibited significantly strong stimulus-locked SSMVEP responses. The results of declining exponential fittings exhibited low-adaptation characteristics over the 100-s stimulation sequences in most experimental conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that the proposed paradigm can provide comparable performance with low-adaptation characteristic and less visual discomfort for BCI applications.

  18. Exploring the temporal dynamics of sustained and transient spatial attention using steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai; Röder, Brigitte

    2017-03-03

    While the behavioral dynamics as well as the functional network of sustained and transient attention have extensively been studied, their underlying neural mechanisms have most often been investigated in separate experiments. In the present study, participants were instructed to perform an audio-visual spatial attention task. They were asked to attend to either the left or the right hemifield and to respond to deviant transient either auditory or visual stimuli. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) elicited by two task irrelevant pattern reversing checkerboards flickering at 10 and 15 Hz in the left and the right hemifields, respectively, were used to continuously monitor the locus of spatial attention. The amplitude and phase of the SSVEPs were extracted for single trials and were separately analyzed. Sustained attention to one hemifield (spatial attention) as well as to the auditory modality (intermodal attention) increased the inter-trial phase locking of the SSVEP responses, whereas briefly presented visual and auditory stimuli decreased the single-trial SSVEP amplitude between 200 and 500 ms post-stimulus. This transient change of the single-trial amplitude was restricted to the SSVEPs elicited by the reversing checkerboard in the spatially attended hemifield and thus might reflect a transient re-orienting of attention towards the brief stimuli. Thus, the present results demonstrate independent, but interacting neural mechanisms of sustained and transient attentional orienting.

  19. Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potentials Produced by Oscillating Newton's Rings: Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we utilize a special visual stimulation protocol, called motion reversal, to present a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI paradigm that relied on human perception of motions oscillated in two opposite directions. Four Newton's rings with the oscillating expansion and contraction motions served as visual stimulators to elicit subjects' SSMVEPs. And four motion reversal frequencies of 8.1, 9.8, 12.25 and 14 Hz were tested. According to Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), the offline accuracy and ITR (mean ± standard deviation) over six healthy subjects were 86.56±9.63% and 15.93±3.83 bits/min, respectively. All subjects except one exceeded the level of 80% mean accuracy. Circular Hotelling's T-Squared test () also demonstrated that most subjects exhibited significantly strong stimulus-locked SSMVEP responses. The results of declining exponential fittings exhibited low-adaptation characteristics over the 100-s stimulation sequences in most experimental conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that the proposed paradigm can provide comparable performance with low-adaptation characteristic and less visual discomfort for BCI applications. PMID:22724028

  20. Athletic training in badminton players modulates the early C1 component of visual evoked potentials: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Xu, Guiping; Zhang, John X; Ye, Zuoer; Wang, Shufang; Zhao, Lun; Lin, Chong-De; Mo, Lei

    2010-12-01

    One basic question in brain plasticity research is whether individual life experience in the normal population can affect very early sensory-perceptual processing. Athletes provide a possible model to explore plasticity of the visual cortex as athletic training in confrontational ball games is quite often accompanied by training of the visual system. We asked professional badminton players to watch video clips related to their training experience and predict where the ball would land and examined whether they differed from non-player controls in the elicited C1, a visual evoked potential indexing V1 activity. Compared with controls, the players made judgments significantly more accurately, albeit not faster. An early ERP component peaking around 65 ms post-stimulus with a scalp topography centering at the occipital pole (electrode Oz) was observed in both groups and interpreted as the C1 component. With comparable latency, amplitudes of this component were significantly enhanced for the players than for the non-players, suggesting that it can be modulated by long-term physical training. The results present a clear case of experience-induced brain plasticity in primary visual cortex for very early sensory processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dysfunction of the magnocellular stream in Alzheimer’s disease evaluated by pattern electroretinograms and visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Sartucci, F.; Borghetti, D.; Bocci, T.; Murri, L.; Orsini, P.; Porciatti, V.; Origlia, N.; Domenici, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Visuo-spatial disturbances could represent a clinical feature of early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The magnocellular (M) pathway has anatomo-physiological characteristic which make it more suitable for detecting form, motion and depth compared with parvocellular one (P). Objective Aim of our study was to evaluate specific visual subsystem involvement in a group of AD patients, recording isoluminant chromatic and luminance pattern electroretinograms and pattern visual evoked potentials. Material and methods data were obtained from 15 AD patients (9 females and 6 males, mean age ± 1SD: 77.6 ± 4.01 years) not yet undergoing any treatment, and from 10 age-matched healthy controls. Diagnosis of probable AD was clinically and neuroradiologically established. PERGs were recorded monocularly in response to equiluminant red-green (R-G), blue-yellow (B-Y) and luminance yellow-black (Y-Bk) horizontal square gratings of 0.3 c/deg and 90% contrast, reversed at 1 Hz. VEPs were recorded in response to full-field (14 deg) equiluminant chromatic R-G, B-Y and luminance Y-Bk sinusoidal gratings of 2 c/deg, presented in onset (300 ms)–offset (700 ms) mode, at the contrast levels of 90%. Results All data were retrieved in terms of peak-amplitude and latency and assessed using the Student’s t-test for paired data. Temporal differences of PERGs and VEPs, evoked by Y-Bk grating in AD patients compared with controls, suggest a specific impairment of the magnocellular stream. Conclusions Our study support the hypothesis that the impairment of the PERGs and VEPs arising from the magnocellular streams of visual processing may indicate a primary dysfunction of the M-pathways in AD. PMID:20385208

  2. An objective method for measuring face detection thresholds using the sweep steady-state visual evoked response

    PubMed Central

    Ales, Justin M.; Farzin, Faraz; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a sensitive method for measuring face detection thresholds rapidly, objectively, and independently of low-level visual cues. The method is based on the swept parameter steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP), in which a stimulus is presented at a specific temporal frequency while parametrically varying (“sweeping”) the detectability of the stimulus. Here, the visibility of a face image was increased by progressive derandomization of the phase spectra of the image in a series of equally spaced steps. Alternations between face and fully randomized images at a constant rate (3/s) elicit a robust first harmonic response at 3 Hz specific to the structure of the face. High-density EEG was recorded from 10 human adult participants, who were asked to respond with a button-press as soon as they detected a face. The majority of participants produced an evoked response at the first harmonic (3 Hz) that emerged abruptly between 30% and 35% phase-coherence of the face, which was most prominent on right occipito-temporal sites. Thresholds for face detection were estimated reliably in single participants from 15 trials, or on each of the 15 individual face trials. The ssVEP-derived thresholds correlated with the concurrently measured perceptual face detection thresholds. This first application of the sweep VEP approach to high-level vision provides a sensitive and objective method that could be used to measure and compare visual perception thresholds for various object shapes and levels of categorization in different human populations, including infants and individuals with developmental delay. PMID:23024355

  3. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The effects of constraining eye movements on visually evoked steering responses during walking in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Reed-Jones, Rebecca; Reed-Jones, James; Vallis, Lori Ann; Hollands, Mark

    2009-08-01

    We have previously shown that participants who step in place while viewing a moving scene that simulates walking towards and turning a corner demonstrate anticipatory sequential reorientation of axial body segments with timing characteristics similar to those seen during real turning. We propose that the coordination of axial body segments during steering represents a robust pre-programmed postural synergy triggered by gaze realignment in the desired direction of travel. The primary aim of the current study was to test this hypothesis by studying the effects of constraining eye movement on visually evoked steering responses exhibited by participants stepping in place in a virtual environment. We predicted that preventing participants from generating anticipatory gaze shifts would significantly attenuate or eliminate visually evoked postural responses. A secondary aim was to investigate the nature of the visual cues that trigger the coordinated eye and whole body response by testing whether spatial (distance from the corner) or temporal (time to contact with corner) parameters modulated with the speed of the visual scene (normal, half speed and double speed). Six university graduate student (27.8 +/- 5.0 years) participants were asked to step in place at a self-selected comfortable pace while immersed in a virtual environment which simulated walking down a hallway and turning a corner. In half of the trials participants were required to maintain gaze direction on a static target placed in the middle of the viewing screen. Whole body kinematics and gaze behaviour were recorded. In support of our hypothesis, gaze fixation on a stationary target resulted in the suppression of anticipatory steering responses. Although postural adjustments were still observed during constrained gaze trials, they were reactive rather than anticipatory in nature and were significantly smaller than trials in which gaze was unconstrained. Our results further suggest that the time of eye and

  5. The effects of neck flexion on cerebral potentials evoked by visual, auditory and somatosensory stimuli and focal brain blood flow in related sensory cortices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A flexed neck posture leads to non-specific activation of the brain. Sensory evoked cerebral potentials and focal brain blood flow have been used to evaluate the activation of the sensory cortex. We investigated the effects of a flexed neck posture on the cerebral potentials evoked by visual, auditory and somatosensory stimuli and focal brain blood flow in the related sensory cortices. Methods Twelve healthy young adults received right visual hemi-field, binaural auditory and left median nerve stimuli while sitting with the neck in a resting and flexed (20° flexion) position. Sensory evoked potentials were recorded from the right occipital region, Cz in accordance with the international 10–20 system, and 2 cm posterior from C4, during visual, auditory and somatosensory stimulations. The oxidative-hemoglobin concentration was measured in the respective sensory cortex using near-infrared spectroscopy. Results Latencies of the late component of all sensory evoked potentials significantly shortened, and the amplitude of auditory evoked potentials increased when the neck was in a flexed position. Oxidative-hemoglobin concentrations in the left and right visual cortices were higher during visual stimulation in the flexed neck position. The left visual cortex is responsible for receiving the visual information. In addition, oxidative-hemoglobin concentrations in the bilateral auditory cortex during auditory stimulation, and in the right somatosensory cortex during somatosensory stimulation, were higher in the flexed neck position. Conclusions Visual, auditory and somatosensory pathways were activated by neck flexion. The sensory cortices were selectively activated, reflecting the modalities in sensory projection to the cerebral cortex and inter-hemispheric connections. PMID:23199306

  6. Stimulus Dependency of Object-Evoked Responses in Human Visual Cortex: An Inverse Problem for Category Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Graewe, Britta; De Weerd, Peter; Farivar, Reza; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have linked the processing of different object categories to specific event-related potentials (ERPs) such as the face-specific N170. Despite reports showing that object-related ERPs are influenced by visual stimulus features, there is consensus that these components primarily reflect categorical aspects of the stimuli. Here, we re-investigated this idea by systematically measuring the effects of visual feature manipulations on ERP responses elicited by both structure-from-motion (SFM)-defined and luminance-defined object stimuli. SFM objects elicited a novel component at 200–250 ms (N250) over parietal and posterior temporal sites. We found, however, that the N250 amplitude was unaffected by restructuring SFM stimuli into meaningless objects based on identical visual cues. This suggests that this N250 peak was not uniquely linked to categorical aspects of the objects, but is strongly determined by visual stimulus features. We provide strong support for this hypothesis by parametrically manipulating the depth range of both SFM- and luminance-defined object stimuli and showing that the N250 evoked by SFM stimuli as well as the well-known N170 to static faces were sensitive to this manipulation. Importantly, this effect could not be attributed to compromised object categorization in low depth stimuli, confirming a strong impact of visual stimulus features on object-related ERP signals. As ERP components linked with visual categorical object perception are likely determined by multiple stimulus features, this creates an interesting inverse problem when deriving specific perceptual processes from variations in ERP components. PMID:22363479

  7. Are There Abnormalities in Peripheral and Central Components of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Puta, Christian; Franz, Marcel; Blume, Kathrin R.; Gabriel, Holger H. W.; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) was shown to be associated with longer reflex response latencies of trunk muscles during external upper limb perturbations. One theoretical, but rarely investigated possibility for longer reflex latencies might be related to modulated somatosensory information processing. Therefore, the present study investigated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to median nerve stimulation in CLBP patients and healthy controls (HC). Latencies of the peripheral N9 SEP component were used as the primary outcome. In addition, latencies and amplitudes of the central N20 SEP component, sensory thresholds, motor thresholds and nerve conduction velocity were also analyzed in CLBP patients and HC. There is a trend for the CLBP patients to exhibit longer N9 latencies at the ipsilateral Erb’s point compared to HC. This trend is substantiated by significantly longer N9 latencies in CLBP patients compared to normative data. None of the other parameters showed any significant difference between CLBP patients and HC. Overall, our data indicate small differences of the peripheral N9 SEP component; however, these differences cannot explain the reflex delay observed in CLBP patients. While it was important to rule out the contribution of early somatosensory processing and to elucidate its contribution to the delayed reflex responses in CLBP patients, further research is needed to find the primary source(s) of time-delayed reflexes in CLBP. PMID:27799904

  8. High Frequency Tympanometry (1,000 Hz) for Neonates with Normal and Abnormal Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Nahrani, Morteza Hamidi; Bolandi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper aimed at evaluating the characteristics of high-frequency (1,000 Hz) acoustic admittance (ya) for the neonates with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) as either pass or refer group. Subjects and Methods Using a 1,000 Hz probe tone, 297neonates (152 male, 145 female aged 0–104 days old) were evaluated. Tympanometric parameters admittance value at +200 dapa, middle ear admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure were calculated for each tympanogram. Results The mean of ya was 0.9678 mmho in the TEOAE for the pass group and 0.7229 mmho in the refer group. The mean of acoustic admittance at +200 (y200) was 2.0657 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 1.7191 for the refer group. The mean of Tpp was 23/8591 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 59/7619 for the refer group. Conclusions There were significant differences in the distribution of different types of tympanograms, the mean of ya, tympanic peak pressure, and y200 between the TEOAEs for the pass and the refer groups. PMID:27942601

  9. Are There Abnormalities in Peripheral and Central Components of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed

    Puta, Christian; Franz, Marcel; Blume, Kathrin R; Gabriel, Holger H W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) was shown to be associated with longer reflex response latencies of trunk muscles during external upper limb perturbations. One theoretical, but rarely investigated possibility for longer reflex latencies might be related to modulated somatosensory information processing. Therefore, the present study investigated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to median nerve stimulation in CLBP patients and healthy controls (HC). Latencies of the peripheral N9 SEP component were used as the primary outcome. In addition, latencies and amplitudes of the central N20 SEP component, sensory thresholds, motor thresholds and nerve conduction velocity were also analyzed in CLBP patients and HC. There is a trend for the CLBP patients to exhibit longer N9 latencies at the ipsilateral Erb's point compared to HC. This trend is substantiated by significantly longer N9 latencies in CLBP patients compared to normative data. None of the other parameters showed any significant difference between CLBP patients and HC. Overall, our data indicate small differences of the peripheral N9 SEP component; however, these differences cannot explain the reflex delay observed in CLBP patients. While it was important to rule out the contribution of early somatosensory processing and to elucidate its contribution to the delayed reflex responses in CLBP patients, further research is needed to find the primary source(s) of time-delayed reflexes in CLBP.

  10. The developmental effects of extremely low frequency electric fields on visual and somatosensory evoked potentials in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gok, Deniz Kantar; Akpinar, Deniz; Hidisoglu, Enis; Ozen, Sukru; Agar, Aysel; Yargicoglu, Piraye

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the developmental effects of extremely low frequency electric fields (ELF-EFs) on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and to examine the relationship between lipid peroxidation and changes of these potentials. In this context, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels were determined as an indicator of lipid peroxidation. Wistar albino female rats were divided into four groups; Control (C), gestational (prenatal) exposure (Pr), gestational+ postnatal exposure (PP) and postnatal exposure (Po) groups. Pregnant rats of Pr and PP groups were exposed to 50 Hz electric field (EF) (12 kV/m; 1 h/day), while those of C and Po groups were placed in an inactive system during pregnancy. Following parturition, rats of PP and Po groups were exposed to ELF-EFs whereas rats of C and Pr groups were kept under the same experimental conditions without being exposed to any EF during 68 days. On postnatal day 90, rats were prepared for VEP and SEP recordings. The latencies of VEP components in all experimental groups were significantly prolonged versus C group. For SEPs, all components of PP group, P2, N2 components of Pr group and P1, P2, N2 components of Po group were delayed versus C group. As brain TBARS levels were significantly increased in Pr and Po groups, retina TBARS levels were significantly elevated in all experimental groups versus C group. In conclusion, alterations seen in evoked potentials, at least partly, could be explained by lipid peroxidation in the retina and brain.

  11. Abnormal Visual Scanning of Emotionally Evocative Natural Scenes in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kordsachia, Catarina C.; Labuschagne, Izelle; Stout, Julie C.

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder associated with deficits in the processing of emotional stimuli, including alterations in the self-reported subjective experience of emotion when presented with pictures of emotional scenes. The aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with HD, compared to unaffected controls, display abnormal visual scanning of emotionally evocative natural scenes. Using eye-tracking, we recorded eye-movements of 25 HD participants (advanced pre-symptomatic and early symptomatic) and 25 age-matched unaffected control participants during a picture viewing task. Participants viewed pictures of natural scenes associated with different emotions: anger, fear, disgust, happiness, or neutral, and evaluated those pictures on a valence rating scale. Individuals with HD displayed abnormal visual scanning patterns, but did not differ from controls with respect to their valence ratings. Specifically, compared to controls, HD participants spent less time fixating on the pictures and made longer scan paths. This finding highlights the importance of taking visual scanning behavior into account when investigating emotion processing in HD. The visual scanning patterns displayed by HD participants could reflect a heightened, but possibly unfocussed, search for information, and might be linked to attentional deficits or to altered subjective emotional experiences in HD. Another possibility is that HD participants may have found it more difficult than controls to evaluate the emotional valence of the scenes, and the heightened search for information was employed as a compensatory strategy. PMID:28405190

  12. Abnormal Visual Scanning of Emotionally Evocative Natural Scenes in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kordsachia, Catarina C; Labuschagne, Izelle; Stout, Julie C

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder associated with deficits in the processing of emotional stimuli, including alterations in the self-reported subjective experience of emotion when presented with pictures of emotional scenes. The aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with HD, compared to unaffected controls, display abnormal visual scanning of emotionally evocative natural scenes. Using eye-tracking, we recorded eye-movements of 25 HD participants (advanced pre-symptomatic and early symptomatic) and 25 age-matched unaffected control participants during a picture viewing task. Participants viewed pictures of natural scenes associated with different emotions: anger, fear, disgust, happiness, or neutral, and evaluated those pictures on a valence rating scale. Individuals with HD displayed abnormal visual scanning patterns, but did not differ from controls with respect to their valence ratings. Specifically, compared to controls, HD participants spent less time fixating on the pictures and made longer scan paths. This finding highlights the importance of taking visual scanning behavior into account when investigating emotion processing in HD. The visual scanning patterns displayed by HD participants could reflect a heightened, but possibly unfocussed, search for information, and might be linked to attentional deficits or to altered subjective emotional experiences in HD. Another possibility is that HD participants may have found it more difficult than controls to evaluate the emotional valence of the scenes, and the heightened search for information was employed as a compensatory strategy.

  13. Abnormal magnocellular pathway visual processing in infants at risk for autism.

    PubMed

    McCleery, Joseph P; Allman, Elizabeth; Carver, Leslie J; Dobkins, Karen R

    2007-11-01

    A wealth of data has documented impairments in face processing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Recently, the suggestion has been made that these impairments may arise from abnormal development of a subcortical system involved in face processing that originates in the magnocellular pathway of the primate visual system. To test this developmental hypothesis, we obtained visual perceptual data from 6-month-old infants who were at risk for ASD because they had an older sibling diagnosed with the disorder ("high-risk infants"). To measure sensitivity of the magnocellular (M) pathway and, for comparison, of the parvocellular (P) visual pathway, we employed visual stimuli designed to selectively stimulate the two. Sensitivity data from high-risk infants (n = 13) were compared with data from matched control infants (i.e., "low-risk" infants with no family history of ASD, n = 26). On the P pathway stimulus, high-risk infants exhibited sensitivities that were identical to those of control infants. By contrast, on the M pathway stimulus, high-risk infants exhibited sensitivities nearly twofold greater than those of control infants. Given that ASD and its symptoms are known to run in families, these preliminary results suggest that ASD may be associated with abnormal M pathway function early in infancy, which may aid in early diagnosis of the disorder.

  14. A review of abnormalities in the perception of visual illusions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel J; Hodgekins, Joanne; Chouinard, Philippe A; Chouinard, Virginie-Anne; Sperandio, Irene

    2017-06-01

    Specific abnormalities of vision in schizophrenia have been observed to affect high-level and some low-level integration mechanisms, suggesting that people with schizophrenia may experience anomalies across different stages in the visual system affecting either early or late processing or both. Here, we review the research into visual illusion perception in schizophrenia and the issues which previous research has faced. One general finding that emerged from the literature is that those with schizophrenia are mostly immune to the effects of high-level illusory displays, but this effect is not consistent across all low-level illusions. The present review suggests that this resistance is due to the weakening of top-down perceptual mechanisms and may be relevant to the understanding of symptoms of visual distortion rather than hallucinations as previously thought.

  15. Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Ogbonna, Chinyere; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The perception of visual illusions is a powerful diagnostic of implicit integration of global information. Many illusions occur when length, size, orientation, or luminance are misjudged because neighboring visuospatial information cannot be ignored. We asked if people with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetic disorder that results in severely impaired global visuospatial construction abilities, are also susceptible to the context of visual illusions. Remarkably, we found that illusions influenced WS individuals to the same degree as normal adults, although size discrimination was somewhat impaired in WS. Our results are evidence that illusions are a consequence of the brain's bias to implicitly integrate visual information, even in a population known to have difficulty in explicitly representing spatial relationships among objects. Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development.

  16. [Impact of the method choice and the extent of correction on the development of visual evoked potentials in children and adolescents with refractive anomalies].

    PubMed

    Lobanova, I V; Leshchenko, I A; Markova, E Iu; Khatsenko, I E

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses a possible impact of different refraction correction methods, providing fu