Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal visual experience

  1. Contrast sensitivity in humans with abnormal visual experience.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, R D; Thibos, L N

    1975-01-01

    1. Grating contrast sensitivities have been determined over a range of spatial frequencies for a normal subject and for subjects who are visually biased in that they have a lower resolution capacity for targets of specific orientations. The bias si only found in astigmatic subjects and the grating orientation yielding poorest acuity coincides with the most defocused astigmatic meridian. However this resolution anisotropy remains when optical factors are accounted for. 2. For the normal subject, high and low frequency attenuation is found and a typical reduction in contrast sensitivity is exhibited for oblique target orientations. 3. The biased subjects, called meridional amblyopes because they have reduced acuity for a given grating orientation, show markedly abnormal contrast sensitivity functions. Their cut-off spatial frequencies are different for various target orientations and this difference applies also to contrast sensitivity over nearly the entire spatial frequency range tested (0-5-16 cycles/deg). The differences are of about the same magnitude for most frequencies and they are found in all types of meridional amblyopes. 4. Optical explanations of these differences are ruled out by laser-interference fringe tests and by varying effective pupil size. 5. Theoretical effects of defocus have been calculated to compare predicted visual deprivation with performance. Results indicate that reduced contrast sensitivity functions can be equivalent to a small defocus effect. 6. To examine the results in the spatial domain, inverse Fourier transforms of representative contrast sensitivity functions have been computed. The optical portion of the resulting spatial weighting functions has been parcelled out to obtain neural spatial weighting functions. PMID:1142303

  2. Abnormal visual experiences in individuals with histories of hallucinogen use: a Web-based questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Baggott, M J; Coyle, J R; Erowid, E; Erowid, F; Robertson, L C

    2011-03-01

    Despite longstanding reports of prolonged or reoccurring perceptual changes in a subset of hallucinogen users, very little is known about Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder and related visual abnormalities in hallucinogen users. We used an online questionnaire to document the symptoms and relationship to drug use of unusual visual phenomena in hallucinogen users. 16,192 individuals viewed the information sheet and 2679 were included in the study. Of these, 224 reported having unrelated diagnoses associated with unusual visual experiences and were excluded from main analyses. Most (60.6%) of the remaining 2455 participants reported having experienced drug-free visual experiences that resembled hallucinogen effects. Probability of experiencing constant or near-constant symptoms was predicted by greater past exposure to specific hallucinogens, including lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Although symptoms were common, few (104, or 4.2% of the sample) found them distressing or impairing enough to consider seeking treatment. Visual changes in hallucinogen users may be more common than previously suspected and are worthy of further study.

  3. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic visualization of fetal chromosome abnormalities: a preliminary experience report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Komwilaisak, Ratana; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan

    2004-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis of fetal malformations in utero can provide both heath care providers and parents a number of management options. Three-dimensional ultrasonography is a new technique of diagnosis which has several potential advantages to allow for evaluation of specific anomalies by permitting high-quality views of body surface. We report 4 cases of fetal chromosomal abnormalities including 2 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 13 and 1 case of 48, XXY/+18. All cases were proved to have abnormal chromosomes by amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. After 3D reconstruction, we can identify specific facial abnormalities which can not be visualized by conventional two-dimensional ultrasound such as low set ear Mongolian's slant eyes, facial dysmorphism of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. We also clearly visualized abnormalities of digits such as overlapping fingers, club hands and sandal gap. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the fetal body surface improves the antenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities characterized by a particular dysmorphism. Our report suggests that three-dimensional ultrasonography has the potential to provide novel informations on the fetal anatomy and be useful in visualization and identification of chromosomal abnormalities in utero.

  4. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  5. Effects of Normal and Abnormal Visual Experience on the Development of Opposing Aftereffects for Upright and Inverted Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rachel A.; Maurer, Daphne; Hatry, Alexandra; Anzures, Gizelle; Mondloch, Catherine J.

    2012-01-01

    We used opposing figural aftereffects to investigate whether there are at least partially separable representations of upright and inverted faces in patients who missed early visual experience because of bilateral congenital cataracts (mean age at test 19.5 years). Visually normal adults and 10-year-olds were tested for comparison. Adults showed…

  6. Visual perceptual abnormalities: hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Corbett, J J

    2000-01-01

    Visual perceptual abnormalities may be caused by diverse etiologies which span the fields of psychiatry and neurology. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of visual perceptual abnormalities from both a neurological and a psychiatric perspective. Psychiatric etiologies include mania, depression, substance dependence, and schizophrenia. Common neurological causes include migraine, epilepsy, delirium, dementia, tumor, and stroke. The phenomena of palinopsia, oscillopsia, dysmetropsia, and polyopia among others are also reviewed. A systematic approach to the many causes of illusions and hallucinations may help to achieve an accurate diagnosis, and a more focused evaluation and treatment plan for patients who develop visual perceptual abnormalities. This article provides the practicing neurologist with a practical understanding and approach to patients with these clinical symptoms.

  7. Genetic abnormality of the visual pathways in a "white" tiger.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Kaas, J H

    1973-06-22

    "White"tigers show an inherited reduction of pigment, produced by an autosomal recessive gene. The brain of one of these tigers shows an abnormality of the visual pathways similar to abnormalities that are associated with albinism in many other mammals. There is a close relationship between the reduced pigment formation, the pathway abnormality, and strabismus.

  8. Brain growth rate abnormalities visualized in adolescents with autism.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xue; Thompson, Paul M; Leow, Alex D; Madsen, Sarah K; Caplan, Rochelle; Alger, Jeffry R; O'Neill, Joseph; Joshi, Kishori; Smalley, Susan L; Toga, Arthur W; Levitt, Jennifer G

    2013-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a heterogeneous disorder of brain development with wide ranging cognitive deficits. Typically diagnosed before age 3, autism spectrum disorder is behaviorally defined but patients are thought to have protracted alterations in brain maturation. With longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we mapped an anomalous developmental trajectory of the brains of autistic compared with those of typically developing children and adolescents. Using tensor-based morphometry, we created 3D maps visualizing regional tissue growth rates based on longitudinal brain MRI scans of 13 autistic and seven typically developing boys (mean age/interscan interval: autism 12.0 ± 2.3 years/2.9 ± 0.9 years; control 12.3 ± 2.4/2.8 ± 0.8). The typically developing boys demonstrated strong whole brain white matter growth during this period, but the autistic boys showed abnormally slowed white matter development (P = 0.03, corrected), especially in the parietal (P = 0.008), temporal (P = 0.03), and occipital lobes (P = 0.02). We also visualized abnormal overgrowth in autism in gray matter structures such as the putamen and anterior cingulate cortex. Our findings reveal aberrant growth rates in brain regions implicated in social impairment, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors in autism, suggesting that growth rate abnormalities persist into adolescence. Tensor-based morphometry revealed persisting growth rate anomalies long after diagnosis, which has implications for evaluation of therapeutic effects.

  9. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, A. J. F.; Atkins, K. J.; Beilharz, F. L.; Mundy, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder. PMID:27152128

  10. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern.

    PubMed

    Duncum, A J F; Atkins, K J; Beilharz, F L; Mundy, M E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder.

  11. Altering Visual Perception Abnormalities: A Marker for Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, Anna J. F.; Mundy, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    The body image concern (BIC) continuum ranges from a healthy and positive body image, to clinical diagnoses of abnormal body image, like body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). BDD and non-clinical, yet high-BIC participants have demonstrated a local visual processing bias, characterised by reduced inversion effects. To examine whether this bias is a potential marker of BDD, the visual processing of individuals across the entire BIC continuum was examined. Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ; quantified BIC) scores were expected to correlate with higher discrimination accuracy and faster reaction times of inverted stimuli, indicating reduced inversion effects (occurring due to increased local visual processing). Additionally, an induced global or local processing bias via Navon stimulus presentation was expected to alter these associations. Seventy-four participants completed the DCQ and upright-inverted face and body stimulus discrimination task. Moderate positive associations were revealed between DCQ scores and accuracy rates for inverted face and body stimuli, indicating a graded local bias accompanying increases in BIC. This relationship supports a local processing bias as a marker for BDD, which has significant assessment implications. Furthermore, a moderate negative relationship was found between DCQ score and inverted face accuracy after inducing global processing, indicating the processing bias can temporarily be reversed in high BIC individuals. Navon stimuli were successfully able to alter the visual processing of individuals across the BIC continuum, which has important implications for treating BDD. PMID:27003715

  12. Abnormalities in visual processing amongst students with body image concerns

    PubMed Central

    Mundy E., Matthew; Sadusky, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they observe and discriminate visual information. A pre-occupation with perceived defects in appearance has been attributed to a local visual processing bias. We studied the nature of visual bias in individuals who may be at risk of developing BDD – those with high body image concerns (BICs) – by using inverted stimulus discrimination. Inversion disrupts global, configural information in favor of local, feature-based processing. 40 individuals with high BIC and 40 low BIC controls performed a discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, bodies, and scenes. Individuals with high BIC discriminated inverted faces and bodies faster than controls, and were also more accurate when discriminating inverted bodies and scenes. This reduction in inversion effect for high BIC individuals may be due to a stimulus-general local, detail-focused processing bias, which may be associated with maladaptive fixation on small features in their appearance. PMID:25157299

  13. Abnormal contextual modulation of visual contour detection in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Sponheim, Scott R; Olman, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients demonstrate perceptual deficits consistent with broad dysfunction in visual context processing. These include poor integration of segments forming visual contours, and reduced visual contrast effects (e.g. weaker orientation-dependent surround suppression, ODSS). Background image context can influence contour perception, as stimuli near the contour affect detection accuracy. Because of ODSS, this contextual modulation depends on the relative orientation between the contour and flanking elements, with parallel flankers impairing contour perception. However in schizophrenia, the impact of abnormal ODSS during contour perception is not clear. It is also unknown whether deficient contour perception marks genetic liability for schizophrenia, or is strictly associated with clinical expression of this disorder. We examined contour detection in 25 adults with schizophrenia, 13 unaffected first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, and 28 healthy controls. Subjects performed a psychophysics experiment designed to quantify the effect of flanker orientation during contour detection. Overall, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer contour detection performance than relatives or controls. Parallel flankers suppressed and orthogonal flankers enhanced contour detection performance for all groups, but parallel suppression was relatively weaker for schizophrenia patients than healthy controls. Relatives of patients showed equivalent performance with controls. Computational modeling suggested that abnormal contextual modulation in schizophrenia may be explained by suppression that is more broadly tuned for orientation. Abnormal flanker suppression in schizophrenia is consistent with weaker ODSS and/or broader orientation tuning. This work provides the first evidence that such perceptual abnormalities may not be associated with a genetic liability for schizophrenia.

  14. Visual Field Abnormalities among Adolescent Boys with Hearing Impairments

    PubMed Central

    KHORRAMI-NEJAD, Masoud; HERAVIAN, Javad; SEDAGHAT, Mohamad-Reza; MOMENI-MOGHADAM, Hamed; SOBHANI-RAD, Davood; ASKARIZADEH, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the visual field (VF) categorizations (based on the severity of VF defects) between adolescent boys with hearing impairments and those with normal hearing. This cross-sectional study involved the evaluation of the VF of 64 adolescent boys with hearing impairments and 68 age-matched boys with normal hearing at high schools in Tehran, Iran, in 2013. All subjects had an intelligence quotient (IQ) > 70. The hearing impairments were classified based on severity and time of onset. Participants underwent a complete eye examination, and the VFs were investigated using automated perimetry with a Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer. This device was used to determine their foveal threshold (FT), mean deviation (MD), and Glaucoma Hemifield Test (GHT) results. Most (50%) of the boys with hearing impairments had profound hearing impairments. There was no significant between-group difference in age (P = 0.49) or IQ (P = 0.13). There was no between-group difference in the corrected distance visual acuity (P = 0.183). According to the FT, MD, and GHT results, the percentage of boys with abnormal VFs in the hearing impairment group was significantly greater than that in the normal hearing group: 40.6% vs. 22.1%, 59.4% vs. 19.1%, and 31.2% vs. 8.8%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The mean MD in the hearing impairment group was significantly worse than that in the normal hearing group (-0.79 ± 2.04 and -4.61 ± 6.52 dB, respectively, P < 0.0001), and the mean FT was also significantly worse (38.97 ± 1.66 vs. 35.30 ± 1.43 dB, respectively, P <0.0001). Moreover, there was a significant between-group difference in the GHT results (P < 0.0001). Thus, there were higher percentages of boys with VF abnormalities and higher mean MD, FT, and GHT results among those with hearing impairments compared to those with normal hearing. These findings emphasize the need for detailed VF assessments for patients with hearing impairments. PMID:28293650

  15. Abnormal Visual Scanning of Emotionally Evocative Natural Scenes in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kordsachia, Catarina C.; Labuschagne, Izelle; Stout, Julie C.

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder associated with deficits in the processing of emotional stimuli, including alterations in the self-reported subjective experience of emotion when presented with pictures of emotional scenes. The aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with HD, compared to unaffected controls, display abnormal visual scanning of emotionally evocative natural scenes. Using eye-tracking, we recorded eye-movements of 25 HD participants (advanced pre-symptomatic and early symptomatic) and 25 age-matched unaffected control participants during a picture viewing task. Participants viewed pictures of natural scenes associated with different emotions: anger, fear, disgust, happiness, or neutral, and evaluated those pictures on a valence rating scale. Individuals with HD displayed abnormal visual scanning patterns, but did not differ from controls with respect to their valence ratings. Specifically, compared to controls, HD participants spent less time fixating on the pictures and made longer scan paths. This finding highlights the importance of taking visual scanning behavior into account when investigating emotion processing in HD. The visual scanning patterns displayed by HD participants could reflect a heightened, but possibly unfocussed, search for information, and might be linked to attentional deficits or to altered subjective emotional experiences in HD. Another possibility is that HD participants may have found it more difficult than controls to evaluate the emotional valence of the scenes, and the heightened search for information was employed as a compensatory strategy.

  16. A review of abnormalities in the perception of visual illusions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel J; Hodgekins, Joanne; Chouinard, Philippe A; Chouinard, Virginie-Anne; Sperandio, Irene

    2016-10-11

    Specific abnormalities of vision in schizophrenia have been observed to affect high-level and some low-level integration mechanisms, suggesting that people with schizophrenia may experience anomalies across different stages in the visual system affecting either early or late processing or both. Here, we review the research into visual illusion perception in schizophrenia and the issues which previous research has faced. One general finding that emerged from the literature is that those with schizophrenia are mostly immune to the effects of high-level illusory displays, but this effect is not consistent across all low-level illusions. The present review suggests that this resistance is due to the weakening of top-down perceptual mechanisms and may be relevant to the understanding of symptoms of visual distortion rather than hallucinations as previously thought.

  17. Visual experiences of Blaise Pascal.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    The writings of Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), mathematician, physicist, and theologian, are often thought of as an ideal example of classical French prose. In fact, Pascal's scientific contributions include the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. In mathematics, he helped develop the probability theory and also made significant contributions to the realization of infinite series and the geometry of curves. He is also considered one of the most important French philosophers principally due to his book entitled 'Pensées'. Pascal had a religious conversion in the 1650s and following this he devoted himself more to religion than science. There is evidence that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It is believed that the migraine aura experiences might have acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire which brought him the total conviction of God's 'reality and presence'. This experience may have been based on the effects of a migraine aura attack. In fact, this spiritual experience led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests.

  18. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  19. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Erin A.; Olson, Carl R.

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system. PMID:26067532

  20. Abnormal visual field maps in human cortex: a mini-review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Haak, Koen V; Langers, Dave R M; Renken, Remco; van Dijk, Pim; Borgstein, Johannes; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2014-07-01

    Human visual cortex contains maps of the visual field. Much research has been dedicated to answering whether and when these visual field maps change if critical components of the visual circuitry are damaged. Here, we first provide a focused mini-review of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have evaluated the human cortical visual field maps in the face of retinal lesions, brain injury, and atypical retinocortical projections. We find that there is a fair body of research that has found abnormal fMRI activity, but also that this abnormal activity does not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. The abnormal fMRI activity can often be explained in terms of task effects and/or the uncovering of normally hidden system dynamics. We then present the case of a 16-year-old patient who lost the entire left cerebral hemisphere at age three for treatment of chronic focal encephalitis (Rasmussen syndrome) and intractable epilepsy. Using an fMRI retinotopic mapping procedure and population receptive field (pRF) modeling, we found that (1) despite the long period since the hemispherectomy, the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex remained unaffected by the removal of an entire cerebral hemisphere, and (2) the intact lateral occipital cortex contained an exceptionally large representation of the center of the visual field. The same method also indicates that the neuronal receptive fields in these lateral occipital brain regions are extraordinarily small. These features are clearly abnormal, but again they do not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. For example, the abnormal features can also be explained by the notion that the hemispherectomy took place during a critical period in the development of the lateral occipital cortex and therefore arrested its normal development. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting abnormal fMRI activity as a marker of cortical remapping; there are often other explanations.

  1. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  2. Abnormalities of Visual Processing and Frontostriatal Systems in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Feusner, Jamie D.; Moody, Teena; Hembacher, Emily; Townsend, Jennifer; McKinley, Malin; Moller, Hayley; Bookheimer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Context Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder in which individuals are preoccupied with perceived defects in their appearance, often related to their face. Little is known about its pathophysiology, although early research provides evidence of abnormal visual processing. Objective To determine whether patients with BDD have abnormal patterns of brain activation when visually processing their own face with high, low, or normal spatial resolution. Design Case-control study. Setting A university hospital. Participants Seventeen right-handed medication-free subjects with BDD and 16 matched healthy control subjects. Intervention Functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing photographs of face stimuli. Stimuli were neutral-expression photographs of the patient’s own face and a familiar face (control stimuli) that were unaltered, altered to include only high spatial frequency (fine spatial resolution), or altered to include only low spatial frequency (low spatial resolution). Main Outcome Measure Blood oxygen level–dependent signal changes in the BDD and control groups during each stimulus type. Results Subjects with BDD showed relative hyperactivity in the left orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral head of the caudate for the unaltered own-face vs familiar-face condition. They showed relative hypoactivity in the left occipital cortex for the low spatial frequency faces. Differences in activity in frontostriatal systems but not visual cortex covaried with aversiveness ratings of the faces. Severity of BDD symptoms correlated with activity in frontostriatal systems and visual cortex. Conclusions These results suggest abnormalities in visual processing and frontostriatal systems in BDD. Hypoactivation in the occipital cortex for low spatial frequency faces may indicate either primary visual system abnormalities for configural face elements or top-down modulation of visual processing. Frontostriatal hyperactivity may be associated both with

  3. Visual performance and ocular abnormalities in deaf children and young adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Richard; Ludlow, Amanda K; Wilkins, Arnold; Calver, Richard; Allen, Peter M

    2014-06-01

    Visual defects are common in deaf individuals. Refractive error and ocular motor abnormalities are frequently reported, with hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism and anomalies of binocular vision, all showing a greater prevalence in deaf individuals compared with the general population. Near visual function in deaf individuals has been relatively neglected in the literature to date. Comparisons between studies are problematic due to differences in methodology and population characteristics. Any untreated visual defect has the potential to impair the development of language, with consequences for education more generally, and there is a need to improve screening and treatments of deaf children.

  4. Abnormal bodily experiences may be a marker of early schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Ballerini, Massimo; Fusar Poli, Paolo; Cutting, John

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to answer the following question: What are the typical features of abnormal bodily experiences (ABEs) in persons affected by acute first-episode schizophrenia? Our overall objective is to contribute to enhance early diagnosis of schizophrenia, and providing supplementary diagnostic criteria especially for ultra-high risk patients. In a group of 39 patients with first-episode schizophrenia selected from a sample of 393 psychotic patients, 30 (76.9 %) reported ABEs. By means of a phenomenologically-based qualitative method of inquiry, we recognized four subtypes of ABEs whose main characteristics are dynamization of bodily boundaries and construction, morbid objectivization/devitalization, dysmorphic experiences and pain-like experiences. These four typologies of ABEs are documented through the patients' first-person self-descriptions, and then operationally defined. Two main properties emerge as tentative eidetic (defining) cores of ABEs in early schizophrenia: dynamization of bodily boundaries and construction, and morbid objectivization/devitalization. Sharpening the diagnostic sensibility for typically schizophrenic ABEs can help improve differential diagnosis between schizophrenia and other disorders entailing other types of anomalies of lived corporeality. Also, studying possible transitions from schizophrenic cenesthopathies to bodily delusions in persons with schizophrenia may refine the concept of bizarre delusions by improving its validity. Furthermore, our knowledge about the pathogenesis of schizophrenia may profit from an in-depth assessment of ABEs and their relationship with an abnormal sense of selfhood, especially in early schizophrenia.

  5. Visual sensor based abnormal event detection with moving shadow removal in home healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sook; Chung, Wan-Young

    2012-01-01

    Vision-based abnormal event detection for home healthcare systems can be greatly improved using visual sensor-based techniques able to detect, track and recognize objects in the scene. However, in moving object detection and tracking processes, moving cast shadows can be misclassified as part of objects or moving objects. Shadow removal is an essential step for developing video surveillance systems. The goal of the primary is to design novel computer vision techniques that can extract objects more accurately and discriminate between abnormal and normal activities. To improve the accuracy of object detection and tracking, our proposed shadow removal algorithm is employed. Abnormal event detection based on visual sensor by using shape features variation and 3-D trajectory is presented to overcome the low fall detection rate. The experimental results showed that the success rate of detecting abnormal events was 97% with a false positive rate of 2%. Our proposed algorithm can allow distinguishing diverse fall activities such as forward falls, backward falls, and falling asides from normal activities.

  6. Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Ogbonna, Chinyere; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The perception of visual illusions is a powerful diagnostic of implicit integration of global information. Many illusions occur when length, size, orientation, or luminance are misjudged because neighboring visuospatial information cannot be ignored. We asked if people with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetic disorder that results in severely impaired global visuospatial construction abilities, are also susceptible to the context of visual illusions. Remarkably, we found that illusions influenced WS individuals to the same degree as normal adults, although size discrimination was somewhat impaired in WS. Our results are evidence that illusions are a consequence of the brain's bias to implicitly integrate visual information, even in a population known to have difficulty in explicitly representing spatial relationships among objects. Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development.

  7. Developmental visual perception deficits with no indications of prosopagnosia in a child with abnormal eye movements.

    PubMed

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Doron, Ravid

    2017-04-08

    Visual categories are associated with eccentricity biases in high-order visual cortex: Faces and reading with foveally-biased regions, while common objects and space with mid- and peripherally-biased regions. As face perception and reading are among the most challenging human visual skills, and are often regarded as the peak achievements of a distributed neural network supporting common objects perception, it is unclear why objects, which also rely on foveal vision to be processed, are associated with mid-peripheral rather than with a foveal bias. Here, we studied BN, a 9 y.o. boy who has normal basic-level vision, abnormal (limited) oculomotor pursuit and saccades, and shows developmental object and contour integration deficits but with no indication of prosopagnosia. Although we cannot infer causation from the data presented here, we suggest that normal pursuit and saccades could be critical for the development of contour integration and object perception. While faces and perhaps reading, when fixated upon, take up a small portion of central visual field and require only small eye movements to be properly processed, common objects typically prevail in mid-peripheral visual field and rely on longer-distance voluntary eye movements as saccades to be brought to fixation. While retinal information feeds into early visual cortex in an eccentricity orderly manner, we hypothesize that propagation of non-foveal information to mid and high-order visual cortex critically relies on circuitry involving eye movements. Limited or atypical eye movements, as in the case of BN, may hinder normal information flow to mid-eccentricity biased high-order visual cortex, adversely affecting its development and consequently inducing visual perceptual deficits predominantly for categories associated with these regions.

  8. Cytogenetic Analysis for Suspected Chromosomal Abnormalities; A Five Years Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Puppala, Madhavi; Singh, Pratiksha; Rawat, Kanchan; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chromosomal abnormalities are the results of alterations in the number or structure of chromosomes causing significant human morbidity and mortality. They are responsible for a large proportion of miscarriages, developmental delay, disorders of sexual development, congenital malformations and mental retardation. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of different chromosomal abnormalities in North Indian patients referred for cytogenetic analysis. Materials and Methods Total of 859 patients ranging from newborn to 37 years of age were referred to the division of genetics, Department of Paediatrics between 2010 and 2015, with a variety of clinical disorders; Down syndrome (DS), Turner’s syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome; amenorrhea; ambiguous sex and multiple congenital malformations. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocyte culture according to standard methods. Results Of the 859 cases studied, 371 (43.1%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most common autosomal abnormalities were DS 302 (81.4%) and sex chromosomal abnormalities were TS 51 (13.7%). Numerical abnormalities were accounted for 353 (41.0%) and structural abnormalities 18 (2.0%), respectively. Various other chromosomal anomalies were also reported. Conclusion We have reviewed the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities and found higher rate of chromosomal abnormalities 43.1% in the referred cases. Our data suggest that chromosomal analysis is important tool in the evaluation of genetic disorders and helps clinicians to provide accurate diagnosis and proper genetic counselling. PMID:27790464

  9. Mathematical impairment associated with high-contrast abnormalities in change detection and magnocellular visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2015-10-01

    The cause of developmental dyscalculia, a specific deficit in acquisition of arithmetic skills, particularly of enumeration, has never been investigated with respect to the patency of the visual magnocellular system. Here, the question of dysfunction of the afferent magnocellular cortical input and its dorsal stream projections was tested directly using nonlinear analysis of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and through the psychophysical ability to rapidly detect visual change. A group of young adults with self-reported deficiencies of arithmetical ability, showed marked impairment in magnitude estimation and enumeration performance-though not in lexical decision reaction times when compared with an arithmetically capable group controlled for age and handedness. Multifocal nonlinear VEPs were recorded at low (24 %) and high (96 %) contrast. First- and second-order VEP kernels were comparable between groups at low contrast, but not at high contrast. The mathematically impaired group showed an abnormal lack of contrast saturation in the shortest latency first-order peak (N60) and a delayed P100 positivity in the first slice of the second-order kernel. Both features have previously been argued to be physiological markers of magnocellular function. Mathematically impaired participants also performed worse on a gap paradigm change detection for digit task showing increased reaction times for high-contrast stimuli but not for low-contrast stimuli compared with controls. The VEP results give direct evidence of abnormality in the occipital processing of magnocellular information in those with mathematical impairment. The anomalous high visual contrast physiological and psychophysical performance suggests an abnormality in the inhibitory processes that normally result in saturation of contrast gain in the magnocellular system.

  10. Behavioral Objectives for Classroom Experiences in Visual Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Steven D.

    Behavioral objectives for visual literacy experiences are briefly delineated. The objectives concern skills related to: informative visual communication, persuasive and/or visual communication, general visual communication, visual concepts, and reading visual materials, as well as aesthetic and/or recreational skills. For example, the behavioral…

  11. Serendipity in Technetium-99m dimethyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy. [Visualization of nonbiliary incidental abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, H.S.; Sugarman, L.A.; Frank, M.S.; Freeman, L.M.

    1980-05-01

    Technetium-99m dimethyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy has contributed significantly to the diagnosis of acute and chronic biliary tract disorders. Yet attention should also be focused on the other structres visualized during the blood pool, hepatocyte, renal excretory, and intestinal phases of the study. Nonbiliary pathology was detected in 42 of 294 patients (14.3%) studied for suspected acute cholecystitis. The serendipitous detection of previously unsuspected abnormalities assisted in directing further work-up away from suspected biliary disease and towards the real source of the patient's acute problem in 28 cases (9.5%).

  12. Experiences of patients with abnormal extubation of PICC tubes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Luan, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ming; Li, Kan; Li, Qiu-Huan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, De-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the experiences of patients with abnormal extubation of PICC tubes. Methods: Using phenomenological research methods, 15 cases of patients with abnormal extubation of PICC tubes were enrolled in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by Nancy’s phenomenological procedure. Results: After abnormal extubation, patients exhibited conflicting complicated mood which combined negative experience and positive experience. Negative experience was mainly for complaint, helpless, worry and fear. Positive experience was mainly for relief and peace of mind. Conclusions: Patients with abnormal extubation often possessed negative experience. So nursing staff should be suggested to communicate with patients before extubation in order to reduce the dispute between nurses and patients. At the same time, we should summarize and analyze the reasons and factors for abnormal extubation, and take targeted intervention measures in clinical to ensure the safety and effectiveness of PICC extubation. PMID:26770567

  13. [Blaise Pascal and his visual experiences].

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) the mathematician, physicist, and theologian, is often considered as an example of classical French prose. Pascal's primary scientific contribution was the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. Furthermore, he is also regarded as one of the most important French philosophers, principally due to his publication: "Pensées". There is documentation affirming that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It has been hypothesised that these migraine aura experiences acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire convincing him of God's "reality and presence". This experience may have been triggered by the effects of a migraine aura attack. This spiritual epiphany led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests.

  14. Autistic Traits and Abnormal Sensory Experiences in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horder, Jamie; Wilson, C. Ellie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Murphy, Declan G.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities are common in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and now form part of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5th Edition" (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria, but it is unclear whether they characterize the "broader phenotype" of the disorder. We recruited adults (n = 772) with and without an ASD and…

  15. Developing Verbal and Visual Literacy through Experiences in the Visual Arts: 25 Tips for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Margaret H.

    2008-01-01

    Including talk about art--conversing with children about artwork, their own and others'--as a component of visual art activities extends children's experiences in and understanding of visual messages. Johnson discusses practices that help children develop visual and verbal expression through active experiences with the visual arts. She offers 25…

  16. Self-organisation in the human visual system--visuo-motor processing with congenitally abnormal V1 input.

    PubMed

    Wolynski, Barbara; Kanowski, Martin; Meltendorf, Synke; Behrens-Baumann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Michael B

    2010-11-01

    Due to an abnormal projection of the temporal retina the albinotic primary visual cortex receives substantial input from the ipsilateral visual field. To test whether representation abnormalities are also evident in higher tier visual, and in motor and somatosensory cortices, brain activity was measured with fMRI in 14 subjects with albinism performing a visuo-motor task. During central fixation, a blue or red target embedded in a distractor array was presented for 250 ms in the left or right visual hemifield. After a delay, the subjects were prompted to indicate with left or right thumb button presses the target presence in the upper or lower hemifield. The fMRI responses were evaluated for different regions of interest concerned with visual, motor and somatosensory processing and compared to previously acquired data from 14 controls. The following results were obtained: (1) in albinism the hit rates in the visuo-motor task were indistinguishable from normal. (2) In area MT and the intraparietal sulcus there was an indication of abnormal lateralisation patterns. (3) Largely normal lateralisation patterns were evident in motor and somatosensory cortices. It is concluded that in human albinism, the abnormal visual field representation is made available for visuo-motor processing with a motor cortex that comprises an essentially normal lateralisation. Consequently, specific adaptations of the mechanisms mediating visuo-motor integration are required in albinism.

  17. Online Least Squares One-Class Support Vector Machines-Based Abnormal Visual Event Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Yi; Snoussi, Hichem

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal event detection problem is an important subject in real-time video surveillance. In this paper, we propose a novel online one-class classification algorithm, online least squares one-class support vector machine (online LS-OC-SVM), combined with its sparsified version (sparse online LS-OC-SVM). LS-OC-SVM extracts a hyperplane as an optimal description of training objects in a regularized least squares sense. The online LS-OC-SVM learns a training set with a limited number of samples to provide a basic normal model, then updates the model through remaining data. In the sparse online scheme, the model complexity is controlled by the coherence criterion. The online LS-OC-SVM is adopted to handle the abnormal event detection problem. Each frame of the video is characterized by the covariance matrix descriptor encoding the moving information, then is classified into a normal or an abnormal frame. Experiments are conducted, on a two-dimensional synthetic distribution dataset and a benchmark video surveillance dataset, to demonstrate the promising results of the proposed online LS-OC-SVM method. PMID:24351629

  18. Pediatric bony craniovertebral junction abnormalities: Institutional experience of 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kale, S. S.; Ailawadhi, Pankaj; Yerramneni, Vamsi Krishna; Chandra, P. S.; Kumar, Rajender; Sharma, B. S.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical features and treatment outcome of pediatric patients with bony craniovertebral abnormalities. Materials and Methods: The authors studied 189 consecutive cases of pediatric bony craniovertebral junction abnormalities operated between 2001 and March, 2010. Results: The pathologies were developmental (n = 162), traumatic (n = 18) and tuberculous (n = 9). Surgical procedures included transoral decompression (n = 118), occipitocervical fusion (OCF, n = 139), C 1 -C 2 fusion (n = 45), and posterior fossa decompression (n = 5). Methods for OCF included contoured stainless steel rods (n = 86), titanium lateral mass screws and plates (n = 47) and steel wires (n = 6). Constructs of all patients of posterior fixation with contoured rods and wires or lateral mass screw and rod who could be followed up were either stable/fused or were fused and stable. No implant failure was noticed among these two surgical procedures. However, 6 patients with C 1-C 2 fusion had broken wires on follow-up requiring repeat posterior fixation. Good neurological outcome was observed even in poor-grade patients. No significant effect on the curvature or growth of the spine was observed at follow-up. Conclusions: Pediatric craniovertebral junction anomalies can be managed successfully with good outcomes using a low cost contoured rod and wires. PMID:22069436

  19. Autistic traits and abnormal sensory experiences in adults.

    PubMed

    Horder, Jamie; Wilson, C Ellie; Mendez, M Andreina; Murphy, Declan G

    2014-06-01

    Sensory processing abnormalities are common in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and now form part of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5th Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria, but it is unclear whether they characterize the 'broader phenotype' of the disorder. We recruited adults (n = 772) with and without an ASD and administered the Autism Quotient (AQ) along with the Adult/Adolescent Sensory Profile (AASP), the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS), and the Glasgow Sensory Questionnaire (GSQ), all questionnaire measures of abnormal sensory responsivity. Autism traits were significantly correlated with scores on all three sensory scales (AQ/GSQ r = 0.478; AQ/AASP r = 0.344; AQ/CAPS r = 0.333; all p < 0.001). This relationship was linear across the whole range of AQ scores and was true both in those with, and without, an ASD diagnosis. It survived correction for anxiety trait scores, and other potential confounds such as mental illness and migraine.

  20. Loss of Arc renders the visual cortex impervious to the effects of sensory experience or deprivation.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Cortina L; Shepherd, Jason D; Tropea, Daniela; Wang, Kuan H; Bear, Mark F; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-04-01

    A myriad of mechanisms have been suggested to account for the full richness of visual cortical plasticity. We found that visual cortex lacking Arc is impervious to the effects of deprivation or experience. Using intrinsic signal imaging and chronic visually evoked potential recordings, we found that Arc(-/-) mice did not exhibit depression of deprived-eye responses or a shift in ocular dominance after brief monocular deprivation. Extended deprivation also failed to elicit a shift in ocular dominance or open-eye potentiation. Moreover, Arc(-/-) mice lacked stimulus-selective response potentiation. Although Arc(-/-) mice exhibited normal visual acuity, baseline ocular dominance was abnormal and resembled that observed after dark-rearing. These data suggest that Arc is required for the experience-dependent processes that normally establish and modify synaptic connections in visual cortex.

  1. MBARI CANON Experiment Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatland, R.; Oscar, N.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the task of understanding a marine drift experiment conducted by MBARI in Fall 2012 ('CANON'). Datasets were aggregated from a drifting ADCP, from the MBARI Environmental Sample Processor, from Long Range Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (LRAUVs), from other in situ sensors, from NASA and NOAA remote sensing platforms, from moorings, from shipboard CTD casts and from post-experiment metagenomic analysis. We seek to combine existing approaches to data synthesis -- visual inspection, cross correlation and co.-- with three new ideas. This approach has the purpose of differentiating biological signals into three causal categories: Microcurrent advection, physical factors and microbe metabolism. Respective examples are aberrance from Lagrangian frame drift due to windage, changes in solar flux over several days, and microbial population responses to shifts in nitrate concentration. The three ideas we implemented are as follows: First, we advect LRAUV data to look for patterns in time series data for conserved quanitities such as salinity. We investigate whether such patterns can be used to support or undermine the premise of Lagrangian motion of the experiment ensemble. Second we built a set of configurable filters that enable us to visually isolate segments of data: By type, value, time, anomaly and location. Third we associated data hypotheses with a Bayesian inferrence engine for the purpose of model validation, again across sections taken from within the complete data complex. The end result is towards a free-form exploration of experimental data with low latency: from question to view, from hypothesis to test (albeit with considerable preparatory effort.) Preliminary results show the three causal categories shifting in relative influence.

  2. Visual Analysis in a Deployable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Fukase, Y.; Harima, K.; Sato, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2002-01-01

    in space under the size constraints of available delivery vehicles. A large space antenna should make it possible to improve the telecommunication bandwidth and reduce the size of ground terminals. reliable and precise deployment. Since the antenna is a highly complex structure, monitoring the deployment process and the detection of anomalies are also important. The deployed antenna should be collimated to achieve its optimal performance. such as tension and acceleration sensors. With a visual analysis, we can acquire information at many locations without complex wiring, which can increase the complexity of the system. Therefore, visual analysis should be used in conjunction with other methods for monitoring large deployable antennas. combination of cross-correlations between images and approximation at sub-pixel precision enables us to detect shifts in images with a precision of up to 0.01 pixels. This method is effective for monitoring and collimation of a deployable antenna. broadcast technologies which was developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) under the cooperation with Communications Research Lab. and NTT Network Innovation Lab.. One of the most important missions of ETS-VIII is to construct a large deployable antenna for S-band telecommunication. In December 2001, the LDREX mission, which was a preliminary experiment for the large deployable antenna of ETS-VIII , was performed as an Ariane-5 auxiliary payload (ASAP). A 6m scale model of the ETS-VIII deployable antenna was launched and deployed in geo-transfer orbit (GTO). During this experiment, anomalies occurred in the deployable antenna, and deployment was aborted. analysis method. Using this analysis, we detected vibrating features of the deployable antenna , which were useful for explaining the anomalies deployable antenna.

  3. Experience Report: Visual Programming in the Real World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroth, E.; Hartsough, C

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports direct experience with two commercial, widely used visual programming environments. While neither of these systems is object oriented, the tools have transformed the development process and indicate a direction for visual object oriented tools to proceed.

  4. Experience and information loss in auditory and visual memory.

    PubMed

    Gloede, Michele E; Paulauskas, Emily E; Gregg, Melissa K

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies show that recognition memory for sounds is inferior to memory for pictures. Four experiments were conducted to examine the nature of auditory and visual memory. Experiments 1-3 were conducted to evaluate the role of experience in auditory and visual memory. Participants received a study phase with pictures/sounds, followed by a recognition memory test. Participants then completed auditory training with each of the sounds, followed by a second memory test. Despite auditory training in Experiments 1 and 2, visual memory was superior to auditory memory. In Experiment 3, we found that it is possible to improve auditory memory, but only after 3 days of specific auditory training and 3 days of visual memory decay. We examined the time course of information loss in auditory and visual memory in Experiment 4 and found a trade-off between visual and auditory recognition memory: Visual memory appears to have a larger capacity, while auditory memory is more enduring. Our results indicate that visual and auditory memory are inherently different memory systems and that differences in visual and auditory recognition memory performance may be due to the different amounts of experience with visual and auditory information, as well as structurally different neural circuitry specialized for information retention.

  5. The patient portal and abnormal test results: An exploratory study of patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Traber Davis; Modi, Varsha; Parrish, Danielle E.; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    Many health care institutions are implementing patient portals that allow patients to track and maintain their personal health information, mostly in response to the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act requirements. Test results review is an area of high interest to patients and provides an opportunity to foster their involvement in preventing abnormal test results from being overlooked, a common patient safety concern. However, little is known about how patients engage with portals to review abnormal results and which strategies could facilitate that interaction in order to ensure safe follow-up on abnormalities. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore patients’ experiences related to abnormal test result notifications through patient portals. The authors conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with 13 participants, patients and primary caregivers, between February 2014 and October 2014. Using content analysis, the authors explored patient experiences accessing abnormal test results through their portals. Respondents strongly favored access to all types of abnormal test results, but they raised several concerns including need for more timely notification and not being able to interpret the exact relevance of the result. Respondents’ personal experiences with physicians, test result notification, and the portal heavily influenced respondents’ notification preferences. Patient experiences with portals could be improved by development of strategies to help patients understand and manage the information received. These findings suggest important considerations for health professionals and institutions aiming to better engage patients in follow-up of their test results.

  6. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  7. Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments in Canadian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Maureen; Curtis, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article presents a study of the higher education experiences of students with visual impairments in Canada. Methods: Students with visual impairments and the staff members of disability programs were surveyed and interviewed regarding the students' experiences in entering higher education and completing their higher education…

  8. Experience, Context, and the Visual Perception of Human Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Alissa; Pinto, Jeannine; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Why are human observers particularly sensitive to human movement? Seven experiments examined the roles of visual experience and motor processes in human movement perception by comparing visual sensitivities to point-light displays of familiar, unusual, and impossible gaits across gait-speed and identity discrimination tasks. In both tasks, visual…

  9. The Social Experiences of High School Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, Glenda; Bundy, Anita C.; Broom, Alex; Hancock, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the social experiences in high school of students with visual impairments. Methods: Experience sampling methodology was used to examine (a) how socially included students with visual impairments feel, (b) the internal qualities of their activities, and (c) the factors that influence a sense of inclusion. Twelve…

  10. Looking you in the mouth: abnormal gaze in autism resulting from impaired top-down modulation of visual attention.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Dirk; Spezio, Michael L; Piven, Joseph; Adolphs, Ralph

    2006-12-01

    People with autism are impaired in their social behavior, including their eye contact with others, but the processes that underlie this impairment remain elusive. We combined high-resolution eye tracking with computational modeling in a group of 10 high-functioning individuals with autism to address this issue. The group fixated the location of the mouth in facial expressions more than did matched controls, even when the mouth was not shown, even in faces that were inverted and most noticeably at latencies of 200-400 ms. Comparisons with a computational model of visual saliency argue that the abnormal bias for fixating the mouth in autism is not driven by an exaggerated sensitivity to the bottom-up saliency of the features, but rather by an abnormal top-down strategy for allocating visual attention.

  11. Effects of attention on visual experience during monocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Reavis, Eric A; Kohler, Peter J; Caplovitz, Gideon P; Wheatley, Thalia P; Tse, Peter U

    2013-05-03

    There is a long-running debate over the extent to which volitional attention can modulate the appearance of visual stimuli. Here we use monocular rivalry between afterimages to explore the effects of attention on the contents of visual experience. In three experiments, we demonstrate that attended afterimages are seen for longer periods, on average, than unattended afterimages. This occurs both when a feature of the afterimage is attended directly and when a frame surrounding the afterimage is attended. The results of these experiments show that volitional attention can dramatically influence the contents of visual experience.

  12. Effects of attention on visual experience during monocular rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Reavis, Eric A.; Kohler, Peter J.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.; Wheatley, Thalia P.; Tse, Peter U.

    2013-01-01

    There is a long-running debate over the extent to which volitional attention can modulate the appearance of visual stimuli. Here we use monocular rivalry between afterimages to explore the effects of attention on the contents of visual experience. In three experiments, we demonstrate that attended afterimages are seen for longer periods, on average, than unattended afterimages. This occurs both when a feature of the afterimage is attended directly and when a frame surrounding the afterimage is attended. The results of these experiments show that volitional attention can dramatically influence the contents of visual experience. PMID:23499978

  13. Sensory deprivation: visual experience alters the mental number line.

    PubMed

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Taya, Shuichiro; Proulx, Michael J

    2014-03-15

    Early studies on numeric cognition reported that numbers are spatially organised according to a left-to-right small-to-large 'number line'. We investigated whether this spatial-number organisation is dictated by visual experience. We tested congenitally and late blind, and blindfolded sighted participants in a random number generation task where in one block their heads were alternately turned left or right before uttering the number. We found that the 'random' number generation was biased according to the side where the head was turned to. Consistent with the standard number line, participants with visual experience generated smaller numbers for left turns, and larger numbers for right turns. In contrast, participants without any visual experience showed the opposite pattern of results. These results suggest a role for visual experience in the development of spatial and numerical representations, which is supported by cultural differences in number representation, and provide converging evidence for visually driven organisation of the parietal cortex.

  14. Termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormality: a meta-ethnography of women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Caroline; Mitchell, Kathryn; Fox, Pauline

    2014-11-01

    Due to technological advances in antenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities, more women face the prospect of terminating pregnancies on these grounds. Much existing research focuses on women's psychological adaptation to this event. However, there is a lack of holistic understanding of women's experiences. This article reports a systematic review of qualitative studies into women's experiences of pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality. Eight databases were searched up to April 2014 for peer-reviewed studies, written in English, that reported primary or secondary data, used identifiable and interpretative qualitative methods, and offered a valuable contribution to the synthesis. Altogether, 4,281 records were screened; 14 met the inclusion criteria. The data were synthesised using meta-ethnography. Four themes were identified: a shattered world, losing and regaining control, the role of health professionals and the power of cultures. Pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality can be considered as a traumatic event that women experience as individuals, in their contact with the health professional community, and in the context of their politico-socio-legal environment. The range of emotions and experiences that pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality generates goes beyond the abortion paradigm and encompasses a bereavement model. Coordinated care pathways are needed that enable women to make their own decisions and receive supportive care.

  15. Visual experience without lines: effect on developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, J D; Freeman, R D

    1973-11-09

    Kittens were reared in a planetarium-like visual environment that lacked straight line contours. Cortical neurons were subsequently highly sensitive to spots of light but not to straight lines, in marked contrast to those from a normal cat. If linear contour processing is an innate function it appears to be subject to substantial modification by early visual experience.

  16. Youth with Visual Impairments: Experiences in General Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Robinson, Barbara L.; Rollheiser, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of students with visual impairments currently being educated in inclusive general physical education makes it important that physical education instructors know how best to serve them. Assessment of the experiences of students with visual impairments during general physical education classes, knowledge of students'…

  17. Detecting Visual Function Abnormality with a Contrast-Dependent Visual Test in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Ting; Liao, Kuo-Meng; Jang, Yuh; Hu, Fu-Chang; Wu, Wei-Chi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to diabetic retinopathy, diabetes also causes early retinal neurodegeneration and other eye problems, which cause various types of visual deficits. This study used a computer-based visual test (Macular Multi-Function Assessment (MMFA)) to assess contrast-dependent macular visual function in patients with type 2 diabetes to collect more visual information than possible with only the visual acuity test. Because the MMFA is a newly developed test, this study first compared the agreement and discriminative ability of the MMFA and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) contrast acuity charts. Then symbol discrimination performances of diabetic patients and controls were evaluated at 4 contrast levels using the MMFA. Seventy-seven patients and 45 controls participated. The agreement between MMFA and ETDRS scores was examined by fitting three-level linear mixed-effect models to estimate the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The estimated areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the discriminative ability of diseased versus non-diseased participants between the two tests. The MMFA scores of patients and controls were compared with multiple linear regression analysis after adjusting the effects of age, sex, hypertension and cataract. Results showed that the scores of the MMFA and ETDRS tests displayed high levels of agreement and acceptable and similar discriminative ability. The MMFA performance was correlated with the severity of diabetic retinopathy. Most of the MMFA scores differed significantly between the diabetic patients and controls. In the low contrast condition, the MMFA scores were significantly lower for 006Eon-DR patients than for controls. The potential utility of the MMFA as an easy screening tool for contrast-dependent visual function and for detecting early functional visual change in patients with type 2 diabetes is discussed.

  18. Detecting Visual Function Abnormality with a Contrast-Dependent Visual Test in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yuh; Hu, Fu-Chang; Wu, Wei-Chi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to diabetic retinopathy, diabetes also causes early retinal neurodegeneration and other eye problems, which cause various types of visual deficits. This study used a computer-based visual test (Macular Multi-Function Assessment (MMFA)) to assess contrast-dependent macular visual function in patients with type 2 diabetes to collect more visual information than possible with only the visual acuity test. Because the MMFA is a newly developed test, this study first compared the agreement and discriminative ability of the MMFA and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) contrast acuity charts. Then symbol discrimination performances of diabetic patients and controls were evaluated at 4 contrast levels using the MMFA. Seventy-seven patients and 45 controls participated. The agreement between MMFA and ETDRS scores was examined by fitting three-level linear mixed-effect models to estimate the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The estimated areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the discriminative ability of diseased versus non-diseased participants between the two tests. The MMFA scores of patients and controls were compared with multiple linear regression analysis after adjusting the effects of age, sex, hypertension and cataract. Results showed that the scores of the MMFA and ETDRS tests displayed high levels of agreement and acceptable and similar discriminative ability. The MMFA performance was correlated with the severity of diabetic retinopathy. Most of the MMFA scores differed significantly between the diabetic patients and controls. In the low contrast condition, the MMFA scores were significantly lower for 006Eon-DR patients than for controls. The potential utility of the MMFA as an easy screening tool for contrast-dependent visual function and for detecting early functional visual change in patients with type 2 diabetes is discussed. PMID:27611680

  19. Sharing visualization experiences among remote virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.L.; Papka, M.E.; Pellegrino, M.; Stevens, R.

    1995-12-31

    Virtual reality has become an increasingly familiar part of the science of visualization and communication of information. This, combined with the increase in connectivity of remote sites via high-speed networks, allows for the development of a collaborative distributed virtual environment. Such an environment enables the development of supercomputer simulations with virtual reality visualizations that can be displayed at multiple sites, with each site interacting, viewing, and communicating about the results being discovered. The early results of an experimental collaborative virtual reality environment are discussed in this paper. The issues that need to be addressed in the implementation, as well as preliminary results are covered. Also provided are a discussion of plans and a generalized application programmers interface for CAVE to CAVE will be provided.

  20. 'Visual' parsing can be taught quickly without visual experience during critical periods.

    PubMed

    Reich, Lior; Amedi, Amir

    2015-10-20

    Cases of invasive sight-restoration in congenital blind adults demonstrated that acquiring visual abilities is extremely challenging, presumably because visual-experience during critical-periods is crucial for learning visual-unique concepts (e.g. size constancy). Visual rehabilitation can also be achieved using sensory-substitution-devices (SSDs) which convey visual information non-invasively through sounds. We tested whether one critical concept--visual parsing, which is highly-impaired in sight-restored patients--can be learned using SSD. To this end, congenitally blind adults participated in a unique, relatively short (~70 hours), SSD-'vision' training. Following this, participants successfully parsed 2D and 3D visual objects. Control individuals naïve to SSDs demonstrated that while some aspects of parsing with SSD are intuitive, the blind's success could not be attributed to auditory processing alone. Furthermore, we had a unique opportunity to compare the SSD-users' abilities to those reported for sight-restored patients who performed similar tasks visually, and who had months of eyesight. Intriguingly, the SSD-users outperformed the patients on most criteria tested. These suggest that with adequate training and technologies, key high-order visual features can be quickly acquired in adulthood, and lack of visual-experience during critical-periods can be somewhat compensated for. Practically, these highlight the potential of SSDs as standalone-aids or combined with invasive restoration approaches.

  1. Flow visualization experiments in a porous nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cielak, Z.; Kinney, R. B.; Perkins, H. C.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental approach is described for the study of nozzle flows with large wall-transpiration rates. Emphasizing a qualitative understanding of the flow, the technique uses the hydraulic analogy, whereby a compressible gas flow is simulated by a water flow having a free surface. For simplicity, the simulated gas flow is taken to be two-dimensional. A nozzle with porous walls in the throat region has been developed for use on a water table. A technique for visualizing the transpired fluid has also been devised. These are discussed, and preliminary results are presented which illustrate the success of the experimental approach.

  2. The two-visual-systems hypothesis and the perspectival features of visual experience.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert T; Whitwell, Robert L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-09-01

    Some critics of the two-visual-systems hypothesis (TVSH) argue that it is incompatible with the fundamentally egocentric nature of visual experience (what we call the 'perspectival account'). The TVSH proposes that the ventral stream, which delivers up our visual experience of the world, works in an allocentric frame of reference, whereas the dorsal stream, which mediates the visual control of action, uses egocentric frames of reference. Given that the TVSH is also committed to the claim that dorsal-stream processing does not contribute to the contents of visual experience, it has been argued that the TVSH cannot account for the egocentric features of our visual experience. This argument, however, rests on a misunderstanding about how the operations mediating action and the operations mediating perception are specified in the TVSH. In this article, we emphasize the importance of the 'outputs' of the two-systems to the specification of their respective operations. We argue that once this point is appreciated, it becomes evident that the TVSH is entirely compatible with a perspectival account of visual experience.

  3. Sensory experience modifies feature map relationships in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cloherty, Shaun L; Hughes, Nicholas J; Hietanen, Markus A; Bhagavatula, Partha S

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which brain structure is influenced by sensory input during development is a critical but controversial question. A paradigmatic system for studying this is the mammalian visual cortex. Maps of orientation preference (OP) and ocular dominance (OD) in the primary visual cortex of ferrets, cats and monkeys can be individually changed by altered visual input. However, the spatial relationship between OP and OD maps has appeared immutable. Using a computational model we predicted that biasing the visual input to orthogonal orientation in the two eyes should cause a shift of OP pinwheels towards the border of OD columns. We then confirmed this prediction by rearing cats wearing orthogonally oriented cylindrical lenses over each eye. Thus, the spatial relationship between OP and OD maps can be modified by visual experience, revealing a previously unknown degree of brain plasticity in response to sensory input. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13911.001 PMID:27310531

  4. Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

    2004-01-01

    A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

  5. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Corinna M; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-08-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation of 2 young adults diagnosed with CVI and visual dysfunction characterized by difficulties related to visually guided attention and visuospatial processing. Using high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), we characterized and compared their individual white matter projections of the extrageniculo-striate visual system with a normal-sighted control. Compared to a sighted control, both CVI cases revealed a striking reduction in association fibers, including the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus as well as superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. This reduction in fibers associated with the major pathways implicated in visual processing may provide a neuroanatomical basis for the visual dysfunctions observed in these patients.

  6. A Simple Experiment for Visualizing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and fascinating experiment for studying diffusion in gels using a pH-sensitive dye. By doping agar with methyl red, we obtain a gel which rapidly reacts to changes in pH by changing its absorption spectrum. The pH gradients can be followed using a digital camera, and we demonstrate here that the pH-sensitive colour changes can…

  7. Abnormal Attention in Autism Shown by Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmonte, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Eight males with autism were required to shift attention between rapidly flashed targets alternating between left and right visual hemifields. When targets were separated by less than 700 ms, steady-state brain electrical response in both hemispheres was augmented and background EEG decreased for rightward shifts as compared with leftward shifts.…

  8. Early visual mechanisms do not contribute to synesthetic color experience.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Wook; Blake, Randolph

    2008-03-01

    Color-graphemic synesthetes perceive colors when viewing alphanumeric characters. Theories of color-graphemic synesthesia posit that synesthetic color experience arises from activation of neural mechanisms also involved in ordinary color vision. To learn how early in visual processing those mechanisms exist, we performed several experiments. In one experiment, real colors were altered in appearance by the lightness of their backgrounds, but the appearance of synesthetic colors was immune to surrounding light levels. In the second experiment using a hue cancellation technique, adaptation to synesthetic color had no subsequent effect on the amount of cancelling light to achieve equilibrium yellow, whereas adaptation to real colors did. In the third experiment, vivid synesthetic color had no influence on equilibrium yellow settings of the actual color of the characters evoking synesthesia. Because brightness contrast and chromatic adaptation are putatively mediated by neural mechanisms early in visual processing including retina and primary visual cortex, our results imply that neural events responsible for synesthetic color emerge subsequent to these early visual stages.

  9. The onset of visual experience gates auditory cortex critical periods

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Todd M.; Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory systems influence one another during development and deprivation can lead to cross-modal plasticity. As auditory function begins before vision, we investigate the effect of manipulating visual experience during auditory cortex critical periods (CPs) by assessing the influence of early, normal and delayed eyelid opening on hearing loss-induced changes to membrane and inhibitory synaptic properties. Early eyelid opening closes the auditory cortex CPs precociously and dark rearing prevents this effect. In contrast, delayed eyelid opening extends the auditory cortex CPs by several additional days. The CP for recovery from hearing loss is also closed prematurely by early eyelid opening and extended by delayed eyelid opening. Furthermore, when coupled with transient hearing loss that animals normally fully recover from, very early visual experience leads to inhibitory deficits that persist into adulthood. Finally, we demonstrate a functional projection from the visual to auditory cortex that could mediate these effects. PMID:26786281

  10. The large-scale organization of "visual" streams emerges without visual experience.

    PubMed

    Striem-Amit, Ella; Dakwar, Ornella; Reich, Lior; Amedi, Amir

    2012-07-01

    A key question in sensory perception is the role of experience in shaping the functional architecture of the sensory neural systems. Here we studied dependence on visual experience in shaping the most fundamental division of labor in vision, namely between the ventral "what" and the dorsal "where and how" processing streams. We scanned 11 fully congenitally blind (CB) and 9 sighted individuals performing location versus form identification tasks following brief training on a sensory substitution device used for artificial vision. We show that the dorsal/ventral visual pathway division of labor can be revealed in the adult CB when perceiving sounds that convey the relevant visual information. This suggests that the most important large-scale organization of the visual system into the 2 streams can develop even without any visual experience and can be attributed at least partially to innately determined constraints and later to cross-modal plasticity. These results support the view that the brain is organized into task-specific but sensory modality-independent operators.

  11. Deafferentation-induced plasticity of visual callosal connections: predicting critical periods and analyzing cortical abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, Jaime F; Bock, Andrew S; Leigland, Lindsey A; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  12. Abnormal visual-evoked potentials in leukemic children after cranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.; Tomarchio, S.; Pero, G.; Consoli, G.; Marina, R.; Rizzari, C.; Schiliro, G.

    1985-01-01

    Visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) were studied in 55 asymptomatic children with leukemia or solid tumors in remission in order to detect subclinical demyelination of the optic pathway after CNS prophylaxis. In group I (11 patients with ALL studied prospectively), VEP latency was increased in ten after cranial radiation (CR) as compared with previous values. Group II (18 patients with ALL in maintenance) and group III (16 patients with ALL off therapy) were studied retrospectively and VEP latency was found above normal limits in 33 and 31%, respectively. In group IV (four patients with solid tumors and six with leukemia, all of whom received no CR), VEP latency was normal despite periodical intrathecal methotrexate administrations to five of them. The authors conclude that CR determines a slowing of conduction on VEP test, probably due to demyelination of the optic pathway, in a high proportion of patients. The future clinical significance of these findings must be established throughout a prolonged follow-up period.

  13. Sleep Promotes Cortical Response Potentiation Following Visual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aton, Sara J.; Suresh, Aneesha; Broussard, Christopher; Frank, Marcos G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep has been hypothesized to globally reduce synaptic strength. However, recent findings suggest that in the context of learning and memory consolidation, sleep may promote synaptic potentiation. We tested the requirement for sleep in a naturally occurring form of experience-dependent synaptic potentiation in the adult mouse visual cortex (V1), which is initiated by patterned visual experience. Design: Visual responses were recorded in individual V1 neurons before and after presentation of an oriented grating stimulus, and after subsequent sleep or sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: We find that V1 response potentiation—associated with a shift in orientation preference in favor of the presented stimulus—occurs only after sleep and only during the entrained circadian sleep phase, and is blocked by sleep deprivation. Induction of plasticity following stimulus presentation is associated with an increase in principal neuron firing in V1, which is present in all behavioral states and occurs regardless of time of day. Sleep dependent potentiation is proportional to phase-locking of neuronal activity with thalamocortical spindle oscillations. Conclusions: Our results suggest that sleep can promote cortical synaptic potentiation in vivo, and that this potentiation may be mediated by slow wave sleep spindles. Citation: Aton SJ, Suresh A, Broussard C, Frank MG. Sleep promotes cortical response potentiation following visual experience. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1163-1170. PMID:25061244

  14. Recent Visual Experience Shapes Visual Processing in Rats through Stimulus-Specific Adaptation and Response Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Kasper; Vogels, Rufin; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2017-03-20

    From an ecological point of view, it is generally suggested that the main goal of vision in rats and mice is navigation and (aerial) predator evasion [1-3]. The latter requires fast and accurate detection of a change in the visual environment. An outstanding question is whether there are mechanisms in the rodent visual system that would support and facilitate visual change detection. An experimental protocol frequently used to investigate change detection in humans is the oddball paradigm, in which a rare, unexpected stimulus is presented in a train of stimulus repetitions [4]. A popular "predictive coding" theory of cortical responses states that neural responses should decrease for expected sensory input and increase for unexpected input [5, 6]. Despite evidence for response suppression and enhancement in noninvasive scalp recordings in humans with this paradigm [7, 8], it has proven challenging to observe both phenomena in invasive action potential recordings in other animals [9-11]. During a visual oddball experiment, we recorded multi-unit spiking activity in rat primary visual cortex (V1) and latero-intermediate area (LI), which is a higher area of the rodent ventral visual stream. In rat V1, there was only evidence for response suppression related to stimulus-specific adaptation, and not for response enhancement. However, higher up in area LI, spiking activity showed clear surprise-based response enhancement in addition to stimulus-specific adaptation. These results show that neural responses along the rat ventral visual stream become increasingly sensitive to changes in the visual environment, suggesting a system specialized in the detection of unexpected events.

  15. Visualizing Hyporheic Flow Through Bedforms Using Dye Experiments and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Stonedahl, Susa H; Roche, Kevin R; Stonedahl, Forrest; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-11-18

    Advective exchange between the pore space of sediments and the overlying water column, called hyporheic exchange in fluvial environments, drives solute transport in rivers and many important biogeochemical processes. To improve understanding of these processes through visual demonstration, we created a hyporheic flow simulation in the multi-agent computer modeling platform NetLogo. The simulation shows virtual tracer flowing through a streambed covered with two-dimensional bedforms. Sediment, flow, and bedform characteristics are used as input variables for the model. We illustrate how these simulations match experimental observations from laboratory flume experiments based on measured input parameters. Dye is injected into the flume sediments to visualize the porewater flow. For comparison virtual tracer particles are placed at the same locations in the simulation. This coupled simulation and lab experiment has been used successfully in undergraduate and graduate laboratories to directly visualize river-porewater interactions and show how physically-based flow simulations can reproduce environmental phenomena. Students took photographs of the bed through the transparent flume walls and compared them to shapes of the dye at the same times in the simulation. This resulted in very similar trends, which allowed the students to better understand both the flow patterns and the mathematical model. The simulations also allow the user to quickly visualize the impact of each input parameter by running multiple simulations. This process can also be used in research applications to illustrate basic processes, relate interfacial fluxes and porewater transport, and support quantitative process-based modeling.

  16. JoVE: the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is the world's first scientific video journal and is designed to communicate research and scientific methods in an innovative, intuitive way. JoVE includes a wide range of biomedical videos, from biology to immunology and bioengineering to clinical and translation medicine. This column describes the browsing and searching capabilities of JoVE, as well as its additional features (including the JoVE Scientific Education Database designed for students in scientific fields).

  17. Visual Assessment of CT Findings in Smokers With Nonobstructed Spirometric Abnormalities in The COPDGene® Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song Soo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Stinson, Douglas S.; Zach, Jordan A.; McKenzie, Alexander S.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Wan, Emily S.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the COPD Genetic Epidemiology (COPDGene®) study population of cigarette smokers, 9% were found to be unclassifiable by the Global Initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. This study was to identify the differences in computed tomography (CT) findings between this nonobstructed (GOLDU) group and a control group of smokers with normal lung function. This research was approved by the institutional review board of each institution. CT images of 400 participants in the COPDGene® study (200 GOLDU, 200 smokers with normal lung function) were retrospectively evaluated in a blinded fashion. Visual CT assessment included lobar analysis of emphysema (type, extent), presence of paraseptal emphysema, airway wall thickening, expiratory air trapping, centrilobular nodules, atelectasis, non-fibrotic and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD), pleural thickening, diaphragmatic eventration, vertebral body changes and internal thoracic diameters (in mm). Univariate comparisons of groups for each CT parameter and multiple logistic regression were performed to determine the imaging features associated with GOLDU. When compared with the control group, GOLDU participants had a significantly higher prevalence of unilateral diaphragm eventration (30% vs. 16%), airway wall thickening, centrilobular nodules, reticular abnormality, paraseptal emphysema (33% vs. 17%), linear atelectasis (60% vs. 35.6%), kyphosis (12% vs. 4%), and a smaller internal transverse thoracic diameter (255 ± 22.5 [standard deviation] vs. 264.8 ± 22.4, mm) (all p<0.05). With multiple logistic regression, all of these CT parameters, except non-fibrotic ILD and kyphosis, remained significantly associated with GOLDU status (p<0.05). In cigarette smokers, chest wall abnormalities and parenchymal lung disease, which contribute to restrictive physiologic impairment, are associated with GOLD-nonobstructed status. PMID:25197723

  18. Audio-visual speech experience with age influences perceived audio-visual asynchrony in speech.

    PubMed

    Alm, Magnus; Behne, Dawn

    2013-10-01

    Previous research indicates that perception of audio-visual (AV) synchrony changes in adulthood. Possible explanations for these age differences include a decline in hearing acuity, a decline in cognitive processing speed, and increased experience with AV binding. The current study aims to isolate the effect of AV experience by comparing synchrony judgments from 20 young adults (20 to 30 yrs) and 20 normal-hearing middle-aged adults (50 to 60 yrs), an age range for which a decline of cognitive processing speed is expected to be minimal. When presented with AV stop consonant syllables with asynchronies ranging from 440 ms audio-lead to 440 ms visual-lead, middle-aged adults showed significantly less tolerance for audio-lead than young adults. Middle-aged adults also showed a greater shift in their point of subjective simultaneity than young adults. Natural audio-lead asynchronies are arguably more predictable than natural visual-lead asynchronies, and this predictability may render audio-lead thresholds more prone to experience-related fine-tuning.

  19. Anomalous echo: Exploring abnormal experience correlates of emotional motor resonance in Schizophrenia Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Mariateresa; Raballo, Andrea; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Amore, Mario; Maggini, Carlo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2015-09-30

    Anomalous experiences such as Basic Symptoms (BS) are considered the first subjective manifestation of the neurobiological substrate of schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a low or high emotional motor resonance occurring in Schizophrenia Spectrum (SzSp) patients was related to patients׳ clinical features and to their anomalous subjective experiences as indexed by the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS). To this aim, we employed a validated paradigm sensitive in evoking a congruent facial mimicry (measured by means of facial electromyographic activity, EMG) through multimodal positive and negative emotional stimuli presentation. Results showed that SzSp patients more resonating with negative emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) had significantly higher scores in BSABS Cluster 3 (Vulnerability) and more psychotic episodes than Internalizers patients. On the other hand, SzSp patients more resonating with positive emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) scored higher in BSABS Cluster 5 (Interpersonal irritation) than Internalizers. Drawing upon a phenomenological-based perspective, we attempted to shed new light on the abnormal experiences characterizing schizophrenia, explaining them in terms of a disruption of the normal self-perception conveyed by the basic, low-level emotional motor mechanisms.

  20. Gap Effect Abnormalities during a Visually Guided Pro-Saccade Task in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Taniike, Masako; Mohri, Ikuko; Kobashi, Syoji; Tachibana, Masaya; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that starts in early childhood and has a comprehensive impact on psychosocial activity and education as well as general health across the lifespan. Despite its prevalence, the current diagnostic criteria for ADHD are debated. Saccadic eye movements are easy to quantify and may be a quantitative biomarker for a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including ADHD. The goal of this study was to examine whether children with ADHD exhibit abnormalities during a visually guided pro-saccadic eye-movement and to clarify the neurophysiological mechanisms associated with their behavioral impairments. Thirty-seven children with ADHD (aged 5–11 years) and 88 typically developing (TD) children (aged 5–11 years) were asked to perform a simple saccadic eye-movement task in which step and gap conditions were randomly interleaved. We evaluated the gap effect, which is the difference in the reaction time between the two conditions. Children with ADHD had a significantly longer reaction time than TD children (p < 0.01) and the gap effect was markedly attenuated (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the measurement of saccadic eye movements may provide a novel method for evaluating the behavioral symptoms and clinical features of ADHD, and that the gap effect is a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of ADHD in early childhood. PMID:26018057

  1. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities with the use of color kinesis: a valuable visual and training aid.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y S; Puryear, J V; Gan, S C; Fowler, M B; Vagelos, R H; Popp, R L; Schnittger, I

    1997-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of left ventricular segmental wall motion by echocardiography is an important yet difficult skill to learn. Color-coded left ventricular wall motion (color kinesis) is a tool that potentially could aid in the interpretation and provide semiquantification. We studied the usefulness of color kinesis in 42 patients with a history of congestive cardiomyopathy who underwent two-dimensional echocardiograms and a color kinesis study. The expert's reading of the two-dimensional wall motion served as a reference for comparison of color kinesis studies interpreted by the expert and a cardiovascular trainee. Correlation between two-dimensional echocardiography and the expert's and trainee's color coded wall motion scores were r = 0.83 and r = 0.67, respectively. Reproducibility between reviewers and between operators was also assessed. Interobserver variability for color-coded wall motion showed a correlation of r = 0.78. Correlation between operators was also good; r = 0.84. Color kinesis is reliable and appears promising as an adjunct in the assessment of wall motion abnormalities by echocardiography. It is both a valuable visual aid, as well as a training aid for the cardiovascular trainee.

  2. Psychopathology of Lived Time: Abnormal Time Experience in Persons With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Ballerini, Massimo; Presenza, Simona; Mancini, Milena; Raballo, Andrea; Blasi, Stefano; Cutting, John

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal time experience (ATE) in schizophrenia is a long-standing theme of phenomenological psychopathology. This is because temporality constitutes the bedrock of any experience and its integrity is fundamental for the sense of coherence and continuity of selfhood and personal identity. To characterize ATE in schizophrenia patients as compared to major depressives we interviewed, in a clinical setting over a period of 15 years, 550 consecutive patients affected by schizophrenic and affective disorders. Clinical files were analyzed by means of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR), an inductive method suited to research that requires rich descriptions of inner experiences. Of the whole sample, 109 persons affected by schizophrenic (n = 95 acute, n = 14 chronic) and 37 by major depression reported at least 1 ATE. ATE are more represented in acute (N = 109 out of 198; 55%) than in chronic schizophrenic patients (N = 14 out of 103; 13%). The main feature of ATE in people with schizophrenia is the fragmentation of time experience (71 out of 109 patients), an impairment of the automatic and prereflexive synthesis of primal impression-retention-protention. This includes 4 subcategories: disruption of time flowing, déjà vu/vecu, premonitions about oneself and the external world. We contrasted ATE in schizophrenia and in major depression, finding relevant differences: in major depressives there is no disarticulation of time experience, rather timelessness because time lacks duration, not articulation. These core features of the schizophrenic pheno-phenotype may be related to self-disorders and to the manifold of characteristic schizophrenic symptoms, including so called bizarre delusions and verbal-acoustic hallucinations.

  3. Psychopathology of Lived Time: Abnormal Time Experience in Persons With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Ballerini, Massimo; Presenza, Simona; Mancini, Milena; Raballo, Andrea; Blasi, Stefano; Cutting, John

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal time experience (ATE) in schizophrenia is a long-standing theme of phenomenological psychopathology. This is because temporality constitutes the bedrock of any experience and its integrity is fundamental for the sense of coherence and continuity of selfhood and personal identity. To characterize ATE in schizophrenia patients as compared to major depressives we interviewed, in a clinical setting over a period of 15 years, 550 consecutive patients affected by schizophrenic and affective disorders. Clinical files were analyzed by means of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR), an inductive method suited to research that requires rich descriptions of inner experiences. Of the whole sample, 109 persons affected by schizophrenic (n = 95 acute, n = 14 chronic) and 37 by major depression reported at least 1 ATE. ATE are more represented in acute (N = 109 out of 198; 55%) than in chronic schizophrenic patients (N = 14 out of 103; 13%). The main feature of ATE in people with schizophrenia is the fragmentation of time experience (71 out of 109 patients), an impairment of the automatic and prereflexive synthesis of primal impression-retention-protention. This includes 4 subcategories: disruption of time flowing, déjà vu/vecu, premonitions about oneself and the external world. We contrasted ATE in schizophrenia and in major depression, finding relevant differences: in major depressives there is no disarticulation of time experience, rather timelessness because time lacks duration, not articulation. These core features of the schizophrenic pheno-phenotype may be related to self-disorders and to the manifold of characteristic schizophrenic symptoms, including so called bizarre delusions and verbal-acoustic hallucinations. PMID:25943123

  4. Audio-Visual Object Search is Changed by Bilingual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chabal, Sarah; Schroeder, Scott R.; Marian, Viorica

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of language experience on the ability to efficiently search for objects in the face of distractions. Monolingual and bilingual participants completed an ecologically-valid, object-finding task that contained conflicting, consistent, or neutral auditory cues. Bilinguals were faster than monolinguals at locating the target item, and eye-movements revealed that this speed advantage was driven by bilinguals’ ability to overcome interference from visual distractors and focus their attention on the relevant object. Bilinguals fixated the target object more often than did their monolingual peers, who, in contrast, attended more to a distracting image. Moreover, bilinguals’, but not monolinguals’, object-finding ability was positively associated with their executive control ability. We conclude that bilinguals’ executive control advantages extend to real-world visual processing and object finding within a multi-modal environment. PMID:26272368

  5. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  6. Interactive Visualization of Infrared Spectral Data: Synergy of Computation, Visualization, and Experiment for Learning Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahti, Paul M.; Motyka, Eric J.; Lancashire, Robert J.

    2000-05-01

    A straightforward procedure is described to combine computation of molecular vibrational modes using commonly available molecular modeling programs with visualization of the modes using advanced features of the MDL Information Systems Inc. Chime World Wide Web browser plug-in. Minor editing of experimental spectra that are stored in the JCAMP-DX format allows linkage of IR spectral frequency ranges to Chime molecular display windows. The spectra and animation files can be combined by Hypertext Markup Language programming to allow interactive linkage between experimental spectra and computationally generated vibrational displays. Both the spectra and the molecular displays can be interactively manipulated to allow the user maximum control of the objects being viewed. This procedure should be very valuable not only for aiding students through visual linkage of spectra and various vibrational animations, but also by assisting them in learning the advantages and limitations of computational chemistry by comparison to experiment.

  7. How do musical tonality and experience affect visual working memory?

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Lu, Jing; Gong, Diankun; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-20

    The influence of music on the human brain has continued to attract increasing attention from neuroscientists and musicologists. Currently, tonal music is widely present in people's daily lives; however, atonal music has gradually become an important part of modern music. In this study, we conducted two experiments: the first one tested for differences in perception of distractibility between tonal music and atonal music. The second experiment tested how tonal music and atonal music affect visual working memory by comparing musicians and nonmusicians who were placed in contexts with background tonal music, atonal music, and silence. They were instructed to complete a delay matching memory task. The results show that musicians and nonmusicians have different evaluations of the distractibility of tonal music and atonal music, possibly indicating that long-term training may lead to a higher auditory perception threshold among musicians. For the working memory task, musicians reacted faster than nonmusicians in all background music cases, and musicians took more time to respond in the tonal background music condition than in the other conditions. Therefore, our results suggest that for a visual memory task, background tonal music may occupy more cognitive resources than atonal music or silence for musicians, leaving few resources left for the memory task. Moreover, the musicians outperformed the nonmusicians because of the higher sensitivity to background music, which also needs a further longitudinal study to be confirmed.

  8. Normal and Abnormal Development of Motor Behavior: Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2001-01-01

    In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human. PMID:11530886

  9. Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with abnormal neural mechanism during charitable donation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongtao; Wang, Kangcheng; Shen, Yimo; Du, Xue; Li, Wenfu; Dupuis-Roy, Nicolas; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-10-30

    Previous studies suggested that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) might be associated with dysfunctional reward processing. At present, little is known about the neural mechanisms of reward-related processing during a charitable donation task in trauma survivors who do not go on to develop PTSD. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural basis of charitable donation in non-PTSD survivors of the Sichuan earthquake. Results showed that activations in the striatum of trauma survivors were reduced in both the low donation (donated a small amount to the Red Cross) and the high donation conditions (donated a large amount to the Red Cross) compared with the healthy controls. Furthermore, the trauma survivors also exhibited less activity in the insula than the healthy controls in the high donation condition. These findings suggest that abnormal reward-related activations might be associated with dysfunctions in the reward pathway of trauma survivors. Also, we discuss the possibility that traumatic experiences attenuate the reactivity of reward-related brain areas to positive emotions (as induced by advantageous donations).

  10. Improving the User Experience of Finding and Visualizing Oceanographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C. L.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for and locating data of interest can be a challenge to researchers as increasing volumes of data are made available online through various data centers, repositories, and archives. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) is keenly aware of this challenge and, as a result, has implemented features and technologies aimed at improving data discovery and enhancing the user experience. BCO-DMO was created in 2006 to manage and publish data from research projects funded by the Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections and the Division of Polar Programs (PLR) Antarctic Sciences Organisms and Ecosystems Program (ANT) of the US National Science Foundation (NSF). The BCO-DMO text-based and geospatial-based data access systems provide users with tools to search, filter, and visualize data in order to efficiently find data of interest. The geospatial interface, developed using a suite of open-source software (including MapServer [1], OpenLayers [2], ExtJS [3], and MySQL [4]), allows users to search and filter/subset metadata based on program, project, or deployment, or by using a simple word search. The map responds based on user selections, presents options that allow the user to choose specific data parameters (e.g., a species or an individual drifter), and presents further options for visualizing those data on the map or in "quick-view" plots. The data managed and made available by BCO-DMO are very heterogeneous in nature, from in-situ biogeochemical, ecological, and physical data, to controlled laboratory experiments. Due to the heterogeneity of the data types, a 'one size fits all' approach to visualization cannot be applied. Datasets are visualized in a way that will best allow users to assess fitness for purpose. An advanced geospatial interface, which contains a semantically-enabled faceted search [5], is also available. These search facets are highly interactive and responsive, allowing

  11. The Experiences of Parents of Students with Visual Impairments Who Are Professionals in the Field of Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Steiguer, Pamela B.; Erin, Jane N.; Topor, Irene L.; Rosenblum, L. Penny

    2008-01-01

    This survey examined the experiences of parents of individuals with visual impairments who acquired professional credentials in the field of visual impairment. The participants reported on such topics as the advantages and disadvantages of being a parent-professional, the types of support they seek, and advice to others who are balancing both…

  12. What's in View for Toddlers? Using a Head Camera to Study Visual Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Hanako; Smith, Linda B.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports 2 experiments using a new method to study 18- to 24-month-olds' visual experiences as they interact with objects. Experiment 1 presents evidence on the coupling of head and eye movements and thus the validity of the head camera view of the infant's visual field in the geometry of the task context. Experiment 2 demonstrates the…

  13. Experience-dependent plasticity of visual cortical microcircuits.

    PubMed

    Medini, P

    2014-10-10

    The recent decade testified a tremendous increase in our knowledge on how cell-type-specific microcircuits process sensory information in the neocortex and on how such circuitry reacts to manipulations of the sensory environment. Experience-dependent plasticity has now been investigated with techniques endowed with cell resolution during both postnatal development and in adult animals. This review recapitulates the main recent findings in the field using mainly the primary visual cortex as a model system to highlight the more important questions and physiological principles (such as the role of non-competitive mechanisms, the role of inhibition in excitatory cell plasticity, the functional importance of spine and axonal plasticity on a microscale level). I will also discuss on which scientific problems the debate and controversies are more pronounced. New technologies that allow to perturbate cell-type-specific subcircuits will certainly shine new light in the years to come at least on some of the still open questions.

  14. Visual attention in orienteers at different levels of experience.

    PubMed

    Eccles, David W; Walsh, Susanne E; Ingledew, David K

    2006-01-01

    This study explored how differences in orienteering experience are related to differences in how visual attention is allocated to the map, the environment and to travel. Twenty more experienced and 20 less experienced individuals orienteered while wearing a head-mounted video camera with microphone. The participants verbalized what they were attending to (map, environment or travel) at any given time. Each recorded film was coded at each point in time in terms of what the participant was attending to and whether the participant was moving or stationary. More experienced orienteers attended to the map markedly more while moving and spent less time stationary than less experienced orienteers. The participants' performance was significantly related to the ability to attend to the map while moving. The strategic control of attention is proposed to explain this ability. It is proposed that attentional training might enhance performance in sports characterized by multiple and dynamically varying elements.

  15. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  16. The predictive mind and the experience of visual art work

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Among the main challenges of the predictive brain/mind concept is how to link prediction at the neural level to prediction at the cognitive-psychological level and finding conceptually robust and empirically verifiable ways to harness this theoretical framework toward explaining higher-order mental and cognitive phenomena, including the subjective experience of aesthetic and symbolic forms. Building on the tentative prediction error account of visual art, this article extends the application of the predictive coding framework to the visual arts. It does so by linking this theoretical discussion to a subjective, phenomenological account of how a work of art is experienced. In order to engage more deeply with a work of art, viewers must be able to tune or adapt their prediction mechanism to recognize art as a specific class of objects whose ontological nature defies predictability, and they must be able to sustain a productive flow of predictions from low-level sensory, recognitional to abstract semantic, conceptual, and affective inferences. The affective component of the process of predictive error optimization that occurs when a viewer enters into dialog with a painting is constituted both by activating the affective affordances within the image and by the affective consequences of prediction error minimization itself. The predictive coding framework also has implications for the problem of the culturality of vision. A person’s mindset, which determines what top–down expectations and predictions are generated, is co-constituted by culture-relative skills and knowledge, which form hyperpriors that operate in the perception of art. PMID:25566111

  17. Adult Visual Experience Promotes Recovery of Primary Visual Cortex from Long-Term Monocular Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Quentin S.; Aleem, Salman; Zhou, Hongyi; Pham, Tony A.

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged visual deprivation from early childhood to maturity is believed to cause permanent visual impairment. However, there have been case reports of substantial improvement of binocular vision in human adults following lifelong visual impairment or deprivation. These observations, together with recent findings of adult ocular dominance…

  18. Effects of early and delayed visual experience on intersensory development in bobwhite quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Banker, H; Lickliter, R

    1993-04-01

    The relative impact of early versus delayed visual experience on intersensory development was studied by manipulating the timing of visual experience of bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) embryos and hatchlings. Previous studies with quail chicks have revealed that: (1) Socially reared chicks require only maternal auditory cues to direct their social preferences in the first 2 days following hatching; (2) by 3 days following hatching chicks require both auditory and visual maternal cues to direct their social preferences; (3) chicks which have received unusually early visual experience as embryos require both auditory and visual cues by 24 hr following hatching, indicating an accelerated pattern of the emergence of intersensory functioning; and (4) chicks reared under conditions of attenuated social and visual experience continue to rely on maternal auditory cues alone at 4 days following hatching, indicating a decelerated pattern of early intersensory functioning. In the present study, quail chicks that received both early visual experience as embryos and delayed visual experience as hatchlings exhibited a pattern of both auditory and visual responsiveness like that seen in normally reared chicks. These results indicate that, at least under the present experimental conditions, the influence of early and delayed visual experience on perinatal perceptual development appears to be relatively comparable in effect.

  19. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  20. A Contaminant Ice Visualization Experiment in a Glass Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Le, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented from pulse tube experiments designed to investigate the effect of 400 parts per million water vapor contamination of the helium working gas. The experiments were conducted in a glass pulse tube to enable visualization of ice formation on internal surfaces. Photographs of this ice formation were taken along with simultaneous coldtip temperature and compressor power measurements. Four types of regenerator elements were tested in various combinations: 200- and 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 1.6 mm diameter glass beads, and 1.6 mm thick perforated plastic plates. Internal spacers were also used to provide clear fields of view into the regenerator stack. Substantial water-ice formation was observed at the cold end of the regenerator and on the inside wall of pulse tube; it appeared to be highly porous, like snow, and was seen to accumulate only in a very localized region at the coldest end, despite changing the cold tip temperature across a range of 150 to 235 K. Ice formation degraded pulse tube thermal performance only in cases where screen regenerators were used at the regenerator cold end. It was concluded that flow blockage was the mechanism by which contaminants affected performance; coarse regenerator elements were largely immune over the tested time scale of a few days. Substantially reduced ice formation and minimal performance loss were also observed in repeated tests where the contaminated gas was reused after warming up and melting of the accumulated internal ice. Significant adsorption of the liquid water onto the regenerator was inferred, a process that depleted the gas phase concentration of water.

  1. AODA Training Experiences of Blindness and Visual Impairment Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, S. J.; Koch, D. Shane; McKee, Marissa F.; Nelipovich, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Co-existing alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) and blindness or visually impairment may complicate the delivery of rehabilitation services. Professionals working with individuals who are blind or visually impaired need to be aware of unique issues facing those with co-existing disabilities. This study sought to examine the AODA training needs,…

  2. Experiences with starfield visualizations for analysis of library collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. Alfredo; Twidale, Michael B.; Nichols, David M.; Silva, Nabani N.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a qualitative and formative study of the uses of a starfield-based visualization interface for analysis of library collections. The evaluation process has produced feedback that suggests ways to significantly improve starfield interfaces and the interaction process to improve their learnability and usability. The study also gave us clear indication of additional potential uses of starfield visualizations that can be exploited by further functionality and interface development. We report on resulting implications for the design and use of starfield visualizations that will impact their graphical interface features, their use for managing data quality and their potential for various forms of visual data mining. Although the current implementation and analysis focuses on the collection of a physical library, the most important contributions of our work will be in digital libraries, in which volume, complexity and dynamism of collections are increasing dramatically and tools are needed for visualization and analysis.

  3. Effect of visual experience on tubulin synthesis during a critical period of visual cortex development in the hooded rat.

    PubMed

    Cronly-Dillon, J; Perry, G W

    1979-08-01

    1. In some species, restriction of visual experience in early life may affect normal functional development of visual cortical cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine if visual deprivation during post-natal development in the hooded rat also affects the production in brain cells of certain molecular components such as tubulin, that are needed for growth and maintenance of synapses and neurites. 2. Norwegian black hooded rats were reared under a variety of conditions of visual deprivation. At various stages of development the animals were killed and the rate of synthesis of tubulin in visual and motor cortex determined. Tritiated colchicine was used to assay tubulin and L-[14C]leucine injected into the brain ventricles 2 hr before death was used to measure rate of tubulin synthesis. 3. In rats reared in normal light there is a marked elevation in visual cortex tubulin synthesis that spans the period from eye-opening (13 days) until approximately 35 days. This elevation in tubulin synthesis is absent in animals reared in darkness from birth or deprived of pattern vision by eyelid suture. Also the effect of visual deprivation on tubulin synthesis was specifically confined to visual cortex and was not found for the motor cortex. Similarly, the incorporation of L-[14C]leucine into total protein in visual cortex was unaffected by dark rearing. Hence the stimulation of tubulin synthesis by visual experience in rat visual cortex is not attributable to a general non-specific stimulation of protein synthesis. 4. Rats that were dark-reared from birth and then exposed to a lighted environment for 24 hr during a certain critical period that extends from eye-opening (13 days) until approximately 35 days, displayed a significant increase in visual cortex tubulin rats that were brought into the light later than 35 days showed no significant increase in tubulin synthesis when compared with their continuously dark-rearer controls. 5. It is suggested that the number

  4. How Can Visual Experience Be Depicted? A Study of Close-Up Double Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, James; Pepperell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The attempt to record visual experience has been of central importance to many artists throughout the history of art. Vision itself is made up of many processes, both psychological and physiological, and is still only partially understood. This paper presents research into an aspect of visual experience descried as "close-up double…

  5. Using Visual Literacy to Teach Science Academic Language: Experiences from Three Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly-Jackson, Charlease; Delacruz, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    This original pedagogical study captured three preservice teachers' experiences using visual literacy strategies as an approach to teaching English language learners (ELLs) science academic language. The following research questions guided this study: (1) What are the experiences of preservice teachers' use of visual literacy to teach science…

  6. Visual Experience Influences 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Goal-Directed Actions of Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Kawakita, Yuka; Okanda, Mako; Takeshita, Hideko

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether infants' own visual experiences affected their perception of the visual status of others engaging in goal-directed actions. In Experiment 1, infants viewed video clips of successful and failed goal-directed actions performed by a blindfolded adult, with half the infants having previously experienced…

  7. Conversational Pedagogy: Exploring Interactions between a Teaching Artist and Young Learners during Visual Arts Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhoff, Angela

    2013-01-01

    In many early childhood classrooms, visual arts experiences occur around a communal arts table. A shared workspace allows for spontaneous conversation and exploration of the art-making process of peers and teachers. In this setting, conversation can play an important role in visual arts experiences as children explore new media, skills, and ideas.…

  8. Visual experience regulates gene expression in the developing striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Neve, R L; Bear, M F

    1989-06-01

    We have examined the regulation of expression of the genes for the neuronal growth-associated protein GAP43, the type II calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and glutamic acid decarboxylase in the kitten visual cortex during normal postnatal development and after a period of visual deprivation. We find that the mRNA transcripts of these genes display very different patterns of normal development but are all increased in the visual cortex of animals reared in the dark. Upon exposure to light, the transcript of the GAP43 gene drops to near-normal levels within 12 hr.

  9. Experiences in using DISCUS for visualizing human communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groehn, Matti; Nieminen, Marko; Haho, Paeivi; Smeds, Riitta

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we present further improvement to the DISCUS software that can be used to record and analyze the flow and constants of business process simulation session discussion. The tool was initially introduced in 'visual data exploration and analysis IV' conference. The initial features of the tool enabled the visualization of discussion flow in business process simulation sessions and the creation of SOM analyses. The improvements of the tool consists of additional visualization possibilities that enable quick on-line analyses and improved graphical statistics. We have also created the very first interface to audio data and implemented two ways to visualize it. We also outline additional possibilities to use the tool in other application areas: these include usability testing and the possibility to use the tool for capturing design rationale in a product development process. The data gathered with DISCUS may be used in other applications, and further work may be done with data ming techniques.

  10. Imaging mass spectrometry visualizes ceramides and the pathogenesis of dorfman-chanarin syndrome due to ceramide metabolic abnormality in the skin.

    PubMed

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Kimiko; Holleran, Walter M; Sano, Shigetoshi; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a useful cutting edge technology used to investigate the distribution of biomolecules such as drugs and metabolites, as well as to identify molecular species in tissues and cells without labeling. To protect against excess water loss that is essential for survival in a terrestrial environment, mammalian skin possesses a competent permeability barrier in the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis. The key lipids constituting this barrier in the SC are the ceramides (Cers) comprising of a heterogeneous molecular species. Alterations in Cer composition have been reported in several skin diseases that display abnormalities in the epidermal permeability barrier function. Not only the amounts of different Cers, but also their localizations are critical for the barrier function. We have employed our new imaging system, capable of high-lateral-resolution IMS with an atmospheric-pressure ionization source, to directly visualize the distribution of Cers. Moreover, we show an ichthyotic disease pathogenesis due to abnormal Cer metabolism in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, a neutral lipid storage disorder with ichthyosis in human skin, demonstrating that IMS is a novel diagnostic approach for assessing lipid abnormalities in clinical setting, as well as for investigating physiological roles of lipids in cells/tissues.

  11. How personal experiences feature in women's accounts of use of information for decisions about antenatal diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    France, Emma F; Wyke, Sally; Ziebland, Sue; Entwistle, Vikki A; Hunt, Kate

    2011-03-01

    There has been a striking growth in the availability of health-related information based on personal experience in recent years and internet users are often drawn towards other people's stories about their health. Accounts of other people's experiences might convey social and emotional information that is not otherwise available but little is known about how it is used or the implications of its use in practice. This paper examines how people refer to information about other people's experiences when accounting for decisions about antenatal diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality. We conducted a secondary analysis of 37 qualitative interviews undertaken across the UK with 36 women and nine of their male partners (eight couples were interviewed together) who talked about diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality in 55 pregnancies. When describing their decisions, respondents referred to examples of knowledge gleaned from their own and other individuals' experiences as well as information based on biomedical or clinical-epidemiological research (usually about the probabilities of having a child affected by health problems or the probability of diagnostic tests causing miscarriage). Both forms of knowledge were employed in people's accounts to illustrate the legitimacy and internal coherence of decisions taken. The analysis demonstrates the personally idiosyncratic ways that people reflect on and incorporate different types of information to add meaning to abstract ideas about risk, to imagine the consequences for their own lives and to help them to make sense of the decisions they faced.

  12. Reversal of visual discrimination and visual acute extinction in cats with poor or limited early visual experience.

    PubMed

    Zernicki, B

    1997-01-01

    Transformation of visual instrumental conditioned reflexes rewarded with food was compared in cats binocularly deprived of pattern vision in the early period of life (BD cats), control cats reared also in the laboratory but with open eyes (C cats) and cats reared in normal environment (N cats). In Expt. I the cats were given 4 sequential reversal trainings of cross vs. disc discrimination and in Expt. II a response to a gate marked with a cross or a disc was submitted to 4 sequential acute extinctions and restorations. The results show that both visual deprivation and rearing in monotonous laboratory environment moderately affect transformation of associations between visual stimuli and hunger drive and instrumental responses. However, in BD cats transformation learning is less impaired than previously studied visual discrimination learning.

  13. Patterns of visual sensory and sensorimotor abnormalities in autism vary in relation to history of early language delay.

    PubMed

    Takarae, Yukari; Luna, Beatriz; Minshew, Nancy J; Sweeney, John A

    2008-11-01

    Visual motion perception and pursuit eye movement deficits have been reported in autism. However, it is unclear whether these impairments are related to each other or to clinical symptoms of the disorder. High-functioning individuals with autism (41 with and 36 without delayed language acquisition) and 46 control subjects participated in the present study. All three subject groups were matched on chronological age and Full-Scale IQ. The autism group with delayed language acquisition had bilateral impairments on visual motion discrimination tasks, whereas the autism group without delay showed marginal impairments only in the left hemifield. Both autism groups showed difficulty tracking visual targets, but only the autism group without delayed language acquisition showed increased pursuit latencies and a failure to show the typical rightward directional advantage in pursuit. We observed correlations between performance on the visual perception and pursuit tasks in both autism groups. However, pursuit performance was correlated with manual motor skills only in the autism group with delayed language, suggesting that general sensorimotor or motor disturbances are a significant additional factor related to pursuit deficits in this subgroup. These findings suggest that there may be distinct neurocognitive phenotypes in autism associated with patterns of early language development.

  14. Visual Experience Shapes Orthographic Representations in the Visual Word Form Area

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Heinz; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Richlan, Fabio; Kronbichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Current neurocognitive research suggests that the efficiency of visual word recognition rests on abstract memory representations of written letters and words stored in the visual word form area (VWFA) in the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex. These representations are assumed to be invariant to visual characteristics such as font and case. In the present functional MRI study, we tested this assumption by presenting written words and varying the case format of the initial letter of German nouns (which are always capitalized) as well as German adjectives and adverbs (both usually in lowercase). As evident from a Word Type × Case Format interaction, activation in the VWFA was greater to words presented in unfamiliar case formats relative to familiar case formats. Our results suggest that neural representations of written words in the VWFA are not fully abstract and still contain information about the visual format in which words are most frequently perceived. PMID:27435995

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  16. The Dynamic Discourse of Visual Literacy in Experience Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Search, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, people have used perspectives of space and time to define a sense of place and personal identity. Western cultures interpret place and time as static entities. In interactive multimedia computing, visual literacy defines new dimensions in communication that are reshaping traditional Western concepts of place and time. Experience…

  17. Our Experiences with Using Visualization Tools in Teaching Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalczyk, Robert E.; Hausknecht, Adam O.

    This paper describes two uses of the software package TEMATH (Tools for Exploring Mathematics) with calculus students: (1) as a demonstration tool in the classroom to visually explore with students the many mathematical models introduced in a first year calculus course; and (2) as a part of a lab where students use a set of laboratory explorations…

  18. Varieties of Visual Experience; Art as Image and Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke, Ed.

    Beginning with a discussion of the functions of art, the author traces the various connections between visual forms and the personal, social, and physical dimensions of everyday life. These are examined in the light of the impact art has on psychological expression, social description, the communication of ideology, the design of useful objects,…

  19. Abnormal development of sensory-motor, visual temporal and parahippocampal cortex in children with learning disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Ricci, Cristian; Baglio, Gisella; Lipari, Susanna; Griffanti, Ludovica; Preti, Maria G; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Zanette, Michela; Blasi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is a condition characterized by an intelligence quotient (IQ) between 70 and 85. BIF children present with cognitive, motor, social, and adaptive limitations that result in learning disabilities and are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate brain morphometry and its relation to IQ level in BIF children. Thirteen children with BIF and 14 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. All children underwent a full IQ assessment (WISC-III scale) and a magnetic resonance (MR) examination including conventional sequences to assess brain structural abnormalities and high resolution 3D images for voxel-based morphometry analysis. To investigate to what extent the group influenced gray matter (GM) volumes, both univariate and multivariate generalized linear model analysis of variance were used, and the varimax factor analysis was used to explore variable correlations and clusters among subjects. Results showed that BIF children, compared to controls have increased regional GM volume in bilateral sensorimotor and right posterior temporal cortices and decreased GM volume in the right parahippocampal gyrus. GM volumes were highly correlated with IQ indices. The present work is a case study of a group of BIF children showing that BIF is associated with abnormal cortical development in brain areas that have a pivotal role in motor, learning, and behavioral processes. Our findings, although allowing for little generalization to the general population, contribute to the very limited knowledge in this field. Future longitudinal MR studies will be useful in verifying whether cortical features can be modified over time even in association with rehabilitative intervention.

  20. 'Visual’ parsing can be taught quickly without visual experience during critical periods

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Lior; Amedi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Cases of invasive sight-restoration in congenital blind adults demonstrated that acquiring visual abilities is extremely challenging, presumably because visual-experience during critical-periods is crucial for learning visual-unique concepts (e.g. size constancy). Visual rehabilitation can also be achieved using sensory-substitution-devices (SSDs) which convey visual information non-invasively through sounds. We tested whether one critical concept – visual parsing, which is highly-impaired in sight-restored patients – can be learned using SSD. To this end, congenitally blind adults participated in a unique, relatively short (~70 hours), SSD-‘vision’ training. Following this, participants successfully parsed 2D and 3D visual objects. Control individuals naïve to SSDs demonstrated that while some aspects of parsing with SSD are intuitive, the blind’s success could not be attributed to auditory processing alone. Furthermore, we had a unique opportunity to compare the SSD-users’ abilities to those reported for sight-restored patients who performed similar tasks visually, and who had months of eyesight. Intriguingly, the SSD-users outperformed the patients on most criteria tested. These suggest that with adequate training and technologies, key high-order visual features can be quickly acquired in adulthood, and lack of visual-experience during critical-periods can be somewhat compensated for. Practically, these highlight the potential of SSDs as standalone-aids or combined with invasive restoration approaches. PMID:26482105

  1. A Quantitative Analysis of the Work Experiences of Adults with Visual Impairments in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolffe, Karen E.; Ajuwon, Paul M.; Kelly, Stacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Worldwide, people with visual impairments often struggle to gain employment. This study attempts to closely evaluate the work experiences of employed individuals with visual impairments living in one of the world's most populous developing nations, Nigeria. Methods: The researchers developed a questionnaire that assessed personal and…

  2. High resolution renderings and interactive visualization of the 2006 Huntington Beach experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, T.; Nayak, A.; Keen, C.; Samilo, D.; Matthews, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Visualization Center at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography investigates innovative ways to represent graphically interactive 3D virtual landscapes and to produce high resolution, high quality renderings of Earth sciences data and the sensors and instruments used to collect the data . Among the Visualization Center's most recent work is the visualization of the Huntington Beach experiment, a study launched in July 2006 by the Southern California Ocean Observing System (http://www.sccoos.org/) to record and synthesize data of the Huntington Beach coastal region. Researchers and students at the Visualization Center created visual presentations that combine bathymetric data provided by SCCOOS with USGS aerial photography and with 3D polygonal models of sensors created in Maya into an interactive 3D scene using the Fledermaus suite of visualization tools (http://www.ivs3d.com). In addition, the Visualization Center has produced high definition (HD) animations of SCCOOS sensor instruments (e.g. REMUS, drifters, spray glider, nearshore mooring, OCSD/USGS mooring and CDIP mooring) using the Maya modeling and animation software and rendered over multiple nodes of the OptIPuter Visualization Cluster at Scripps. These visualizations are aimed at providing researchers with a broader context of sensor locations relative to geologic characteristics, to promote their use as an educational resource for informal education settings and increasing public awareness, and also as an aid for researchers' proposals and presentations. These visualizations are available for download on the Visualization Center website at http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/sccoos/hb2006.php.

  3. Visual experience regulates Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 expression in developing rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Grabert, J; Wahle, P

    2009-01-23

    Among the GABAergic neocortical interneurons, parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking (FS) basket cells are essential mediators of feed-forward inhibition, network synchrony and oscillations, and timing of the critical period for sensory plasticity. The FS phenotype matures after birth. It depends on the expression of the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1b/3.2 which mediate the fast membrane repolarization necessary for firing fast action potentials at high frequencies. We have now tested in rat visual cortex if visual deprivation affects the Kv3 expression. During normal development, Kv3.1b/3.2 mRNA and protein expression increased in rat visual cortex reaching adult levels around P20. Dark rearing from birth neither prevented nor delayed the upregulation. Rather unexpectedly, the expression of Kv3.1b protein and Kv3.2 mRNA and protein increased to higher levels from the third postnatal week onwards. Triple-labeling revealed that in dark-reared visual cortex Kv3.2 was upregulated in parvalbuminergic interneurons in supragranular layers which in normal animals rarely display Kv3.2 expression. Recovery from dark rearing normalized Kv3.2 expression. This showed that visual experience influences the Kv3 expression. The results suggest that an altered expression of Kv3 channels affects the functional properties of FS neurons, and may contribute to the deficits in inhibition observed in the sensory-deprived cortex.

  4. Real-Time Strategy Video Game Experience and Visual Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Hye-Jin; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo

    2015-07-22

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is defined as long-term improvement in performance on a visual-perception task after visual experiences or training. Early studies have found that VPL is highly specific for the trained feature and location, suggesting that VPL is associated with changes in the early visual cortex. However, the generality of visual skills enhancement attributable to action video-game experience suggests that VPL can result from improvement in higher cognitive skills. If so, experience in real-time strategy (RTS) video-game play, which may heavily involve cognitive skills, may also facilitate VPL. To test this hypothesis, we compared VPL between RTS video-game players (VGPs) and non-VGPs (NVGPs) and elucidated underlying structural and functional neural mechanisms. Healthy young human subjects underwent six training sessions on a texture discrimination task. Diffusion-tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed before and after training. VGPs performed better than NVGPs in the early phase of training. White-matter connectivity between the right external capsule and visual cortex and neuronal activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were greater in VGPs than NVGPs and were significantly correlated with RTS video-game experience. In both VGPs and NVGPs, there was task-related neuronal activity in the right IFG, ACC, and striatum, which was strengthened after training. These results indicate that RTS video-game experience, associated with changes in higher-order cognitive functions and connectivity between visual and cognitive areas, facilitates VPL in early phases of training. The results support the hypothesis that VPL can occur without involvement of only visual areas. Significance statement: Although early studies found that visual perceptual learning (VPL) is associated with involvement of the visual cortex, generality of visual skills enhancement by action video-game experience

  5. Greater default-mode network abnormalities compared to high order visual processing systems in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: an integrated multi-modal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M; Rami, Lorena; Bargalló, Núria; Junqué, Carme; Molinuevo, José-Luis; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an integrated multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study based on functional MRI (fMRI) data during a complex but cognitively preserved visual task in 15 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI) patients and 15 Healthy Elders (HE). Independent Component Analysis of fMRI data identified a functional network containing an Activation Task Related Pattern (ATRP), including regions of the dorsal and ventral visual stream, and a Deactivation Task Related Pattern network (DTRP), with high spatial correspondence with the default-mode network (DMN). Gray matter (GM) volumes of the underlying ATRP and DTRP cortical areas were measured, and probabilistic tractography (based on diffusion MRI) identified fiber pathways within each functional network. For the ATRP network, a-MCI patients exhibited increased fMRI responses in inferior-ventral visual areas, possibly reflecting compensatory activations for more compromised dorsal regions. However, no significant GM or white matter group differences were observed within the ATRP network. For the DTRP/DMN, a-MCI showed deactivation deficits and reduced GM volumes in the posterior cingulate/precuneus, excessive deactivations in the inferior parietal lobe, and less fiber tract integrity in the cingulate bundles. Task performance correlated with DTRP-functionality in the HE group. Besides allowing the identification of functional reorganizations in the cortical network directly processing the task-stimuli, these findings highlight the importance of conducting integrated multi-modal MRI studies in MCI based on spared cognitive domains in order to identify functional abnormalities in critical areas of the DMN and their precise anatomical substrates. These latter findings may reflect early neuroimaging biomarkers in dementia.

  6. Seeing the World Dimly: The Impact of Early Visual Deficits on Visual Experience in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kantrowitz, Joshua T.; Butler, Pamela D.; Schecter, Isaac; Silipo, Gail; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in early visual processing are well documented in schizophrenia, using methods such as contrast sensitivity. Higher, integrative stages of functioning, such as susceptibility to visual illusions, have been evaluated less extensively. For example, patients show increased susceptibility to (ie, are more easily affected by) the Muller-Lyer illusion but decreased susceptibility (ie, are less easily affected by) to stereopsis based upon binocular disparity. The basis for pattern of illusion response and interaction between sensory and integrative stages of processing, however, is unclear. We tested a group of 38 patients and 28 control subjects in contrast sensitivity, the Muller-Lyer and Poggendorff illusions, as well as a subgroup in stereopsis and the Ponzo illusion, Sander parallelogram, and Hermann grid illusions. We predicted that patients would be more susceptible to tests that become more apparent with increased contrast (Muller-Lyer illusion), less susceptible to tests that become less apparent with increased contrast (stereopsis, Ponzo illusion, Hermann grid), and equally susceptible to contrast-insensitive tests (Poggendorff illusion). Additionally, the Hermann grid was tested at varying levels of contrast. Patients demonstrated significant deficits in contrast sensitivity, especially to brief, low spatial frequency stimuli, and the predicted differential response to the tested illusions. Additionally, poor performance on stereopsis and the Hermann grid significantly correlated with decreased contrast sensitivity (all P’s <.01). Muller-Lyer illusion and stereopsis performance were also inversely related (P < .01). This study replicates and expands upon previous findings with visual illusions. Our results offer a unifying explanation for disparate studies and suggest that deficits in early sensory gain affect subsequent integrative processes. PMID:19793795

  7. Detection, visualization and animation of abnormal anatomic structure with a deformable probabilistic brain atlas based on random vector field transformations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P M; Toga, A W

    1997-09-01

    probability maps are animated in video format (on the accompanying CD-ROM). Applications of the deformable probabilistic atlas include the transfer of multi-subject 3-D functional, vascular and histologic maps onto a single anatomic template, the mapping of 3-D atlases onto the scans of new subjects, and the rapid detection, quantification and mapping of local shape changes in 3-D medical images in disease and during normal or abnormal growth and development.

  8. TallyHO obese female mice experience poor reproductive outcomes and abnormal blastocyst metabolism which is reversed by metformin

    PubMed Central

    Louden, Erica D.; Luzzo, Kerri M.; Jimenez, Patricia T.; Chi, Tiffany; Chi, Maggie; Moley, Kelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obese women experience worse reproductive outcomes compared to normal weight women, specifically infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal malformations and developmental delay. The objective of this study was to use a genetic mouse model of obesity in order to recapitulate the human reproductive phenotype and further examine potential mechanisms and therapies. Methods New inbred, polygenic Type 2 diabetic TallyHO mice and age matched control C57BL/6 mice were superovulated to obtain morulae or blastocysts stage embryos which were cultured in human tubal fluid media. Deoxyglucose uptake was performed on insulin-stimulated individual blastocysts. Apoptosis was detected by confocal microscopy using TUNEL assay and Topro-3 nuclear dye. Embryos were scored for %TUNEL positive/total nuclei. AMPK activation, TNFα expression, and adiponectin expression were analyzed by western immunoblot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. Lipid accumulation was assayed by Bodipy. Finally all measured parameters were compared between TallyHO mice in morulaes cultured to blastocyst embryos in either human tubal fluid (HTF) media or HTF with 25ug/ml metformin added. Results TallyHo mice developed whole body abnormal insulin tolerance, decreased litter number and increased NEFA. Blastocysts demonstrated increased apoptosis, decreased insulin sensitivity, and decreased activation of AMP activated protein-kinase (AMPK). As a possible cause of the insulin resistance/abnormal P-AMPK, we found that Tumor necrosis Factor (TNFα) expression and lipid accumulation as detected by BODIPY were increased in TallyHO blastocysts and adiponectin was decreased. Culturing TallyHO morulae with the AMPK activator, metformin lead to a reversal of all abnormal findings, including increased p-AMPK, improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and normalization of lipid accumulation. Conclusions Women with obesity and insulin resistance experience poor pregnancy outcomes. Previously we have shown in mouse

  9. Prior Visual Experience Modulates Learning of Sound Localization Among Blind Individuals.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Chan, Chetwyn C H; Luo, Yue-Jia; Li, Jian-Jun; Ting, Kin-Hung; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Wang, Jun; Lee, Tatia M C

    2017-02-04

    Cross-modal learning requires the use of information from different sensory modalities. This study investigated how the prior visual experience of late blind individuals could modulate neural processes associated with learning of sound localization. Learning was realized by standardized training on sound localization processing, and experience was investigated by comparing brain activations elicited from a sound localization task in individuals with (late blind, LB) and without (early blind, EB) prior visual experience. After the training, EB showed decreased activation in the precuneus, which was functionally connected to a limbic-multisensory network. In contrast, LB showed the increased activation of the precuneus. A subgroup of LB participants who demonstrated higher visuospatial working memory capabilities (LB-HVM) exhibited an enhanced precuneus-lingual gyrus network. This differential connectivity suggests that visuospatial working memory due to the prior visual experience gained via LB-HVM enhanced learning of sound localization. Active visuospatial navigation processes could have occurred in LB-HVM compared to the retrieval of previously bound information from long-term memory for EB. The precuneus appears to play a crucial role in learning of sound localization, disregarding prior visual experience. Prior visual experience, however, could enhance cross-modal learning by extending binding to the integration of unprocessed information, mediated by the cognitive functions that these experiences develop.

  10. The role of visual deprivation and experience on the performance of sensory substitution devices.

    PubMed

    Stronks, H Christiaan; Nau, Amy C; Ibbotson, Michael R; Barnes, Nick

    2015-10-22

    It is commonly accepted that the blind can partially compensate for their loss of vision by developing enhanced abilities with their remaining senses. This visual compensation may be related to the fact that blind people rely on their other senses in everyday life. Many studies have indeed shown that experience plays an important role in visual compensation. Numerous neuroimaging studies have shown that the visual cortices of the blind are recruited by other functional brain areas and can become responsive to tactile or auditory input instead. These cross-modal plastic changes are more pronounced in the early blind compared to late blind individuals. The functional consequences of cross-modal plasticity on visual compensation in the blind are debated, as are the influences of various etiologies of vision loss (i.e., blindness acquired early or late in life). Distinguishing between the influences of experience and visual deprivation on compensation is especially relevant for rehabilitation of the blind with sensory substitution devices. The BrainPort artificial vision device and The vOICe are assistive devices for the blind that redirect visual information to another intact sensory system. Establishing how experience and different etiologies of vision loss affect the performance of these devices may help to improve existing rehabilitation strategies, formulate effective selection criteria and develop prognostic measures. In this review we will discuss studies that investigated the influence of training and visual deprivation on the performance of various sensory substitution approaches.

  11. Absence of visual experience modifies the neural basis of numerical thinking.

    PubMed

    Kanjlia, Shipra; Lane, Connor; Feigenson, Lisa; Bedny, Marina

    2016-10-04

    In humans, the ability to reason about mathematical quantities depends on a frontoparietal network that includes the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). How do nature and nurture give rise to the neurobiology of numerical cognition? We asked how visual experience shapes the neural basis of numerical thinking by studying numerical cognition in congenitally blind individuals. Blind (n = 17) and blindfolded sighted (n = 19) participants solved math equations that varied in difficulty (e.g., 27 - 12 = x vs. 7 - 2 = x), and performed a control sentence comprehension task while undergoing fMRI. Whole-cortex analyses revealed that in both blind and sighted participants, the IPS and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices were more active during the math task than the language task, and activity in the IPS increased parametrically with equation difficulty. Thus, the classic frontoparietal number network is preserved in the total absence of visual experience. However, surprisingly, blind but not sighted individuals additionally recruited a subset of early visual areas during symbolic math calculation. The functional profile of these "visual" regions was identical to that of the IPS in blind but not sighted individuals. Furthermore, in blindness, number-responsive visual cortices exhibited increased functional connectivity with prefrontal and IPS regions that process numbers. We conclude that the frontoparietal number network develops independently of visual experience. In blindness, this number network colonizes parts of deafferented visual cortex. These results suggest that human cortex is highly functionally flexible early in life, and point to frontoparietal input as a mechanism of cross-modal plasticity in blindness.

  12. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence

  13. Visualization of Growth Curve Data from Phenotype MicroarrayExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Janet S.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-04-19

    Phenotype microarrays provide a technology to simultaneouslysurvey the response of an organism to nearly 2,000 substrates, includingcarbon, nitrogen and potassium sources; varying pH; varying saltconcentrations; and antibiotics. In order to more quickly and easily viewand compare the large number of growth curves produced by phenotypemicroarray experiments, we have developed software to produce and displaycolor images, each of which corresponds to a set of 96 growth curves.Using color images to represent growth curves data has proven to be avaluable way to assess experiment quality, compare replicates, facilitatecomparison of the responses of different organisms, and identifysignificant phenotypes. The color images are linked to traditional plotsof growth versus time, as well as to information about the experiment,organism, and substrate. In order to share and view information and dataproject-wide, all information, plots, and data are accessible using onlya Web browser.

  14. Interior landscapes of mental disorder: visual representations of the experience of madness.

    PubMed

    Schoeneman, Thomas J; Henderson, Carly M; Weathers, Vaunne M

    2005-04-01

    The authors surveyed 38 textbooks of abnormal psychology and found 673 pictures of the inner experience of mental disorder. Textbook authors use these pictures to demonstrate diagnostic features of individuals and groups, to make a connection between mental disorder and artistic talent, and to suggest what it is like to experience mental disorder. To fulfill these functions, many of the pictures in the sample use the incongruities and distortions of expressionist, surrealist, and naive techniques.

  15. Leading and Learning as a Transcultural Experience: A Visual Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schratz, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Leaving one's own territory in research by taking part in an international project is like learning a new language: it's not just learning a new vocabulary and grammar, but is a total human experience which is best learnt in everyday activity. Social scientists like Jean Lave argued that "knowledge-in-practice, constituted in the settings of…

  16. What Do We See?: Extending Understanding of Visual Experience in the Art Therapy Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Visual experience and meaning making in art therapy constitute more than looking at the image created. Clients and therapists utilize the environment of therapy in ways that have been hitherto unrecognized. This article presents a key finding from an art-based study of the experience of the art therapy room from the perspectives of client and…

  17. The Impact of a Visual Imagery Intervention on Army ROTC Cadets' Marksmanship Performance and Flow Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakes, Edward Lee

    2012-01-01

    This investigation used an experimental design to examine how a visual imagery intervention and two levels of challenge would affect the flow experiences and performance of cadets engaged in Army ROTC marksmanship training. I employed MANCOVA analyses, with gender and prior marksmanship training experience as covariates, to assess cadets' (n =…

  18. Designing, Visualizing, and Discussing Algorithms within a CS 1 Studio Experience: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundhausen, Christopher D.; Brown, Jonathan L.

    2008-01-01

    Within the context of an introductory CS1 unit on algorithmic problem-solving, we are exploring the pedagogical value of a novel active learning activity--the "studio experience"--that actively engages learners with algorithm visualization technology. In a studio experience, student pairs are tasked with (a) developing a solution to an algorithm…

  19. Feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for appendicitis in abnormal anatomical locations: A single surgeon's initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Sanoop K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is considered as a more technically demanding procedure than the standard laparoscopic surgery. Based on an initial and early experience, single-incision laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) was found to be technically advantageous for dealing with appendicitis in unusual anatomical locations. This study aims to highlight the technical advantages of single-incision laparoscopic surgery in dealing with the abnormally located appendixes and furthermore report a case of acute appendicitis occurring in a sub-gastric position, which is probably the first such case to be reported in English literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the first 10 cases of single-incision LA which were performed by a single surgeon is presented here. RESULTS: There were seven females and three males. The mean age of the patients was 30.6 (range 18–52) years, mean BMI was 22.7 (range 17–28) kg/m2 and the mean operative time was 85.5 (range 45–150) min. The mean postoperative stay was 3.6 (range 1–7) days. The commonest position of the appendix was retro-caecal (50%) followed by pelvic (30%). In three cases the appendix was found to be in abnormal locations namely sub-hepatic, sub-gastric and deep pelvic or para-vesical or para-rectal. All these cases could be managed with this technique without any conversions CONCLUSION: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery appears to be a feasible and safe technique for dealing with appendicitis in rare anatomical locations. Appendectomy may be a suitable procedure for the initial training in single-incision laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23626414

  20. Experiments at Scale with In-Situ Visualization Using ParaView/Catalyst in RAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Kares, Robert John

    2014-10-31

    In this paper I describe some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation on the Cielo supercomputer at Los Alamos. The detailed procedures for the creation of the visualizations using ParaView/Catalyst are discussed and several images sequences from the ICF simulation problem produced with the in-situ method are presented. My impressions and conclusions concerning the use of the in-situ visualization method in RAGE are discussed.

  1. Experience-dependent hemispheric specialization of letters and numbers is revealed in early visual processing.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonkoo; Chiang, Crystal; Brannon, Elizabeth M; Woldorff, Marty G

    2014-10-01

    Recent fMRI research has demonstrated that letters and numbers are preferentially processed in distinct regions and hemispheres in the visual cortex. In particular, the left visual cortex preferentially processes letters compared with numbers, whereas the right visual cortex preferentially processes numbers compared with letters. Because letters and numbers are cultural inventions and are otherwise physically arbitrary, such a double dissociation is strong evidence for experiential effects on neural architecture. Here, we use the high temporal resolution of ERPs to investigate the temporal dynamics of the neural dissociation between letters and numbers. We show that the divergence between ERP traces to letters and numbers emerges very early in processing. Letters evoked greater N1 waves (latencies 140-170 msec) than did numbers over left occipital channels, whereas numbers evoked greater N1s than letters over the right, suggesting letters and numbers are preferentially processed in opposite hemispheres early in visual encoding. Moreover, strings of letters, but not single letters, elicited greater P2 ERP waves (starting around 250 msec) than numbers did over the left hemisphere, suggesting that the visual cortex is tuned to selectively process combinations of letters, but not numbers, further along in the visual processing stream. Additionally, the processing of both of these culturally defined stimulus types differentiated from similar but unfamiliar visual stimulus forms (false fonts) even earlier in the processing stream (the P1 at 100 msec). These findings imply major cortical specialization processes within the visual system driven by experience with reading and mathematics.

  2. Mobility Experience of Persons with Visual Impairments in Indian Railway Station Environments.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Gaurav; Tyagi, Megha

    2016-01-01

    Mobility for persons with visual impairments in Indian railway stations poses multidimensional challenges for access to an inclusive travel experience. India is a home to about twenty million persons with diverse disabilities out of which about five million are persons with visual impairments. Diversity of passenger movements on a railway station including persons with visual impairments requires a Universal Design approach to respond to the accessibility issues in these contexts. This research study is based on a series of live on-site experiences conducted along with persons with visual impairments at New Delhi Railway Station. It also includes the generic studies carried out with other diversities of railway passengers including aging, gender and diverse physical abilities. It employs research methods like ethnography, focus group interactions and trace study to develop a deeper understanding of human and spatial parameters of mobility in railway station environments. A Universal Design perspective with a holistic understanding remains critical to the foundation of this research study. While it deals in specific requirements of persons with visual impairments, it also brings an illustration of handling diversity on a railway station from a unique Indian perspective. It concludes by highlighting and reinterpreting the Universal Design India Principles integrating the needs of persons with visual impairments in railway station environments. Brief recommendation for an inclusive mobility experience on railway station forms a vital part of this grounded research study.

  3. Focus of attention in systems for visual monitoring of experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, G. E.; Martin, W. N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of designing a computerized experiment monitoring system for use in a space station or elsewhere is examined. It is shown that the essential challenge of such a system - attaining a reasonable expected running time - can be attacked using the concept of focus of attention and by exploiting parallelism. The use of the Contract Net Protocol for the latter purpose is discussed. The use of ideas from information science to help focus a programs's efforts on those computations likely to bring results is addressed, and the incorporation of those ideas into a design in order to aid the system in deciding upon the best course of action is considered.

  4. Seeing The "New Forest": A Visual Curricular Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, Pariss Nicola

    In contemporary Western contexts, human interaction with and interpretation of nature is a perpetually mediated process. Understandings and engagements with natural environments are informed by and often overlaid with meanings derived from representations. In other words, representations help constitute human relationships with nature. Thus learning how representations shape human understandings and experiences of nature and the resulting social, political, and ecological impact of these mediated relationships has emerged as an important field of inquiry within environmental education. This dissertation examines how a critical, self-reflexive act of looking at photographs can challenge an individual's concepts of nature/culture, real/imaginary, and self/other. The project engages in a curricular experiment where the researcher explores how photography meditates her abstract and embodied understandings of specific natural environments. A critical, self-reflexive approach to aesthetic engagement with photographs moves beyond simply deciphering or decoding representations; it incorporates the learner's own narrative and embodied responses to the photographic representations being explored. This approach also recognizes that pedagogy has a transformative effect; both the learner and the representations being explored are transformed through the process of engagement. In this dissertation, a selection of iconic photographs of Canadian tree planting from the collection of the National Gallery of Canada are looked at: Lorraine Gilbert's (1987-2004) series "Shaping the New Forest" and Sarah Anne Johnson's (2005) work "The Tree Planting Project." The aim of this project is twofold: to unravel how these photographs construct and transform knowledge of and relationships with the environment in Canada, and to demonstrate a model of environmental inquiry that can be integrated into critical environmental education curricula.

  5. TallyHO obese female mice experience poor reproductive outcomes and abnormal blastocyst metabolism that is reversed by metformin.

    PubMed

    Louden, Erica D; Luzzo, Kerri M; Jimenez, Patricia T; Chi, Tiffany; Chi, Maggie; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-12-01

    Obese women experience worse reproductive outcomes than normal weight women, specifically infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal malformations and developmental delay of offspring. The aim of the present study was to use a genetic mouse model of obesity to recapitulate the human reproductive phenotype and further examine potential mechanisms and therapies. New inbred, polygenic Type 2 diabetic TallyHO mice and age-matched control C57BL/6 mice were superovulated to obtain morula or blastocyst stage embryos that were cultured in human tubal fluid (HTF) medium. Deoxyglucose uptake was determined for individual insulin-stimulated blastocysts. Apoptosis was detected by confocal microscopy using the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay and Topro-3 nuclear dye. Embryos were scored for TUNEL-positive as a percentage of total nuclei. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression and adiponectin expression were analysed by western immunoblot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. Lipid accumulation was assayed by BODIPY. Comparisons were made between TallyHO morulae cultured to blastocyst embryos in either HTF medium or HTF medium with 25 μg mL(-1) metformin. TallyHO mice developed whole body abnormal insulin tolerance, had decreased litter sizes and increased non-esterified fatty acid levels. Blastocysts from TallyHO mice exhibited increased apoptosis, decreased insulin sensitivity and decreased AMPK. A possible cause for the insulin resistance and abnormal AMPK phosphorylation was the increased TNF-α expression and lipid accumulation, as detected by BODIPY, in TallyHO blastocysts and decreased adiponectin. Culturing TallyHO morulae with the AMPK activator metformin led to a reversal of all the abnormal findings, including increased AMPK phosphorylation, improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and normalisation of lipid accumulation. Women with obesity and

  6. The effect of visual experience on the development of functional architecture in hMT+.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Emiliano; Vanello, Nicola; Sani, Lorenzo; Gentili, Claudio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Landini, Luigi; Guazzelli, Mario; Bicchi, Antonio; Haxby, James V; Pietrini, Pietro

    2007-12-01

    We investigated whether the visual hMT+ cortex plays a role in supramodal representation of sensory flow, not mediated by visual mental imagery. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural activity in sighted and congenitally blind individuals during passive perception of optic and tactile flows. Visual motion-responsive cortex, including hMT+, was identified in the lateral occipital and inferior temporal cortices of the sighted subjects by response to optic flow. Tactile flow perception in sighted subjects activated the more anterior part of these cortical regions but deactivated the more posterior part. By contrast, perception of tactile flow in blind subjects activated the full extent, including the more posterior part. These results demonstrate that activation of hMT+ and surrounding cortex by tactile flow is not mediated by visual mental imagery and that the functional organization of hMT+ can develop to subserve tactile flow perception in the absence of any visual experience. Moreover, visual experience leads to a segregation of the motion-responsive occipitotemporal cortex into an anterior subregion involved in the representation of both optic and tactile flows and a posterior subregion that processes optic flow only.

  7. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  8. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  9. Cortical activation during Braille reading is influenced by early visual experience in subjects with severe visual disability: a correlational fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Melzer, P; Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Price, R R; Wall, R S; Ebner, F F

    2001-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed on blind adults resting and reading Braille. The strongest activation was found in primary somatic sensory/motor cortex on both cortical hemispheres. Additional foci of activation were situated in the parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes where visual information is processed in sighted persons. The regions were differentiated most in the correlation of their time courses of activation with resting and reading. Differences in magnitude and expanse of activation were substantially less significant. Among the traditionally visual areas, the strength of correlation was greatest in posterior parietal cortex and moderate in occipitotemporal, lateral occipital, and primary visual cortex. It was low in secondary visual cortex as well as in dorsal and ventral inferior temporal cortex and posterior middle temporal cortex. Visual experience increased the strength of correlation in all regions except dorsal inferior temporal and posterior parietal cortex. The greatest statistically significant increase, i.e., approximately 30%, was in ventral inferior temporal and posterior middle temporal cortex. In these regions, words are analyzed semantically, which may be facilitated by visual experience. In contrast, visual experience resulted in a slight, insignificant diminution of the strength of correlation in dorsal inferior temporal cortex where language is analyzed phonetically. These findings affirm that posterior temporal regions are engaged in the processing of written language. Moreover, they suggest that this function is modified by early visual experience. Furthermore, visual experience significantly strengthened the correlation of activation and Braille reading in occipital regions traditionally involved in the processing of visual features and object recognition suggesting a role for visual imagery.

  10. The lived experience of visual creative expression for young adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Green, A R; Young, R A

    2015-09-01

    Engaging in visual creative expression individually and in a therapeutic setting can be a beneficial experience for cancer survivors; however, most research in this field has been conducted with older adults. The current study aimed to address this gap by utilising van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenology to answer the following question: 'What is the lived experience and meaning of visual creative expression for young adult cancer survivors?' Seven young adults, diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 18 and 35, were interviewed about creative expression experiences, which they engaged in individually and/or in a therapeutic setting. Data analysis included a thematic reflection, guided existential reflection, and a process of writing and rewriting. Two superordinate themes were identified: increased self-understanding and a healing experience. Seven subthemes were also identified and included the following: being in the flow, allowing the body to express itself, renegotiating control, changing one's environment, being seen, respect for art as a separate entity and giving back. Findings suggest that visual creative expression can be a meaningful experience for young adult cancer survivors, and that this experience espouses both similarities and differences from experiences of older adult survivors. Recommendations are made for future research, in addition to implications for practitioners.

  11. Personal experience with narrated events modulates functional connectivity within visual and motor systems during story comprehension.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ho Ming; Mar, Raymond A; Xu, Yisheng; Liu, Siyuan; Wagage, Suraji; Braun, Allen R

    2015-04-01

    Past experience of everyday life activities, which forms the basis of our knowledge about the world, greatly affects how we understand stories. Yet, little is known about how this influence is instantiated in the human brain. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how past experience facilitates functional connectivity during the comprehension of stories rich in perceptual and motor details. We found that comprehenders' past experience with the scenes and actions described in the narratives selectively modulated functional connectivity between lower- and higher-level areas within the neural systems for visual and motor processing, respectively. These intramodal interactions may play an important role in integrating personal knowledge about a narrated situation with an evolving discourse representation. This study provides empirical evidence consistent with the idea that regions related to visual and motor processing are involved in the reenactment of experience as proposed by theories of embodied cognition.

  12. Layered Worlds: A Metaphor of Time, Visualizing the Experience of Alzheimer's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Ann M.

    This paper describes an exhibit, "Layered Worlds: The Look of Alzheimer's," which uses photography as the medium to interpret Alzheimer's disease visually. The goal was not to photograph the victims of the disease, but to interpret the experience of Alzheimer's for the patient, family members, and caregivers. The metaphor of layers was…

  13. Braille and Tactile Graphics: Youths with Visual Impairments Share Their Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, L. Penny; Herzberg, Tina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Data were collected from youths with visual impairment about their experiences with tactile graphics and braille materials used in mathematics and science classes. Methods: Youths answered questions and explored four tactile graphics made using different production methods. They located specific information on each graphic and shared…

  14. Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments in Adoption of Digital Talking Textbooks: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussin, Ahamad

    2013-01-01

    Assistive technology devices have become essential tools for students with visual impairments. In 2009, the Malaysian Ministry of Education introduced Digital Talking Textbooks (DTTs) for selected subjects to facilitate learning. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, describe, and interpret the experiences of students with visual…

  15. Relative Roles of Experience/Learning and Visual Factors on Radiographic Inspector Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megling, Robert C.; Abrams, Macy L.

    The purpose of this research was to determine the relative roles of experience/learning and selected visual aptitude factors on the ability to detect and identify indications of defects in X-ray film of welds and other materials. Penetrameter Detection and Defect Identification Tests were developed to measure the ability of radiographic film…

  16. The Role of Visual Experience on the Representation and Updating of Novel Haptic Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Newell, Fiona N.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of visual experience on the spatial representation and updating of haptic scenes by comparing recognition performance across sighted, congenitally and late blind participants. We first established that spatial updating occurs in sighted individuals to haptic scenes of novel objects. All participants were required to…

  17. Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments in Adoption of Digital Talking Textbooks: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussin, Ahamad; Folkestad, James E.; Makela, Carole

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the experiences of Malaysian secondary students with visual impairments in using digital talking textbooks (DTTs) to assist their learning. Data were obtained from individual in-depth interviews. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to understand the findings and confirm the emergent…

  18. A Qualitatively Different Experience: Mainstreaming Pupils with a Visual Impairment in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Colette

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the experiences of special education needs co-ordinators (SENCOs) on the inclusion of pupils with a visual impairment (VI) in mainstream schools in Northern Ireland. A mixed method approach (postal questionnaire survey (n=113) and interviews (n=6)) was utilised to triangulate the findings. The results indicate an inverse…

  19. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  20. The Dynamics of Visual Art Dialogues: Experiences to Be Used in Hospital Settings with Visual Art Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Britt-Maj

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Given that hospitals have environmental enrichment with paintings and visual art arrangement, it would be meaningful to develop and document how hospital art could be used by health professionals. Methods. The study was undertaken at an art site in Sweden. During 1-hour sessions, participants (n = 20) get together in an art gallery every second week five times. Results. According to the participants a new value was perceived. From qualitative analyses, three themes appear: raise association, mentally present, and door-opener. In addition 72% of the participants reported makes me happy and gives energy and inspiration, and 52% reported that dialogues increase inspiration, make you involved, and stimulate curiosity. Conclusion. The present study supported the view that visual art dialogue could be used by health care professionals in a structured manner and that meaningful art stimulation, related to a person's experiences, could be of importance for the patients. Implementing art dialogues in hospital settings could be a fruitful working tool for nurses, a complementary manner of patient communication. PMID:22242200

  1. Effects of Fluoxetine and Visual Experience on Glutamatergic and GABAergic Synaptic Proteins in Adult Rat Visual Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Beshara, Simon; Beston, Brett R.; Pinto, Joshua G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fluoxetine has emerged as a novel treatment for persistent amblyopia because in adult animals it reinstates critical period-like ocular dominance plasticity and promotes recovery of visual acuity. Translation of these results from animal models to the clinic, however, has been challenging because of the lack of understanding of how this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor affects glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic mechanisms that are essential for experience-dependent plasticity. An appealing hypothesis is that fluoxetine recreates a critical period (CP)-like state by shifting synaptic mechanisms to be more juvenile. To test this we studied the effect of fluoxetine treatment in adult rats, alone or in combination with visual deprivation [monocular deprivation (MD)], on a set of highly conserved presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins (synapsin, synaptophysin, VGLUT1, VGAT, PSD-95, gephyrin, GluN1, GluA2, GluN2B, GluN2A, GABAAα1, GABAAα3). We did not find evidence that fluoxetine shifted the protein amounts or balances to a CP-like state. Instead, it drove the balances in favor of the more mature subunits (GluN2A, GABAAα1). In addition, when fluoxetine was paired with MD it created a neuroprotective-like environment by normalizing the glutamatergic gain found in adult MDs. Together, our results suggest that fluoxetine treatment creates a novel synaptic environment dominated by GluN2A- and GABAAα1-dependent plasticity. PMID:26730408

  2. Effects of Fluoxetine and Visual Experience on Glutamatergic and GABAergic Synaptic Proteins in Adult Rat Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Beshara, Simon; Beston, Brett R; Pinto, Joshua G A; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Fluoxetine has emerged as a novel treatment for persistent amblyopia because in adult animals it reinstates critical period-like ocular dominance plasticity and promotes recovery of visual acuity. Translation of these results from animal models to the clinic, however, has been challenging because of the lack of understanding of how this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor affects glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic mechanisms that are essential for experience-dependent plasticity. An appealing hypothesis is that fluoxetine recreates a critical period (CP)-like state by shifting synaptic mechanisms to be more juvenile. To test this we studied the effect of fluoxetine treatment in adult rats, alone or in combination with visual deprivation [monocular deprivation (MD)], on a set of highly conserved presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins (synapsin, synaptophysin, VGLUT1, VGAT, PSD-95, gephyrin, GluN1, GluA2, GluN2B, GluN2A, GABAAα1, GABAAα3). We did not find evidence that fluoxetine shifted the protein amounts or balances to a CP-like state. Instead, it drove the balances in favor of the more mature subunits (GluN2A, GABAAα1). In addition, when fluoxetine was paired with MD it created a neuroprotective-like environment by normalizing the glutamatergic gain found in adult MDs. Together, our results suggest that fluoxetine treatment creates a novel synaptic environment dominated by GluN2A- and GABAAα1-dependent plasticity.

  3. A specific requirement of Arc/Arg3.1 for visual experience-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity in mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Sossa, Kenneth; Song, Lihua; Errington, Lauren; Cummings, Laurel; Hwang, Hongik; Kuhl, Dietmar; Worley, Paul; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2010-05-26

    Visual experience scales down excitatory synapses in the superficial layers of visual cortex in a process that provides an in vivo paradigm of homeostatic synaptic scaling. Experience-induced increases in neural activity rapidly upregulates mRNAs of immediate early genes involved in synaptic plasticity, one of which is Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton protein or Arg3.1). Cell biological studies indicate that Arc/Arg3.1 protein functions to recruit endocytic machinery for AMPA receptor internalization, and this action, together with its activity-dependent expression, rationalizes a role for Arc/Arg3.1 in homeostatic synaptic scaling. Here, we investigated the role of Arc/Arg3.1 in homeostatic scaling in vivo by examining experience-dependent development of layer 2/3 neurons in the visual cortex of Arc/Arg3.1 knock-out (KO) mice. Arc/Arg3.1 KOs show minimal changes in basal and developmental regulation of excitatory synaptic strengths but display a profound deficit in homeostatic regulation of excitatory synapses by visual experience. As additional evidence of specificity, we found that the visual experience-induced regulation of inhibitory synapses is normal, although the basal inhibitory synaptic strength is increased in the Arc/Arg3.1 KOs. Our results demonstrate that Arc/Arg3.1 plays a selective role in regulating visual experience-dependent homeostatic plasticity of excitatory synaptic transmission in vivo.

  4. Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarity, motor experience and music.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Bettina E

    2014-01-01

    According to event segmentation theory, action perception depends on sensory cues and prior knowledge, and the segmentation of observed actions is crucial for understanding and memorizing these actions. While most activities in everyday life are characterized by external goals and interaction with objects or persons, this does not necessarily apply to dance-like actions. We investigated to what extent visual familiarity of the observed movement and accompanying music influence the segmentation of a dance phrase in dancers of different skill level and non-dancers. In Experiment 1, dancers and non-dancers repeatedly watched a video clip showing a dancer performing a choreographed dance phrase and indicated segment boundaries by key press. Dancers generally defined less segment boundaries than non-dancers, specifically in the first trials in which visual familiarity with the phrase was low. Music increased the number of segment boundaries in the non-dancers and decreased it in the dancers. The results suggest that dance expertise reduces the number of perceived segment boundaries in an observed dance phrase, and that the ways visual familiarity and music affect movement segmentation are modulated by dance expertise. In a second experiment, motor experience was added as factor, based on empirical evidence suggesting that action perception is modified by visual and motor expertise in different ways. In Experiment 2, the same task as in Experiment 1 was performed by dance amateurs, and was repeated by the same participants after they had learned to dance the presented dance phrase. Less segment boundaries were defined in the middle trials after participants had learned to dance the phrase, and music reduced the number of segment boundaries before learning. The results suggest that specific motor experience of the observed movement influences its perception and anticipation and makes segmentation broader, but not to the same degree as dance expertise on a professional

  5. Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarity, motor experience and music

    PubMed Central

    Bläsing, Bettina E.

    2015-01-01

    According to event segmentation theory, action perception depends on sensory cues and prior knowledge, and the segmentation of observed actions is crucial for understanding and memorizing these actions. While most activities in everyday life are characterized by external goals and interaction with objects or persons, this does not necessarily apply to dance-like actions. We investigated to what extent visual familiarity of the observed movement and accompanying music influence the segmentation of a dance phrase in dancers of different skill level and non-dancers. In Experiment 1, dancers and non-dancers repeatedly watched a video clip showing a dancer performing a choreographed dance phrase and indicated segment boundaries by key press. Dancers generally defined less segment boundaries than non-dancers, specifically in the first trials in which visual familiarity with the phrase was low. Music increased the number of segment boundaries in the non-dancers and decreased it in the dancers. The results suggest that dance expertise reduces the number of perceived segment boundaries in an observed dance phrase, and that the ways visual familiarity and music affect movement segmentation are modulated by dance expertise. In a second experiment, motor experience was added as factor, based on empirical evidence suggesting that action perception is modified by visual and motor expertise in different ways. In Experiment 2, the same task as in Experiment 1 was performed by dance amateurs, and was repeated by the same participants after they had learned to dance the presented dance phrase. Less segment boundaries were defined in the middle trials after participants had learned to dance the phrase, and music reduced the number of segment boundaries before learning. The results suggest that specific motor experience of the observed movement influences its perception and anticipation and makes segmentation broader, but not to the same degree as dance expertise on a professional

  6. Experiences of visually impaired students in higher education: Bodily perspectives on inclusive education

    PubMed Central

    Lourens, Heidi; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Although previous literature sheds light on the experiences of visually impaired students on tertiary grounds, these studies failed to provide an embodied understanding of their lives. In-depth interviews with 15 visually impaired students at one university demonstrated the ways in which they experienced their disability and the built environment in their bodies. At the same time, lost, fearful, shameful and aching bodies revealed prevailing gaps in provision for disabled students. Through this research it becomes clear how the environment is acutely felt within fleshly worlds, while bodies do not fail to tell of disabling societal structures. Based on the bodily stories, we thus make recommendations to improve the lives of visually impaired students on tertiary campuses. PMID:27917028

  7. Experiences of visually impaired students in higher education: Bodily perspectives on inclusive education.

    PubMed

    Lourens, Heidi; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Although previous literature sheds light on the experiences of visually impaired students on tertiary grounds, these studies failed to provide an embodied understanding of their lives. In-depth interviews with 15 visually impaired students at one university demonstrated the ways in which they experienced their disability and the built environment in their bodies. At the same time, lost, fearful, shameful and aching bodies revealed prevailing gaps in provision for disabled students. Through this research it becomes clear how the environment is acutely felt within fleshly worlds, while bodies do not fail to tell of disabling societal structures. Based on the bodily stories, we thus make recommendations to improve the lives of visually impaired students on tertiary campuses.

  8. Four-Month-Old Infants' Visual Investigation of Cats and Dogs: Relations with Pet Experience and Attentional Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A.; McMurray, Bob; Oakes, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the eye-movements of 4-month-old infants (N = 38) as they visually inspected pairs of images of cats or dogs. In general, infants who had previous experience with pets exhibited more sophisticated inspection than did infants without pet experience, both directing more visual attention to the informative head regions of the animals,…

  9. Experimenting with Visual Storytelling in Students' Portfolios: Narratives of Visual Pedagogy for Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifa-Valls, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    This article interprets the repercussions of visual storytelling for art education and arts-based narrative research and, particularly, it approaches visual storytelling as a critical tool for pre-service teacher education. After reinterpreting storytelling from the perspective of visual critical pedagogy, I will narratively reconstruct the use of…

  10. Understanding the patient-provider communication needs and experiences of Latina and non-Latina White women following an abnormal mammogram

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Hohl, Sarah D.; Ko, Linda K.; Rodriguez, Edgar A.; Thompson, Beti; Beresford, Shirley A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Latinas are more likely to delay recommended follow-up care than non-Latina White (NLW) women after an abnormal mammogram result. Ethnic differences in communication needs and experiences with healthcare staff and providers may contribute to these delays as well as satisfaction with care. Nonetheless, little research has explored the aspects of communication that may contribute to patient comprehension, adherence to follow-up care, and satisfaction across ethnicity. The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to identify patients' communication needs and experiences with follow-up care among Latina and NLW women who received an abnormal mammogram. We conducted 41 semi-structured interviews with 19 Latina and 22 NLW women between the ages of 40 and 74 who had received an abnormal mammogram. Communication themes indicated that women's needs and experiences concerning abnormal mammograms and follow-up care varied across ethnicity. Latinas and NLW women appeared to differ in their comprehension of abnormal results and follow-up care as a result of language barriers and health literacy. Both groups of women identified clear, empathic communication as being important in patient-provider communication; however, Latinas underscored the need for warm communicative styles and NLW women emphasized the importance of providing more information. Women with high levels of satisfaction with patient-provider interactions appeared to have positive perspectives of subsequent screening and cancer treatment. To improve patient satisfaction and adherence to follow-up care among Latinas, educational programs are necessary to counsel healthcare professionals with regard to language, health literacy, and empathic communication needs in healthcare service delivery. PMID:24748097

  11. Understanding the patient-provider communication needs and experiences of Latina and non-Latina White women following an abnormal mammogram.

    PubMed

    Molina, Yamile; Hohl, Sarah D; Ko, Linda K; Rodriguez, Edgar A; Thompson, Beti; Beresford, Shirley A A

    2014-12-01

    Latinas are more likely to delay recommended follow-up care than non-Latina White (NLW) women after an abnormal mammogram result. Ethnic differences in communication needs and experiences with health-care staff and providers may contribute to these delays as well as satisfaction with care. Nonetheless, little research has explored the aspects of communication that may contribute to patient comprehension, adherence to follow-up care, and satisfaction across ethnicity. The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to identify patients' communication needs and experiences with follow-up care among Latina and NLW women who received an abnormal mammogram. We conducted 41 semi-structured interviews with 19 Latina and 22 NLW women between the ages of 40 and 74 who had received an abnormal mammogram. Communication themes indicated that women's needs and experiences concerning abnormal mammograms and follow-up care varied across ethnicity. Latinas and NLW women appeared to differ in their comprehension of abnormal results and follow-up care as a result of language barriers and health literacy. Both groups of women identified clear, empathic communication as being important in patient-provider communication; however, Latinas underscored the need for warm communicative styles, and NLW women emphasized the importance of providing more information. Women with high levels of satisfaction with patient-provider interactions appeared to have positive perspectives of subsequent screening and cancer treatment. To improve patient satisfaction and adherence to follow-up care among Latinas, educational programs are necessary to counsel health-care professionals with regard to language, health literacy, and empathic communication needs in health-care service delivery.

  12. The influence of anaesthetists' experience on workload, performance and visual attention during simulated critical incidents.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian M; Schneider, Erich; Kohlbecher, Stefan; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Heuser, Fabian; Wagner, Klaus J; Kochs, Eberhard F; Schneider, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Development of accurate Situation Awareness (SA) depends on experience and may be impaired during excessive workload. In order to gain adequate SA for decision making and performance, anaesthetists need to distribute visual attention effectively. Therefore, we hypothesized that in more experienced anaesthetists performance is better and increase of physiological workload is less during critical incidents. Additionally, we investigated the relation between physiological workload indicators and distribution of visual attention. In fifteen anaesthetists, the increase of pupil size and heart rate was assessed in course of a simulated critical incident. Simulator log files were used for performance assessment. An eye-tracking device (EyeSeeCam) provided data about the anaesthetists' distribution of visual attention. Performance was assessed as time until definitive treatment. T tests and multivariate generalized linear models (MANOVA) were used for retrospective statistical analysis. Mean pupil diameter increase was 8.1% (SD ± 4.3) in the less experienced and 15.8% (±10.4) in the more experienced subjects (p = 0.191). Mean heart rate increase was 10.2% (±6.7) and 10.5% (±8.3, p = 0.956), respectively. Performance did not depend on experience. Pupil diameter and heart rate increases were associated with a shift of visual attention from monitoring towards manual tasks (not significant). For the first time, the following four variables were assessed simultaneously: physiological workload indicators, performance, experience, and distribution of visual attention between "monitoring" and "manual" tasks. However, we were unable to detect significant interactions between these variables. This experimental model could prove valuable in the investigation of gaining and maintaining SA in the operation theatre.

  13. Video game experience and its influence on visual attention parameters: an investigation using the framework of the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA).

    PubMed

    Schubert, Torsten; Finke, Kathrin; Redel, Petra; Kluckow, Steffen; Müller, Hermann; Strobach, Tilo

    2015-05-01

    Experts with video game experience, in contrast to non-experienced persons, are superior in multiple domains of visual attention. However, it is an open question which basic aspects of attention underlie this superiority. We approached this question using the framework of Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) with tools that allowed us to assess various parameters that are related to different visual attention aspects (e.g., perception threshold, processing speed, visual short-term memory storage capacity, top-down control, spatial distribution of attention) and that are measurable on the same experimental basis. In Experiment 1, we found advantages of video game experts in perception threshold and visual processing speed; the latter being restricted to the lower positions of the used computer display. The observed advantages were not significantly moderated by general person-related characteristics such as personality traits, sensation seeking, intelligence, social anxiety, or health status. Experiment 2 tested a potential causal link between the expert advantages and video game practice with an intervention protocol. It found no effects of action video gaming on perception threshold, visual short-term memory storage capacity, iconic memory storage, top-down control, and spatial distribution of attention after 15 days of training. However, observations of a selected improvement of processing speed at the lower positions of the computer screen after video game training and of retest effects are suggestive for limited possibilities to improve basic aspects of visual attention (TVA) with practice.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Aesthetic perception of visual textures: a holistic exploration using texture analysis, psychological experiment, and perception modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianli; Lughofer, Edwin; Zeng, Xianyi

    2015-01-01

    Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design, and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective, and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and non-linear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties.

  16. Aesthetic perception of visual textures: a holistic exploration using texture analysis, psychological experiment, and perception modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianli; Lughofer, Edwin; Zeng, Xianyi

    2015-01-01

    Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design, and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective, and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and non-linear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties. PMID:26582987

  17. Experience-dependent regulation of TrkB isoforms in rodent visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Bethany K; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2009-04-01

    Within primary visual cortex (V1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its high-affinity receptor TrkB is important for normal development and experience-dependent plasticity. TrkB is expressed in several alternatively spliced isoforms, including full-length TrkB (TrkB.FL), and several truncated isoforms (TrkB.T1, TrkB.T2, and TrkB.T4) that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These isoforms are important components of BDNF signaling, yet little is known about the developmental or experience-dependent regulation of their expression. Using immunohistochemistry, we found TrkB.FL and TrkB.T1 expressed in interneurons and pyramidal neurons within V1, but not in cortical astrocytes. We used real-time PCR to quantify the changes in mRNA expression of BDNF, the four TrkB isoforms, and the low-affinity receptor P75NTR during normal development, and in response to visual deprivation at two different ages. BDNF expression increased between postnatal days 10 (P10) and P30, and was rapidly down-regulated by 3 days of visual deprivation during both the pre-critical period (P14-P17) and the critical period (P18-P21). Over the same developmental period, expression of each TrkB isoform was regulated independently; TrkB.T1 increased, TrkB.FL and TrkB.T2 decreased, and TrkB.T4 showed transient changes. Neither brief visual deprivation nor prolonged dark-rearing induced changes in either TrkB.FL or TrkB.T1 expression. However, TrkB.T4 expression was reduced by brief visual deprivation, whereas TrkB.T4, TrkB.T2 and P75(NTR) were up-regulated by prolonged dark-rearing into the critical period. Our data indicate that TrkB isoform expression can be selectively regulated by visual experience, and may contribute to experience-dependent cortical plasticity.

  18. Visual experience and subsequent sleep induce sequential plastic changes in putative inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Aton, Sara J; Broussard, Christopher; Dumoulin, Michelle; Seibt, Julie; Watson, Adam; Coleman, Tammi; Frank, Marcos G

    2013-02-19

    Ocular dominance plasticity in the developing primary visual cortex is initiated by monocular deprivation (MD) and consolidated during subsequent sleep. To clarify how visual experience and sleep affect neuronal activity and plasticity, we continuously recorded extragranular visual cortex fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and putative principal (i.e., excitatory) neurons in freely behaving cats across periods of waking MD and post-MD sleep. Consistent with previous reports in mice, MD induces two related changes in FS interneurons: a response shift in favor of the closed eye and depression of firing. Spike-timing-dependent depression of open-eye-biased principal neuron inputs to FS interneurons may mediate these effects. During post-MD nonrapid eye movement sleep, principal neuron firing increases and becomes more phase-locked to slow wave and spindle oscillations. Ocular dominance (OD) shifts in favor of open-eye stimulation--evident only after post-MD sleep--are proportional to MD-induced changes in FS interneuron activity and to subsequent sleep-associated changes in principal neuron activity. OD shifts are greatest in principal neurons that fire 40-300 ms after neighboring FS interneurons during post-MD slow waves. Based on these data, we propose that MD-induced changes in FS interneurons play an instructive role in ocular dominance plasticity, causing disinhibition among open-eye-biased principal neurons, which drive plasticity throughout the visual cortex during subsequent sleep.

  19. Sensori-motor experience leads to changes in visual processing in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    James, Karin Harman

    2014-01-01

    Since Broca's studies on language processing, cortical functional specialization has been considered to be integral to efficient neural processing. A fundamental question in cognitive neuroscience concerns the type of learning that is required for functional specialization to develop. To address this issue with respect to the development of neural specialization for letters, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain activation patterns in pre-school children before and after different letter-learning conditions: a sensori-motor group practised printing letters during the learning phase, while the control group practised visual recognition. Results demonstrated an overall left-hemisphere bias for processing letters in these pre-literate participants, but, more interestingly, showed enhanced blood oxygen-level-dependent activation in the visual association cortex during letter perception only after sensori-motor (printing) learning. It is concluded that sensori-motor experience augments processing in the visual system of pre-school children. The change of activation in these neural circuits provides important evidence that ‘learning-by-doing’ can lay the foundation for, and potentially strengthen, the neural systems used for visual letter recognition. PMID:20136924

  20. The Lived Experience of Women With Abnormal Papanicolaou Smears Receiving Care in a Military Health Care Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    cytologic screening has been demonstrated. It is estimated that the rate of invasive cervical cancer has been reduced by as much as 70% because of... invasive cervical cancer when detection, surveillance, and treatment occur early in the course of cervical pathology. Interpreting abnormal results...procedure has greatly reduced morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer . Despite the effectiveness of this screening tool, patient compliance with

  1. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience

    PubMed Central

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom–up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top–down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel (“aesthetics of perception”), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel (“aesthetics of cognition”). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of

  2. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom-up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top-down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel ("aesthetics of perception"), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel ("aesthetics of cognition"). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of aesthetics.

  3. The Importance of Visual Experience, Gender, and Emotion in the Assessment of an Assistive Tactile Mouse.

    PubMed

    Brayda, Luca; Campus, Claudio; Memeo, Mariacarla; Lucagrossi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Tactile maps are efficient tools to improve spatial understanding and mobility skills of visually impaired people. Their limited adaptability can be compensated with haptic devices which display graphical information, but their assessment is frequently limited to performance-based metrics only which can hide potential spatial abilities in O&M protocols. We assess a low-tech tactile mouse able to deliver three-dimensional content considering how performance, mental workload, behavior, and anxiety status vary with task difficulty and gender in congenitally blind, late blind, and sighted subjects. Results show that task difficulty coherently modulates the efficiency and difficulty to build mental maps, regardless of visual experience. Although exhibiting attitudes that were similar and gender-independent, the females had lower performance and higher cognitive load, especially when congenitally blind. All groups showed a significant decrease in anxiety after using the device. Tactile graphics with our device seems therefore to be applicable with different visual experiences, with no negative emotional consequences of mentally demanding spatial tasks. Going beyond performance-based assessment, our methodology can help with better targeting technological solutions in orientation and mobility protocols.

  4. A Computational Model of Innate Directional Selectivity Refined by Visual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Samantha V.; Harris, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian visual system has been extensively studied since Hubel and Wiesel’s work on cortical feature maps in the 1960s. Feature maps representing the cortical neurons’ ocular dominance, orientation and direction preferences have been well explored experimentally and computationally. The predominant view has been that direction selectivity (DS) in particular, is a feature entirely dependent upon visual experience and as such does not exist prior to eye opening (EO). However, recent experimental work has shown that there is in fact a DS bias already present at EO. In the current work we use a computational model to reproduce the main results of this experimental work and show that the DS bias present at EO could arise purely from the cortical architecture without any explicit coding for DS and prior to any self-organising process facilitated by spontaneous activity or training. We explore how this latent DS (and its corresponding cortical map) is refined by training and that the time-course of development exhibits similar features to those seen in the experimental study. In particular we show that the specific cortical connectivity or ‘proto-architecture’ is required for DS to mature rapidly and correctly with visual experience. PMID:26228922

  5. Sensory experience shapes the development of the visual system’s first synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Felice A.; Santina, Luca Della; Parker, Edward D.; Wong, Rachel O.L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Specific connectivity patterns among neurons create the basic architecture underlying parallel processing in our nervous system. Here we focus on the visual system’s first synapse to examine the structural and functional consequences of sensory deprivation on the establishment of parallel circuits. Dark rearing reduces synaptic strength between cones and cone bipolar cells, a previously unappreciated effect of sensory deprivation. In contrast, rod bipolar cells, which utilize the same glutamate receptor to contact rods, are unaffected by dark rearing. Underlying the physiological changes, we find the localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors within cone bipolar, but not rod bipolar, cell dendrites is a light-dependent process. Furthermore, although cone bipolar cells share common cone partners, each bipolar cell type we examined depends differentially on sensory input to achieve mature connectivity. Thus, visual experience differentially affects maturation of rod versus cone pathways and of cell types within the cone pathway. PMID:24314727

  6. Role for Visual Experience in the Development of Direction-Selective Circuits.

    PubMed

    Bos, Rémi; Gainer, Christian; Feller, Marla B

    2016-05-23

    Visually guided behavior can depend critically on detecting the direction of object movement. This computation is first performed in the retina where direction is encoded by direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) that respond strongly to an object moving in the preferred direction and weakly to an object moving in the opposite, or null, direction (reviewed in [1]). DSGCs come in multiple types that are classified based on their morphologies, response properties, and targets in the brain. This study focuses on two types-ON and ON-OFF DSGCs. Though animals can sense motion in all directions, the preferred directions of DSGCs in adult retina cluster along distinct directions that we refer to as the cardinal axes. ON DSGCs have three cardinal axes-temporal, ventral, and dorsonasal-while ON-OFF DSGCs have four-nasal, temporal, dorsal, and ventral. How these preferred directions emerge during development is still not understood. Several studies have demonstrated that ON [2] and ON-OFF DSGCs are well tuned at eye-opening, and even a few days prior to eye-opening, in rabbits [3], rats [4], and mice [5-8], suggesting that visual experience is not required to produce direction-selective tuning. However, here we show that at eye-opening the preferred directions of both ON and ON-OFF DSGCs are diffusely distributed and that visual deprivation prevents the preferred directions from clustering along the cardinal axes. Our findings indicate a critical role for visual experience in shaping responses in the retina.

  7. Experiments on Auditory-Visual Perception of Sentences by Users of Unilateral, Bimodal, and Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Michael F.; Liss, Julie; Wang, Shuai; Berisha, Visar; Ludwig, Cimarron; Natale, Sarah Cook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Five experiments probed auditory-visual (AV) understanding of sentences by users of cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Sentence material was presented in auditory (A), visual (V), and AV test conditions to listeners with normal hearing and CI users. Results: (a) Most CI users report that most of the time, they have access to both A and V…

  8. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  9. In-Situ Visualization Experiments with ParaView Cinema in RAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Kares, Robert John

    2015-10-15

    A previous paper described some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation. One challenge of the in-situ approach apparent in these experiments was the difficulty of choosing parameters likes isosurface values for the visualizations to be produced from the running simulation without the benefit of prior knowledge of the simulation results and the resultant cost of recomputing in-situ generated images when parameters are chosen suboptimally. A proposed method of addressing this difficulty is to simply render multiple images at runtime with a range of possible parameter values to produce a large database of images and to provide the user with a tool for managing the resulting database of imagery. Recently, ParaView/Catalyst has been extended to include such a capability via the so-called Cinema framework. Here I describe some initial experiments with the first delivery of Cinema and make some recommendations for future extensions of Cinema’s capabilities.

  10. Gene Expression Browser: large-scale and cross-experiment microarray data integration, management, search & visualization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last decade, a large amount of microarray gene expression data has been accumulated in public repositories. Integrating and analyzing high-throughput gene expression data have become key activities for exploring gene functions, gene networks and biological pathways. Effectively utilizing these invaluable microarray data remains challenging due to a lack of powerful tools to integrate large-scale gene-expression information across diverse experiments and to search and visualize a large number of gene-expression data points. Results Gene Expression Browser is a microarray data integration, management and processing system with web-based search and visualization functions. An innovative method has been developed to define a treatment over a control for every microarray experiment to standardize and make microarray data from different experiments homogeneous. In the browser, data are pre-processed offline and the resulting data points are visualized online with a 2-layer dynamic web display. Users can view all treatments over control that affect the expression of a selected gene via Gene View, and view all genes that change in a selected treatment over control via treatment over control View. Users can also check the changes of expression profiles of a set of either the treatments over control or genes via Slide View. In addition, the relationships between genes and treatments over control are computed according to gene expression ratio and are shown as co-responsive genes and co-regulation treatments over control. Conclusion Gene Expression Browser is composed of a set of software tools, including a data extraction tool, a microarray data-management system, a data-annotation tool, a microarray data-processing pipeline, and a data search & visualization tool. The browser is deployed as a free public web service (http://www.ExpressionBrowser.com) that integrates 301 ATH1 gene microarray experiments from public data repositories (viz. the Gene

  11. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience.

    PubMed

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S; Lauring, Jon O; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art.

  12. Visual experience, unilateral cortical lesions, and lateralization of function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tees, R C

    1984-12-01

    The effects of early visual experience and later unilateral neocortical lesions on the behavior of male hooded rats were measured on an open-field, 17-arm spatial maze, and a visual field or perimetry test. The comparison of behavior observed in the open field revealed that light-reared (LR) rats that suffered a right hemispheric lesion were more active and reared more than any of their dark-reared (DR) counterparts as well as LR animals that had left hemispheric or sham operations. On the radial maze task in which 8 of 17 arms were baited, the rats with unilateral lesions performed less effectively than did the sham-operated animals. The effect of the lesions was significantly greater for LR rats than their DR counterparts. The perimetry testing revealed that although the operated animals did react to stimuli throughout their visual field, some contralateral neglect was evident in the case of both LR and DR rats. The lesions did have a much greater impact on orientational behavior of operated LR rats. However, as was the case with respect to performance on the radial maze, no evidence emerged of any functional asymmetry following the unilateral cortical lesions. The results are discussed in terms of Denenberg's (1981) hypothesis about cerebral and functional asymmetry in the rat.

  13. Measuring Software Timing Errors in the Presentation of Visual Stimuli in Cognitive Neuroscience Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Garaizar, Pablo; Vadillo, Miguel A.; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Matute, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Because of the features provided by an abundance of specialized experimental software packages, personal computers have become prominent and powerful tools in cognitive research. Most of these programs have mechanisms to control the precision and accuracy with which visual stimuli are presented as well as the response times. However, external factors, often related to the technology used to display the visual information, can have a noticeable impact on the actual performance and may be easily overlooked by researchers. The aim of this study is to measure the precision and accuracy of the timing mechanisms of some of the most popular software packages used in a typical laboratory scenario in order to assess whether presentation times configured by researchers do not differ from measured times more than what is expected due to the hardware limitations. Despite the apparent precision and accuracy of the results, important issues related to timing setups in the presentation of visual stimuli were found, and they should be taken into account by researchers in their experiments. PMID:24409318

  14. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S.; Lauring, Jon O.; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  15. Ego depletion in visual perception: Ego-depleted viewers experience less ambiguous figure reversal.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Marina C; Stirk, Steven; Hancock, Peter J B

    2017-02-22

    This study examined the effects of ego depletion on ambiguous figure perception. Adults (N = 315) received an ego depletion task and were subsequently tested on their inhibitory control abilities that were indexed by the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and their ability to perceive both interpretations of ambiguous figures that was indexed by reversal (Experiment 2). Ego depletion had a very small effect on reducing inhibitory control (Cohen's d = .15) (Experiment 1). Ego-depleted participants had a tendency to take longer to respond in Stroop trials. In Experiment 2, ego depletion had small to medium effects on the experience of reversal. Ego-depleted viewers tended to take longer to reverse ambiguous figures (duration to first reversal) when naïve of the ambiguity and experienced less reversal both when naïve and informed of the ambiguity. Together, findings suggest that ego depletion has small effects on inhibitory control and small to medium effects on bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes. The depletion of cognitive resources can reduce our visual perceptual experience.

  16. Experience of Multisensory Environments in Public Space among People with Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Gavin R.; Yuen, Hon K.; Vogtle, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the role of sensory characteristics embedded in the built environment and whether they support or hinder people with visual impairment in their use of public spaces. An online survey link was e-mailed to the presidents and committee members of each state’s chapters and associations of the National Federation of the Blind in the United States, resulting in 451 direct invitations to participate. Written responses of the survey questions from 48 respondents with visual impairment were analyzed. Three main themes: Barriers, Supporters, and Context-Dependence emerged from the respondents’ experience of multisensory characteristics within the built environment. The four subthemes subsumed in Barriers were: (1) Population specific design, (2) Extreme sensory backgrounds, (3) Uneven ground surfaces and objects, and (4) Inconsistent lighting. For Supporters, respondents provided specific examples of various sensory characteristics in built environments, including audible cues and echoes, smells, tactile quality of the ground surface, and temperature. Context-Dependence referred to the effects of sensory characteristics embedded in public spaces depending on one’s vision condition, the proximity to the sensory cues and the purpose of the activities one was performing at that moment. Findings provide occupational therapy practitioners an in-depth understanding of the transactional relationship between embedded sensory characteristics in the built environment, occupations, and people with visual impairment in order to make appropriate modifications or removal of barriers that affect occupational performance and engagement. Suggestions for occupational therapists as well as architects, designers, planners, policy makers/legislators related to functional sensory cues in the design of built environments were provided to increase accessibility in the use of public spaces by people with visual impairment. PMID:26213952

  17. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  18. Visual experience regulates the development of long-term synaptic modifications induced by low-frequency stimulation in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Taketoshi; Yamamoto, Mariko; Yamada, Kazumasa; Komatsu, Yukio; Yoshimura, Yumiko

    2017-03-08

    Manipulation of visual experience can considerably modify visual responses of visual cortical neurons even in adulthood in the mouse, although the modification is less profound than that observed during the critical period. Our previous studies demonstrated that low-frequency (2Hz) stimulation for 15min applied to layer 4 induces T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at excitatory synapses in layer 2/3 neurons of visual cortex during the critical period. In this study, we investigated whether low-frequency stimulation could induce synaptic plasticity in adult mice. We found that 2Hz stimulation induced LTP of extracellular field potentials evoked by stimulation of layer 4 in layer 2/3 in adulthood as during the critical period. LTP in adulthood was blocked by L-type, but not T-type, Ca(2+) channel antagonists, whereas LTP during the critical period was blocked by T-type, but not L-type, Ca(2+) channel antagonists. This developmental change in LTP was prevented by dark rearing. Under pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors, T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent LTP occurred, whereas L-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent LTP did not occur. These results suggest that different forms of synaptic plasticity can contribute separately to experience-dependent modification of visual responses during the critical period and in adulthood.

  19. Effects of visual experience on vascular endothelial growth factor expression during the postnatal development of the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Harkaitz; Argandoña, Enrike G; Lafuente, José V

    2008-07-01

    The development of the cortical vascular network depends on functional maturation. External inputs are an essential requirement in the modeling of the visual cortex, mainly during the critical period, when the functional and structural properties of visual cortical neurons are particularly susceptible to alterations. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the major angiogenic factor, a key signal in the induction of vessel growth. Our study focused on the role of visual stimuli on the development of the vascular pattern correlated with VEGF levels. Vascular density and the expression of VEGF were examined in the primary visual cortex of rats reared under different visual environments (dark rearing, dark-rearing in conditions of enriched environment, enriched environment, and laboratory standard conditions) during postnatal development (before, during, and after the critical period). Our results show a restricted VEGF cellular expression to astroglial cells. Quantitative differences appeared during the critical period: higher vascular density and VEGF protein levels were found in the enriched environment group; both dark-reared groups showed lower vascular density and VEGF levels, which means that enriched environment without the physical exercise component does not exert effects in dark-reared rats.

  20. Effects of Visual Experience on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression during the Postnatal Development of the Rat Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Argandoña, Enrike G.; Lafuente, José V.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the cortical vascular network depends on functional maturation. External inputs are an essential requirement in the modeling of the visual cortex, mainly during the critical period, when the functional and structural properties of visual cortical neurons are particularly susceptible to alterations. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the major angiogenic factor, a key signal in the induction of vessel growth. Our study focused on the role of visual stimuli on the development of the vascular pattern correlated with VEGF levels. Vascular density and the expression of VEGF were examined in the primary visual cortex of rats reared under different visual environments (dark rearing, dark-rearing in conditions of enriched environment, enriched environment, and laboratory standard conditions) during postnatal development (before, during, and after the critical period). Our results show a restricted VEGF cellular expression to astroglial cells. Quantitative differences appeared during the critical period: higher vascular density and VEGF protein levels were found in the enriched environment group; both dark-reared groups showed lower vascular density and VEGF levels, which means that enriched environment without the physical exercise component does not exert effects in dark-reared rats. PMID:17986606

  1. Initial experience with stereoscopic visualization of three-dimensional ultrasound data in surgery.

    PubMed

    Gronningsaeter, A; Lie, T; Kleven, A; Mørland, T; Langø, T; Unsgård, G; Myhre, H O; Mårvik, R

    2000-11-01

    Initial in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of stereoscopically displaying three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound data from neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery, and vascular surgery. Stereoscopic visualization was illustrated by four video sequences, which can be downloaded from http://www.us.unimed. sintef.no/. These sequences show a brain tumor, hepatic arteries in relation to the gallbladder, a model that mimics a neuroendoscope in a cyst, and a "flight" into model of an artery with an intima flap. The experiments indicate that stereoscopic display of ultrasound data is feasible when there is sufficient contrast between the objects of interest and the surrounding tissue. True 3D vision improves perception, thus enhancing the ability to understand complex anatomic structures such as irregular lesions and tortuous vessels.

  2. Unsupervised abnormality detection using saliency and Retinex based color enhancement.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farah; Mohammed, Shahed K; Bui, Francis M; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    An efficient and automated abnormality detection method can significantly reduce the burden of screening of the enormous visual information resulting from capsule endoscopic procedure. As a pre-processing stage, color enhancement could be useful to improve the image quality and the detection performance. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a two-stage automated abnormality detection algorithm. In the first stage, an adaptive color enhancement method based on Retinex theory is applied on the endoscopic images. In the second stage, an efficient salient region detection algorithm is applied to detect the clinically significant regions. The proposed algorithm is applied on a dataset containing images with diverse pathologies. The algorithm can successfully detect a significant percentage of the abnormal regions. From our experiment, it was evident that color enhancement method improves the performance of abnormality detection. The proposed algorithm can achieve a sensitivity of 97.33% and specificity of 79%, higher than state-of-the-art performance.

  3. Early non-visual experience influences proprioceptive-spatial discrimination acuity in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Fiehler, Katja; Reuschel, Johanna; Rösler, Frank

    2009-02-01

    The present study tested whether non-visual spatial experience affects later acuity of space perception. Congenitally blind adults who differed in the age acquired spatial knowledge via an orientation and mobility (O&M) training and matched sighted controls performed passive arm movements and judged the direction of the sensed movement. Proprioceptive-spatial discrimination acuity was assessed by an adaptive psychophysical procedure in two spatial coding conditions. In the egocentric coding condition, participants judged whether the hand trajectory felt left- or right-tilted in reference to a straight trajectory aligned to the transverse horizontal plane of the body midline axis. In the allocentric coding condition, they indicated whether the hand trajectory felt acute- or obtuse-angled in reference to a right angle. Proprioceptive-spatial acuity of congenitally blind participants significantly covaried with the age they attended an O&M training. The earlier the congenitally blind participants started the O&M training the more accurate was their space perception. Congenitally blind participants who underwent an O&M training after the age of 12 years showed poorer acuity than sighted controls. Congenitally blind participants with an earlier O&M training, however, approached the performance level of the sighted controls. The observed improvement in spatial acuity was more pronounced when judgements were given on the basis of an allocentric than an egocentric frame of reference. These findings suggest that proprioceptive-spatial acuity in adulthood depends on non-visual spatial experience during early development.

  4. Confinement has no effect on visual space perception: The results of the Mars-500 experiment.

    PubMed

    Sikl, Radovan; Simeček, Michal

    2014-02-01

    People confined to a closed space live in a visual environment that differs from a natural open-space environment in several respects. The view is restricted to no more than a few meters, and nearby objects cannot be perceived relative to the position of a horizon. Thus, one might expect to find changes in visual space perception as a consequence of the prolonged experience of confinement. The subjects in our experimental study were participants of the Mars-500 project and spent nearly a year and a half isolated from the outside world during a simulated mission to Mars. The participants were presented with a battery of computer-based psychophysical tests examining their performance on various 3-D perception tasks, and we monitored changes in their perceptual performance throughout their confinement. Contrary to our expectations, no serious effect of the confinement on the crewmembers' 3-D perception was observed in any experiment. Several interpretations of these findings are discussed, including the possibilities that (1) the crewmembers' 3-D perception really did not change significantly, (2) changes in 3-D perception were manifested in the precision rather than the accuracy of perceptual judgments, and/or (3) the experimental conditions and the group sample were problematic.

  5. Four-month-old infants' visual investigation of cats and dogs: relations with pet experience and attentional strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A; McMurray, Bob; Oakes, Lisa M

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the eye-movements of 4-month-old infants (N = 38) as they visually inspected pairs of images of cats or dogs. In general, infants who had previous experience with pets exhibited more sophisticated inspection than did infants without pet experience, both directing more visual attention to the informative head regions of the animals, particularly when comparing stimuli, and maintaining their attention to an individual animal, resisting the pull on their attention by the other visible animal. Individual differences in general attentional strategies as assessed during a pretest had similar but weaker relations to visual scanning patterns. There was some evidence that the 2 factors were interactively associated with visual inspection, supporting the findings of Kovack-Lesh and colleagues (Kovack-Lesh, Horst, & Oakes, 2008; Kovack-Lesh, Oakes, & McMurray, 2012) that infants' learning about and memory for this type of stimuli is jointly determined by pet experience and attentional style.

  6. Resolving Visual Interference During Covert Spatial Orienting: Online Attentional Control Through Static Records of Prior Visual Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awh, Edward; Sgarlata, Antoinette Marie; Kliestik, John

    2005-01-01

    Models of attentional control usually describe online shifts in control settings that accommodate changing task demands. The current studies suggest that online control over distractor exclusion--a core component of visual selection--can be accomplished without online shifts in top-down settings. Measurements of target discrimination accuracy…

  7. Psychophysical measures of visual function and everyday perceptual experience in a case of congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Cammack, Jocelyn; Whight, John; Cross, Vinette; Rider, Andrew T; Webster, Andrew R; Stockman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    An appreciation of the relation between laboratory measures of visual deficit and everyday perceptual experience is fundamental to understanding the impact of a visual condition on patients and so to a fuller characterization of the disorder. This study aims to understand better the interpretative processes by which modified sensory information is perceived by a patient with congenital stationary night blindness and the adaptive strategies that are devised to deal with their measurable visual loss. Psychophysical measurements of temporal resolution, spectral sensitivity, and color discrimination were conducted on a 78-year-old male patient with the condition, who was also interviewed at length about the ways in which his diagnosis affected his daily life. Narrative analysis was employed to identify the relation between his subjective perceptual experiences and functional deficits in identifiable components of the visual system. Psychophysical measurements indicated a complete lack of rod perception and substantially reduced cone sensitivity. Two particular effects of this visual loss emerged during interviews: 1) the development of navigational techniques that relied on light reflections and point sources of light and 2) a reluctance to disclose the extent of visual loss and resulting lifelong psychosocial consequences. This study demonstrates the valuable complementary role that rich descriptive patient testimony can play, in conjunction with laboratory and clinical measurements, in more fully characterizing a disorder and in reaching a more complete understanding of the experience of vision loss. It also evidences the particular suitability of filmmaking techniques as a means of accessing and communicating subjective patient experience. PMID:27601873

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates one component of competitive, experience-dependent plasticity in developing visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi; Stellwagen, David; Malenka, Robert C; Stryker, Michael P

    2008-06-12

    Rapid, experience-dependent plasticity in developing visual cortex is thought to be competitive. After monocular visual deprivation, the reduction in response of binocular neurons to one eye is matched by a corresponding increase to the other. Chronic optical imaging in mice deficient in TNFalpha reveals the normal initial loss of deprived-eye responses, but the subsequent increase in response to the open eye is absent. This mutation also blocks homeostatic synaptic scaling of mEPSCs in visual cortex in vitro, without affecting LTP. In monocular cortex, thought not to be subject to competition, responses in TNFalpha mutants are as reduced as in the binocular zone. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous TNFalpha in wild-type mice phenocopies the knockout. These findings suggest that experience-dependent competition in developing visual cortex is the outcome of two distinct, noncompetitive processes, a loss of deprived-eye responses followed by an apparently homeostatic increase in responses dependent on TNFalpha signaling.

  9. Effects of early visual experience on the background preference in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsin; Yan, Hong Young; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2012-10-23

    Although cuttlefish are capable of showing diverse camouflage body patterns against a variety of background substrates, whether they show background preference when given a choice of substrates is not well known. In this study, we characterized the background choice of post-embryonic cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) and examined the effects of rearing visual environments on their background preferences. Different rearing backgrounds (enriched, uniformly grey and checkerboard) were used to raise cuttlefish from eggs or hatchlings, and four sets of two-background-choice experiments (differences in contrast, shape, size and side) were conducted at day 1 and weeks 4, 8 and 12 post-hatch. Cuttlefish reared in the enriched environment preferred high-contrast backgrounds at all post-embryonic stages. In comparison, those reared in the impoverished environments (uniformly grey and checkerboard) had either reversed or delayed high-contrast background preference. In addition, cuttlefish raised on the uniformly grey background, exposed to a checkerboard briefly (0.5 or 3 h) at week 4 and tested at week 8 showed increased high-contrast background preference. Interestingly, cuttlefish in the enriched group preferred an object size similar to their body size at day 1 and week 4, but changed this preference to smaller objects at week 12. These results suggest that high-contrast backgrounds may be more adaptive for juvenile cuttlefish, and visually enriched environments are important for the development of these background preference behaviours.

  10. Intermittently-visual Tracking Experiments Reveal the Roles of Error-correction and Predictive Mechanisms in the Human Visual-motor Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Tamura, Yurie; Sase, Kazuya; Sugawara, Ken; Sawada, Yasuji

    Prediction mechanism is necessary for human visual motion to compensate a delay of sensory-motor system. In a previous study, “proactive control” was discussed as one example of predictive function of human beings, in which motion of hands preceded the virtual moving target in visual tracking experiments. To study the roles of the positional-error correction mechanism and the prediction mechanism, we carried out an intermittently-visual tracking experiment where a circular orbit is segmented into the target-visible regions and the target-invisible regions. Main results found in this research were following. A rhythmic component appeared in the tracer velocity when the target velocity was relatively high. The period of the rhythm in the brain obtained from environmental stimuli is shortened more than 10%. The shortening of the period of rhythm in the brain accelerates the hand motion as soon as the visual information is cut-off, and causes the precedence of hand motion to the target motion. Although the precedence of the hand in the blind region is reset by the environmental information when the target enters the visible region, the hand motion precedes the target in average when the predictive mechanism dominates the error-corrective mechanism.

  11. A twin study of genetic and environmental determinants of abnormal persistence of psychotic experiences in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wigman, Johanna T W; van Winkel, Ruud; Jacobs, Nele; Wichers, Marieke; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; van Os, Jim

    2011-07-01

    Evidence suggests that subclinical psychotic experiences are more likely to cause transition to psychotic disorder if their expression becomes persistent. The study of longitudinal patterns of subclinical psychotic experiences may help to distinguish subgroups with transient and persistent psychotic symptoms, who may differ in risk of later psychosis. The current study investigated patterns of developmental course of subclinical psychotic experiences in a general population sample of 566 female twins, aged 18-45 years. The positive symptoms subscale of the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), completed three times in 2 years, was analyzed with growth modeling. Using Latent Class Analysis, two developmental courses were distinguished: a Persistent and a Low (expression of subclinical psychotic experiences) group. The Persistent group reported significantly higher levels of depressive and negative symptoms and worse functioning in daily life. Childhood trauma (OR: 3.26, P < 0.0001) and stressful life events over the study period (OR: 3.15, P = 0.031) predicted membership of the Persistent group. Of the monozygotic (MZ) twins with their co-twin in the Persistent group, 49% also were in the Persistent group themselves (OR: 9.32, P < 0.0001), compared to only 14% in the dizygotic (DZ) co-twins (OR: 1.56, P = 0.42) (χ(2)(2) = 22.97; P < 0.001). The findings suggest that persistence of subclinical psychosis is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, providing the possibility to study the (possibly modifiable) etiology underlying the longitudinal process of persistence of the early expression of psychosis liability.

  12. Visualizing characteristics of ocean data collected during the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Topographic measurements of sea surface elevation collected by the Surface Contour Radar (SCR) during NASA's Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment are plotted as three dimensional surface plots to observe wave height variance along the track of a P-3 aircraft. Ocean wave spectra were computed from rotating altimeter measurements acquired by the Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS). Fourier power spectra computed from SIR-B synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean are compared to ROWS surface wave spectra. Fourier inversion of SAR spectra, after subtraction of spectral noise and modeling of wave height modulation, yields topography similar to direct measurements made by SCR. Visual perspectives on the SCR and SAR ocean data are compared. Threshold distinctions between surface elevation and texture modulations of SAR data are considered within the context of a dynamic statistical model of rough surface scattering. The result of these endeavors is insight as to the physical mechanism governing the imaging of ocean waves with SAR.

  13. Uncertainty analysis of thermocouple measurements used in normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and Lurance Canyon Burn Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2004-04-01

    It would not be possible to confidently qualify weapon systems performance or validate computer codes without knowing the uncertainty of the experimental data used. This report provides uncertainty estimates associated with thermocouple data for temperature measurements from two of Sandia's large-scale thermal facilities. These two facilities (the Radiant Heat Facility (RHF) and the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS)) routinely gather data from normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments. They are managed by Fire Science & Technology Department 09132. Uncertainty analyses were performed for several thermocouple (TC) data acquisition systems (DASs) used at the RHF and LCBS. These analyses apply to Type K, chromel-alumel thermocouples of various types: fiberglass sheathed TC wire, mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed (MIMS) TC assemblies, and are easily extended to other TC materials (e.g., copper-constantan). Several DASs were analyzed: (1) A Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3852A system, and (2) several National Instrument (NI) systems. The uncertainty analyses were performed on the entire system from the TC to the DAS output file. Uncertainty sources include TC mounting errors, ANSI standard calibration uncertainty for Type K TC wire, potential errors due to temperature gradients inside connectors, extension wire uncertainty, DAS hardware uncertainties including noise, common mode rejection ratio, digital voltmeter accuracy, mV to temperature conversion, analog to digital conversion, and other possible sources. Typical results for 'normal' environments (e.g., maximum of 300-400 K) showed the total uncertainty to be about {+-}1% of the reading in absolute temperature. In high temperature or high heat flux ('abnormal') thermal environments, total uncertainties range up to {+-}2-3% of the reading (maximum of 1300 K). The higher uncertainties in abnormal thermal environments are caused by increased errors due to the effects of imperfect TC attachment to the test item. 'Best

  14. Fusing visual and behavioral cues for modeling user experience in games.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Noor; Asteriadis, Stylianos; Yannakakis, Georgios N; Karpouzis, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Estimating affective and cognitive states in conditions of rich human-computer interaction, such as in games, is a field of growing academic and commercial interest. Entertainment and serious games can benefit from recent advances in the field as, having access to predictors of the current state of the player (or learner) can provide useful information for feeding adaptation mechanisms that aim to maximize engagement or learning effects. In this paper, we introduce a large data corpus derived from 58 participants that play the popular Super Mario Bros platform game and attempt to create accurate models of player experience for this game genre. Within the view of the current research, features extracted both from player gameplay behavior and game levels, and player visual characteristics have been used as potential indicators of reported affect expressed as pairwise preferences between different game sessions. Using neuroevolutionary preference learning and automatic feature selection, highly accurate models of reported engagement, frustration, and challenge are constructed (model accuracies reach 91%, 92%, and 88% for engagement, frustration, and challenge, respectively). As a step further, the derived player experience models can be used to personalize the game level to desired levels of engagement, frustration, and challenge as game content is mapped to player experience through the behavioral and expressivity patterns of each player.

  15. Theta Oscillations in Visual Cortex Emerge with Experience to Convey Expected Reward Time and Experienced Reward Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zold, Camila L.

    2015-01-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is widely regarded as faithfully conveying the physical properties of visual stimuli. Thus, experience-induced changes in V1 are often interpreted as improving visual perception (i.e., perceptual learning). Here we describe how, with experience, cue-evoked oscillations emerge in V1 to convey expected reward time as well as to relate experienced reward rate. We show, in chronic multisite local field potential recordings from rat V1, that repeated presentation of visual cues induces the emergence of visually evoked oscillatory activity. Early in training, the visually evoked oscillations relate to the physical parameters of the stimuli. However, with training, the oscillations evolve to relate the time in which those stimuli foretell expected reward. Moreover, the oscillation prevalence reflects the reward rate recently experienced by the animal. Thus, training induces experience-dependent changes in V1 activity that relate to what those stimuli have come to signify behaviorally: when to expect future reward and at what rate. PMID:26134643

  16. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  17. Changes in visual search patterns of pathology residents as they gain experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Weinstein, Ronald S.

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study was to examine and characterize changes in the ways that pathology residents examine digital or "virtual" slides as they gain more experience. A series of 20 digitized breast biopsy virtual slides (half benign and half malignant) were shown to 6 pathology residents at three points in time - at the beginning of their first year of residency, at the beginning of the second year, and at the beginning of the third year. Their task was to examine each image and select three areas that they would most want to zoom on in order to view the diagnostic detail at higher resolution. Eye position was recorded as they scanned each image. The data indicate that with each successive year of experience, the residents' search patterns do change. Overall it takes significantly less time to view an individual slide and decide where to zoom, significantly fewer fixations are generated overall, and there is less examination of non-diagnostic areas. Essentially, the residents' search becomes much more efficient and after only one year closely resembles that of an expert pathologist. These findings are similar to those in radiology, and support the theory that an important aspect of the development of expertise is improved pattern recognition (taking in more information during the initial Gestalt or gist view) as well as improved allocation of attention and visual processing resources.

  18. Toward autonomous rotorcraft flight in degraded visual environments: experiments and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambler, Adam; Spiker, Spencer; Bergerman, Marcel; Singh, Sanjiv

    2016-05-01

    Unmanned cargo delivery to combat outposts will inevitably involve operations in degraded visual environments (DVE). When DVE occurs, the aircraft autonomy system needs to be able to function regardless of the obscurant level. In 2014, Near Earth Autonomy established a baseline perception system for autonomous rotorcraft operating in clear air conditions, when its m3 sensor suite and perception software enabled autonomous, no-hover landings onto unprepared sites populated with obstacles. The m3's long-range lidar scanned the helicopter's path and the perception software detected obstacles and found safe locations for the helicopter to land. This paper presents the results of initial tests with the Near Earth perception system in a variety of DVE conditions and analyzes them from the perspective of mission performance and risk. Tests were conducted with the m3's lidar and a lightweight synthetic aperture radar in rain, smoke, snow, and controlled brownout experiments. These experiments showed the capability to penetrate through mild DVE but the perceptual capabilities became degraded with the densest brownouts. The results highlight the need for not only improved ability to see through DVE, but also for improved algorithms to monitor and report DVE conditions.

  19. Do you see what I see? The difference between dog and human visual perception may affect the outcome of experiments.

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Péter; Ujvári, Vera; Faragó, Tamás; Miklósi, Ádám; Péter, András

    2017-04-07

    The visual sense of dogs is in many aspects different than that of humans. Unfortunately, authors do not explicitly take into consideration dog-human differences in visual perception when designing their experiments. With an image manipulation program we altered stationary images, according to the present knowledge about dog-vision. Besides the effect of dogs' dichromatic vision, the software shows the effect of the lower visual acuity and brightness discrimination, too. Fifty adult humans were tested with pictures showing a female experimenter pointing, gazing or glancing to the left or right side. Half of the pictures were shown after they were altered to a setting that approximated dog vision. Participants had difficulty to find out the direction of glancing when the pictures were in dog-vision mode. Glances in dog-vision setting were followed less correctly and with a slower response time than other cues. Our results are the first that show the visual performance of humans under circumstances that model how dogs' weaker vision would affect their responses in an ethological experiment. We urge researchers to take into consideration the differences between perceptual abilities of dogs and humans, by developing visual stimuli that fit more appropriately to dogs' visual capabilities.

  20. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  1. Impact of Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping Using 2D-Micromodel Visualization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Attaei-Dadavi, Iman; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    According to experimental observations, capillary trapping is strongly dependent on the roughness of the pore-solid interface. We performed imbibition experiments in the range of capillary numbers (Ca) from 10^-6 to 5x10^-5 using 2D-micromodels, which exhibit a rough surface. The microstructure comprises a double-porosity structure with pronounced macropores. The dynamics of precursor thin-film flow and its importance for capillary trapping is studied. For the first time Thin-Film Dynamics and the Complex Interplay of Thin Film- and Corner Flow for Snap-off Trapping is visualized using fluorescence microscopy. The experimental data for thin-film flow advancement show a square-root time dependence. Contrary to smooth surfaces, we prove by strict thermodynamical arguments that complete wetting is possible in a broad range of contact angles (0 - 90°). We develop a pore-scale model, which describes the front dynamics of thin-film flow on rough surfaces. Furthermore, contact angle hysteresis is considered for rough surfaces. We conduct a comprehensive cluster analysis, studying the influence of viscous forces (capillary number) and buoyancy forces (bond number) on cluster size distribution and comparing the results with predictions from percolation theory. We found that our experimental results agree with theoretical results of percolation theory for Ca = 10^-6: (i) a universal power-like cluster size distribution, (ii) the linear surface-volume relationship of trapped clusters, and (iii) the existence of the cut-off correlation length for the maximal cluster height. The good agreement is a strong argument that the experimental cluster size distribution is caused by a percolation-like trapping process (Ordinary Percolation). [1] H. Geistlinger, I. Ataei-Dadavi, S. Mohammadian, and H.-J. Vogel (2015) The Impact of Pore structure and Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping for 2D- and 3D-porous media: Comparison with Percolation theory. Special issue: Applications of

  2. The Importance of Art Viewing Experiences in Early Childhood Visual Arts: The Exploration of a Master Art Teacher's Strategies for Meaningful Early Arts Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhoff, Angela

    2008-01-01

    The visual arts can be an important and rich domain of learning for young children. In PreK education, The Task Force on Children's Learning and the Arts: Birth to Age Eight ("Young children and the arts: Making creative connections", Washington, DC: Arts Education Partnership, 1998) recommends that art experiences for young children…

  3. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold ("visual acuity") nor of the contrast threshold ("contrast sensitivity") of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions.

  4. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements

    PubMed Central

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold (“visual acuity”) nor of the contrast threshold (“contrast sensitivity”) of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain

  5. Sensory experience during locomotion promotes recovery of function in adult visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi; Stryker, Michael P

    2014-06-26

    Recovery from sensory deprivation is slow and incomplete in adult visual cortex. In this study, we show that visual stimulation during locomotion, which increases the gain of visual responses in primary visual cortex, dramatically enhances recovery in the mouse. Excitatory neurons regained normal levels of response, while narrow-spiking (inhibitory) neurons remained less active. Visual stimulation or locomotion alone did not enhance recovery. Responses to the particular visual stimuli viewed by the animal during locomotion recovered, while those to another normally effective stimulus did not, suggesting that locomotion promotes the recovery only of the neural circuits that are activated concurrent with the locomotion. These findings may provide an avenue for improving recovery from amblyopia in humans.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02798.001.

  6. The Influence of Visual Experience on the Ability to Form Spatial Mental Models Based on Route and Survey Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Zuidhoek, Sander; Postma, Albert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is twofold: the first objective is to evaluate the importance of visual experience for the ability to form a spatial representation (spatial mental model) of fairly elaborate spatial descriptions. Secondly, we examine whether blind people exhibit the same preferences (i.e. level of performance on spatial tasks) as…

  7. A Phenomenological Study Exploring the Educational, Vocational and Social Experiences of College Educated Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Mary-Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Students who are visually impaired have significantly lower educational and vocational success rates than their nondisabled peers (Hasazi, Johnson, Hasazi, Gordon, & Hull, 1989; Nagle, 2001). A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to explore the educational, vocational and social experiences of college educated individuals who were…

  8. Hemispheric Specialization for Language According to Grapho-Phonemic Transformation and Gender. A Divided Visual Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousin, Emilie; Perrone, Marcela; Baciu, Monica

    2009-01-01

    This behavioral study aimed at assessing the effect of two variables on the degree of hemispheric specialization for language. One of them was the "grapho-phonemic translation (transformation)" (letter-sound mapping) and the other was the participants' "gender". The experiment was conducted with healthy volunteers. A divided visual field procedure…

  9. Using ICT at an Open Distance Learning (ODL) Institution in South Africa: The Learning Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokiwa, S. A.; Phasha, T. N.

    2012-01-01

    For students with visual impairments, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become an important means through which they can learn and access learning materials at various levels of education. However, their learning experiences in using such form of technologies have been rarely documented, thus suggests society's lack of…

  10. EXEL; Experience for Children in Learning. Parent-Directed Activities to Develop: Oral Expression, Visual Discrimination, Auditory Discrimination, Motor Coordination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrmann, Polly; Millman, Joan

    The activities collected in this handbook are planned for parents to use with their children in a learning experience. They can also be used in the classroom. Sections contain games designed to develop visual discrimination, auditory discrimination, motor coordination and oral expression. An objective is given for each game, and directions for…

  11. Visual Half-Field Experiments Are a Good Measure of Cerebral Language Dominance if Used Properly: Evidence from fMRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Zoe R.; Brysbaert, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Traditional neuropsychology employs visual half-field (VHF) experiments to assess cerebral language dominance. This approach is based on the assumption that left cerebral dominance for language leads to faster and more accurate recognition of words in the right visual half-field (RVF) than in the left visual half-field (LVF) during tachistoscopic…

  12. INTEGRATION OF THEORY AND EXPERIMENT INTO A UNIFIED CONCEPT OF VISUAL PERCEPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    VISUAL PERCEPTION, FACTOR ANALYSIS ), (*NERVOUS SYSTEM, MATHEMATICAL MODELS), THEORY, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, CORRELATION TECHNIQUES, PHYSIOLOGY, ANATOMICAL MODELS, INTERACTIONS, DECISION MAKING, ENVIRONMENT, BEHAVIOR

  13. Experiences using Visualization Techniques to Present Requirements, Risks to Them, and Options for Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Cornford, Steven L.; Kiper, James D.; Menzies, Tim

    2006-01-01

    For several years we have been employing a risk-based decision process to guide development and application of advanced technologies, and for research and technology portfolio planning. The process is supported by custom software, in which visualization plays an important role. During requirements gathering, visualization is used to help scrutinize the status (completeness, extent) of the information. During decision making based on the gathered information, visualization is used to help decisionmakers understand the space of options and their consequences. In this paper we summarize the visualization capabilities that we have employed, indicating when and how they have proven useful.

  14. Visualization of hot flows of tall space fires in model experiments with Schlieren Photography technique.

    PubMed

    Su, ChungHwei; Wang, ShiuanCheng; Shih, ChiaYuan; Yang, YungChang

    2016-01-01

    The natural smoke exhaust system for tall spaces is more advantageous than the mechanical type of exhaust. In Taiwan, the effectiveness of natural smoke exhaust systems is inspected only by checking the vent area size. However, the air flow field in a tall space is very complicated, both at ordinary times or during fires. This study used Schlieren Photography technique, on the principle that light rays are refracted when penetrating materials of different densities, to test and simulate the dynamic measurement of hot air in tall space model. A single-mirror Schlieren system, including an 838 mm (H) × 736 mm (W) square concave mirror, as well as the focal length of 3100 mm was adopted. The experimental process of six smokeless candles were used for 1/12.5 model experiment to record the dynamic distribution and accumulation of air flow in the abovementioned space. FDS software was used to simulate various fire scenarios. The different locations of openings in some cases were studied with the maximum temperature scales of 40 and 45 °C, separately. The simulation results and experimental images showed highly similar hot air flow patterns. Schlieren Photography was proved capable of recording and visualizing the dynamic flow of hot air immediately, directly and accurately.

  15. Perceptual moments of conscious visual experience inferred from oscillatory brain activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie L; Gosselin, Frédéric; Schyns, Philippe G

    2006-04-04

    Transient periods of synchronized oscillating neuronal discharges in the brain have been proposed to support the discrete perceptual moments underlying conscious visual experience. However, the information content of these perceptual moments remains a critical challenge to the understanding of consciousness. We uncovered this information content in four observers who consciously perceived each interpretation of the ambiguous Dali painting Slave Market with the Disappearing Bust of Voltaire. For each individual observer, we isolated the stimulus spatial frequency (SF) features underlying their overt judgments of the input as "the nuns" and "Voltaire". Every 2 ms between stimulus onset and overt response, we derived the sensitivity of the observer's oscillatory brain activity (in the theta, alpha, and beta bandwidths) to these SF features. Then, in each bandwidth, we estimated the moments (between stimulus onset and perceptual judgment) when perception-specific SF features were maximally integrated, corresponding to perceptual moments. We show that the centroparietal beta oscillations support perceptual moments underlying the conscious perception of the nuns, whereas theta oscillations support the perception of Voltaire. For both perceptions, we reveal the specific information content of these perceptual moments.

  16. Visualization of the meridian of traditional Chinese medicine with electrical impedance tomography: An initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanli; Lu, Xiaozuo; Wang, Xuemin

    2010-04-01

    The meridian is a concept central to traditional Chinese medical techniques such as acupuncture. There is no physically verifiable anatomical or histological basis for the existence of meridians. In Chinese medicine, the meridians are channels along which the energy of the psychological system is considered to flow. It has been proven that the resistance along the meridian channels is lower compared to other paths. Based on this knowledge, we proposed using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to visualize the meridians of human being. A simplified three dimensional (3D) mathematical model of the forearm developed. Current was injected in the direction perpendicular to the cross-section where eight electrodes were equally placed around the surface of the forearm for the voltage measurements. The model was solved using Finite Element Method (FEM) and dynamic image was reconstructed using truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) regularization method. The conductivity distributions were compared with different current injections, along the meridian channel and channels around respectively. We also conducted experiments on models and the meridians were shown in final reconstructed images.

  17. Visualization experiments of biofilm growth in the presence of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Sygouni, V.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 emissions in properly selected deep geologic formations is considered a promising solution for the reduction of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, CO2 leakage may potentially occur from the storage geologic formation. Partition of CO2 in water may result in pH decrease. This change in aqueous phase may contribute to solubilization of undesired heavy metals from the solid matrix. In this work we investigate experimentally the impact of CO2 to shallow groundwater systems. A series of visualization experiments in a glass-etched micromodel were performed in order to estimate the effect of CO2 on biofilm formation. Biofilms were developed using Pseudomonas putida. Nutrient saturated with CO2 was injected in the micromodel through an inlet port, and fluid samples were collected at the outlet port. The transient growth of the biofilm was monitored by taking high-resolution digital photographs at various times, and the effect of CO2 on biofilm growth was estimated.

  18. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  19. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 1 Mediates Experience-Dependent Maintenance of Mature Synaptic Connectivity in the Visual Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Madoka; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Yagasaki, Yuki; Harada, Takeshi; Nagumo, Yasuyuki; Uesaka, Naofumi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Aiba, Atsu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miyata, Mariko; Kano, Masanobu

    2016-09-07

    Neural circuits formed during postnatal development have to be maintained stably thereafter, but their mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report that the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) is essential for the maintenance of mature synaptic connectivity in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). In mGluR1 knockout (mGluR1-KO) mice, strengthening and elimination at retinogeniculate synapses occurred normally until around postnatal day 20 (P20). However, during the subsequent visual-experience-dependent maintenance phase, weak retinogeniculate synapses were newly recruited. These changes were similar to those of wild-type (WT) mice that underwent visual deprivation or inactivation of mGluR1 in the dLGN from P21. Importantly, visual deprivation was ineffective in mGluR1-KO mice, and the changes induced by visual deprivation in WT mice were rescued by pharmacological activation of mGluR1 in the dLGN. These results demonstrate that mGluR1 is crucial for the visual-experience-dependent maintenance of mature synaptic connectivity in the dLGN.

  20. Sleep and Sex: What Can Go Wrong? A Review of the Literature on Sleep Related Disorders and Abnormal Sexual Behaviors and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Carlos H.; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mahowald, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To formulate the first classification of sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. Design: A computerized literature search was conducted, and other sources, such as textbooks, were searched. Results: Many categories of sleep related disorders were represented in the classification: parasomnias (confusional arousals/sleepwalking, with or without obstructive sleep apnea; REM sleep behavior disorder); sleep related seizures; Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS); severe chronic insomnia; restless legs syndrome; narcolepsy; sleep exacerbation of persistent sexual arousal syndrome; sleep related painful erections; sleep related dissociative disorders; nocturnal psychotic disorders; miscellaneous states. Kleine-Levin syndrome (78 cases) and parasomnias (31 cases) were most frequently reported. Parasomnias and sleep related seizures had overlapping and divergent clinical features. Thirty-one cases of parasomnias (25 males; mean age, 32 years) and 7 cases of sleep related seizures (4 males; mean age, 38 years) were identified. A full range of sleep related sexual behaviors with self and/or bed partners or others were reported, including masturbation, sexual vocalizations, fondling, sexual intercourse with climax, sexual assault/rape, ictal sexual hyperarousal, ictal orgasm, and ictal automatism. Adverse physical and/or psychosocial effects from the sleepsex were present in all parasomnia and sleep related seizure cases, but pleasurable effects were reported by 5 bed partners and by 3 patients with sleep related seizures. Forensic consequences were common, occurring in 35.5% (11/31) of parasomnia cases, with most (9/11) involving minors. All parasomnias cases reported amnesia for the sleepsex, in contrast to 28.6% (2/7) of sleep related seizure cases. Polysomnography (without penile tumescence monitoring), performed in 26 of 31 parasomnia cases, documented sexual moaning from slow wave sleep in 3 cases and sexual intercourse during

  1. English Language Learners: Experiences of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments Who Work with This Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topor, Irene; Rosenblum, L. Penny

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This article presents a study that gathered data from 66 teachers of students with visual impairments about their preparation to work with children who are visually impaired and are learning English, and their knowledge of instructional strategies and methods of instruction. Methods: An online five-part survey was available to…

  2. Visually Impaired People with Learning Difficulties: Their Education from 1900 to 1970--Policy, Practice and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sally

    2008-01-01

    By means of documentary evidence and six in-depth interviews, this paper traces policy and practice relating to the education of visually impaired children with learning difficulties from 1900 to 1970. It reveals that if visually impaired children with learning difficulties were given an education at all, their needs were not usually met and they…

  3. The Nature of Experience Determines Object Representations in the Visual System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Yetta K.; Folstein, Jonathan R.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (PL) and perceptual expertise (PE) traditionally lead to different training effects and recruit different brain areas, but reasons for these differences are largely unknown. Here, we tested how the learning history influences visual object representations. Two groups were trained with tasks typically used in PL or PE…

  4. Experience-dependent emergence of beta and gamma band oscillations in the primary visual cortex during the critical period

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang; Rasch, Malte J.; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Xiao-hui

    2015-01-01

    Neural oscillatory activities have been shown to play important roles in neural information processing and the shaping of circuit connections during development. However, it remains unknown whether and how specific neural oscillations emerge during a postnatal critical period (CP), in which neuronal connections are most substantially modified by neural activity and experience. By recording local field potentials (LFPs) and single unit activity in developing primary visual cortex (V1) of head-fixed awake mice, we here demonstrate an emergence of characteristic oscillatory activities during the CP. From the pre-CP to CP, the peak frequency of spontaneous fast oscillatory activities shifts from the beta band (15–35 Hz) to the gamma band (40–70 Hz), accompanied by a decrease of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and broadband spike-field coherence (SFC). Moreover, visual stimulation induced a large increase of beta-band activity but a reduction of gamma-band activity specifically from the CP onwards. Dark rearing of animals from the birth delayed this emergence of oscillatory activities during the CP, suggesting its dependence on early visual experience. These findings suggest that the characteristic neuronal oscillatory activities emerged specifically during the CP may represent as neural activity trait markers for the experience-dependent maturation of developing visual cortical circuits. PMID:26648548

  5. Lessons Learned From the CISM-DX Open Source Visualization and Data Analysis Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M. J.; Weigel, R. S.; Schmitt, P.

    2012-12-01

    As part of its efforts to develop an end-to-end physics-based numerical model for the Sun-to-Earth space weather system the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) created CISM-DX the open-source visualization and analysis package. The package is a collection of data, models, and tools for both analysis and visualization of space physics data sets. A key component of the package is SPDX, which extends the capabilities of the open source visualization package, OpenDX, into the space physics domain through a series of custom modules for importing data and visual programs for producing visualizations of the results as well as assisting in the analysis of the simulation results. The package includes the ability to import data from all CISM components, e.g. MAS, ENLIL, LFM, RCM, and TIEGCM, as well as other space physics models. We also developed a series of hands-on exercises that have been used as part of the CISM Space Weather School to provide a unique educational tool to students beginning their space physics careers. Numerous challenges have been address during the lifetime of this project including how to deal with multiple independent component libraries, installation on different operating systems, and encourage user participation in the development process. The future of CISM-DX includes addressing the need for visualization tools that support parallel rendering and remote visualization.

  6. Comparison of the hemodynamic response to different visual stimuli in single-event and block stimulation fMRI experiments.

    PubMed

    Janz, C; Schmitt, C; Speck, O; Hennig, J

    2000-11-01

    Experiments with three different types of basic visual stimulation were performed to compare cortical activation in single-event and block trials. Independent of the stimulation paradigm, the single-event presentation leads to highly consistent signal responses regarding both the activated cortical areas and the dynamics of the signal time course. In contrast, signal time courses during block paradigms depend on the stimulus applied and are a complex and nonlinear function of the single-event responses. Additionally, the initial dip during the first 2 seconds after stimulus onset is consistently observed. However, the small amplitude change (-0.1% to -0.3%) requires signal averaging to establish statistical significance of the effect. Furthermore, different patterns of activation were observed within the primary visual cortex. In an anterior part of the primary visual cortex, activation was only observed at the onset and at the cessation of stimulation involving luminance changes.

  7. Visualization experiment of 30 MeV proton beam irradiated water target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwan Hong, Bong; Gun Yang, Tea; Su Jung, In; Soo Park, Yeun; Hee Cho, Hyung

    2011-11-01

    The nucleate boiling phenomena in a water target irradiated by 30 MeV proton beam were visualized experimentally. The beam size was 10 mm in diameter and beam current of 10, 15 and 20 μA were used, respectively. A target cavity of 4.5 cc in volume was filled with distilled water without atmosphere. A CMOS camera is used to record the phenomena through a side window. The temperature and pressure were measured during experiments. The depth of the Bragg peak was indicated by the blue light emission of the proton beam in the water target. In the case of 10 μA beam intensity, there was no visible phase change but fluxes by convection was observed at the Bragg peak and near the foil surface region. At 15 μA beam intensity, steam bubbles were generated by homogenous nuclear boiling at the Bragg peak and corrupted by cavitation at the upper region. The steam bubble generation point can be indicated by the blue light emission, which can show us the position of the Bragg peak. At 20 μΑ beam intensity, the steam bubbles were generated at Bragg peak and near the foil surface. The homogenous nucleate boiling at the Bragg peak was dominant and the heterogeneous nucleate boiling near the foil surface took place, occasionally. The cavitation of the steam bubble was also observed in the upper region within the target. The penetration depth of the proton beam was change along with the steam bubble formation. The blue light emission of the proton beam in water shows that the penetration depth of the proton beam becomes deeper when vapor bubbles are generated.

  8. With the Advent of Tomosynthesis in the Workup of Mammographic Abnormality, is Spot Compression Mammography Now Obsolete? An Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Ni Mhuircheartaigh, Neasa; Coffey, Louise; Fleming, Hannah; O' Doherty, Ann; McNally, Sorcha

    2017-03-02

    To determine if the routine use of spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and architectural distortion since the availability of digital breast tomosynthesis. We introduced breast tomosynthesis in the workup of screen detected abnormalities in our screening center in January 2015. During an initial learning period with tomosynthesis standard spot compression views were also performed. Three consultant breast radiologists retrospectively reviewed all screening mammograms recalled for assessment over the first 6-month period. We assessed retrospectively whether there was any additional diagnostic information obtained from spot compression views not already apparent on tomography. All cases were also reviewed for any additional lesions detected by tomosynthesis, not detected on routine 2-view screening mammography. 548 women screened with standard 2-view digital screening mammography were recalled for assessment in the selected period and a total of 565 lesions were assessed. 341 lesions were assessed by both tomosynthesis and routine spot compression mammography. The spot compression view was considered more helpful than tomosynthesis in only one patient. This was because the breast was inadequately positioned for tomosynthesis and the area in question was not adequately imaged. Apart from this technical error there was no asymmetry, distortion or mass where spot compression provided more diagnostic information than tomosynthesis alone. We detected three additional cancers on tomosynthesis, not detected by routine screening mammography. From our initial experience with tomosynthesis we conclude that spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and distortions where tomosynthesis is available.

  9. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual analysis was possible 67% of the time and with computer analysis 95% of the time. Ninety four per cent of abnormalities in frequency were detected by visual analysis and 93.7% by computer analysis. Abnormalities involving a loss of coupling, however, were not recognised by transcutaneous recordings. Transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity assessed by computer analysis can usually recognise normal gastric electrical activity and tachygastria. Current techniques, however, are unable to detect abnormalities in electrical coupling. PMID:1864531

  10. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  11. Apollo experience report: The application of a computerized visualization capability to lunar missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyle, C. T.; Lunde, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a computerized capability to depict views from the Apollo spacecraft during a lunar mission was undertaken before the Apollo 8 mission. Such views were considered valuable because of the difficulties in visualizing the complex geometry of the Earth, Moon, Sun, and spacecraft. Such visualization capability originally was desired for spacecraft attitude verification and contingency situations. Improvements were added for later Apollo flights, and results were adopted for several real time and preflight applications. Some specific applications have included crewmember and ground control personnel familiarization, nominal and contingency mission planning, definition of secondary attitude checks for all major thrust maneuvers, and preflight star selection for navigation and for platform alinement. The use of this computerized visualization capability should prove valuable for any future space program as an aid to understanding the geometrical relationships between the spacecraft and the celestial surroundings.

  12. Changes in and Efficacies of Indications for Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Cytogenomic Abnormalities: 13 Years of Experience in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jinlai; Matarese, Chelsea; Crivello, Julianna; Wilcox, Katherine; Wang, Dongmei; DiAdamo, Autumn; Xu, Fang; Li, Peining

    2015-01-01

    Background Because the future application of cell-free fetal DNA screening is expected to dramatically improve the diagnostic yield and reduce unnecessary invasive procedures, it is time to summarize the indications of invasive prenatal diagnosis. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the changes and efficacies of indications of invasive procedures for detecting cytogenomic abnormalities from 2000 to 2012. Material/Methods From our regional obstetric unit, 7818 invasive procedures were referred by indications of advance maternal age (AMA), abnormal ultrasound findings (aUS), abnormal maternal serum screening (aMSS), and family history (FH). Chromosome, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analyses were performed on chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniotic fluid (AF) specimens at the Yale Cytogenetics Laboratory. The abnormal findings from single or combined indications were compared to evaluate the diagnostic yield. Results The annual caseload declined by 57.2% but the diagnostic yield increased from 7.2% to 13.4%. Chromosomal and genomic abnormalities were detected in 752 cases (9.6%, 752/7818) and 12 cases (4%, 12/303), respectively. Significantly decreased AMA referrals and increased aUS and aMSS referrals were noted. The top 3 indications by diagnostic yield were AMA/aUS (51.4% for CVS, 24.2% for AF), aUS (34.7% for CVS, 14.5% for AF), and AMA/aMSS (17.8% for CVS, 9.9% for AF). Conclusions Over a period of 13 years, the indication of aMSS and aUS were increasing while AMA was decreasing for prenatal diagnosis of cytogenomic abnormalities, and there was a continuous trend of reduced invasive procedures. Prenatal evaluation using AMA/aUS was the most effective in detecting chromosomal abnormalities, but better indications for genomic abnormalities are needed. PMID:26143093

  13. Reading in the dark: neural correlates and cross-modal plasticity for learning to read entire words without visual experience.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Nadine; Maidenbaum, Shachar; Amedi, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has long attempted to determine the ways in which cortical selectivity develops, and the impact of nature vs. nurture on it. Congenital blindness (CB) offers a unique opportunity to test this question as the brains of blind individuals develop without visual experience. Here we approach this question through the reading network. Several areas in the visual cortex have been implicated as part of the reading network, and one of the main ones among them is the VWFA, which is selective to the form of letters and words. But what happens in the CB brain? On the one hand, it has been shown that cross-modal plasticity leads to the recruitment of occipital areas, including the VWFA, for linguistic tasks. On the other hand, we have recently demonstrated VWFA activity for letters in contrast to other visual categories when the information is provided via other senses such as touch or audition. Which of these tasks is more dominant? By which mechanism does the CB brain process reading? Using fMRI and visual-to-auditory sensory substitution which transfers the topographical features of the letters we compare reading with semantic and scrambled conditions in a group of CB. We found activation in early auditory and visual cortices during the early processing phase (letter), while the later phase (word) showed VWFA and bilateral dorsal-intraparietal activations for words. This further supports the notion that many visual regions in general, even early visual areas, also maintain a predilection for task processing even when the modality is variable and in spite of putative lifelong linguistic cross-modal plasticity. Furthermore, we find that the VWFA is recruited preferentially for letter and word form, while it was not recruited, and even exhibited deactivation, for an immediately subsequent semantic task suggesting that despite only short sensory substitution experience orthographic task processing can dominate semantic processing in the VWFA. On a wider

  14. Family Voices at Mealtime: Experiences with Young Children with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Catherine A.; Spicer, Carol L.; Morgese, Zoe L.

    2014-01-01

    Infants with visual impairment often require additional interaction from adults to reinforce behaviors that lead to competency at mealtimes, but parental and professional confidence in teaching these skills is often limited. In the following collective case study, the authors, a speech/language pathologist (S/LP), occupational therapist (OT), and…

  15. The Impact of Interactive Classroom Television Systems on the Educational Experiences of Severely Visually Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikson, T. K.; And Others

    A 3 year evaluation report is presented on an Interactive Classroom Television System (ITCS), which creates a visual classroom environment for partially sighted elementary school students (study N=24) using the magnification, brightness, and contrast capabilities of television cameras and monitors. It is explained that the system allows teachers…

  16. The effects of action video game experience on the time course of inhibition of return and the efficiency of visual search.

    PubMed

    Castel, Alan D; Pratt, Jay; Drummond, Emily

    2005-06-01

    The ability to efficiently search the visual environment is a critical function of the visual system, and recent research has shown that experience playing action video games can influence visual selective attention. The present research examined the similarities and differences between video game players (VGPs) and non-video game players (NVGPs) in terms of the ability to inhibit attention from returning to previously attended locations, and the efficiency of visual search in easy and more demanding search environments. Both groups were equally good at inhibiting the return of attention to previously cued locations, although VGPs displayed overall faster reaction times to detect targets. VGPs also showed overall faster response time for easy and difficult visual search tasks compared to NVGPs, largely attributed to faster stimulus-response mapping. The findings suggest that relative to NVGPs, VGPs rely on similar types of visual processing strategies but possess faster stimulus-response mappings in visual attention tasks.

  17. On the delights of being an ex-cataract patient: Visual experiences before and after cataract operations; what they indicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about changes in the author's visual perception over most of his lifetime, but in particular in the period before and after cataract operations. The author was myopic (-3D) until the operations, and emmetropic afterwards - with mild astigmatic aberrations that can be compensated with cylindrical spectacles, but in his case rarely are, because of the convenience of not needing to wear distance glasses in daily life anymore. The perceptual changes concern color vision, stereopsis and visual acuity. The post-cataract changes were partly expected, for example less yellow and more blue images, but partly wholly unexpected, and accompanied by feelings of excitement and pleasure; even delight. These unexpected changes were a sudden, strongly increased depth vision and the sensation of seeing suddenly sharper than ever before, mainly at intermediate viewing distances. The visual acuity changes occur after, exceptionally, his distance glasses are put on. All these sensations lasted or last only for a short time. Those concerning stereopsis were dubbed 'super depth', and were confined to the first two months after the second cataract operation. Those concerning acuity were termed 'super-sharpness impression'; SSI. These can be elicited more or less at will, by putting on the spectacles described; but will then disappear again, although the spectacles are kept on. Ten other ex-cataract patients have been interviewed on their post-operation experiences. The 'super-depth' and SSI experiences may be linked to assumed neurophysiological mechanisms such as the concept of Bayesian reweighting of perceptual criteria.

  18. An adult-like pattern of ocular dominance columns in striate cortex of newborn monkeys prior to visual experience.

    PubMed

    Horton, J C; Hocking, D R

    1996-03-01

    In macaque monkeys, the geniculocortical afferents serving each eye segregate in layer IVc of striate cortex during early life into a pattern of alternating inputs called ocular dominance columns. It has been disputed whether visual experience is necessary for the formation of ocular dominance columns. To settle this issue, fetal monkeys were delivered prematurely by Caesarean section at embryonic day 157 (E157), 8 d before the end of normal gestation. To avoid light exposure, the Caesarean section and all subsequent feedings and procedures were done in absolute darkness, using infrared night-vision goggles. Tritiated proline was injected into the right eye 1 d after delivery (E158). One week later at postnatal age 0 (P0), the equivalent of a full-term pregnancy (E165/P0), alternate sections of unfolded and flattened visual cortex were prepared for autoradiography or cytochrome oxidase (CO). All three newborns studied at E165/P0 had well segregated ocular dominance columns organized into the characteristic mosaic present in adults. In the upper layers, a mature pattern of CO patches (also known as blobs or puffs) was visible, aligned with the ocular dominance columns in layer IVc. Every other row of patches in layers II, III was labeled by [3H]proline. In V2, a distinct system of alternating thick-pale-thin-pale CO stripes was present. These findings indicate that stimulation of the retina by light is not necessary for the development of columnar systems in the visual cortex. Ocular dominance columns, patches, and V2 stripes all are well formed before visual experience. Even the thalamic input to the patches in the upper layers of striate cortex is segregated by eye in newborns.

  19. Experience and activity-dependent maturation of perisomatic GABAergic innervation in primary visual cortex during a postnatal critical period.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Di Cristo, Graziella; Higashiyama, Hiroyuki; Knott, Graham W; Kuhlman, Sandra J; Welker, Egbert; Huang, Z Josh

    2004-10-27

    The neocortical GABAergic network consists of diverse interneuron cell types that display distinct physiological properties and target their innervations to subcellular compartments of principal neurons. Inhibition directed toward the soma and proximal dendrites is crucial in regulating the output of pyramidal neurons, but the development of perisomatic innervation is poorly understood because of the lack of specific synaptic markers. In the primary visual cortex, for example, it is unknown whether, and to what extent, the formation and maturation of perisomatic synapses are intrinsic to cortical circuits or are regulated by sensory experience. Using bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice that label a defined class of perisomatic synapses with green fluorescent protein, here we show that perisomatic innervation developed during a protracted postnatal period after eye opening. Maturation of perisomatic innervation was significantly retarded by visual deprivation during the third, but not the fifth, postnatal week, implicating an important role for sensory input. To examine the role of cortical intrinsic mechanisms, we developed a method to visualize perisomatic synapses from single basket interneurons in cortical organotypic cultures. Characteristic perisomatic synapses formed through a stereotyped process, involving the extension of distinct terminal branches and proliferation of perisomatic boutons. Neuronal spiking in organotypic cultures was necessary for the proliferation of boutons and the extension, but not the maintenance, of terminal branches. Together, our results suggest that although the formation of perisomatic synapses is intrinsic to the cortex, visual experience can influence the maturation and pattern of perisomatic innervation during a postnatal critical period by modulating the level of neural activity within cortical circuits.

  20. Impact of a visual programming experience on the attitude toward programming of introductory undergraduate students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Saurabh

    Traditionally, textual tools have been utilized to teach basic programming languages and paradigms. Research has shown that students tend to be visual learners. Using flowcharts, students can quickly understand the logic of their programs and visualize the flow of commands in the algorithm. Moreover, applying programming to physical systems through the use of a microcontroller to facilitate this type of learning can spark an interest in students to advance their programming knowledge to create novel applications. This study examined if freshmen college students' attitudes towards programming changed after completing a graphical programming lesson. Various attributes about students' attitudes were examined including confidence, interest, stereotypes, and their belief in the usefulness of acquiring programming skills. The study found that there were no statistically significant differences in attitudes either immediately following the session or after a period of four weeks.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms for Synaptic Modification in the Visual Cortex: Interaction between Theory and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-03

    receptor effectiveness: NMDA-stimulated uptake of 45Ca into slices of kitten visual cortex maintained in vitro ( Sherin et al., 1988). We predicted...Neuroscience and Connectionist Theory, M. Gluck & D. Rumelhart, eds. Sherin , J.E., D. Feldman and M.F. Bear (1988) NMDA-evoked calcium uptake by slices...Gluck & D. Rumelhart, eds. Figure 12: Data from the work of Sherin , Feldman and Bear (1988) showing NMDA stimulated 45Ca uptake by slices of striate

  2. The Dynamics of Visual Experience, an EEG Study of Subjective Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Twomey, Deirdre; Glennon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using independent-component analysis (ICA) we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns) or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns). Conclusions/Significance Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation. PMID:22292053

  3. Decoding the future from past experience: learning shapes predictions in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Luft, Caroline D B; Meeson, Alan; Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2015-05-01

    Learning the structure of the environment is critical for interpreting the current scene and predicting upcoming events. However, the brain mechanisms that support our ability to translate knowledge about scene statistics to sensory predictions remain largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that learning of temporal regularities shapes representations in early visual cortex that relate to our ability to predict sensory events. We tested the participants' ability to predict the orientation of a test stimulus after exposure to sequences of leftward- or rightward-oriented gratings. Using fMRI decoding, we identified brain patterns related to the observers' visual predictions rather than stimulus-driven activity. Decoding of predicted orientations following structured sequences was enhanced after training, while decoding of cued orientations following exposure to random sequences did not change. These predictive representations appear to be driven by the same large-scale neural populations that encode actual stimulus orientation and to be specific to the learned sequence structure. Thus our findings provide evidence that learning temporal structures supports our ability to predict future events by reactivating selective sensory representations as early as in primary visual cortex.

  4. An experiment to classify the clinical fear seen during aerobic movement acquisition in adults with visual impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to classify the fear that occurs during the process of a squat-like movement by persons with visual impairment. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen persons with a visual impairment, 45 years and older, who were independent in daily living were recruited for the study. The study utilized a field experiment design. The setting was the Kusatsumachi Welfare Center, and the study period was from March through August 2015. Outcome measures included the presence or absence of fear during attempt of a squat-like movement on a force plate. Metrics included the ratio of low and high frequency components of heart rate variability spectra (cm2/Hz) based on resting rate intervals (ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, USA). Autonomic hyperactivity was defined as the occurrence of objective fear with LF/HF ratio of over 2.0. Statistics included Fischer’s exact test. [Results] Four fear types included the combination of danger and objective fear factors. The frequencies of occurrence of clinically categorized subjective fear across the four fear types were two (danger, fear), seven (no danger, fear), six (danger, no fear), and zero (no danger, no fear) persons. [Conclusion] This procedure of classifying fear might be feasible during evaluation of a squat-like movement by persons with a visual impairment. PMID:27821960

  5. Therapy-related patterns of cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome post polycythemia vera: single center experience and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Swolin, Birgitta; Rödjer, Stig; Westin, Jan

    2008-06-01

    A minor fraction of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) develop a terminal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Analysis of the cytogenetic abnormalities during AML or MDS may help in understanding if this development is part of the natural course of the disease or induced by myelosuppressive therapy. Thirty-six cases with AML or MDS post PV, collected in a single Swedish institution during a 33-year period, are described with special regard to time to development of AML or MDS, therapy given during active PV, and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS. A further 118 cases of AML or MDS post PV, in whom type of therapy during active PV and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS were reported, were collected from the literature. AML or MDS developed in our own series after 1-30 years with a fairly constant rate (two cases per year). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities were +1q, -5, 5q-, -7, 7q-, +8, +9, 11q-, 13q-, and 20q-. When patients in the total material (n = 154) were divided with regard to treatment during active PV, marked differences were observed. The highest frequency of abnormalities was found in patients given multiple lines of therapy (n = 61), dominating features being -5/5q- in 28 patients (46%), -7/7q- in 19 patients (31%), numerous translocations in 24 patients (39%), and unidentified markers in 22 patients (36%). Half of the patients treated with hydroxyurea alone showed a -5 or 5q- abnormality. In patients treated with phlebotomy alone, +8 and +9 were the most frequent findings. The type of therapy given during active PV influences the type of chromosome abnormalities present during terminal AML or MDS and can also be instrumental in the development of leukemia.

  6. Mantid - Data Analysis and Visualization Package for Neutron Scattering and $\\mu SR$ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Owen; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Buts, Alex; Campbell, Stuart I; Doucet, Mathieu; Draper, Nicholas J; Ferraz Leal, Ricardo F; Gigg, Martyn; Lynch, Vickie E; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Miller, Ross G; Perring, Toby G; Peterson, Peter F; Ren, Shelly; Reuter, Michael A; Savici, Andrei T; Taylor, Jonathan W; Taylor, Russell J; Zhou, Wenduo; Zikovsky, Janik L

    2014-11-01

    The Mantid framework is a software solution developed for the analysis and visualization of neutron scattering and muon spin measurements. The framework is jointly developed by a large team of software engineers and scientists at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the development is to improve software quality, both in terms of performance and ease of use, for the the user community of large scale facilities. The functionality and novel design aspects of the framework are described.

  7. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  8. Behavioral evidence for inter-hemispheric cooperation during a lexical decision task: a divided visual field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Lemonnier, Sophie; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS The redundant bilateral visual presentation of verbal stimuli decreases asymmetry and increases the cooperation between the two hemispheres.The increased cooperation between the hemispheres is related to semantic information during lexical processing.The inter-hemispheric interaction is represented by both inhibition and cooperation. This study explores inter-hemispheric interaction (IHI) during a lexical decision task by using a behavioral approach, the bilateral presentation of stimuli within a divided visual field experiment. Previous studies have shown that compared to unilateral presentation, the bilateral redundant (BR) presentation decreases the inter-hemispheric asymmetry and facilitates the cooperation between hemispheres. However, it is still poorly understood which type of information facilitates this cooperation. In the present study, verbal stimuli were presented unilaterally (left or right visual hemi-field successively) and bilaterally (left and right visual hemi-field simultaneously). Moreover, during the bilateral presentation of stimuli, we manipulated the relationship between target and distractors in order to specify the type of information which modulates the IHI. Thus, three types of information were manipulated: perceptual, semantic, and decisional, respectively named pre-lexical, lexical and post-lexical processing. Our results revealed left hemisphere (LH) lateralization during the lexical decision task. In terms of inter-hemisphere interaction, the perceptual and decision-making information increased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting the inhibition of one hemisphere upon the other. In contrast, semantic information decreased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting cooperation between the hemispheres. We discussed our results according to current models of IHI and concluded that cerebral hemispheres interact and communicate according to various excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, all which depend on specific

  9. Real-time analysis, visualization, and steering of microtomography experiments at photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszeski, G.; Insley, J. A.; Foster, I.; Bresnahan, J.; Kesselman, C.; Su, M.; Thiebaux, M.; Rivers, M. L.; Wang, S.; Tieman, B., McNulty, I.

    2000-02-29

    A new generation of specialized scientific instruments called synchrotron light sources allow the imaging of materials at very fine scales. However, in contrast to a traditional microscope, interactive use has not previously been possible because of the large amounts of data generated and the considerable computation required translating this data into a useful image. The authors describe a new software architecture that uses high-speed networks and supercomputers to enable quasi-real-time and hence interactive analysis of synchrotron light source data. This architecture uses technologies provided by the Globus computational grid toolkit to allow dynamic creation of a reconstruction pipeline that transfers data from a synchrotron source beamline to a preprocessing station, next to a parallel reconstruction system, and then to multiple visualization stations. Collaborative analysis tools allow multiple users to control data visualization. As a result, local and remote scientists can see and discuss preliminary results just minutes after data collection starts. The implications for more efficient use of this scarce resource and for more effective science appear tremendous.

  10. The roles of vocal and visual interactions in social learning zebra finches: A video playback experiment.

    PubMed

    Guillette, Lauren M; Healy, Susan D

    2016-12-30

    The transmission of information from an experienced demonstrator to a naïve observer often depends on characteristics of the demonstrator, such as familiarity, success or dominance status. Whether or not the demonstrator pays attention to and/or interacts with the observer may also affect social information acquisition or use by the observer. Here we used a video-demonstrator paradigm first to test whether video demonstrators have the same effect as using live demonstrators in zebra finches, and second, to test the importance of visual and vocal interactions between the demonstrator and observer on social information use by the observer. We found that female zebra finches copied novel food choices of male demonstrators they saw via live-streaming video while they did not consistently copy from the demonstrators when they were seen in playbacks of the same videos. Although naive observers copied in the absence of vocalizations by the demonstrator, as they copied from playback of videos with the sound off, females did not copy where there was a mis-match between the visual information provided by the video and vocal information from a live male that was out of sight. Taken together these results suggest that video demonstration is a useful methodology for testing social information transfer, at least in a foraging context, but more importantly, that social information use varies according to the vocal interactions, or lack thereof, between the observer and the demonstrator.

  11. Art Experiences for Young Children with Severe Visual Imapairments: Report from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Anna M.

    1987-01-01

    Ten guidelines are offered for providing art experiences for blind young children include adding sound, smell, or taste whenever possible. Suggested activities include making styrofoam-toothpick sculptures, box sculptures, tape and feather collages, torn paper collages, and fingerpaintings. (DB)

  12. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  13. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  14. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  15. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  17. Visual Earth observation performance in the space environment. Human performance measurement 4: Flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, John F.; Whiteley, James D.; Hawker, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of secondary payloads have flown on the Space Transportation System (STS) since its first flight in the 1980's. These experiments have typically addressed specific issues unique to the zero-gravity environment. Additionally, the experiments use the experience and skills of the mission and payload specialist crew members to facilitate data collection and ensure successful completion. This paper presents the results of the Terra Scout experiment, which flew aboard STS-44 in November 1991. This unique Earth Observation experiment specifically required a career imagery analyst to operate the Spaceborne Direct-View Optical System (SpaDVOS), a folded optical path telescope system designed to mount inside the shuttle on the overhead aft flight deck windows. Binoculars and a small telescope were used as backup optics. Using his imagery background, coupled with extensive target and equipment training, the payload specialist was tasked with documenting the following: (1) the utility of the equipment; (2) his ability to acquire and track ground targets; (3) the level of detail he could discern; (4) the atmospheric conditions; and (5) other in-situ elements which contributed to or detracted from his ability to analyze targets. Special emphasis was placed on the utility of a manned platform for research and development of future spaceborne sensors. The results and lessons learned from Terra Scout will be addressed including human performance and equipment design issues.

  18. Abnormal selective attention normalizes P3 amplitudes in PDD.

    PubMed

    Hoeksma, Marco R; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-07-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in selective attention. Adolescents with PDD showed abnormal selective attention, as reflected by larger auditory Processing Negativity (PN) and visual N2b, but no P3 abnormalities. Dipole localizations revealed that the locations of PN generators in subjects with PDD differed from controls. It was concluded that the abnormalities in selective attention in adolescents with PDD have a normalizing effect on P3, and possibly act as a compensatory process.

  19. Recognition of simple visual images using a sparse distributed memory: Some implementations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeckel, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, a method was described of representing a class of simple visual images so that they could be used with a Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). Herein, two possible implementations are described of a SDM, for which these images, suitably encoded, will serve both as addresses to the memory and as data to be stored in the memory. A key feature of both implementations is that a pattern that is represented as an unordered set with a variable number of members can be used as an address to the memory. In the 1st model, an image is encoded as a 9072 bit string to be used as a read or write address; the bit string may also be used as data to be stored in the memory. Another representation, in which an image is encoded as a 256 bit string, may be used with either model as data to be stored in the memory, but not as an address. In the 2nd model, an image is not represented as a vector of fixed length to be used as an address. Instead, a rule is given for determining which memory locations are to be activated in response to an encoded image. This activation rule treats the pieces of an image as an unordered set. With this model, the memory can be simulated, based on a method of computing the approximate result of a read operation.

  20. Visual Data Collection Methods for Research on the Affective Dimensions of Children's Personal Experiences of PE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgakis, Steve; Light, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The rapid growth of research on Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) over the past decade has paid little attention to research methodology. This paper redresses this lack of attention to research methods and reports on a study conducted on children's personal experiences of Game Sense. The study focuses on the use of year six students'…

  1. Including Visually Impaired Students in Physical Education Lessons: A Case Study of Teacher and Pupil Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Frank; Dandolo, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Following recent education policy and curriculum changes in England, the notion of inclusion of children with special educational needs in physical education has increasingly become a topic of research interest and concern. It was the aim of this study to explore personal experiences and perspectives of inclusion in physical education. To this end…

  2. Oscillating Droplets and Incompressible Liquids: Slow-Motion Visualization of Experiments with Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present fascinating simple demonstration experiments recorded with high-speed cameras in the field of fluid dynamics. Examples include oscillations of falling droplets, effects happening upon impact of a liquid droplet into a liquid, the disintegration of extremely large droplets in free fall and the consequences of incompressibility. (Contains…

  3. Understanding Student Experiences: A Case Study in Scientific Visualization and Civics and Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Emily George

    2012-01-01

    This research study provides the finding of a qualitative case study in Technology, Engineering, and Design Education as well as Social Studies Education. The purpose of this study was to describe the role of graphics within a social studies lesson by examining a student's experience when a new lesson is implemented in class. The participants were…

  4. Why Are Faces Denser in the Visual Experiences of Younger than Older Infants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Swapnaa; Fausey, Caitlin M.; Smith, Linda B.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence from studies using head cameras suggests that the frequency of faces directly in front of infants "declines" over the first year and a half of life, a result that has implications for the development of and evolutionary constraints on face processing. Two experiments tested 2 opposing hypotheses about this observed…

  5. Visual Population Receptive Fields in People with Schizophrenia Have Reduced Inhibitory Surrounds.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elaine J; Tibber, Marc S; Schwarzkopf, D Sam; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Rees, Geraint; Dakin, Steven C

    2017-02-08

    People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal visual perception on a range of visual tasks, which have been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition. However, differences in the underlying architecture of visual cortex neurons, which might explain these visual anomalies, have yet to be reported in vivo Here, we probed the neural basis of these deficits using fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to infer properties of visually responsive neurons in people with SZ. We employed a difference-of-Gaussian model to capture the center-surround configuration of the pRF, providing critical information about the spatial scale of the pRFs inhibitory surround. Our analysis reveals that SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex, as well as a reduction in size and depth of the inhibitory surround in V1, V2, and V4. We consider how reduced inhibition might explain the diverse range of visual deficits reported in SZ.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal perception on a range of visual tasks, which has been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation/inhibition. However, associated differences in the functional architecture of visual cortex neurons have yet to be reported in vivo We used fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to demonstrate that the fine-grained functional architecture of visual cortex in people with SZ differs from unaffected controls. SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex largely due to reduced inhibitory surrounds. An imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition could drive such a change in the center-surround pRF configuration and ultimately explain the range of visual deficits experienced in SZ.

  6. Visual Population Receptive Fields in People with Schizophrenia Have Reduced Inhibitory Surrounds

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Schwarzkopf, D. Sam; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal visual perception on a range of visual tasks, which have been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition. However, differences in the underlying architecture of visual cortex neurons, which might explain these visual anomalies, have yet to be reported in vivo. Here, we probed the neural basis of these deficits using fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to infer properties of visually responsive neurons in people with SZ. We employed a difference-of-Gaussian model to capture the center-surround configuration of the pRF, providing critical information about the spatial scale of the pRFs inhibitory surround. Our analysis reveals that SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex, as well as a reduction in size and depth of the inhibitory surround in V1, V2, and V4. We consider how reduced inhibition might explain the diverse range of visual deficits reported in SZ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal perception on a range of visual tasks, which has been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation/inhibition. However, associated differences in the functional architecture of visual cortex neurons have yet to be reported in vivo. We used fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to demonstrate that the fine-grained functional architecture of visual cortex in people with SZ differs from unaffected controls. SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex largely due to reduced inhibitory surrounds. An imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition could drive such a change in the center-surround pRF configuration and ultimately explain the range of visual deficits experienced in SZ. PMID:28025253

  7. Early Experience with Hyaluronic Acid Instillation to Assist with Visual Internal Urethrotomy for Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Min; Kang, Dong Il; Shim, Bong Suk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The clinical usefulness of hyaluronic acid (HA) instillation during visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) for decreasing the incidence of recurrent urethral stricture was assessed. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight patients were treated by VIU with HA instillation between May 2007 and June 2009. After insertion of a Foley catheter following urethrotomy, HA was instilled via an 18-gauge tube catheter between the urethral lumen and Foley catheter. Seventeen cases were analyzed retrospectively 12 months postoperatively. We evaluated the success rate of this procedure by comparing retrograde urethrography (RGU) results, maximum flow rates, and postvoid residual urine volumes preoperatively and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Success was defined as either a maximum flow rate of at least 15 ml/s or no visible urethral stricture on RGU at 12 months postoperatively. Results Total success rates were 76.5% (13/17) and 52.9% (9/17) at 3 and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. By etiology, success rates at 3 and 12 months postoperatively, respectively, were 66.7% and 33.3% for inflammation, 66.7% and 50.0% for trauma, and 83.3% and 66.7% for unknown causes. Success rates were 63.6% for strictures less than 10 mm in length and 33.3% for strictures of 10 mm or more in length at 12 months postoperatively. Success rates were 61.5% for single strictures and 25% for multiple strictures at 12 months postoperatively. Conclusions The success rate of VIU with HA instillation was not better than that observed in the literature for conventional VIU. PMID:21221206

  8. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies - Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques.

    PubMed

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J; Aspell, Jane E; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty J; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location - measured by anterior posterior drift - was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body.

  9. Bioluminescence Flow Visualization in the Ocean: An Initial Strategy Based on Laboratory Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    development of the 408-416. purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus . Biological Rohr, J., Latz, M.I., Fallon, S ., Nauen, J.C., Hendricks, E...experiments 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHORS 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jim Rohr, Stewart Fallon’ Mark Hyman2 S . TASK NUMBER Michael I...Latz 3 51. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION ’SSC San Diego 2Coastal Systems Station

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities Are Major Prognostic Factors in Elderly Patients With Multiple Myeloma: The Intergroupe Francophone du Myélome Experience

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Hulin, Cyrille; Campion, Loic; Rodon, Philippe; Marit, Gerald; Attal, Michel; Royer, Bruno; Dib, Mamoun; Voillat, Laurent; Bouscary, Didier; Caillot, Denis; Wetterwald, Marc; Pegourie, Brigitte; Lepeu, Gerard; Corront, Bernadette; Karlin, Lionel; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Delbrel, Xavier; Guilhot, Francois; Kolb, Brigitte; Decaux, Olivier; Lamy, Thierry; Garderet, Laurent; Allangba, Olivier; Lifermann, Francois; Anglaret, Bruno; Moreau, Philippe; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Facon, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chromosomal abnormalities, especially t(4;14) and del(17p), are major prognostic factors in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, this has been especially demonstrated in patients age < 66 years treated with intensive approaches. The goal of this study was to address this issue in elderly patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy. Patients and Methods To answer this important question, we retrospectively analyzed a series of 1,890 patients (median age, 72 years; range, 66 to 94 years), including 1,095 with updated data on treatment modalities and survival. Results This large study first showed that the incidence of t(4;14) was not uniform over age, with a marked decrease in the oldest patients. Second, it showed that both t(4;14) and del(17p) retained their prognostic value in elderly patients treated with melphalan and prednisone–based chemotherapy. Conclusion t(4;14) and del(17p) are major prognostic factors in elderly patients with MM, both for progression-free and overall survival, indicating that these two abnormalities should be investigated at diagnosis of MM, regardless of age. PMID:23796999

  11. Investigation of NAA and NAAG dynamics underlying visual stimulation using MEGA-PRESS in a functional MRS experiment.

    PubMed

    Landim, Ricardo C G; Edden, Richard A E; Foerster, Bernd; Li, Li Min; Covolan, Roberto J M; Castellano, Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) is responsible for the majority of the most prominent peak in (1)H-MR spectra, and has been used as diagnostic marker for several pathologies. However, ~10% of this peak can be attributed to N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide whose release may be triggered by intense neuronal activation. Separate measurement of NAA and NAAG using MRS is difficult due to large superposition of their spectra. Specifically, in functional MRS (fMRS) experiments, most work has evaluated the sum NAA+NAAG, which does not appear to change during experiments. The aim of this work was to design and perform an fMRS experiment using visual stimulation and a spectral editing sequence, MEGA-PRESS, to further evaluate the individual dynamics of NAA and NAAG during brain activation. The functional paradigm used consisted of three blocks, starting with a rest (baseline) block of 320 s, followed by a stimulus block (640 s) and a rest block (640 s). Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. On average, subjects followed a pattern of NAA decrease and NAAG increase during stimulation, with a tendency to return to basal levels at the end of the paradigm, with a peak NAA decrease of -(21±19)% and a peak NAAG increase of (64±62)% (Wilcoxon test, p<0.05). These results may relate to: 1) the only known NAAG synthesis pathway is from NAA and glutamate; 2) a relationship between NAAG and the BOLD response.

  12. Abnormal Saccadic Eye Movements in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemner, C.; Verbaten, M. N.; Cuperus, J. M.; Camfferman, G.; van Engeland, H.

    1998-01-01

    The saccadic eye movements, generated during a visual oddball task, were compared for 10 autistic children, 10 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 10 dyslexic children, and 10 typically developing children. Several abnormal patterns of saccades were found in the autistic group. (DB)

  13. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  14. New observations by visualizing age stratification and internal dynamics of freshwater lenses in heterogeneous media - laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, L.; Dose, E.; Houben, G.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2012-12-01

    We performed a series of multi-tracer laboratory scale experiments in a transparent sand-box model to visualize (a) processes during the genesis of freshwater lenses and (b) their internal dynamics. For physical modeling an acrylic glass box was used to simulate a cross section of an island, similar to Stoeckl & Houben (2012). Degassed salt water with a density of 1023 kg/m3 was injected from the bottom, saturating the sand inside the model. Fluorescent tracer dyes uranine, eosine and indigotine were used to mark the infiltrating fresh water from the top. All experiments were filmed and analyzed using fast motion mode. We performed two different types of experimental set-up according to Vacher (1988): (1) Layers of different hydraulic conductivity: By filling the sand-box model with sand of different grain sizes, layers of different hydraulic conductivity could be simulated. (2) Recharge distribution: By recharging the island heterogeneously we could observe shifts in the geometry of the freshwater lens. A novel approach of using different tracer colors and varying them spatially and over time within the recharge waters allowed us to visualize and measure internal flow processes. Age stratification and flow paths could therefore be investigated. Moreover, a combination of temporal and spatial tracer color variation in one single experiment enabled us to measure flow velocities of freshwater movement. Additionally, by injecting small amounts of tracer in the salt water environment, movements near the interface between fresh- and saltwater could be observed. Using the finite element model FEFLOW we could model the density driven dynamics of our small scale freshwater lens, including its formation and the degradation after turning off the recharge water. This is important to fill the gap between our physical sand-box model and ongoing field investigations. The main focus of this work is the effects of climate change as well as geological and morphological

  15. Interaction between auditory and visual processing in car audio: simulation experiment using video reproduction.

    PubMed

    Iwamiya, S

    1997-05-01

    To clarify the effect of listening to music on the impression obtained from the landscape viewed from the car, a simulation experiment using video reproductions was conducted. The impression left by the landscapes and that of the music excerpts were measured by a semantic differential method. The impression of the landscapes is more pleasant when music excerpts are reproduced than when no music is presented. The pleasantness of the landscapes is the highest when relaxing music is being played. The impression of the landscapes is more powerful when music is present. In particular, agitated music has a strong effect to make the impression of the landscape more powerful. Music generally has an effect to 'lighten' the landscape impression. However, very heavy music makes the landscape much heavier. Musical tempo is an important factor to determine the impression of music and affects the impression of landscape.

  16. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig T.; McRae, Colin D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela; Cantu, Luca Maria Luigi; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were performed in the University of Virginia s dual-mode scramjet experiment. The test section was set up in configuration A, which includes a Mach 2 nozzle, combustor, and extender section. Hydrogen fuel was injected through an unswept compression ramp at two different equivalence ratios. Through the translation of the optical system and the use of two separate camera views, the entire optical range of the combustor was accessed. Single-shot, average, and standard deviation images of the OH PLIF signal are presented at several streamwise locations. The results show the development of a highly turbulent flame structure and provide an experimental database to be used for numerical model assessment.

  17. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig T.; McRae, Colin D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Chris P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were performed in the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The test section was set up in configuration A, which includes a Mach 2 nozzle, combustor, and extender section. Hydrogen fuel was injected through an unswept compression ramp at two different equivalence ratios. Through the translation of the optical system and the use of two separate camera views, the entire optically accessible range of the combustor was imaged. Single-shot, average, and standard deviation images of the OH PLIF signal are presented at several streamwise locations. The results show the development of a highly turbulent flame structure and provide an experimental database to be used for numerical model assessment.

  18. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Colin D.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDnaiel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Non-intrusive hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were obtained in configuration C of the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The combustion of hydrogen fuel injected through an unswept compression ramp into a supersonic cross-flow was imaged over a range of streamwise positions. Images were corrected for optical distortion, variations in the laser sheet profile, and different camera views. Results indicate an effect of fuel equivalence ratio on combustion zone shape and local turbulence length scale. The streamwise location of the reaction zone relative to the fuel injector was also found to be sensitive to the fuel equivalence ratio. The flow boundary conditions in the combustor section, which are sensitive to the fuel flow rate, are believed to have caused this effect. A combination of laser absorption and radiative trapping effects are proposed to have caused asymmetry observed in the images. The results complement previously published OH PLIF data obtained for configuration A along with other non-intrusive measurements to form a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model validation.

  19. Improving the ensemble average of visual evoked potentials. II. Simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, M H; Thijssen, J M

    1995-03-01

    Ensemble averaging is generally used for the estimation of Evoked Potentials. This paper deals with the assessment of correction procedures for the time variability of the ensemble components, this time variability reduces the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by averaging. Evoked potentials were estimated by ensemble averaging, synchronized to a periodic stimulus. It is assumed that VEP-instability is partly caused by time-variability of the evoked potentials. Two time-variate models were used, from which procedures were derived to correct the single VEP-responses prior to ensemble averaging. The models are: (1) variation in response delay (jitter), (2) variable compression/expansion of the time scale of the response (wow). The Spectral Phase Difference method was applied to estimate both the delay time jitter and the wow factor of single responses with respect to a template (conventional ensemble average). The effects of the devised correction on the average VEP waveform and on the SNR of the ensemble were investigated by using data from realistic simulations and from experiments (n = 23) with a number of healthy human volunteers (n = 17). Jitter- and wow-corrections were effective on simulations with time variability due to delay time jitter and time scale distortion (wow), respectively. Both wow- and jitter correction of the single responses improved the SNR of the VEP measurements significantly and to the same amount. A combined wow-jitter approach resulted in significantly better results than the exclusive application of jitter- or wow correction.

  20. Visualizing electromagnetic fields in laser-produced counterstreaming plasma experiments for collisionless shock laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, Nathan

    2012-10-01

    In astrophysical settings, large and stable structures often emerge from turbulent supersonic plasma flows. Examples include the cosmic magnetic field and the collisionless shocks [1] in supernova remnants. In a scaled environment created with the high power lasers at OMEGA EP, proton imaging shows that large, stable electromagnetic field structures arise within counterstreaming supersonic plasmas [2]. These field structures are large compared to the fundamental turbulence scale lengths of the plasma (e.g. the Debye length and the ion skin-depth), indicating a high degree of self-organization. These features remain in place from 4 to 7 ns, indicating a high degree of stability. At early times out to at least 8 ns, intra-jet ion collisions are strong (due to relatively low thermal velocities) but inter-jet ion collisions are rare (due to relatively high flow velocities), permitting the evolution of both hydrodynamic and collisionless plasma instabilities [3, 4]. This paper will present detailed results from our laboratory astrophysics experiments. Prepared by LLNL for US DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.[4pt] [1] H. S. Park et al, HEDP, 8, 38 (2011).[0pt] [2] N.L. Kugland et al, submitted to Nature Physics (2012).[0pt] [3] J.S. Ross et al, Phys. Plas., 19, 056501 (2012).[0pt] [3] D.D. Ryutov et al, Phys. Plas., 19, 076532 (2012).

  1. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  3. Abnormal cubic-tetragonal phase transition of barium strontium titanate nanoparticles studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Gao, Ran; Xia, Feng; Li, YueSheng; Che, Renchao

    2015-11-02

    Phase stability of the ferroelectric materials at high temperature is extremely important to their device performance. Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) nanoparticles with different Sr contents (x = 1, 0.91, 0.65, 0.4, and 0) are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. Using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses under in situ heating conditions (up to 300 °C), the phase transitions of BST nanoparticles between 25 °C and 280 °C are comprehensively investigated. The original Curie temperature of BST nanoparticles decreases abruptly with the increase in Sr content, which is more obvious than in the bulk or film material. Besides, an abnormal phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure is observed from BST nanoparticles and the transition temperature rises along with the increase in Sr content. Direct TEM evidences including a slight lattice distortion have been provided. Differently, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained in the tetragonal phase during the above temperature ranges.

  4. [Additional memory load causes changes in induced EEG beta-rhythm in experiments with a visual set formed to facial expression].

    PubMed

    Iakovenko, I A; Kozlov, M K; Cheremushkin, E A

    2012-01-01

    Subjects were divided into two equal groups 35 healthy subjects each. Formation of the visual set to facial emotion recognition was supplemented with two types of additional task: either visuospatial (to find a target stimulus among others) or verbal (to tell a word from a pseudoword). The results of the experiments were compared to those obtained in similar experiments without the memory load. Changes in the EEG beta rhythm during visual set forming and testing were studied. The EEG was analyzed by wavelet transformation. Changes in the mean level, maximum and latency of the maximum of wavelet coefficient were rated at different stages of the experiment. All these characteristics for the beta rhythm were higher in experiments with both types of additional memory load as compared to those without the memory load.

  5. Developing an Inclusive Learning Environment for Students with Visual Impairment in Higher Education: Progressive Mutual Accommodation and Learner Experiences in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewett, Rachel; Douglas, Graeme; McLinden, Michael; Keil, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the findings of a unique longitudinal qualitative study, this article investigates the experiences of 32 young people with visual impairment (VI) in higher education (HE) in the United Kingdom (UK) to explore how well they were able to participate on their courses. We propose and apply a Bioecological Model of Inclusive HE to interpret…

  6. H3 and H4 Lysine Acetylation Correlates with Developmental and Experimentally Induced Adult Experience-Dependent Plasticity in the Mouse Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vierci, Gabriela; Pannunzio, Bruno; Bornia, Natalia; Rossi, Francesco M.

    2016-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications play a fundamental role in orchestrating gene expression. In this work, we analyzed the acetylation of H3 and H4 histones (AcH3–AcH4) and its modulation by visual experience in the mouse visual cortex (VC) during normal development and in two experimental conditions that restore juvenile-like plasticity levels in adults (fluoxetine treatment and enriched environment). We found that AcH3–AcH4 declines with age and is upregulated by treatments restoring plasticity in the adult. We also found that visual experience modulates AcH3–AcH4 in young and adult plasticity-restored mice but not in untreated ones. Finally, we showed that the transporter vGAT is downregulated in adult plasticity-restored models. In summary, we identified a dynamic regulation of AcH3–AcH4, which is associated with high plasticity levels and enhanced by visual experience. These data, along with recent ones, indicate H3–H4 acetylation as a central hub in the control of experience-dependent plasticity in the VC. PMID:27891053

  7. Preliminary experiments on surface flow visualization in the cryogenic wind tunnel by use of condensing or freezing gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic wind tunnel users must have available surface flow visualization techniques to satisfy a variety of needs. While the ideal from an aerodynamic stand would be non-intrusive, until an economical technique is developed there will be occasions when the user will be prepared to resort to an intrusive method. One such method is proposed, followed by preliminary evaluation experiments carried out in environments representative of the cryogenic nitrogen tunnel. The technique uses substances which are gases at normal temperature and pressure but liquid or solid at cryogenic temperatures. These are deposited on the model in localized regions, the patterns of the deposits and their subsequent melting or evaporation revealing details of the surface flow. The gases were chosen because of the likelihood that they will not permanently contaminate the model or tunnel. Twenty-four gases were identified as possibly suitable and four of these were tested from which it was concluded that surface flow direction can be shown by the method. Other flow details might also be detectable. The cryogenic wind tunnel used was insulated on the outside and did not show signs of contamination.

  8. Spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization toward development of a lensless imaging platform: phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Pandya, Aditya; Saiko, Guennadi; Nacy, Lidia; Babar, Hannan; Shah, Duoaud; Lilge, Lothar; Douplik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A portable, spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance lensless imaging technique based on the charge-coupled device or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor directly coupled to the fiber optic bundle is proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as superficial microvasculature in the epithelium. We discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiber-optic cable over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. To evaluate the ability of the technique to recover information about the subsurface linear structures, scattering layers formed of the Sylgard® 184 Silicone Elastomer and titanium dioxide were placed atop the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 mm, and the values of the reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) were between 0.85 and 4.25 mm-1. The results demonstrate that fiber-optic, lensless platform can be used for two-dimensional imaging of absorbing inclusions in diffuse reflectance mode. In these experiments, it was shown that diffuse reflectance imaging can provide sufficient spatial sampling of the phantom for differentiation of 30 μm structural features of the embedded absorbing pattern inside the scattering media.

  9. Concentrations of biogenic amines in fundal layers in chickens with normal visual experience, deprivation, and after reserpine application.

    PubMed

    Ohngemach, S; Hagel, G; Schaeffel, F

    1997-01-01

    HVA levels in retina and vitreous for at least 10 days in a dose-dependent fashion and diminished or suppressed further effects of deprivation on these compounds. DOPAC levels continued to change upon deprivation even after reserpine injection (Fig. 3). Our results suggest that the release rates of dopamine from retinal amacrine cells can be estimated from vitreal dopamine concentrations; furthermore, they are in line with the hypothesis that there is an inverse relationship between dopamine release and axial eye growth rates. Although our experiments do not ultimately prove that dopamine has a functional role in the visual control of eye growth, they are in line with this notion.

  10. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  11. Experiments in Visual Localization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    thinking also leads us to believe that this model will apply to naturally occurring pathological paretic states such as those’that occur in myasthenia ... gravis and in other pathological states involving I. L. Matin 13 ophthalmoplegia, and we are currently carrying out such research. Fig. 4 The four main

  12. Food shopping, sensory determinants of food choice and meal preparation by visually impaired people. Obstacles and expectations in daily food experiences.

    PubMed

    Kostyra, Eliza; Żakowska-Biemans, Sylwia; Śniegocka, Katarzyna; Piotrowska, Anna

    2017-06-01

    The number of visually impaired and blind people is rising worldwide due to ageing of the global population, but research regarding the impact of visual impairment on the ability of a person to choose food and to prepare meals is scarce. The aim of this study was threefold: to investigate factors determining the choices of food products in people with various levels of impaired vision; to identify obstacles they face while purchasing food, preparing meals and eating out; and to determine what would help them in the areas of food shopping and meal preparation. The data was collected from 250 blind and visually impaired subjects, recruited with the support of the National Association of the Blind. The study revealed that majority of the visually impaired make food purchases at a supermarket or local grocery and they tend to favour shopping for food via the Internet. Direct sale channels like farmers markets were rarely used by the visually impaired. The most frequently mentioned factors that facilitated their food shopping decisions were the assistance of salespersons, product labelling in Braille, scanners that enable the reading of labels and a permanent place for products on the shop shelves. Meal preparation, particularly peeling, slicing and frying, posed many challenges to the visually impaired. More than half of the respondents ate meals outside the home, mainly with family or friends. The helpfulness of the staff and a menu in Braille were crucial for them to have a positive dining out experience. The results of the study provide valuable insights into the food choices and eating experiences of visually impaired people, and also suggest some practical implications to improve their independence and quality of life.

  13. Effects of Visual Experience on the Human MT+ Functional Connectivity Networks: An fMRI Study of Motion Perception in Sighted and Congenitally Blind Individuals.

    PubMed

    Sani, Lorenzo; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Gentili, Claudio; Vanello, Nicola; Haxby, James V; Pietrini, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Human middle temporal complex (hMT+) responds also to the perception of non-visual motion in both sighted and early blind individuals, indicating a supramodal organization. Visual experience, however, leads to a segregation of hMT+ into a more anterior subregion, involved in the supramodal representation of motion, and a posterior subregion that processes visual motion only. In contrast, in congenitally blind subjects tactile motion activates the full extent of hMT+. Here, we used fMRI to investigate brain areas functionally connected with the two hMT+ subregions (seeds) during visual and tactile motion in sighted and blind individuals. A common functional connectivity network for motion processing, including bilateral ventral and dorsal extrastriate, inferior frontal, middle and inferior temporal areas, correlated with the two hMT+ seeds both in sighted and blind individuals during either visual or tactile motion, independently from the sensory modality through which the information was acquired. Moreover, ventral premotor, somatosensory, and posterior parietal areas correlated only with the anterior but not with the posterior portion of hMT+ in sighted subjects, and with both hMT+ seeds in blind subjects. Furthermore, a correlation between middle temporal and occipital areas with primary somatosensory seeds was demonstrated across conditions in both sighted and blind individuals, suggesting a cortico-cortical pathway that conveys non-visual information from somatosensory cortex, through posterior parietal regions, to ventral extrastriate cortex. These findings expand our knowledge about the development of the functional organization within hMT+ by showing that distinct patterns of brain functional correlations originate from the anterior and posterior hMT+ subregions as a result of visual experience.

  14. Multiple Roles for Nogo Receptor 1 in Visual System Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Frantz, Michael G; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    During the developmental critical period for visual plasticity, discordant vision alters the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex. The subsequent closure of the critical period not only consolidates neural function but also limits recovery of acuity from preceding abnormal visual experience. Despite species-specific differences in circuitry of the visual system, these characteristics are conserved. The nogo-66 receptor 1 (ngr1) is one of only a small number of genes identified thus far that is essential to closing the critical period. Mice lacking a functional ngr1 gene retain developmental visual plasticity as adults and their visual acuity spontaneously improves after prolonged visual deprivation. Experiments employing conditional mouse genetics have revealed that ngr1 restricts plasticity within distinct circuits for ocular dominance and visual acuity. However, the mechanisms by which NgR1 limits plasticity have not been elucidated, in part because the subcellular localization and signal transduction of the protein are only partially understood. Here we explore potential mechanisms for NgR1 function in relation to manipulations that reactivate visual plasticity in adults and propose lines of investigation to address relevant gaps in knowledge.

  15. Does Expectation of Abnormality Affect the Search Pattern of Radiologists When Looking for Pulmonary Nodules?

    PubMed

    Littlefair, Stephen; Brennan, Patrick; Reed, Warren; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    This experiment investigated whether there might be an effect on the visual search strategy of radiologists during image interpretation of the same adult chest radiographs when given different clinical information. Each of 17 experienced radiologists was asked to interpret a set of 57 (10 abnormal) posteroanterior chest images to identify the presence of pulmonary lesions using differing clinical information (leading to unknown, low and high expectations of prevalence). Eye position metrics (search time, dwell time and time to first fixation) were compared for normal and abnormal images, as well as between conditions. For all images, there was a significantly longer search time at high prevalence expectation compared to low prevalence expectation (W = 75.19, P = <0.0001). Mann-Whitney analysis of the abnormal images demonstrated that the dwell time on correctly identified lesions was significantly shorter at low prevalence expectation compared to both unknown (U = 364.5, P = 0.02) and high prevalence expectation (U = 397.0, P = 0.0002). Visual search patterns of radiologists appear to be affected by changing a priori information where such information fosters an expectation of abnormality.

  16. Visual cognition

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Visual cognition, high-level vision, mid-level vision and top-down processing all refer to decision-based scene analyses that combine prior knowledge with retinal input to generate representations. The label “visual cognition” is little used at present, but research and experiments on mid- and high-level, inference-based vision have flourished, becoming in the 21st century a significant, if often understated part, of current vision research. How does visual cognition work? What are its moving parts? This paper reviews the origins and architecture of visual cognition and briefly describes some work in the areas of routines, attention, surfaces, objects, and events (motion, causality, and agency). Most vision scientists avoid being too explicit when presenting concepts about visual cognition, having learned that explicit models invite easy criticism. What we see in the literature is ample evidence for visual cognition, but few or only cautious attempts to detail how it might work. This is the great unfinished business of vision research: at some point we will be done with characterizing how the visual system measures the world and we will have to return to the question of how vision constructs models of objects, surfaces, scenes, and events. PMID:21329719

  17. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  18. Experiments with User Interfaces of an Expert System That Recommends Computer Access Devices for the Visually Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Julia E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated interfaces (menu-driven, natural language, or hybrid) for using the Computer Access Technology-Knowledge Based Expert System (CAT-KBES), which assists in the selection of appropriate computer access technology for clients with severe visual disabilities. Users (n=19, including 12 with visual impairments) preferred the revised…

  19. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  20. Major challenges to scale up of visual inspection-based cervical cancer prevention programs: the experience of Guatemalan NGOs

    PubMed Central

    Chary, Anita Nandkumar; Rohloff, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Like many other low- and middle-income countries, Guatemala has adopted visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a low-resource alternative to the Pap smear for cervical cancer screening. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) introduced VIA to Guatemala in 2004, and a growing number of NGOs, working both independently and in collaboration with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health, employ VIA in cervical cancer prevention programs today. While much research describes VIA efficacy and feasibility in Latin America, little is known about NGO involvement with VIA programming or experiences with VIA outside the context of clinical trials and pilot projects in the region. Methods: To explore challenges faced by NGOs implementing VIA programs in Guatemala, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 NGO staff members involved with 20 VIA programs as direct service providers, program administrators, and training course instructors. Additionally, we collected data through observation at 30 NGO-sponsored cervical cancer screening campaigns, 8 cervical cancer prevention conferences, and 1 week-long NGO-sponsored VIA training course. Results: Frequently highlighted challenges included staff turnover, concerns over training quality, a need for opportunities for continued supervision, and problems with cryotherapy referrals when immediate treatment for VIA-positive women was unavailable. Conclusions: Reducing staff turnover, budgeting to train replacement providers, standardizing training curricula, and offering continued supervision are key strategies to improve VIA service quality and program sustainability. Alternative training methods, such as on-the-job mentoring and course prerequisites of online learning, could help increase training time available for clinical supervision. Efforts should be made to ensure that VIA testing is coupled with immediate cryotherapy, that providers trained in VIA are also trained in cryotherapy, and that cryotherapy

  1. The importance of synchrony and temporal order of visual and tactile input for illusory limb ownership experiences - an FMRI study applying virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Foell, Jens; Diers, Martin; Kamping, Sandra; Rance, Mariela; Kirsch, Pinar; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Bach, Felix; Çakmak, Hüseyin Kemal; Maaß, Heiko; Flor, Herta

    2014-01-01

    In the so-called rubber hand illusion, synchronous visuotactile stimulation of a visible rubber hand together with one's own hidden hand elicits ownership experiences for the artificial limb. Recently, advanced virtual reality setups were developed to induce a virtual hand illusion (VHI). Here, we present functional imaging data from a sample of 25 healthy participants using a new device to induce the VHI in the environment of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In order to evaluate the neuronal robustness of the illusion, we varied the degree of synchrony between visual and tactile events in five steps: in two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied prior to visual stimulation (asynchrony of -300 ms or -600 ms), whereas in another two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied after visual stimulation (asynchrony of +300 ms or +600 ms). In the fifth condition, tactile and visual stimulation was applied synchronously. On a subjective level, the VHI was successfully induced by synchronous visuotactile stimulation. Asynchronies between visual and tactile input of ±300 ms did not significantly diminish the vividness of illusion, whereas asynchronies of ±600 ms did. The temporal order of visual and tactile stimulation had no effect on VHI vividness. Conjunction analyses of functional MRI data across all conditions revealed significant activation in bilateral ventral premotor cortex (PMv). Further characteristic activation patterns included bilateral activity in the motion-sensitive medial superior temporal area as well as in the bilateral Rolandic operculum, suggesting their involvement in the processing of bodily awareness through the integration of visual and tactile events. A comparison of the VHI-inducing conditions with asynchronous control conditions of ±600 ms yielded significant PMv activity only contralateral to the stimulation site. These results underline the temporal limits of the induction of limb ownership related to multisensory

  2. The Importance of Synchrony and Temporal Order of Visual and Tactile Input for Illusory Limb Ownership Experiences – An fMRI Study Applying Virtual Reality

    PubMed Central

    Diers, Martin; Kamping, Sandra; Rance, Mariela; Kirsch, Pinar; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Bach, Felix; Çakmak, Hüseyin Kemal; Maaß, Heiko; Flor, Herta

    2014-01-01

    In the so-called rubber hand illusion, synchronous visuotactile stimulation of a visible rubber hand together with one's own hidden hand elicits ownership experiences for the artificial limb. Recently, advanced virtual reality setups were developed to induce a virtual hand illusion (VHI). Here, we present functional imaging data from a sample of 25 healthy participants using a new device to induce the VHI in the environment of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In order to evaluate the neuronal robustness of the illusion, we varied the degree of synchrony between visual and tactile events in five steps: in two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied prior to visual stimulation (asynchrony of −300 ms or −600 ms), whereas in another two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied after visual stimulation (asynchrony of +300 ms or +600 ms). In the fifth condition, tactile and visual stimulation was applied synchronously. On a subjective level, the VHI was successfully induced by synchronous visuotactile stimulation. Asynchronies between visual and tactile input of ±300 ms did not significantly diminish the vividness of illusion, whereas asynchronies of ±600 ms did. The temporal order of visual and tactile stimulation had no effect on VHI vividness. Conjunction analyses of functional MRI data across all conditions revealed significant activation in bilateral ventral premotor cortex (PMv). Further characteristic activation patterns included bilateral activity in the motion-sensitive medial superior temporal area as well as in the bilateral Rolandic operculum, suggesting their involvement in the processing of bodily awareness through the integration of visual and tactile events. A comparison of the VHI-inducing conditions with asynchronous control conditions of ±600 ms yielded significant PMv activity only contralateral to the stimulation site. These results underline the temporal limits of the induction of limb ownership related to

  3. Driver's visual attention as a function of driving experience and visibility. Using a driving simulator to explore drivers' eye movements in day, night and rain driving.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Panos; Chapman, Peter; Crundall, David

    2010-05-01

    Road crashes are the main cause of death of young people in the developed world. The reasons that cause traffic crashes are numerous; however, most researchers agree that a lack of driving experience is one of the major contributing factors. In addition it has been demonstrated that environmental factors such as driving during night and rain increases the risk of a crash. Both of these factors may be related to drivers' visual search strategies that become more efficient with increased experience. In the present study we recorded the eye movements of driving instructors and learner drivers while they drove three virtual routes that included day, night and rain routes in a driving simulator. The results showed that driving instructors had an increased sampling rate, shorter processing time and broader scanning of the road than learner drivers. This broader scanning of the road could be possibly explained by the mirror inspection pattern which revealed that driving instructors fixated more on the side mirrors than learner drivers. Also it was found that poor visibility conditions, especially rain, decrease the effectiveness of drivers' visual search. The lack of interaction between driving experience and visibility suggests that some aspects of visual search are affected by general rather than situation specific driving experience. The present findings support the effect of driving experience in modifying eye movement strategies. The high accident risk of night and rain driving could be partly explained by the decrement in visual search strategies during these conditions. Finally it is argued that the use of driving simulators can provide valuable insights regarding driving safety.

  4. Sensory experience differentially modulates the mRNA expression of the polysialyltransferases ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV in postnatal mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Marie-Claude; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2011-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a unique carbohydrate composed of a linear homopolymer of α-2,8 linked sialic acid, and is mainly attached to the fifth immunoglobulin-like domain of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in vertebrate neural system. In the brain, PSA is exclusively synthesized by the two polysialyltransferases ST8SiaII (also known as STX) and ST8SiaIV (also known as PST). By modulating adhesive property of NCAM, PSA plays a critical role in several neural development processes such as cell migration, neurite outgrowth, axon pathfinding, synaptogenesis and activity-dependent plasticity. The expression of PSA is temporally and spatially regulated during neural development and a tight regulation of PSA expression is essential to its biological function. In mouse visual cortex, PSA is downregulated following eye opening and its decrease allows the maturation of GABAergic synapses and the opening of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity. Relatively little is known about how PSA levels are regulated by sensory experience and neuronal activity. Here, we demonstrate that while both ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV mRNA levels decrease around the time of eye opening in mouse visual cortex, only ST8SiaII mRNA level reduction is regulated by sensory experience. Using an organotypic culture system from mouse visual cortex, we further show that ST8SiaII gene expression is regulated by spiking activity and NMDA-mediated excitation. Further, we show that both ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV mRNA levels are positively regulated by PKC-mediated signaling. Therefore, sensory experience-dependent ST8SiaII gene expression regulates PSA levels in postnatal visual cortex, thus acting as molecular link between visual activity and PSA expression.

  5. KENeV: A web-application for the automated reconstruction and visualization of the enriched metabolic and signaling super-pathways deriving from genomic experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pilalis, Eleftherios; Koutsandreas, Theodoros; Valavanis, Ioannis; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil; Spyrou, George; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis, using high throughput genomic technologies,has become an indispensable step for the meaningful interpretation of the underlying molecular complexity, which shapes the phenotypic manifestation of the investigated biological mechanism. The modularity of the cellular response to different experimental conditions can be comprehended through the exploitation of molecular pathway databases, which offer a controlled, curated background for statistical enrichment analysis. Existing tools enable pathway analysis, visualization, or pathway merging but none integrates a fully automated workflow, combining all above-mentioned modules and destined to non-programmer users. We introduce an online web application, named KEGG Enriched Network Visualizer (KENeV), which enables a fully automated workflow starting from a list of differentially expressed genes and deriving the enriched KEGG metabolic and signaling pathways, merged into two respective, non-redundant super-networks. The final networks can be downloaded as SBML files, for further analysis, or instantly visualized through an interactive visualization module. In conclusion, KENeV (available online at http://www.grissom.gr/kenev) provides an integrative tool, suitable for users with no programming experience, for the functional interpretation, at both the metabolic and signaling level, of differentially expressed gene subsets deriving from genomic experiments. PMID:26925206

  6. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  7. Transplant of polymer-encapsulated cells genetically engineered to release nerve growth factor allows a normal functional development of the visual cortex in dark-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Pizzorusso, T; Porciatti, V; Tseng, J L; Aebischer, P; Maffei, L

    1997-09-01

    Visual experience is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. Dark-reared mammals show abnormal vision when reintroduced into a normal environment. The absence of visual experience during the critical period results in reduced and/or inappropriate neural responses in visual cortical neurons. The change in electrical activity induced by dark rearing is probably reflected by the modulation of specific unknown molecules. Neurotrophins are present in the developing visual cortex and their production depends on visually driven electrical activity. Recent findings support the possibility that an important link between electrical activity in the visual pathway and correct development of visual properties is represented by neurotrophins. We advance the hypothesis that the visual abnormalities present in dark-reared animals could be due to a decreased production of a neurotrophin secondary to the lack of visual stimulation. We report that some properties of visual cortical response such as receptive field size, orientation selectivity, adaptation to repeated stimulation, response latency and visual acuity are virtually normal in dark-reared rats transplanted with polymer-encapsulated baby hamster kidney cells genetically engineered to release nerve growth factor.

  8. Patient DF's visual brain in action: Visual feedforward control in visual form agnosia.

    PubMed

    Whitwell, Robert L; Milner, A David; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Barat, Masihullah; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-05-01

    Patient DF, who developed visual form agnosia following ventral-stream damage, is unable to discriminate the width of objects, performing at chance, for example, when asked to open her thumb and forefinger a matching amount. Remarkably, however, DF adjusts her hand aperture to accommodate the width of objects when reaching out to pick them up (grip scaling). While this spared ability to grasp objects is presumed to be mediated by visuomotor modules in her relatively intact dorsal stream, it is possible that it may rely abnormally on online visual or haptic feedback. We report here that DF's grip scaling remained intact when her vision was completely suppressed during grasp movements, and it still dissociated sharply from her poor perceptual estimates of target size. We then tested whether providing trial-by-trial haptic feedback after making such perceptual estimates might improve DF's performance, but found that they remained significantly impaired. In a final experiment, we re-examined whether DF's grip scaling depends on receiving veridical haptic feedback during grasping. In one condition, the haptic feedback was identical to the visual targets. In a second condition, the haptic feedback was of a constant intermediate width while the visual target varied trial by trial. Despite this incongruent feedback, DF still scaled her grip aperture to the visual widths of the target blocks, showing only normal adaptation to the false haptically-experienced width. Taken together, these results strengthen the view that DF's spared grasping relies on a normal mode of dorsal-stream functioning, based chiefly on visual feedforward processing.

  9. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  10. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  11. ["...cause in such a big hospital ... visually impaired persons like me, alone, can't get anywhere"--the experience of visually impaired people of the in-patient care--an empirical, explorative study].

    PubMed

    Golde, Christian

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of people with visual impairment within in-patient care. Actually, in nursing literature, no similar research is known in the German speaking area. Therefore, an qualitative research framework was used. By using a convenience sampling eight participants have been chosen. Mainly, the thematic content analysis of Burnard has been applied to the analysis of the empirical data. Mental spatial concepts for orientation, primarily acoustically made communicative resonance fields, and Action techniques constitute three major topics, which have been categorised in this study. These concepts are discussed in the cause of the research with respect to their implications on nursing care.

  12. Relevance of visual cues for orientation at familiar sites by homing pigeons: an experiment in a circular arena.

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardo, A.; Odetti, F.; Ioalè, P.

    2001-01-01

    Whether pigeons use visual landmarks for orientation from familiar locations has been a subject of debate. By recording the directional choices of both anosmic and control pigeons while exiting from a circular arena we were able to assess the relevance of olfactory and visual cues for orientation from familiar sites. When the birds could see the surroundings, both anosmic and control pigeons were homeward oriented. When the view of the landscape was prevented by screens that surrounded the arena, the control pigeons exited from the arena approximately in the home direction, while the anosmic pigeons' distribution was not different from random. Our data suggest that olfactory and visual cues play a critical, but interchangeable, role for orientation at familiar sites. PMID:11571054

  13. Visualization techniques for tongue analysis in traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Binh L.; Cai, Yang

    2004-05-01

    Visual inspection of the tongue has been an important diagnostic method of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Clinic data have shown significant connections between various viscera cancers and abnormalities in the tongue and the tongue coating. Visual inspection of the tongue is simple and inexpensive, but the current practice in TCM is mainly experience-based and the quality of the visual inspection varies between individuals. The computerized inspection method provides quantitative models to evaluate color, texture and surface features on the tongue. In this paper, we investigate visualization techniques and processes to allow interactive data analysis with the aim to merge computerized measurements with human expert's diagnostic variables based on five-scale diagnostic conditions: Healthy (H), History Cancers (HC), History of Polyps (HP), Polyps (P) and Colon Cancer (C).

  14. Using Virtual Microscopy to Scaffold Learning of Pathology: A Naturalistic Experiment on the Role of Visual and Conceptual Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nivala, Markus; Saljo, Roger; Rystedt, Hans; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Lehtinen, Erno

    2012-01-01

    New representational technologies, such as virtual microscopy, create new affordances for medical education. In the article, a study on the following two issues is reported: (a) How does collaborative use of virtual microscopy shape students' engagement with and learning from virtual slides of tissue specimen? (b) How do visual and conceptual cues…

  15. Neuron analysis of visual perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The receptive fields of single cells in the visual system of cat and squirrel monkey were studied investigating the vestibular input affecting the cells, and the cell's responses during visual discrimination learning process. The receptive field characteristics of the rabbit visual system, its normal development, its abnormal development following visual deprivation, and on the structural and functional re-organization of the visual system following neo-natal and prenatal surgery were also studied. The results of each individual part of each investigation are detailed.

  16. Visual half-field experiments are a good measure of cerebral language dominance if used properly: evidence from fMRI.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Zoë R; Brysbaert, Marc

    2008-01-15

    Traditional neuropsychology employs visual half-field (VHF) experiments to assess cerebral language dominance. This approach is based on the assumption that left cerebral dominance for language leads to faster and more accurate recognition of words in the right visual half-field (RVF) than in the left visual half-field (LVF) during tachistoscopic presentation. Information in the RVF is directly projected to the left hemisphere, whereas information presented in the LVF needs interhemispheric transfer to reach the left half of the brain. This interpretation of the RVF superiority for word recognition lacks direct evidence however, and a multitude of studies have lead to contradictory findings. To investigate this matter further we try to establish the ideal parameters for VHF experiments to measure language dominance, and subsequently compare laterality indices (LIs) obtained from RT patterns in bilateral VHF tasks to those LIs acquired in the same individuals during a mental word generation task in the fMRI scanner. Our results reveal a direct link between VHF advantages and individual language lateralization. Differences in behavioral performance between left-hemisphere dominant and right-hemisphere dominant individuals suggest that carefully designed VHF tests can be used as a reliable predictor of cerebral language dominance.

  17. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  18. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  19. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  20. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  1. [Investigation of the threshold characteristics of visual information perception by operator controlling the illumination parameters in the 105-day experiment in isolation].

    PubMed

    Bogatova, R I; Gvozdev, S M; Sal'nitskiĭ, V P; Kutina, I V; Sadovnikova, N D; Artiukhova, A E; Liventsova, A A; Tiatykh, I V

    2011-01-01

    The investigations of threshold frequency characteristics (TFC) of the visual analyzer and labor productivity were carried out during 105-d isolation of volunteers in an airtight module illuminated by LED lamps adjustable to personal psychophysiological needs. Software and calculation procedure were devised to assist the chromatic TFC-based determination of photometric parameters. Data of analysis of actual mood and vision contrast sensitivity when looking at a three-color image suggested that visual performance could be improved by achieving light color adequacy to TFC of individual vision. The results of experimental investigations showed once again efficiency of the proposed methods and their relevance to the objectives of the extended ground-based experiment simulating an exploration mission to Mars.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. The mysterious cognitive abilities of bees: why models of visual processing need to consider experience and individual differences in animal performance.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Adrian G

    2012-02-01

    Vision is one of the most important modalities for the remote perception of biologically important stimuli. Insects like honeybees and bumblebees use their colour and spatial vision to solve tasks, such as navigation, or to recognise rewarding flowers during foraging. Bee vision is one of the most intensively studied animal visual systems, and several models have been developed to describe its function. These models have largely assumed that bee vision is determined by mechanistic hard-wired circuits, with little or no consideration for behavioural plasticity or cognitive factors. However, recent work on both bee colour vision and spatial vision suggests that cognitive factors are indeed a very significant factor in determining what a bee sees. Individual bumblebees trade-off speed for accuracy, and will decide on which criteria to prioritise depending upon contextual information. With continued visual experience, honeybees can learn to use non-elemental processing, including configural mechanisms and rule learning, and can access top-down information to enhance learning of sophisticated, novel visual tasks. Honeybees can learn delayed-matching-to-sample tasks and the rules governing this decision making, and even transfer learned rules between different sensory modalities. Finally, bees can learn complex categorisation tasks and display numerical processing abilities for numbers up to and including four. Taken together, this evidence suggests that bees do have a capacity for sophisticated visual behaviours that fit a definition for cognition, and thus simple elemental models of bee vision need to take account of how a variety of factors may influence the type of results one may gain from animal behaviour experiments.

  4. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  5. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  6. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  8. Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual ...

  9. The Experience of Force: The Role of Haptic Experience of Forces in Visual Perception of Object Motion and Interactions, Mental Simulation, and Motion-Related Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Forces are experienced in actions on objects. The mechanoreceptor system is stimulated by proximal forces in interactions with objects, and experiences of force occur in a context of information yielded by other sensory modalities, principally vision. These experiences are registered and stored as episodic traces in the brain. These stored…

  10. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  11. Effects of the Abnormal Acceleratory Environment of Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    responses and fundus oculi changes as determined by ophthalmos- copy. . 28 4. Range of visual thresholds in relation to +GZ tolerance 30...in blood flow in the fundus oculi during 4GZ have been correlated with subjective visual responses using direct ophthalmoscopy (Table 3), Retinal...potentiated reduction in performance. Several physical abnormalities (such as varicose veins, hemorrhoids, hernia, high myopia , and glaucoma) also exist which

  12. Visual Perception versus Visual Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Laurence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disfunctions are drawn between visual perception and visual function, and four optometrists respond with further analysis of the visual perception-visual function controversy and its implications for children with learning problems. (CL)

  13. Declarative Visualization Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Del Rio, N.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    In an ideal interaction with machines, scientists may prefer to write declarative queries saying "what" they want from a machine than to write code stating "how" the machine is going to address the user request. For example, in relational database, users have long relied on specifying queries using Structured Query Language (SQL), a declarative language to request data results from a database management system. In the context of visualizations, we see that users are still writing code based on complex visualization toolkit APIs. With the goal of improving the scientists' experience of using visualization technology, we have applied this query-answering pattern to a visualization setting, where scientists specify what visualizations they want generated using a declarative SQL-like notation. A knowledge enhanced management system ingests the query and knows the following: (1) know how to translate the query into visualization pipelines; and (2) how to execute the visualization pipelines to generate the requested visualization. We define visualization queries as declarative requests for visualizations specified in an SQL like language. Visualization queries specify what category of visualization to generate (e.g., volumes, contours, surfaces) as well as associated display attributes (e.g., color and opacity), without any regards for implementation, thus allowing scientists to remain partially unaware of a wide range of visualization toolkit (e.g., Generic Mapping Tools and Visualization Toolkit) specific implementation details. Implementation details are only a concern for our knowledge-based visualization management system, which uses both the information specified in the query and knowledge about visualization toolkit functions to construct visualization pipelines. Knowledge about the use of visualization toolkits includes what data formats the toolkit operates on, what formats they output, and what views they can generate. Visualization knowledge, which is not

  14. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  15. Pareidolias: complex visual illusions in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Yokoi, Kayoko; Hirayama, Kazumi; Imamura, Toru; Shimomura, Tatsuo; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-08-01

    Patients rarely experience visual hallucinations while being observed by clinicians. Therefore, instruments to detect visual hallucinations directly from patients are needed. Pareidolias, which are complex visual illusions involving ambiguous forms that are perceived as meaningful objects, are analogous to visual hallucinations and have the potential to be a surrogate indicator of visual hallucinations. In this study, we explored the clinical utility of a newly developed instrument for evoking pareidolic illusions, the Pareidolia test, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies-one of the most common causes of visual hallucinations in the elderly. Thirty-four patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 34 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 healthy controls were given the Pareidolia test. Patients with dementia with Lewy bodies produced a much greater number of pareidolic illusions compared with those with Alzheimer's disease or controls. A receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the number of pareidolias differentiated dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 88%. Full-length figures and faces of people and animals accounted for >80% of the contents of pareidolias. Pareidolias were observed in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies who had visual hallucinations as well as those who did not have visual hallucinations, suggesting that pareidolias do not reflect visual hallucinations themselves but may reflect susceptibility to visual hallucinations. A sub-analysis of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies who were or were not treated with donepzil demonstrated that the numbers of pareidolias were correlated with visuoperceptual abilities in the former and with indices of hallucinations and delusional misidentifications in the latter. Arousal and attentional deficits mediated by abnormal cholinergic mechanisms and visuoperceptual dysfunctions are likely to contribute to the development

  16. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  17. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  18. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  19. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Methods Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. Results We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. Discussion This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity. PMID:26930079

  20. Fathers' versus mothers' social referencing signals in relation to infant anxiety and avoidance: a visual cliff experiment.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-11-01

    Infants use signals from others to guide their behavior when confronted with novel situations, a process called 'social referencing' (SR). Via SR, signs of parental anxiety can lead to infant anxiety. Little is known about differences in the effect of paternal and maternal SR signals on child anxiety. Using a visual cliff paradigm, we studied whether SR processes between fathers and their infants differed from mothers and their infants. Eighty-one infants aged 10-15 months were randomly assigned to conduct the visual cliff task with their father (n = 41) or mother (n = 40). The infant was placed on the shallow side of the cliff and the parent, standing at the deep side, was instructed to encourage the infant to cross. Results showed that although mothers showed more intense facial expressions of encouragement than fathers, no differences occurred in how fast, and with how much anxiety, infants crossed the cliff with fathers and mothers. However, path analyses showed that paternal, but not maternal, expressed anxiety was positively associated with infant expressed anxiety and avoidance. For infants who participated with their mother, infants' anxious temperament was negatively associated with infant avoidance of the cliff. Infant anxious temperament moderated the link between paternal expressed anxiety and infant avoidance: the higher the level of infant anxious temperament the stronger the positive association between paternal expressed anxiety and infant's avoidance of the cliff. Lastly, parental encouragement was unrelated to infant expressed anxiety and avoidance. Our results suggest that SR processes between fathers and their infants differ from those between mothers and their infants.

  1. Impaired visual decision-making in individuals with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Faraz; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of amblyopia on perceptual decision-making processes to determine the consequences of visual deprivation on development of higher-level cortical networks outside of visual cortex. A variant of the Eriksen flanker task was used to measure response time and accuracy for decisions made in the presence of response-selection conflict. Performance of adults with amblyopia was compared to that of neurotypical participants of the same age. Additionally, simple and choice reaction time tasks presented in the visual and the auditory modality were used to control for factors such as feature visibility, crowding, and motor execution speed. A selective deficit in response time for visual decisions was found when individuals with amblyopia used either the amblyopic or non-amblyopic (dominant) eye, and this deficit was independent of visual acuity, motor time, and performance accuracy. In trial conditions that provoked response-selection conflict, responses were significantly delayed in amblyopic relative to neurotypical participants, and were not subject to standard trial sequence effects. Our results indicate that, beyond the known effects of abnormal visual experience on visual cortex, suboptimal binocular input during a developmental critical period may also impact cortical connections to downstream areas of the brain, including parietal and frontal cortex, that are believed to underlie decision and response-selection processes. PMID:22147222

  2. Visual imagery without visual perception: lessons from blind subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bértolo, Helder

    2014-08-01

    The question regarding visual imagery and visual perception remain an open issue. Many studies have tried to understand if the two processes share the same mechanisms or if they are independent, using different neural substrates. Most research has been directed towards the need of activation of primary visual areas during imagery. Here we review some of the works providing evidence for both claims. It seems that studying visual imagery in blind subjects can be used as a way of answering some of those questions, namely if it is possible to have visual imagery without visual perception. We present results from the work of our group using visual activation in dreams and its relation with EEG's spectral components, showing that congenitally blind have visual contents in their dreams and are able to draw them; furthermore their Visual Activation Index is negatively correlated with EEG alpha power. This study supports the hypothesis that it is possible to have visual imagery without visual experience.

  3. Imagine that: elevated sensory strength of mental imagery in individuals with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Shine, James M.; Keogh, Rebecca; O'Callaghan, Claire; Muller, Alana J.; Lewis, Simon J. G.; Pearson, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Visual hallucinations occur when our conscious experience does not accurately reflect external reality. However, these dissociations also regularly occur when we imagine the world around us in the absence of visual stimulation. We used two novel behavioural paradigms to objectively measure visual hallucinations and voluntary mental imagery in 19 individuals with Parkinson's disease (ten with visual hallucinations; nine without) and ten healthy, age-matched controls. We then used this behavioural overlap to interrogate the connectivity both within and between the major attentional control networks using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with visual hallucinations had elevated mental imagery strength compared with patients without hallucinations and controls. Specifically, the sensory strength of imagery predicted the frequency of visual hallucinations. Together, hallucinations and mental imagery predicted multiple abnormalities in functional connectivity both within and between the attentional control networks, as measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the two phenomena were also dissociable at the neural level, with both mental imagery and visual misperceptions associated with specific abnormalities in attentional network connectivity. Our results provide the first evidence of both the shared and unique neural correlates of these two similar, yet distinct phenomena. PMID:25429016

  4. Serial and semantic encoding of lists of words in schizophrenia patients with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Brébion, Gildas; Ohlsen, Ruth I; Pilowsky, Lyn S; David, Anthony S

    2011-03-30

    Previous research has suggested that visual hallucinations in schizophrenia are associated with abnormal salience of visual mental images. Since visual imagery is used as a mnemonic strategy to learn lists of words, increased visual imagery might impede the other commonly used strategies of serial and semantic encoding. We had previously published data on the serial and semantic strategies implemented by patients when learning lists of concrete words with different levels of semantic organisation (Brébion et al., 2004). In this paper we present a re-analysis of these data, aiming at investigating the associations between learning strategies and visual hallucinations. Results show that the patients with visual hallucinations presented less serial clustering in the non-organisable list than the other patients. In the semantically organisable list with typical instances, they presented both less serial and less semantic clustering than the other patients. Thus, patients with visual hallucinations demonstrate reduced use of serial and semantic encoding in the lists made up of fairly familiar concrete words, which enable the formation of mental images. Although these results are preliminary, we propose that this different processing of the lists stems from the abnormal salience of the mental images such patients experience from the word stimuli.

  5. Abnormal parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fen; Wang, Jun-Yuan; Xu, Yi; Huang, Man-Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: It is widely believed that structural abnormalities of the brain contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The parietal lobe is a central hub of multisensory integration, and abnormities in this region might account for the clinical features of schizophrenia. However, few cases of parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia have been described. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: In this paper, we present a case of a 25-year-old schizophrenia patient with abnormal parietal encephalomalacia. The patient had poor nutrition and frequently had upper respiratory infections during childhood and adolescence. She showed severe schizophrenic symptoms such as visual hallucinations for 2 years. After examining all her possible medical conditions, we found that the patient had a lesion consistent with the diagnosis of encephalomalacia in her right parietal lobe and slight brain atrophy. Interventions: The patient was prescribed olanzapine (10 mg per day). Outcomes: Her symptoms significantly improved after antipsychotic treatment and were still well controlled 1 year later. Lessons: This case suggested that parietal encephalomalacia, which might be caused by inflammatory and infectious conditions in early life and be aggravated by undernutrition, might be implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:28272261

  6. A ballistic compressor-based experiment for the visualization of liquid propellant jet combustion above 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, A.; Kooker, D. E.

    This paper describes the components and operation of an experimental setup for the visualization of liquid propellant (LP) jet combustion at pressures above 100 MPa. The apparatus consists of an in-line ballistic compressor and LP injector. The ballistic compressor, based on a modified 76 mm gun, provides high-pressure (ca. 55 MPa) clear hot gas for the jet ignition. A piston (projectile) is fired toward a test chamber beyond the barrel's end, and its rebound is arrested in a transition section that seals the test chamber to the barrel. The LP jet is injected once the piston is restrained, and combustion of the jet further elevates the pressure. At a preset pressure, a disc in the piston ruptures and the combustion gas vents sonically into the barrel. If a monopropellant is used, the jet injection-combustion process then resembles liquid rocket combustion but at very high pressures (ca. 140 MPa). This paper discusses the ballistics of the compression and compares experimental results to those predicted by a numerical model of the apparatus. Experimentally, a pressure of 70 MPa was achieved upon a 12.5 volumetric compression factor by firing a 10 kg piston into 1.04 MPa argon using a charge of 75 g of small-grain M1 propellant.

  7. Estimating Synaphobranchus kaupii densities: Contribution of fish behaviour to differences between bait experiments and visual strip transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Verena M.; Lorance, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Kaup's arrowtooth eel Synaphobranchus kaupii is a small-bodied fish and an abundant inhabitant of the European continental slope. To estimate its local density video information using the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Victor 6000 were collected at three locations in the Bay of Biscay slope. Two methods for estimating local densities were tested: strip transect counts and bait experiments. For bait experiments three behaviour types were observed in about equal proportions for individuals arriving near the seafloor: moving up the current towards the ROV, moving across the current and drifting with the current. Visible attraction towards the bait was the highest for individuals swimming against the current (80%) and about equally low for the other two types (around 30%); it did not depend on current speed nor temperature. Three main innovations were introduced for estimating population densities from bait experiments: (i) inclusion of an additional behaviour category—that of passively drifting individuals, (ii) inclusion of reaction behaviour for actively swimming individuals and (iii) a hierarchical Bayesian estimation framework. The results indicated that about half of individuals were foraging actively of which less than one third reacted on encountering the bait plume and the other half were drifting with the current. Taking account of drifting individuals and the reaction probability made density estimates from bait experiments and strip transects more similar.

  8. Destination Raval Sud: A Visual Ethnography on Pedagogy, Aesthetics, and the Spatial Experience of Growing Up Urban

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafi-Prats, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on issues of childhood identity and urban environment. It discusses how a performance art pedagogy inspired by nomadic and relational aesthetics can provide a framework to promote creative learning experiences that address migratory conditions and forms of public alienation lived by young people today. As Lefebvre (1991)…

  9. Speech recognition interface to a hospital information system using a self-designed visual basic program: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Edward C; Sweet, Clifford F; Siegel, Eliot; Reiser, John M; Beall, Douglas P

    2002-03-01

    Speech recognition (SR) in the radiology department setting is viewed as a method of decreasing overhead expenses by reducing or eliminating transcription services and improving care by reducing report turnaround times incurred by transcription backlogs. The purpose of this study was to show the ability to integrate off-the-shelf speech recognition software into a Hospital Information System in 3 types of military medical facilities using the Windows programming language Visual Basic 6.0 (Microsoft, Redmond, WA). Report turnaround times and costs were calculated for a medium-sized medical teaching facility, a medium-sized nonteaching facility, and a medical clinic. Results of speech recognition versus contract transcription services were assessed between July and December, 2000. In the teaching facility, 2042 reports were dictated on 2 computers equipped with the speech recognition program, saving a total of US dollars 3319 in transcription costs. Turnaround times were calculated for 4 first-year radiology residents in 4 imaging categories. Despite requiring 2 separate electronic signatures, we achieved an average reduction in turnaround time from 15.7 hours to 4.7 hours. In the nonteaching facility, 26600 reports were dictated with average turnaround time improving from 89 hours for transcription to 19 hours for speech recognition saving US dollars 45500 over the same 6 months. The medical clinic generated 5109 reports for a cost savings of US dollars 10650. Total cost to implement this speech recognition was approximately US dollars 3000 per workstation, mostly for hardware. It is possible to design and implement an affordable speech recognition system without a large-scale expensive commercial solution.

  10. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    PubMed Central

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J.; Aspell, Jane E.; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Mohler, Betty J.; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body. PMID:24385970

  11. The flip side of perception-action coupling: locomotor experience and the ontogeny of visual-postural coupling.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D I; Campos, J J; Anderson, D E; Thomas, T D; Witherington, D C; Uchiyama, I; Barbu-Roth, M A

    2001-11-01

    The possible role of motor development on psychological function is once again a topic of great theoretical and practical importance. The revival of this issue has stemmed from a different approach to the topic, away from Gesell's interest in the long-term prediction of psychological functions from early motoric assessments, toward an attempt to understand how the acquisition of motor skills orchestrates psychological changes. This paper describes how the acquisition of one motor skill, prone locomotion, has been linked to developmental changes in an infant's ability to regulate posture based on information available in patterns of optic flow. It is argued that the onset of prone locomotion presses the infant to differentiate spatially delimited regions of optic flow to effectively and efficiently control the important subtasks nested within the larger task of locomotion, namely, steering, attending to the surface of support, and maintaining postural control. Following this argument, a research program is described that aims to determine if locomotor experience is causally linked to improvements in the ability to functionalize peripheral optic flow for postural control or whether locomotor experience is merely a maturational forecaster of such improvements. Finally, a hypothesis is put forward that links the emergence of wariness of heights to infants' ability to regulate posture on the basis of peripheral optic flow. The paper's overarching theoretical point is the principle of probabilistic epigenesis, which states that one developmental acquisition produces experiences that bring about a host of new developmental changes in the same and different domains.

  12. Automatic classification of squamosal abnormality in micro-CT images for the evaluation of rabbit fetal skull defects using active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Bagchi, Ansuman; Wise, L. David; Winkelmann, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput micro-CT imaging has been used in our laboratory to evaluate fetal skeletal morphology in developmental toxicology studies. Currently, the volume-rendered skeletal images are visually inspected and observed abnormalities are reported for compounds in development. To improve the efficiency and reduce human error of the evaluation, we implemented a framework to automate the evaluation process. The framework starts by dividing the skull into regions of interest and then measuring various geometrical characteristics. Normal/abnormal classification on the bone segments is performed based on identifying statistical outliers. In pilot experiments using rabbit fetal skulls, the majority of the skeletal abnormalities can be detected successfully in this manner. However, there are shape-based abnormalities that are relatively subtle and thereby difficult to identify using the geometrical features. To address this problem, we introduced a model-based approach and applied this strategy on the squamosal bone. We will provide details on this active shape model (ASM) strategy for the identification of squamosal abnormalities and show that this method improved the sensitivity of detecting squamosal-related abnormalities from 0.48 to 0.92.

  13. Experience in managing a large-scale rescreening of Papanicolaou smears and the pros and cons of measuring proficiency with visual and written examinations.

    PubMed

    Rube, I F

    1989-01-01

    Experiences in a large-scale interlaboratory rescreening of Papanicolaou smears are detailed, and the pros and cons of measuring proficiency in cytology are discussed. Despite the additional work of the rescreening project and some psychological and technical problems, it proved to be a useful measure of the laboratory's performance as a whole. One problem to be avoided in future similar studies is the creation of too many diagnostic categories. Individual testing and certification have been shown to be accurate predictors of proficiency. For cytology, such tests require a strong visual component to test interpretation and judgment skills, such as by the use of glass slides or photomicrographs. The potential of interactive videodisc technology for facilitating cytopathologic teaching and assessment is discussed.

  14. Which visual functions depend on intermediate visual regions? Insights from a case of developmental visual form agnosia.

    PubMed

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    A key question in visual neuroscience is the causal link between specific brain areas and perceptual functions; which regions are necessary for which visual functions? While the contribution of primary visual cortex and high-level visual regions to visual perception has been extensively investigated, the contribution of intermediate visual areas (e.g. V2/V3) to visual processes remains unclear. Here I review more than 20 visual functions (early, mid, and high-level) of LG, a developmental visual agnosic and prosopagnosic young adult, whose intermediate visual regions function in a significantly abnormal fashion as revealed through extensive fMRI and ERP investigations. While expectedly, some of LG's visual functions are significantly impaired, some of his visual functions are surprisingly normal (e.g. stereopsis, color, reading, biological motion). During the period of eight-year testing described here, LG trained on a perceptual learning paradigm that was successful in improving some but not all of his visual functions. Following LG's visual performance and taking into account additional findings in the field, I propose a framework for how different visual areas contribute to different visual functions, with an emphasis on intermediate visual regions. Thus, although rewiring and plasticity in the brain can occur during development to overcome and compensate for hindering developmental factors, LG's case seems to indicate that some visual functions are much less dependent on strict hierarchical flow than others, and can develop normally in spite of abnormal mid-level visual areas, thereby probably less dependent on intermediate visual regions.

  15. Use of spatial, visual, and olfactory information during foraging in wild nocturnal and diurnal anthropoids: A field experiment comparing Aotus, Callicebus, and Saguinus.

    PubMed

    Bicca-Marques, Júlio César; Garber, Paul A

    2004-03-01

    Early in their evolution, the ancestors of anthropoid primates radiated from a nocturnal to a diurnal niche. Foraging during the night differs from foraging during the day in terms of the availability of light and color cues, and in the movement of odor molecules through the canopy. In this study, we compared the ability of nocturnal and diurnal New World monkeys to use perceptual cues (i.e., the sight or smell of food) and spatial information (place predictability) in within-patch foraging decisions. An experimental field study was conducted on wild groups of night monkeys (Aotus nigriceps), tamarins (Saguinus imperator imperator and S. fuscicollis weddelli), and titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at the Zoobotanical Park/UFAC, Rio Branco, Brazil. Our research design included the construction of feeding stations located in the home range of the study groups. Each feeding station consisted of eight visually identical feeding platforms located in a circular arrangement. In all test settings, two platforms at each feeding station contained a food reward (banana), and the remaining six platforms contained a sham reward (yellow plastic or inaccessible banana). In the night-monkey experiments, each feeding platform was illuminated by a 40-W red bulb to aid the researcher in observing their behavior. When the location of reward sites was predictable over time, individuals in all four species successfully relocated food rewards based solely on spatial information. Each species was also successful in using visual information to distinguish real from sham food rewards. However, only night monkeys and one group of emperor tamarins used olfactory information alone to locate food rewards. Overall, the species' performances did not clearly differentiate Aotus from diurnal New World primates in these experiments.

  16. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  17. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  18. Structural Abnormalities of the Inner Macula in Incontinentia Pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Basilius, Jacob; Young, Marielle P.; Michaelis, Timothy C.; Hobbs, Ronald; Jenkins, Glen; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Importance This report presents evidence from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (sdOCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) of inner foveal structural abnormalities associated with vision loss in Incontinentia pigmenti (IP). Observations Two children had reduced visual behavior in association with abnormalities of the inner foveal layers on sdOCT. FA showed filling defects in retinal and choroidal circulations and irregularities of the foveal avascular zones (FAZ). The foveal/parafoveal ratios were greater than 0.57 in 6 eyes of 3 patients who had extraretinal NV and/or peripheral avascular retina on FA and were treated with laser. Of these, 3 eyes of 2 patients had irregularities in FAZ and poor vision. Conclusions and Relevance Besides traction retinal detachment, visual loss in IP can occur with abnormalities of the inner fovea structure seen on sdOCT, consistent with prior descriptions of foveal hypoplasia. The evolution of abnormalities in the neural and vascular retina suggests a vascular cause of the foveal structural changes. More study is needed to determine any potential benefit of the foveal/parafoveal ratio in children with IP. Even with marked foveal structural abnormalities, vision can be preserved in some patients with IP with vigilant surveillance in the early years of life. PMID:26043102

  19. Visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, R; Masjuan, J

    2016-03-01

    Visual agnosia is defined as an impairment of object recognition, in the absence of visual acuity or cognitive dysfunction that would explain this impairment. This condition is caused by lesions in the visual association cortex, sparing primary visual cortex. There are 2 main pathways that process visual information: the ventral stream, tasked with object recognition, and the dorsal stream, in charge of locating objects in space. Visual agnosia can therefore be divided into 2 major groups depending on which of the two streams is damaged. The aim of this article is to conduct a narrative review of the various visual agnosia syndromes, including recent developments in a number of these syndromes.

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  2. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  3. Infant Face Preferences after Binocular Visual Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.; Levin, Alex V.; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Early visual deprivation impairs some, but not all, aspects of face perception. We investigated the possible developmental roots of later abnormalities by using a face detection task to test infants treated for bilateral congenital cataract within 1 hour of their first focused visual input. The seven patients were between 5 and 12 weeks old…

  4. Visual evoked potentials in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Xiong; Wong, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is very standardized. However, there is a lack of an objective method to evaluate the cerebral effects of bilirubin apart from brainstem auditory evoked potentials. There were few studies evaluating the effects of hyperbilirubinemia or phototherapy on the visual pathway in infants with hyperbilirubinemia. Serial visual evoked potentials of two groups of term neonates (N = 24)--group 1 with moderate hyperbilirubinemia (n = 16) and group 2 with severe hyperbilirubinemia (n = 8)--were evaluated prospectively. All infants had regular physical, neurologic, visual, and auditory evaluations until 3 years. Four (16%) had abnormal visual evoked potentials before 1 year, and the abnormalities returned to normal thereafter. There was no significant difference in visual evoked potentials between the two groups. All had normal neurodevelopmental status by 3 years, with the exception of one child from the severe group with ABO incompatibility with transient mild motor delay, hypotonia, and abnormal visual evoked potential. There were no abnormal effects of phototherapy on visual evoked potentials in infants with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia after 1 year of age. Although our sample size was small, the results suggest that the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on visual evoked potentials might be transient. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:58-62).

  5. The effects of fixation and restricted visual field on vection-induced motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Anderson, Richard B.; Leibowitz, Herschel W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 60 percent of healthy human subjects experience motion sickness when exposed to a rotating optokinetic drum. Here, the effects of certain visual factors on susceptibility to motion sickness were determined. Vection data (illusory self-motion), horizontal eye movement recordings, subjective motion sickness report, and a measure of gastric myoelectric activity were obtained from 45 subjects, who were randomly divided into the following three groups: a control group that observed the entire visual field with no fixation, a group that fixated on a central target, and a third group that had a visual field restricted to 15 deg. The experimental session was divided into three 12-min periods: baseline, drum rotation, and recovery. The results showed that fixation greatly reduced nystagmus and slightly reduced vection. The restricted visual field slightly reduced nystagmus and greatly reduced vection. Both of these manipulations significantly reduced symptoms of motion sickness and abnormal gastric myoelectric activity.

  6. Visual Learning in Field Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Ethel D.

    Visual learning has long been recognized as an integral process in educating biology undergraduates, who must develop specific visual skills and knowledge in order to communicate and work in the extensive visual culture shared by practicing biologists. Student experiences with field observations and the development and application of verbal/visual…

  7. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  8. Basal ganglia damage and impaired visual function in the newborn infant

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E.; Atkinson, J.; Braddick, O.; Anker, S.; Cowan, F.; Rutherford, M.; Pennock, J.; Dubowitz, L.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To examine the effects of early lesions in the visual pathway on visual function; and to identify early prognostic indicators of visual abnormalities.
METHODS—The visual function of 37 infants with perinatal brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging was assessed using behavioural and electrophysiological variables.
RESULTS—Normal visual behaviour was observed in most infants with large bilateral occipital lesions, but all the infants with associated basal ganglia involvement had abnormal visual function. Visual abnormalities were also present in six infants with isolated basal ganglia lesions.
CONCLUSIONS—These observations suggest that basal ganglia may have an integral role in human visual development and that their presence on neonatal MRI could be an early marker of abnormal visual function.

 PMID:9377131

  9. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  10. Feature-Based Memory-Driven Attentional Capture: Visual Working Memory Content Affects Visual Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Meijer, Frank; Theeuwes, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In 7 experiments, the authors explored whether visual attention (the ability to select relevant visual information) and visual working memory (the ability to retain relevant visual information) share the same content representations. The presence of singleton distractors interfered more strongly with a visual search task when it was accompanied by…

  11. Mechanisms of recovery of visual function in adult amblyopia through a tailored action video game

    PubMed Central

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Nahum, Mor; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Amblyopia is a deficit in vision that arises from abnormal visual experience early in life. It was long thought to develop into a permanent deficit, unless properly treated before the end of the sensitive period for visual recovery. However, a number of studies now suggest that adults with long-standing amblyopia may at least partially recover visual acuity and stereopsis following perceptual training. Eliminating or reducing interocular suppression has been hypothesized to be at the root of these changes. Here we show that playing a novel dichoptic video game indeed results in reduced suppression, improved visual acuity and, in some cases, improved stereopsis. Our relatively large cohort of adults with amblyopia, allowed us, for the first time, to assess the link between visual function recovery and reduction in suppression. Surprisingly, no significant correlation was found between decreased suppression and improved visual function. This finding challenges the prevailing view and suggests that while dichoptic training improves visual acuity and stereopsis in adult amblyopia, reduced suppression is unlikely to be at the root of visual recovery. These results are discussed in the context of their implication on recovery of amblyopia in adults. PMID:25719537

  12. Imagery May Arise from Associations Formed through Sensory Experience: A Network of Spiking Neurons Controlling a Robot Learns Visual Sequences in Order to Perform a Mental Rotation Task

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Fleischer, Jason G.; Chen, Yanqing; Gall, W. Einar; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Mental imagery occurs “when a representation of the type created during the initial phases of perception is present but the stimulus is not actually being perceived.” How does the capability to perform mental imagery arise? Extending the idea that imagery arises from learned associations, we propose that mental rotation, a specific form of imagery, could arise through the mechanism of sequence learning–that is, by learning to regenerate the sequence of mental images perceived while passively observing a rotating object. To demonstrate the feasibility of this proposal, we constructed a simulated nervous system and embedded it within a behaving humanoid robot. By observing a rotating object, the system learns the sequence of neural activity patterns generated by the visual system in response to the object. After learning, it can internally regenerate a similar sequence of neural activations upon briefly viewing the static object. This system learns to perform a mental rotation task in which the subject must determine whether two objects are identical despite differences in orientation. As with human subjects, the time taken to respond is proportional to the angular difference between the two stimuli. Moreover, as reported in humans, the system fills in intermediate angles during the task, and this putative mental rotation activates the same pathways that are activated when the system views physical rotation. This work supports the proposal that mental rotation arises through sequence learning and the idea that mental imagery aids perception through learned associations, and suggests testable predictions for biological experiments. PMID:27653977

  13. Neurological and cognitive abnormalities associated with chronic petrol sniffing.

    PubMed

    Maruff, P; Burns, C B; Tyler, P; Currie, B J; Currie, J

    1998-10-01

    Substance abuse through the deliberate inhalation of petrol (petrol sniffing or gasoline sniffing) is prevalent in inner-urban and remote rural communities. Although acute toxic encephalopathy is a well-documented consequence of petrol sniffing, the neurological and cognitive effects of chronic petrol sniffing are unknown. A structured neurological examination and the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess neurological and cognitive function in 33 current-sniffers (individuals who had sniffed petrol for >6 months), 30 ex-sniffers (individuals who had sniffed petrol in the past but had abstained for 6 months) and 34 matched non-sniffers (individuals who had never sniffed petrol). No subject was, or had been, encephalopathic from petrol sniffing and all were residing in their community. Blood lead and hydrocarbon levels and information about petrol sniffing behaviour were obtained from each subject. When compared with non-sniffers, current-sniffers showed higher rates of abnormal tandem gait, rapid alternating hand movements, finger to nose movements, postural tremor, bilateral palmomental reflexes and brisk deep reflexes. Cognitive deficits occurred in the areas of visual attention, visual recognition memory and visual paired associate learning. Ex-petrol sniffers showed higher rates of abnormal tandem gait and bilateral palmomental reflexes and cognitive deficits in the areas of visual recognition memory and pattern-location paired associate learning. Blood lead levels and length of time of petrol sniffing correlated significantly with the magnitude of neurological and cognitive deficits. Blood hydrocarbon levels were not related to neurocognitive deficits, although this may have been due to methodological difficulties in obtaining hydrocarbon levels. These results suggest that subtle neurological and cognitive abnormalities do occur in individuals who abuse petrol but who do not have acute toxic encephalopathy and that the

  14. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  15. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  16. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.

  17. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  18. N1 enhancement in synesthesia during visual and audio–visual perception in semantic cross-modal conflict situations: an ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Sinke, Christopher; Neufeld, Janina; Wiswede, Daniel; Emrich, Hinderk M.; Bleich, Stefan; Münte, Thomas F.; Szycik, Gregor R.

    2014-01-01

    Synesthesia entails a special kind of sensory perception, where stimulation in one sensory modality leads to an internally generated perceptual experience of another, not stimulated sensory modality. This phenomenon can be viewed as an abnormal multisensory integration process as here the synesthetic percept is aberrantly fused with the stimulated modality. Indeed, recent synesthesia research has focused on multimodal processing even outside of the specific synesthesia-inducing context and has revealed changed multimodal integration, thus suggesting perceptual alterations at a global level. Here, we focused on audio–visual processing in synesthesia using a semantic classification task in combination with visually or auditory–visually presented animated and in animated objects in an audio–visual congruent and incongruent manner. Fourteen subjects with auditory-visual and/or grapheme-color synesthesia and 14 control subjects participated in the experiment. During presentation of the stimuli, event-related potentials were recorded from 32 electrodes. The analysis of reaction times and error rates revealed no group differences with best performance for audio-visually congruent stimulation indicating the well-known multimodal facilitation effect. We found enhanced amplitude of the N1 component over occipital electrode sites for synesthetes compared to controls. The differences occurred irrespective of the experimental condition and therefore suggest a global influence on early sensory processing in synesthetes. PMID:24523689

  19. N1 enhancement in synesthesia during visual and audio-visual perception in semantic cross-modal conflict situations: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Sinke, Christopher; Neufeld, Janina; Wiswede, Daniel; Emrich, Hinderk M; Bleich, Stefan; Münte, Thomas F; Szycik, Gregor R

    2014-01-01

    Synesthesia entails a special kind of sensory perception, where stimulation in one sensory modality leads to an internally generated perceptual experience of another, not stimulated sensory modality. This phenomenon can be viewed as an abnormal multisensory integration process as here the synesthetic percept is aberrantly fused with the stimulated modality. Indeed, recent synesthesia research has focused on multimodal processing even outside of the specific synesthesia-inducing context and has revealed changed multimodal integration, thus suggesting perceptual alterations at a global level. Here, we focused on audio-visual processing in synesthesia using a semantic classification task in combination with visually or auditory-visually presented animated and in animated objects in an audio-visual congruent and incongruent manner. Fourteen subjects with auditory-visual and/or grapheme-color synesthesia and 14 control subjects participated in the experiment. During presentation of the stimuli, event-related potentials were recorded from 32 electrodes. The analysis of reaction times and error rates revealed no group differences with best performance for audio-visually congruent stimulation indicating the well-known multimodal facilitation effect. We found enhanced amplitude of the N1 component over occipital electrode sites for synesthetes compared to controls. The differences occurred irrespective of the experimental condition and therefore suggest a global influence on early sensory processing in synesthetes.

  20. Words, Shape, Visual Search and Visual Working Memory in 3-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Catarina; Smith, Linda B.

    2015-01-01

    Do words cue children's visual attention, and if so, what are the relevant mechanisms? Across four experiments, 3-year-old children (N = 163) were tested in visual search tasks in which targets were cued with only a visual preview versus a visual preview and a spoken name. The experiments were designed to determine whether labels facilitated…

  1. The pattern of sensory processing abnormalities in autism.

    PubMed

    Kern, Janet K; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Garver, Carolyn R; Grannemann, Bruce D; Andrews, Alonzo A; Savla, Jayshree S; Johnson, Danny G; Mehta, Jyutika A; Schroeder, Jennifer L

    2006-09-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the nature of sensory dysfunction in persons with autism. The cross-sectional study examined auditory, visual, oral, and touch sensory processing, as measured by the Sensory Profile, in 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3-56 years of age, gender-and age-matched to community controls. Persons with autism had abnormal auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory processing that was significantly different from controls. This finding was also apparent when the high and low thresholds of these modalities were examined separately. At later ages for the group with autism, lower levels of abnormal sensory processing were found, except for low threshold touch, which did not improve significantly. There was a significant interaction in low threshold auditory and low threshold visual, suggesting that the two groups change differently over time on these variables. These results suggest that sensory abnormalities in autism are global in nature (involving several modalities) but have the potential to improve with age.

  2. Varenicline and Abnormal Sleep Related Events

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Ruth L.; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess adverse drug reaction reports of “abnormal sleep related events” associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Design: Twenty-seven reports of “abnormal sleep related events” often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. Measurements and Results: These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. Conclusions: The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. Citation: Savage RL, Zekarias A, Caduff-Janosa P. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events. SLEEP 2015

  3. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  4. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  5. Analyzing visual signals as visual scenes.

    PubMed

    Allen, William L; Higham, James P

    2013-07-01

    The study of visual signal design is gaining momentum as techniques for studying signals become more sophisticated and more freely available. In this paper we discuss methods for analyzing the color and form of visual signals, for integrating signal components into visual scenes, and for producing visual signal stimuli for use in psychophysical experiments. Our recommended methods aim to be rigorous, detailed, quantitative, objective, and where possible based on the perceptual representation of the intended signal receiver(s). As methods for analyzing signal color and luminance have been outlined in previous publications we focus on analyzing form information by discussing how statistical shape analysis (SSA) methods can be used to analyze signal shape, and spatial filtering to analyze repetitive patterns. We also suggest the use of vector-based approaches for integrating multiple signal components. In our opinion elliptical Fourier analysis (EFA) is the most promising technique for shape quantification but we await the results of empirical comparison of techniques and the development of new shape analysis methods based on the cognitive and perceptual representations of receivers. Our manuscript should serve as an introductory guide to those interested in measuring visual signals, and while our examples focus on primate signals, the methods are applicable to quantifying visual signals in most taxa.

  6. Visual signatures in video visualization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Botchen, Ralf P; Hashim, Rudy R; Weiskopf, Daniel; Ertl, Thomas; Thornton, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    Video visualization is a computation process that extracts meaningful information from original video data sets and conveys the extracted information to users in appropriate visual representations. This paper presents a broad treatment of the subject, following a typical research pipeline involving concept formulation, system development, a path-finding user study, and a field trial with real application data. In particular, we have conducted a fundamental study on the visualization of motion events in videos. We have, for the first time, deployed flow visualization techniques in video visualization. We have compared the effectiveness of different abstract visual representations of videos. We have conducted a user study to examine whether users are able to learn to recognize visual signatures of motions, and to assist in the evaluation of different visualization techniques. We have applied our understanding and the developed techniques to a set of application video clips. Our study has demonstrated that video visualization is both technically feasible and cost-effective. It has provided the first set of evidence confirming that ordinary users can be accustomed to the visual features depicted in video visualizations, and can learn to recognize visual signatures of a variety of motion events.

  7. Visual Imagery without Visual Perception?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertolo, Helder

    2005-01-01

    The question regarding visual imagery and visual perception remain an open issue. Many studies have tried to understand if the two processes share the same mechanisms or if they are independent, using different neural substrates. Most research has been directed towards the need of activation of primary visual areas during imagery. Here we review…

  8. A new user-friendly experiment visual database system application to the gas migration test (GMT) at the Grimsel test site

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tomoyuki; Asano, Hidekazu; Ando, Kenichi; Okuma, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Vomvoris, Stratis

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Long-term integrated field investigations combine information from different groups (laboratory, modeling, experimental) often working in different locations and on different time scales. The results of these different groups are evaluated and integrated for decision making during the experiment execution, but at the end of the experiment a huge database exists, which may be difficult to use at a later stage - for example, for further modeling, benchmarking etc. How can one preserve the information obtained and present it in a transparent and user-friendly manner? A new visual database system developed is presented and its application to the 'Gas Migration in-situ Test (GMT)' is described. The GMT project has been conducted to assess the gas migration (for example from TRU waste) through the engineered barrier system and the adjacent geosphere. The experiment was initiated in 1997 under the auspices of RWMC and with primary funding by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The project consists of a large-scale in-situ test, laboratory tests and numerical modeling. The in-situ test has been performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland operated by NAGRA (National cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste, Switzerland). Laboratory tests have been performed in facilities in Japan, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. Finally, the modeling activities, performed within the modeling group, have included teams from the US, Spain, France, Japan, Germany and Switzerland with support from organizations BGR, ENRESA, ANDRA, and RWMC. More than 250 reports document the various data and analyses. The database developed uses a three layered framework. The first (or bottom) layer is the data storage which contains all reports, publications as well as the raw data; the second layer is a data flow diagram - from material data, generation of input data to the model and output to the end

  9. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  10. Visual Cortex Plasticity Following Peripheral Damage To The Visual System: fMRI Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lemos, João; Pereira, Daniela; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful research method to investigate cortical visual plasticity. Abnormal fMRI response patterns have been occasionally detected in the visually deprived cortex of patients with bilateral retinal diseases. Controversy remains whether these observations indicate structural reorganization of the visual cortex or unmasking of previously silent cortico-cortical connections. In optic nerve diseases, there is weak evidence showing that early visual cortex seems to lack reorganization, while higher-order visual areas undergo plastic changes which may contribute to optimise visual function. There is however accumulating imaging evidence demonstrating trans-synaptic degeneration of the visual cortex in patients with disease of the anterior visual pathways. This may preclude the use of restorative treatments in these patients. Here, we review and update the body of fMRI evidence on visual cortical plasticity.

  11. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  12. Altered visual information processing systems in bipolar disorder: evidence from visual MMN and P3

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Toshihiko; Katsuki, Satomi; Kishimoto, Junji; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Ogata, Katsuya; Yamasaki, Takao; Ueno, Takefumi; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 are unique ERP components that provide objective indices of human cognitive functions such as short-term memory and prediction. Bipolar disorder (BD) is an endogenous psychiatric disorder characterized by extreme shifts in mood, energy, and ability to function socially. BD patients usually show cognitive dysfunction, and the goal of this study was to access their altered visual information processing via visual MMN (vMMN) and P3 using windmill pattern stimuli. Methods: Twenty patients with BD and 20 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and handedness participated in this study. Subjects were seated in front of a monitor and listened to a story via earphones. Two types of windmill patterns (standard and deviant) and white circle (target) stimuli were randomly presented on the monitor. All stimuli were presented in random order at 200-ms durations with an 800-ms inter-stimulus interval. Stimuli were presented at 80% (standard), 10% (deviant), and 10% (target) probabilities. The participants were instructed to attend to the story and press a button as soon as possible when the target stimuli were presented. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded throughout the experiment using 128-channel EEG equipment. vMMN was obtained by subtracting standard from deviant stimuli responses, and P3 was evoked from the target stimulus. Results: Mean reaction times for target stimuli in the BD group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Additionally, mean vMMN-amplitudes and peak P3-amplitudes were significantly lower in the BD group than in controls. Conclusions: Abnormal vMMN and P3 in patients indicate a deficit of visual information processing in BD, which is consistent with their increased reaction time to visual target stimuli. Significance: Both bottom-up and top-down visual information processing are likely altered in BD. PMID:23898256

  13. Visual hallucinations associated with zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Akman, Cigdem I; Goodkin, Howard P; Rogers, Donald P; Riviello, James J

    2003-01-01

    Zonisamide is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug used to treat various types of seizures. Although visual hallucinations have not been reported as an adverse effect of this agent, we describe three patients who experienced complex visual hallucinations and altered mental status after zonisamide treatment was begun or its dosage increased. All three had been diagnosed earlier with epilepsy, and their electroencephalogram (EEG) findings were abnormal. During monitoring, visual hallucinations did not correlate with EEG readings, nor did video recording capture any of the described events. None of the patients had experienced visual hallucinations before this event. The only recent change in their treatment was the introduction or increased dosage of zonisamide. With either discontinuation or decreased dosage of the drug the symptoms disappeared and did not recur. Further observations and reports will help clarify this adverse effect. Until then, clinicians need to be aware of this possible complication associated with zonisamide.

  14. The Pea Seedling as a Model of Normal and Abnormal Morphogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurkdjian, Armen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes several simple and inexpensive experiments designed to facilitate the study of normal and abnormal morphogenesis in the biology laboratory. Seedlings of the common garden pea are used in the experiments, and abnormal morphogenesis (tumors) are induced by a virulent strain of the crown-gall organism, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. (JR)

  15. The effect of visualization on visual search performance : Does visualization trump vision?

    PubMed

    F Clarke, Alasdair D; Barr, Courtney; Hunt, Amelia R

    2016-11-01

    Striking results recently demonstrated that visualizing search for a target can facilitate visual search for that target on subsequent trials (Reinhart et al. 2015). This visualization benefit was even greater than the benefit of actually repeating search for the target. We registered a close replication and generalization of the original experiment. Our results show clear benefits of repeatedly searching for the same target, but we found no benefit associated with visualization. The difficulty of the search task and the ability to monitor compliance with instructions to visualize are both possible explanations for the failure to replicate, and both should be carefully considered in future research exploring this interesting phenomenon.

  16. Plasticity of Binocularity and Visual Acuity Are Differentially Limited by Nogo Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Chan, Leanne L.H.; Parivash, Sherveen N.; Dorton, Hilary M.; Piechowicz, Mariel

    2014-01-01

    The closure of developmental critical periods consolidates neural circuitry but also limits recovery from early abnormal sensory experience. Degrading vision by one eye throughout a critical period both perturbs ocular dominance (OD) in primary visual cortex and impairs visual acuity permanently. Yet understanding how binocularity and visual acuity interrelate has proven elusive. Here we demonstrate the plasticity of binocularity and acuity are separable and differentially regulated by the neuronal nogo receptor 1 (NgR1). Mice lacking NgR1 display developmental OD plasticity as adults and their visual acuity spontaneously improves after prolonged monocular deprivation. Restricting deletion of NgR1 to either cortical interneurons or a subclass of parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons alters intralaminar synaptic connectivity in visual cortex and prevents closure of the critical period for OD plasticity. However, loss of NgR1 in PV neurons does not rescue deficits in acuity induced by chronic visual deprivation. Thus, NgR1 functions with PV interneurons to limit plasticity of binocularity, but its expression is required more extensively within brain circuitry to limit improvement of visual acuity following chronic deprivation. PMID:25164659

  17. Electrocorticography Reveals Enhanced Visual Cortex Responses to Visual Speech.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Inga M; Yoshor, Daniel; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Human speech contains both auditory and visual components, processed by their respective sensory cortices. We test a simple model in which task-relevant speech information is enhanced during cortical processing. Visual speech is most important when the auditory component is uninformative. Therefore, the model predicts that visual cortex responses should be enhanced to visual-only (V) speech compared with audiovisual (AV) speech. We recorded neuronal activity as patients perceived auditory-only (A), V, and AV speech. Visual cortex showed strong increases in high-gamma band power and strong decreases in alpha-band power to V and AV speech. Consistent with the model prediction, gamma-band increases and alpha-band decreases were stronger for V speech. The model predicts that the uninformative nature of the auditory component (not simply its absence) is the critical factor, a prediction we tested in a second experiment in which visual speech was paired with auditory white noise. As predicted, visual speech with auditory noise showed enhanced visual cortex responses relative to AV speech. An examination of the anatomical locus of the effects showed that all visual areas, including primary visual cortex, showed enhanced responses. Visual cortex responses to speech are enhanced under circumstances when visual information is most important for comprehension.

  18. Electrocorticography Reveals Enhanced Visual Cortex Responses to Visual Speech

    PubMed Central

    Schepers, Inga M.; Yoshor, Daniel; Beauchamp, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Human speech contains both auditory and visual components, processed by their respective sensory cortices. We test a simple model in which task-relevant speech information is enhanced during cortical processing. Visual speech is most important when the auditory component is uninformative. Therefore, the model predicts that visual cortex responses should be enhanced to visual-only (V) speech compared with audiovisual (AV) speech. We recorded neuronal activity as patients perceived auditory-only (A), V, and AV speech. Visual cortex showed strong increases in high-gamma band power and strong decreases in alpha-band power to V and AV speech. Consistent with the model prediction, gamma-band increases and alpha-band decreases were stronger for V speech. The model predicts that the uninformative nature of the auditory component (not simply its absence) is the critical factor, a prediction we tested in a second experiment in which visual speech was paired with auditory white noise. As predicted, visual speech with auditory noise showed enhanced visual cortex responses relative to AV speech. An examination of the anatomical locus of the effects showed that all visual areas, including primary visual cortex, showed enhanced responses. Visual cortex responses to speech are enhanced under circumstances when visual information is most important for comprehension. PMID:24904069

  19. Translating the Verbal to the Visual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbers, Susanna Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Communication has always been at least partly a visual experience--insofar as the speaker's appearance on a stage or the text's appearance on the page. Certainly, however, the experience is becoming more and more visual. Thus, equipping students with the tools necessary to analyze and evaluate the visual rhetoric that surrounds everyone is a task…

  20. Mathematical Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogness, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computer graphics have provided mathematicians with the ability to create stunning visualizations, both to gain insight and to help demonstrate the beauty of mathematics to others. As educators these tools can be particularly important as we search for ways to work with students raised with constant visual stimulation, from video games…

  1. Visual Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipman, Susan F.

    Visual knowledge is an enormously important part of our total knowledge. The psychological study of learning and knowledge has focused almost exclusively on verbal materials. Today, the advance of technology is making the use of visual communication increasingly feasible and popular. However, this enthusiasm involves the illusion that visual…

  2. Visual Theorems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Philip J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues for a mathematics education that interprets the word "theorem" in a sense that is wide enough to include the visual aspects of mathematical intuition and reasoning. Defines the term "visual theorems" and illustrates the concept using the Marigold of Theodorus. (Author/MDH)

  3. Visual Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnheim, Rudolf

    Based on the more general principle that all thinking (including reasoning) is basically perceptual in nature, the author proposes that visual perception is not a passive recording of stimulus material but an active concern of the mind. He delineates the task of visually distinguishing changes in size, shape, and position and points out the…

  4. When viewing natural scenes, do abnormal colors impact on spatial or temporal parameters of eye movements?

    PubMed

    Ho-Phuoc, Tien; Guyader, Nathalie; Landragin, Frédéric; Guérin-Dugué, Anne

    2012-02-03

    Since Treisman's theory, it has been generally accepted that color is an elementary feature that guides eye movements when looking at natural scenes. Hence, most computational models of visual attention predict eye movements using color as an important visual feature. In this paper, using experimental data, we show that color does not affect where observers look when viewing natural scene images. Neither colors nor abnormal colors modify observers' fixation locations when compared to the same scenes in grayscale. In the same way, we did not find any significant difference between the scanpaths under grayscale, color, or abnormal color viewing conditions. However, we observed a decrease in fixation duration for color and abnormal color, and this was particularly true at the beginning of scene exploration. Finally, we found that abnormal color modifies saccade amplitude distribution.

  5. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  6. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  7. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  8. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  9. Initial experience of using an iron-containing fiducial marker for radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Advantages in the visualization of markers in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Iida, Takayoshi; Komeda, Hisao; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Seike, Kensaku; Kato, Daiki; Yokoyama, Takamasa; Hirose, Shigeki; Kawaguchi, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Visualization of markers is critical for imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the size of the marker varies according to the imaging technique. While a large-sized marker is more useful for visualization in MRI, it results in artifacts on CT and causes substantial pain on administration. In contrast, a small-sized marker reduces the artifacts on CT but hampers MRI detection. Herein, we report a new ironcontaining marker and compare its utility with that of non-iron-containing markers. Five patients underwent CT/MRI fusion-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and the markers were placed by urologists. A Gold Anchor™ (GA; diameter, 0.28 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 22G needle on the right side of the prostate. A VISICOIL™ (VIS; diameter, 0.35 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 19G needle on the left side. MRI was performed using T2*-weighted imaging. Three observers evaluated and scored the visual qualities of the acquired images. The mean score of visualization was almost identical between the GA and VIS in radiography and cone-beam CT (Novalis Tx). The artifacts in planning CT were slightly larger using the GA than using the VIS. The visualization of the marker on MRI using the GA was superior to that using the VIS. In conclusion, the visualization quality of radiography, conebeam CT, and planning CT was roughly equal between the GA and VIS. However, the GA was more strongly visualized than was the VIS on MRI due to iron containing.

  10. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  11. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  12. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS), a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical data of the samples for a

  13. Brain abnormality segmentation based on l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Erus, Guray; Tanwar, Manoj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-03-01

    We present a method that uses sparse representations to model the inter-individual variability of healthy anatomy from a limited number of normal medical images. Abnormalities in MR images are then defined as deviations from the normal variation. More precisely, we model an abnormal (pathological) signal y as the superposition of a normal part ~y that can be sparsely represented under an example-based dictionary, and an abnormal part r. Motivated by a dense error correction scheme recently proposed for sparse signal recovery, we use l1- norm minimization to separate ~y and r. We extend the existing framework, which was mainly used on robust face recognition in a discriminative setting, to address challenges of brain image analysis, particularly the high dimensionality and low sample size problem. The dictionary is constructed from local image patches extracted from training images aligned using smooth transformations, together with minor perturbations of those patches. A multi-scale sliding-window scheme is applied to capture anatomical variations ranging from fine and localized to coarser and more global. The statistical significance of the abnormality term r is obtained by comparison to its empirical distribution through cross-validation, and is used to assign an abnormality score to each voxel. In our validation experiments the method is applied for segmenting abnormalities on 2-D slices of FLAIR images, and we obtain segmentation results consistent with the expert-defined masks.

  14. Visual deficits in anisometropia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Dennis M.; McKee, Suzanne P.; Movshon, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Amblyopia is usually associated with the presence of anisometropia, strabismus or both early in life. We set out to explore quantitative relationships between the degree of anisometropia and the loss of visual function, and to examine how the presence of strabismus affects visual function in observers with anisometropia. We measured optotype acuity, Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity and stereoacuity in 84 persons with anisometropia and compared their results with those of 27 persons with high bilateral refractive error (isoametropia) and 101 persons with both strabismus and anisometropia. All subjects participated in a large scale study of amblyopia (McKee, Levi & Movshon, 2003). We found no consistent visual abnormalities in the strong eye, and therefore report only on vision in the weaker, defined as the eye with lower acuity. LogMAR acuity falls off markedly with increasing anisometropia in non-strabismic anisometropes, while contrast sensitivity is much less affected. Acuity degrades rapidly with increases in both hyperopic and myopic anisometropia, but the risk of amblyopia is about twice as great in hyperopic than myopic anisometropes of comparable refractive imbalance. For a given degree of refractive imbalance, strabismic anisometropes perform considerably worse than anisometropes without strabismus – visual acuity for strabismics was on average 2.5 times worse than for non-strabismics with similar anisometropia. For observers with equal refractive error in the two eyes there is very little change in acuity or sensitivity with increasing (bilateral) refractive error except for one extreme individual (bilaterally refractive error of -15 D). Most pure anisometropes with interocular differences less than 4 D retain some stereopsis, and the degree is correlated with the acuity of the weak eye. We conclude that even modest interocular differences in refractive error can influence visual function. PMID:20932989

  15. Lack of experience-mediated differences in the immunohistochemical expression of blood-brain barrier markers (EBA and GluT-1) during the postnatal development of the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Argandoña, Enrike G; Bengoetxea, Harkaitz; Lafuente, José V

    2005-05-12

    The development of the cortical vascular tree depends on functional development. External inputs are an essential requirement in the modeling of the visual cortex, mainly during the critical period, when congruous blood supply is needed. The blood brain barrier (BBB) function regulates the passage of substances between the blood and the brain parenchyma, which is one of the main differential features of central nervous system (CNS) microvessels. The endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) has been reported as a specific marker for the BBB physiological function in rats. We studied the postnatal development of EBA expression in the visual cortex of rats reared under opposite paradigms of visual experience, e.g., standard laboratory conditions, dark rearing, and enriched environment at 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 63 days postnatal (dpn). Parallel sections were immunohistochemically processed for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) and glucose transporter-1 (GluT-1). Total vasculature was quantified by Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA) lectin histochemistry. No differences in EBA expression were found between groups, although quantitative differences were recorded paralleling differences in vascular density. Paradoxically, there was no expression in certain cortical vessels which were GluT-1 immunopositive and positivity was consistent in non-barrier areas such as the pineal gland. These findings were completely independent of age or experimental conditions. Therefore, the role of the EBA antigen in the BBB remains unclear: it has been undeniably linked to vascular permeability, but its presence in non-barrier vessels suggests another vascular function. Although visual experience modifies vascular density in the visual cortex, it has not been shown to have an influence on the maturation of the BBB function.

  16. Visualizing quantitative microscopy data: History and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sailem, Heba Z; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Data visualization is a fundamental aspect of science. In the context of microscopy-based studies, visualization typically involves presentation of the images themselves. However, data visualization is challenging when microscopy experiments entail imaging of millions of cells, and complex cellular phenotypes are quantified in a high-content manner. Most well-established visualization tools are inappropriate for displaying high-content data, which has driven the development of new visualization methodology. In this review, we discuss how data has been visualized in both classical and high-content microscopy studies; as well as the advantages, and disadvantages, of different visualization methods.

  17. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  18. Massively parallel energy space exploration for uncluttered visualization of vascular structures.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongkweon; Won, Joong-Ho; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    Images captured using computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography are used in the examination of the abdominal aorta and its branches. The examination of all clinically relevant branches simultaneously in a single 2-D image without any misleading overlaps facilitates the diagnosis of vascular abnormalities. This problem is called uncluttered single-image visualization (USIV). We can solve the USIV problem by assigning energy-based scores to visualization candidates and then finding the candidate that optimizes the score; this approach is similar to the manner in which the protein side-chain placement problem has been solved. To obtain near-optimum images, we need to explore the energy space extensively, which is often time consuming. This paper describes a method for exploring the energy space in a massively parallel fashion using graphics processing units. According to our experiments, in which we used 30 images obtained from five patients, the proposed method can reduce the total visualization time substantially. We believe that the proposed method can make a significant contribution to the effective visualization of abdominal vascular structures and precise diagnosis of related abnormalities.

  19. Perceptions Concerning Visual Culture Dialogues of Visual Art Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamur, Nuray

    2012-01-01

    The visual art which is commented by the visual art teachers to help processing of the visual culture is important. In this study it is tried to describe the effect of visual culture based on the usual aesthetic experiences to be included in the learning process art education. The action research design, which is a qualitative study, is conducted…

  20. Abnormal Functional Connectivity Density in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youxue; Xie, Bing; Chen, Heng; Li, Meiling; Liu, Feng; Chen, Huafu

    2016-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs in individuals who have experienced life-threatening mental traumas. Previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that the pathology of PTSD may be associated with the abnormal functional integration among brain regions. In the current study, we used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping, a novel voxel-wise data-driven approach based on graph theory, to explore aberrant FC through the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the PTSD. We calculated both short- and long-range FCD in PTSD patients and healthy controls (HCs). Compared with HCs, PTSD patients showed significantly increased long-range FCD in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but no abnormal short-range FCD was found in PTSD. Furthermore, seed-based FC analysis of the left DLPFC showed increased connectivity in the left superior parietal lobe and visual cortex of PTSD patients. The results suggested that PTSD patients experienced a disruption of intrinsic long-range functional connections in the fronto-parietal network and visual cortex, which are associated with attention control and visual information processing.

  1. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  2. Visual Marking Inhibits Singleton Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how we prioritize the selection of new objects in visual scenes. We present four experiments investigating the effects of distractor previews on visual search through new objects. Participants viewed a set of to-be-ignored nontargets, with the task being to search for a target in a second set, added to the first after…

  3. Visual Testing: Searching for Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gendt, Kitty; Verhagen, Plon

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of the variables "realism" and "context" on the performance of biology students on a visual test about the anatomy of a rat. The instruction was primarily visual with additional verbal information like Latin names and practical information about the learning task: dissecting a rat to gain…

  4. Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or head with a baseball or having an automobile or motorcycle accident. Some babies have congenital blindness , ... how well he or she sees at various distances. Visual field test. Ophthalmologists use this test to ...

  5. Visual cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  6. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  7. The Effects of A Learning Experience Upon Preference for Complexity and Asymmetry; Variables of Perceptual Field Independence, and the Ability to Handle Visual Information. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinnie, Harold J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a specific type of perceptual training upon the aesthetic preference for complexity-asymmetry, ability to handle visual information, select variables of perceptual field-independence, and selected variables of creative thinking. A total of 300 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children in…

  8. Getting in and Getting On? The Experiences of Young People with Visual Impairments and Hearing Impairments in Third-Level Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Bronagh

    2014-01-01

    Young disabled people continue to be under-represented throughout further and higher education settings. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's social theory of habitus, capital and field, this paper explores the practices of domination and oppression that have made it difficult for young people with visual impairments and hearing impairments to participate…

  9. The Role of the WHO ICF as a Framework to Interpret Barriers and to Inclusion: Visually Impaired People's Views and Experiences of Personal Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Graeme; Corcoran, Christine; Pavey, Sue

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF), 2001, was used as a framework for the design of the interview schedule used in the Network 1000 project. It is argued that the ICF offers a vocabulary to enable visually impaired participants to describe their lives…

  10. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  11. Visual complications in diabetes mellitus: beyond retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Petropoulos, I N; Ponirakis, G; Malik, R A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetes mellitus; however, other causes of visual impairment/loss include other retinal and non-retinal visual problems, including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy and cataracts. Additionally, when a person with diabetes complains of visual disturbance despite a visual acuity of 6/6, abnormalities in refraction, contrast sensitivity, straylight and amplitude of accommodation should be considered. We review and highlight these visual problems for physicians who manage people with diabetes to ensure timely referral and treatment to limit visual disability, which can have a significant impact on daily living, especially for those participating in sports and driving.

  12. Ocular abnormalities in multi-transfused beta-thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Reza; Heydarian, Samira; Karami, Hosein; Shektaei, Mohammad Momeni; Dailami, Kiumars Noruzpour; Amiri, Ahmad Ahmadzadeh; Rezaee, Majid Reza Sheikh; Far, Asad Allah Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess ocular changes in thalassemia patients who have received multiple transfusions and chelate binding therapy in order to avoid iron accumulation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 54 thalassemia major patients were selected as case group, and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were regarded as a control group. Ocular examination included visual acuity, refraction testing, slit lamp examination, funduscopy, tonometry, perimetry, tear break-up time test, and color vision testing were performed for all the participants. We computed the frequency and duration of blood transfusion, the mean serum ferritin level, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and type, duration, and daily dose of chelation therapy for thalassemia patients based on their records. Statistical Analysis Used: All data analysis was performed using SPSS, version 19. Results: All the thalassemic patients were asymptomatic, but abnormal ocular findings (dry eye (33.3%), cataract (10.2%), retinal pigment epithelium degeneration (16.7%), color vision deficiency (3.7%), and visual field defects (33.7%)) were seen in 68.5% of thalassemic group. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities in normal group was 19.4%, which was significantly lower than that in thalassemia patients (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was found between ocular abnormalities and mean serum ferritin level (P = 0.627) and mean hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.143). Correlation of number of blood transfusion with the presence of ocular abnormalities was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). Conclusions: As life expectancy for beta-thalassemia patients extends, regular ophthalmological evaluation to detect early changes in their ocular system is recommended. PMID:26632126

  13. Abnormal Grain Growth in M-252 and S-816 Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rush, A I; Dano, A G; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out on air- and vacuum-melted M-252 and S-816 alloys to find conditions of heating and hot-working which resulted in abnormal grain growth. The experiments were mainly limited to normal conditions of heating for hot-working and heat treatment and normal temperatures of solution treatment were used to allow grain growth after susceptibility to abnormal grain growth was developed by various experimental conditions. Results indicated that small reductions of essentially strain-free metal were the basic cause of such grain growth.

  14. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  15. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  16. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  17. The Statistics of Visual Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of retinex image processing has prompted us to reconsider fundamental aspects of imaging and image processing. Foremost is the idea that a good visual representation requires a non-linear transformation of the recorded (approximately linear) image data. Further, this transformation appears to converge on a specific distribution. Here we investigate the connection between numerical and visual phenomena. Specifically the questions explored are: (1) Is there a well-defined consistent statistical character associated with good visual representations? (2) Does there exist an ideal visual image? And (3) what are its statistical properties?

  18. CMS tracker visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennea, M. S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-08-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  19. Early clinical and subclinical visual evoked potential and Humphrey's visual field defects in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Anand; Rae, William; Bhigjee, Ahmed; Connolly, Cathy; Devparsad, Natasha; Michowicz, Andrew; Harrison, Thomas; Loyse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcal induced visual loss is a devastating complication in survivors of cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Early detection is paramount in prevention and treatment. Subclinical optic nerve dysfunction in CM has not hitherto been investigated by electrophysiological means. We undertook a prospective study on 90 HIV sero-positive patients with culture confirmed CM. Seventy-four patients underwent visual evoked potential (VEP) testing and 47 patients underwent Humphrey's visual field (HVF) testing. Decreased best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was detected in 46.5% of patients. VEP was abnormal in 51/74 (68.9%) right eyes and 50/74 (67.6%) left eyes. VEP P100 latency was the main abnormality with mean latency values of 118.9 (±16.5) ms and 119.8 (±15.7) ms for the right and left eyes respectively, mildly prolonged when compared to our laboratory references of 104 (±10) ms (p<0.001). Subclinical VEP abnormality was detected in 56.5% of normal eyes and constituted mostly latency abnormality. VEP amplitude was also significantly reduced in this cohort but minimally so in the visually unimpaired. HVF was abnormal in 36/47 (76.6%) right eyes and 32/45 (71.1%) left eyes. The predominant field defect was peripheral constriction with an enlarged blind spot suggesting the greater impact by raised intracranial pressure over that of optic neuritis. Whether this was due to papilloedema or a compartment syndrome is open to further investigation. Subclinical HVF abnormalities were minimal and therefore a poor screening test for early optic nerve dysfunction. However, early optic nerve dysfunction can be detected by testing of VEP P100 latency, which may precede the onset of visual loss in CM.

  20. Early Clinical and Subclinical Visual Evoked Potential and Humphrey's Visual Field Defects in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Anand; Rae, William; Bhigjee, Ahmed; Connolly, Cathy; Devparsad, Natasha; Michowicz, Andrew; Harrison, Thomas; Loyse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcal induced visual loss is a devastating complication in survivors of cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Early detection is paramount in prevention and treatment. Subclinical optic nerve dysfunction in CM has not hitherto been investigated by electrophysiological means. We undertook a prospective study on 90 HIV sero-positive patients with culture confirmed CM. Seventy-four patients underwent visual evoked potential (VEP) testing and 47 patients underwent Humphrey's visual field (HVF) testing. Decreased best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was detected in 46.5% of patients. VEP was abnormal in 51/74 (68.9%) right eyes and 50/74 (67.6%) left eyes. VEP P100 latency was the main abnormality with mean latency values of 118.9 (±16.5) ms and 119.8 (±15.7) ms for the right and left eyes respectively, mildly prolonged when compared to our laboratory references of 104 (±10) ms (p<0.001). Subclinical VEP abnormality was detected in 56.5% of normal eyes and constituted mostly latency abnormality. VEP amplitude was also significantly reduced in this cohort but minimally so in the visually unimpaired. HVF was abnormal in 36/47 (76.6%) right eyes and 32/45 (71.1%) left eyes. The predominant field defect was peripheral constriction with an enlarged blind spot suggesting the greater impact by raised intracranial pressure over that of optic neuritis. Whether this was due to papilloedema or a compartment syndrome is open to further investigation. Subclinical HVF abnormalities were minimal and therefore a poor screening test for early optic nerve dysfunction. However, early optic nerve dysfunction can be detected by testing of VEP P100 latency, which may precede the onset of visual loss in CM. PMID:23285220

  1. Visual Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.; Tehovnik, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 40 million blind individuals in the world whose plight would be greatly ameliorated by creating a visual prosthetic. We begin by outlining the basic operational characteristics of the visual system as this knowledge is essential for producing a prosthetic device based on electrical stimulation through arrays of implanted electrodes. We then list a series of tenets that we believe need to be followed in this effort. Central among these is our belief that the initial research in this area, which is in its infancy, should first be carried out in animals. We suggest that implantation of area V1 holds high promise as the area is of a large volume and can therefore accommodate extensive electrode arrays. We then proceed to consider coding operations that can effectively convert visual images viewed by a camera to stimulate electrode arrays to yield visual impressions that can provide shape, motion and depth information. We advocate experimental work that mimics electrical stimulation effects non-invasively in sighted human subjects using a camera from which visual images are converted into displays on a monitor akin to those created by electrical stimulation. PMID:19065857

  2. Six-month visual outcomes for the correction of presbyopia using a small-aperture corneal inlay: single-site experience

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Quist, Tyler S; Skanchy, David F; Wallace, Ryan T; Linn, Steven H; Hoopes, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe 6-month postoperative efficacy and safety outcomes after monocular KAMRA corneal inlay implantation in emmetropic presbyopic patients. Study design This study followed a retrospective chart analysis. Setting This study was performed at Hoopes Vision in Draper, UT, USA. Subjects and methods Fifty-seven patients met the inclusion criteria of this study and underwent KAMRA corneal inlay implantation following the approval of the United States Food and Drug Association between May 2015 and April 2016 at a single site. Surgery involved femtosecond laser-created corneal pockets of various depths. Efficacy, safety, and patient satisfaction reports were analyzed at 3 and 6 months. Results At 6 months follow-up, the monocular uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) was Jaeger (J) 4 (20/32), the mean uncorrected distance visual acuity was 20/25, and the mean corrected distance visual acuity was 20/20. At 6 months, 71% of patients with a pocket depth of ≥250 μm had a UNVA of 20/20 or better, whereas only 22% of patients with a shallow pocket depth of <250 μm had a UNVA of 20/20 or better. There was no statistical difference in UNVA at 6 months between virgin eyes and post-LASIK eyes. One patient had an explant and five patients underwent inlay recentration, all of which resulted in improved visual acuity. At 6 months, 72% of patients reported some level of satisfaction, 26% of patients reported being “not dependent” on reading glasses, and 62% of patients reported being able to do most things in bright light without reading glasses. Conclusion For patients with emmetropic presbyopia, the KAMRA inlay is a viable treatment option resulting in improved UNVA. Increased pocket depth may be associated with better postoperative outcomes. Safety rates are high, while explantation and recentering rates are low. Overall, patient satisfaction of the KAMRA inlay is good. PMID:27843289

  3. MarC-V: a spreadsheet-based tool for analysis, normalization, and visualization of single cDNA microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Schageman, J J; Basit, M; Gallardo, T D; Garner, H R; Shohet, R V

    2002-02-01

    The comprehensive analysis and visualization of data extracted from cDNA microarrays can be a time-consuming and error-prone process that becomes increasingly tedious with increased number of gene elements on a particular microarray. With the increasingly large number of gene elements on today's microarrays, analysis tools must be developed to meet this challenge. Here, we present MarC-V, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool with Visual Basic macros to automate much of the visualization and calculation involved in the analysis process while providing the familiarity and flexibility of Excel. Automated features of this tool include (i) lower-bound thresholding, (ii) data normalization, (iii) generation of ratio frequency distribution plots, (iv) generation of scatter plots color-coded by expression level, (v) ratio scoring based on intensity measurements, (vi) filtering of data based on expression level or specific gene interests, and (vii) exporting data for subsequent multi-array analysis. MarC-V also has an importing function included for GenePix results (GPR) raw data files.

  4. Spent fuel behavior under abnormal thermal transients during dry storage

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, D.; Landow, M.P.; Burian, R.J.; Pasupathi, V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of abnormally high temperatures on spent fuel behavior. Prior to testing, calculations using the CIRFI3 code were used to determine the steady-state fuel and cask component temperatures. The TRUMP code was used to determine transient heating rates under postulated abnormal events during which convection cooling of the cask surfaces was obstructed by a debris bed covering the cask. The peak rate of temperature rise during the first 6 h was calculated to be about 15/sup 0/C/h, followed by a rate of about 1/sup 0/C/h. A Turkey Point spent fuel rod segment was heated to approx. 800/sup 0/C. The segment deformed uniformly with an average strain of 17% at failure and a local strain of 60%. Pretest characterization of the spent fuel consisted of visual examination, profilometry, eddy-current examination, gamma scanning, fission gas collection, void volume measurement, fission gas analysis, hydrogen analysis of the cladding, burnup analysis, cladding metallography, and fuel ceramography. Post-test characterization showed that the failure was a pinhole cladding breach. The results of the tests showed that spent fuel temperatures in excess of 700/sup 0/C are required to produce a cladding breach in fuel rods pressurized to 500 psing (3.45 MPa) under postulated abnormal thermal transient cask conditions. The pinhole cladding breach that developed would be too small to compromise the confinement of spent fuel particles during an abnormal event or after normal cooling conditions are restored. This behavior is similar to that found in other slow ramp tests with irradiated and nonirradiated rod sections and nonirradiated whole rods under conditions that bracketed postulated abnormal heating rates. This similarity is attributed to annealing of the irradiation-strengthened Zircaloy cladding during heating. In both cases, the failure was a benign, ductile pinhole rupture.

  5. Eye Movements and Visual Memory for Scenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Di Lo110,V. (1980). Temporal integration in visual memory. Journal of Experimental Pychology : General 109,7597. Duhamel, J. R, Colby, C. L, and...H. (1978). Direction-specific motion thresholds for abnormal 9,441474. image shifts during saccadic eye movement. Perception and Psychophyn’cs

  6. Creating visual explanations improves learning.

    PubMed

    Bobek, Eliza; Tversky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Many topics in science are notoriously difficult for students to learn. Mechanisms and processes outside student experience present particular challenges. While instruction typically involves visualizations, students usually explain in words. Because visual explanations can show parts and processes of complex systems directly, creating them should have benefits beyond creating verbal explanations. We compared learning from creating visual or verbal explanations for two STEM domains, a mechanical system (bicycle pump) and a chemical system (bonding). Both kinds of explanations were analyzed for content and learning assess by a post-test. For the mechanical system, creating a visual explanation increased understanding particularly for participants of low spatial ability. For the chemical system, creating both visual and verbal explanations improved learning without new teaching. Creating a visual explanation was superior and benefitted participants of both high and low spatial ability. Visual explanations often included crucial yet invisible features. The greater effectiveness of visual explanations appears attributable to the checks they provide for completeness and coherence as well as to their roles as platforms for inference. The benefits should generalize to other domains like the social sciences, history, and archeology where important information can be visualized. Together, the findings provide support for the use of learner-generated visual explanations as a powerful learning tool.

  7. Visual object affordances: object orientation.

    PubMed

    Symes, Ed; Ellis, Rob; Tucker, Mike

    2007-02-01

    Five experiments systematically investigated whether orientation is a visual object property that affords action. The primary aim was to establish the existence of a pure physical affordance (PPA) of object orientation, independent of any semantic object-action associations or visually salient areas towards which visual attention might be biased. Taken together, the data from these experiments suggest that firstly PPAs of object orientation do exist, and secondly, the behavioural effects that reveal them are larger and more robust when the object appears to be graspable, and is oriented in depth (rather than just frontally) such that its leading edge appears to point outwards in space towards a particular hand of the viewer.

  8. Visual cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  9. Effect of grease type on abnormal vibration of ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Takayoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Igarashib, Teruo

    2003-12-01

    The abnormal vibration of ball bearings lubricated with grease was studied. The test bearings were lubricated with three types of grease: Li soap/silicone oil grease, Na soap/mineral oil grease and Li soap/mineral oil grease. In the experiments, the axial-loaded ball bearings were operated at a constant rotational speed, and the vibration and the outer ring temperatures of the test bearings were measured. In addition, the shear stress and shear rate of the greases were measured by a rheometer. The experimental results showed that the abnormal vibration occurs on the test bearings lubricated with all three types of grease. Based on the experimental results, the generating mechanisms of the abnormal vibrations were discussed. From the discussions, it seems reasonable to conclude: (1) Li soap/silicone oil grease and Na soap/mineral oil grease both have a negative damping moment characteristic. The abnormal vibrations of the ball bearings lubricated with these greases are generated by the negative damping moment. (2) The abnormal vibration of the ball bearings lubricated with Li soap/mineral oil grease is generated by the decreasing positive damping moment of the grease due to the rising temperature.

  10. Visual development in infants with prenatal post‐haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Daniela; Luciano, Rita; Baranello, Giovanni; Veredice, Chiara; Cesarini, Laura; Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; Gallini, Francesca; Vasco, Gessica; Savarese, Immacolata; Zuppa, Antonio A; Masini, Lucia; Rocco, Concezio Di; Romagnoli, Costantino; Guzzetta, Francesco; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess visual function in 13 infants with evidence of prenatal post haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation. Design Infants were assessed at 5, 12 and 24 months using a battery of tests specifically designed to assess various aspects of visual function in infancy. Visual findings were correlated with several variables, including extent of the lesion and presence of epilepsy. Results and conclusions Abnormalities of visual function were frequent (over 60%) in our cohort at age 2 years, ranging from isolated abnormal ocular movements to severe abnormalities of all the aspects of visual function assessed. The most severe and persistent abnormalities of visual function were found in infants with grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage and shunted hydrocephalus who also had epilepsy in the first year. PMID:17142298

  11. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  12. Visual feature extraction and establishment of visual tags in the intelligent visual internet of things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiqun; Wang, Zhihui

    2015-12-01

    The Internet of things (IOT) is a kind of intelligent networks which can be used to locate, track, identify and supervise people and objects. One of important core technologies of intelligent visual internet of things ( IVIOT) is the intelligent visual tag system. In this paper, a research is done into visual feature extraction and establishment of visual tags of the human face based on ORL face database. Firstly, we use the principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm for face feature extraction, then adopt the support vector machine (SVM) for classifying and face recognition, finally establish a visual tag for face which is already classified. We conducted a experiment focused on a group of people face images, the result show that the proposed algorithm have good performance, and can show the visual tag of objects conveniently.

  13. Familiarity Enhances Visual Working Memory for Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Margaret C.; Raymond, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    Although it is intuitive that familiarity with complex visual objects should aid their preservation in visual working memory (WM), empirical evidence for this is lacking. This study used a conventional change-detection procedure to assess visual WM for unfamiliar and famous faces in healthy adults. Across experiments, faces were upright or…

  14. Personalized visual aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  15. Spreading Photoparoxysmal EEG Response is Associated with an Abnormal Cortical Excitability Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groppa, Sergey; Jerosch, Bettina; Muhle, Hiltrud; Kurth, Christoph; Shepherd, Alex J.; Siebner, Hartwig; Stephani, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an abnormal cortical response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). In PPR-positive individuals, IPS induces spikes, spike-waves or intermittent slow waves. The PPR may be restricted to posterior visual areas (i.e. local PPR…

  16. Visualizing inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-07-01

    The study of socioeconomic inequality is of substantial importance, scientific and general alike. The graphic visualization of inequality is commonly conveyed by Lorenz curves. While Lorenz curves are a highly effective statistical tool for quantifying the distribution of wealth in human societies, they are less effective a tool for the visual depiction of socioeconomic inequality. This paper introduces an alternative to Lorenz curves-the hill curves. On the one hand, the hill curves are a potent scientific tool: they provide detailed scans of the rich-poor gaps in human societies under consideration, and are capable of accommodating infinitely many degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the hill curves are a powerful infographic tool: they visualize inequality in a most vivid and tangible way, with no quantitative skills that are required in order to grasp the visualization. The application of hill curves extends far beyond socioeconomic inequality. Indeed, the hill curves are highly effective 'hyperspectral' measures of statistical variability that are applicable in the context of size distributions at large. This paper establishes the notion of hill curves, analyzes them, and describes their application in the context of general size distributions.

  17. Plasticity and stability of the visual system in human achiasma

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, M.B.; Kaule, F.R.; Levin, N.; Masuda, Y.; Kumar, A.; Gottlob, I.; Horiguchi, H.; Dougherty, R.F.; Stadler, J.; Wolynski, B.; Speck, O.; Kanowski, M.; Liao, Y.J.; Wandell, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The absence of the optic chiasm is an extraordinary and extreme abnormality in the nervous system. The abnormality produces highly atypical functional responses in the cortex, including overlapping hemifield representations and bilateral population receptive fields in both striate and extrastriate visual cortex. Even in the presence of these large functional abnormalities, the effect on visual perception and daily life is not easily detected. Here we demonstrate that in two achiasmic humans the gross topography of the geniculo-striate and occipital callosal connections remains largely unaltered. We conclude that visual function is preserved by reorganization of intra-cortical connections instead of large-scale reorganizations of the visual cortex. Thus developmental mechanisms of local wiring within cortical maps compensate for the improper gross wiring to preserve function in human achiasma. PMID:22884323

  18. Plasticity and stability of the visual system in human achiasma.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michael B; Kaule, Falko R; Levin, Netta; Masuda, Yoichiro; Kumar, Anil; Gottlob, Irene; Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Dougherty, Robert F; Stadler, Joerg; Wolynski, Barbara; Speck, Oliver; Kanowski, Martin; Liao, Yaping J; Wandell, Brian A; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2012-08-09

    The absence of the optic chiasm is an extraordinary and extreme abnormality in the nervous system. The abnormality produces highly atypical functional responses in the cortex, including overlapping hemifield representations and bilateral population receptive fields in both striate and extrastriate visual cortex. Even in the presence of these large functional abnormalities, the effect on visual perception and daily life is not easily detected. Here, we demonstrate that in two achiasmic humans the gross topography of the geniculostriate and occipital callosal connections remains largely unaltered. We conclude that visual function is preserved by reorganization of intracortical connections instead of large-scale reorganizations of the visual cortex. Thus, developmental mechanisms of local wiring within cortical maps compensate for the improper gross wiring to preserve function in human achiasma.

  19. Arc visualization of odor objects reveals experience-dependent ensemble sharpening, separation, and merging in anterior piriform cortex in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Shakhawat, Amin Md; Harley, Carolyn W; Yuan, Qi

    2014-07-30

    Visualization using the immediate early gene Arc revealed sparser and more robust odor representations in the anterior piriform cortex of adult rats when odor was associated with water reward over 2-3 d. Rewarded odor "mixtures" resulted in rats responding to either component odor similarly, and, correspondingly, the odor representations became more similar as indexed by increased overlap in piriform Arc-expressing (Arc(+)) pyramidal neurons. The increased overlap was consistent with the rats' generalization from component odors. Discriminating among highly similar odor mixtures for reward led to increased differentiation of the neural representations as indexed by a reduction in overlap for piriform Arc(+) pyramidal neurons after training. Similar odor mixture discrimination also required more trials to criterion. The visible reduction in the overlap of odor representations indexes pattern separation. The Arc visualization of odor representations in the anterior piriform network suggests that odor objects are widely distributed representations and can be rapidly modified by reward training in adult rats. We suggest that dynamic changes such as those observed here in piriform odor encoding are at the heart of perceptual learning and reflect the continuing plastic nature of mature associative cortex as an outcome of successful problem solving.

  20. Neocortical vasculature abnormalities in the Fragile X mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Ashley M; Galvez, Roberto

    2012-08-30

    The Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading form of inherited mental retardation. To date, the most prominent neuronal phenotype associated with the syndrome is an abundance of long thin spines exhibiting an immature morphology. However, in addition to synaptic abnormalities, recent case studies have demonstrated that Fragile X (FX) patients also exhibit abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF). To examine the role of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in altering CBF, we examined blood vessel density (BVD) in the visual cortex of Adult and Middle-aged FX mice. Analysis of Middle-aged FX mice demonstrated elevated BVD compared to wildtype controls, suggesting that FX mice exhibit a lack of age-induced BVD plasticity. However, Adult FX and wildtype mice did not exhibit consistent differences in BVD. These data demonstrate that FMRP is required for age-induced neocortical vasculature plasticity. Furthermore, these data suggest a new role for FMRP in blood vessel regulation that would have profound implications towards appropriately timed delivery of neuronal nutrients, thus contributing to or exacerbating FX cognitive and neuronal abnormalities.

  1. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mervyn G.; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P.; McLean, Rebecca J.; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T.; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus. PMID:24688117

  2. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  3. Snowflake Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Kucera, P. A.; Rodriguez, P.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Snowflake Video Imagers (SVIs) enable snowflake visualization at diverse field sites. The natural variability of frozen precipitation is a complicating factor for remote sensing retrievals in high latitude regions. Particle classification is important for understanding snow/ice physics, remote sensing polarimetry, bulk radiative properties, surface emissivity, and ultimately, precipitation rates and accumulations. Yet intermittent storms, low temperatures, high winds, remote locations and complex terrain can impede us from observing falling snow in situ. SVI hardware and software have some special features. The standard camera and optics yield 8-bit gray-scale images with resolution of 0.05 x 0.1 mm, at 60 frames per second. Gray-scale images are highly desirable because they display contrast that aids particle classification. Black and white (1-bit) systems display no contrast, so there is less information to recognize particle types, which is particularly burdensome for aggregates. Data are analyzed at one-minute intervals using NASA's Precipitation Link Software that produces (a) Particle Catalogs and (b) Particle Size Distributions (PSDs). SVIs can operate nearly continuously for long periods (e.g., an entire winter season), so natural variability can be documented. Let’s summarize results from field studies this past winter and review some recent SVI enhancements. During the winter of 2009-2010, SVIs were deployed at two sites. One SVI supported weather observations during the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. It was located close to the summit (Roundhouse) of Whistler Mountain, near the town of Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. In addition, two SVIs were located at the King City Weather Radar Station (WKR) near Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Access was prohibited to the SVI on Whistler Mountain during the Olympics due to security concerns. So to meet the schedule for daily data products, we operated the SVI by remote control. We also upgraded the

  4. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  5. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  6. Abnormal band of lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian; Goldblatt, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a case of an "abnormal band" of the lateral meniscus, extending from the posterior horn of the true lateral meniscus to its antero-mid portion, observed during arthroscopy in a 45-year-old white man of Bosnian descent. The periphery of the aberrant lateral meniscus was freely mobile, and not connected to the underlying true lateral meniscus. Preoperative physical examination findings were consistent with medial-sided meniscal pathology only; however, evidence of an anomalous lateral meniscus was seen with magnetic resonance imaging. This anatomical pattern is rare and has been reported in the literature only once, in a report of 2 Asian patients. This article illustrates an anatomical variant of the lateral meniscus in a non-Asian patient with a clinical presentation that has not been previously described. In addition to the case report, the article presents a comprehensive review of the existing body of literature on anomalous lateral meniscus patterns. We believe that the definitions of the types of aberrant meniscus can be clarified to establish improved accuracy in reporting.

  7. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  9. Relating Standardized Visual Perception Measures to Simulator Visual System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2013-01-01

    Human vision is quantified through the use of standardized clinical vision measurements. These measurements typically include visual acuity (near and far), contrast sensitivity, color vision, stereopsis (a.k.a. stereo acuity), and visual field periphery. Simulator visual system performance is specified in terms such as brightness, contrast, color depth, color gamut, gamma, resolution, and field-of-view. How do these simulator performance characteristics relate to the perceptual experience of the pilot in the simulator? In this paper, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity will be related to simulator visual system resolution, contrast, and dynamic range; similarly, color vision will be related to color depth/color gamut. Finally, we will consider how some characteristics of human vision not typically included in current clinical assessments could be used to better inform simulator requirements (e.g., relating dynamic characteristics of human vision to update rate and other temporal display characteristics).

  10. Verbal, Visual, and Spatial Working Memory Demands during Text Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Thierry; Kellogg, Ronald T.; Piolat, Annie

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether text composition engages verbal, visual, and spatial working memory to different degrees. In Experiment 1, undergraduate students composed by longhand a persuasive text while performing a verbal, visual, or spatial concurrent task that was presented visually. In Experiment 2, participants performed a verbal or…

  11. Ocular axial length and choroidal thickness in newly hatched chicks and one-year-old chickens fluctuate in a diurnal pattern that is influenced by visual experience and intraocular pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, G I; Schmid, G F; Riva, C E; Mendel, M J; Stone, R A; Laties, A M

    1998-02-01

    Low coherence laser Doppler interferometry (LDI) allows high precision measurements of the axial length of the eye and of the thickness of the individual layers of the ocular fundus. Here, we used LDI to monitor diurnal changes in these dimensions in eyes of newly hatched chicks and one-year-old chickens with normal or altered visual input. In chicks and chickens with normal visual experience, axial eye length displays diurnal fluctuations increasing during the light phase. Choroidal thickness also exhibits a diurnal pattern, shrinking during the day and expanding during the night. Retinal thickness does not vary. Based on the pressure compliance of the enucleated chick eye, the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation could contribute both to the increase in axial length and to daytime choroidal shrinkage. Following deprivation of form vision by unilateral goggle wear, occluded chick eyes demonstrate enhanced axial elongation. Diurnal fluctuations in axial length but not in choroidal thickness are temporarily disrupted. The retina of form deprived eyes thins approximately 10% in five days. In contralateral eyes, the diurnal patterns of both axial length and choroidal thickness fluctuations are also disrupted. Following occluder removal in chicks, choroidal thickness increases for several days during both the light and dark phase, leading to its overall expansion. Retinal thickness returns to baseline. When deprived of form vision for five days, the eyes of year-old chickens do not exhibit measurable axial elongation. Diurnal patterns of fluctuation in axial length and choroidal thickness are however disrupted. After goggle removal, axial length fluctuation is restored to normal, but the diurnal choroidal thickness pattern is inverted. In contralateral eyes, choroidal thickness exhibits normal diurnal fluctuations both during and after form vision deprivation. In conclusion, axial length and choroidal thickness fluctuations are influenced by visual experience

  12. The effects of anatomical information and observer expertise on abnormality detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cavaro-Ménard, C.; Le Callet, P.; Cooper, L. H. K.; Hunault, G.; Tanguy, J.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel study investigating the influences of Magnetic Resonance (MR) image anatomical information and observer expertise on an abnormality detection task. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for detecting brain abnormalities, particularly in the evaluation of white matter diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, MS lesions are simulated as the target stimuli for detection in the present study. Two different image backgrounds are used in the following experiments: a) homogeneous region of white matter tissue, and b) one slice of a healthy brain MR image. One expert radiologist (more than 10 years' experience), three radiologists (less than 5 years' experience) and eight naïve observers (without any prior medical knowledge) have performed these experiments, during which they have been asked different questions dependent upon level of experience; the three radiologists and eight naïve observers were asked if they were aware of any hyper-signal, likely to represent an MS lesion, while the most experienced consultant was asked if a clinically significant sign was present. With the percentages of response "yes" displayed on the y-axis and the lesion intensity contrasts on the x-axis, psychometric function is generated from the observer' responses. Results of psychometric functions and calculated thresholds indicate that radiologists have better hyper-signal detection ability than naïve observers, which is intuitively shown by the lower simple visibility thresholds of radiologists. However, when radiologists perform a task with clinical implications, e.g. to detect a clinically significant sign, their detection thresholds are elevated. Moreover, the study indicates that for the radiologists, the simple visibility thresholds remain the same with and without the anatomical information, which reduces the threshold for the clinically significant sign detection task. Findings provide further insight into human visual system processing for this

  13. Auditory and Visual Electrophysiology of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Implications for Cross-modal Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Corina, David P; Blau, Shane; LaMarr, Todd; Lawyer, Laurel A; Coffey-Corina, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children who receive a cochlear implant early in life and engage in intensive oral/aural therapy often make great strides in spoken language acquisition. However, despite clinicians' best efforts, there is a great deal of variability in language outcomes. One concern is that cortical regions which normally support auditory processing may become reorganized for visual function, leaving fewer available resources for auditory language acquisition. The conditions under which these changes occur are not well understood, but we may begin investigating this phenomenon by looking for interactions between auditory and visual evoked cortical potentials in deaf children. If children with abnormal auditory responses show increased sensitivity to visual stimuli, this may indicate the presence of maladaptive cortical plasticity. We recorded evoked potentials, using both auditory and visual paradigms, from 25 typical hearing children and 26 deaf children (ages 2-8 years) with cochlear implants. An auditory oddball paradigm was used (85% /ba/ syllables vs. 15% frequency modulated tone sweeps) to elicit an auditory P1 component. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded during presentation of an intermittent peripheral radial checkerboard while children watched a silent cartoon, eliciting a P1-N1 response. We observed reduced auditory P1 amplitudes and a lack of latency shift associated with normative aging in our deaf sample. We also observed shorter latencies in N1 VEPs to visual stimulus offset in deaf participants. While these data demonstrate cortical changes associated with auditory deprivation, we did not find evidence for a relationship between cortical auditory evoked potentials and the VEPs. This is consistent with descriptions of intra-modal plasticity within visual systems of deaf children, but do not provide evidence for cross-modal plasticity. In addition, we note that sign language experience had no effect on deaf children's early auditory and visual ERP

  14. Auditory and Visual Electrophysiology of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Implications for Cross-modal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Corina, David P.; Blau, Shane; LaMarr, Todd; Lawyer, Laurel A.; Coffey-Corina, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children who receive a cochlear implant early in life and engage in intensive oral/aural therapy often make great strides in spoken language acquisition. However, despite clinicians’ best efforts, there is a great deal of variability in language outcomes. One concern is that cortical regions which normally support auditory processing may become reorganized for visual function, leaving fewer available resources for auditory language acquisition. The conditions under which these changes occur are not well understood, but we may begin investigating this phenomenon by looking for interactions between auditory and visual evoked cortical potentials in deaf children. If children with abnormal auditory responses show increased sensitivity to visual stimuli, this may indicate the presence of maladaptive cortical plasticity. We recorded evoked potentials, using both auditory and visual paradigms, from 25 typical hearing children and 26 deaf children (ages 2–8 years) with cochlear implants. An auditory oddball paradigm was used (85% /ba/ syllables vs. 15% frequency modulated tone sweeps) to elicit an auditory P1 component. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded during presentation of an intermittent peripheral radial checkerboard while children watched a silent cartoon, eliciting a P1–N1 response. We observed reduced auditory P1 amplitudes and a lack of latency shift associated with normative aging in our deaf sample. We also observed shorter latencies in N1 VEPs to visual stimulus offset in deaf participants. While these data demonstrate cortical changes associated with auditory deprivation, we did not find evidence for a relationship between cortical auditory evoked potentials and the VEPs. This is consistent with descriptions of intra-modal plasticity within visual systems of deaf children, but do not provide evidence for cross-modal plasticity. In addition, we note that sign language experience had no effect on deaf children’s early auditory and visual

  15. Camouflage Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-07

    results of the test are difficult to quantify and to compare with previous observations. The more recent need to develop camouflage measures to defeat...Number: 609-9160002 2-2 Final Report. Camouflage Visualization System A:)TTRIBU!TES)) EMTY ATmUE INSERT TARGET BACKROUND....... IMG IMMAGE IRSG- RHG...atmospheric attenuation models, such as LOWTRAN. As a reference, the calculated results are compared to LOWTRAN predictions to show the performance of our

  16. Battlefield Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    A study analyzing battlefield visualization (BV) as a component of information dominance and superiority. This study outlines basic requirements for effective BV in terms of terrain data, information systems (synthetic environment; COA development and analysis tools) and BV development management, with a focus on technology insertion strategies. This study also reports on existing BV systems and provides 16 recommendations for Army BV support efforts, including interested organization, funding levels and duration of effort for each recommended action.

  17. Visualizing Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Reality Capture Technologies, Inc. is a spinoff company from Ames Research Center. Offering e-business solutions for optimizing management, design and production processes, RCT uses visual collaboration environments (VCEs) such as those used to prepare the Mars Pathfinder mission.The product, 4-D Reality Framework, allows multiple users from different locations to manage and share data. The insurance industry is one targeted commercial application for this technology.

  18. Flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1991-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques are reviewed, with particular attention given to those applicable to liquid helium flows. Three techniques capable of obtaining qualitative and quantitative measurements of complex 3D flow fields are discussed including focusing schlieren, particle image volocimetry, and holocinematography (HCV). It is concluded that the HCV appears to be uniquely capable of obtaining full time-varying, 3D velocity field data, but is limited to the low speeds typical of liquid helium facilities.

  19. Flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    Flow visualization techniques are reviewed, with particular attention given to those applicable to liquid helium flows. Three techniques capable of obtaining qualitative and quantitative measurements of complex 3D flow fields are discussed including focusing schlieren, particle image volocimetry, and holocinematography (HCV). It is concluded that the HCV appears to be uniquely capable of obtaining full time-varying, 3D velocity field data, but is limited to the low speeds typical of liquid helium facilities.

  20. PhasePlot: An Interactive Software Tool for Visualizing Phase Relations, Performing Virtual Experiments, and for Teaching Thermodynamic Concepts in Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The computer program PhasePlot was developed for Macintosh computers and released via the Mac App Store in December 2011. It permits the visualization of phase relations calculated from internally consistent thermodynamic data-model collections, including those from MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995, CMP 119, 197-212), pMELTS (Ghiorso et al., 2002, G-cubed 3, 10.1029/2001GC000217) and the deep mantle database of Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni (2011, GJI 184, 1180-1213). The software allows users to enter a system bulk composition and a range of reference conditions, and then calculate a grid of phase relations. These relations may be visualized in a variety of ways including pseudosections, phase diagrams, phase proportion plots, and contour diagrams of phase compositions and abundances. The program interface is user friendly and the computations are fast on laptop-scale machines, which makes PhasePlot amenable to in-class demonstrations, as a tool in instructional laboratories, and as an aid in support of out-of-class exercises and research. Users focus on problem specification and interpretation of results rather than on manipulation and mechanics of computation. The software has been developed with NSF support and is free. The PhasePlot web site is at phaseplot.org where extensive user documentation, video tutorials and examples of use may be found. The original release of phase plot permitted calculations to be performed on pressure-, temperature-grids (P-T), by direct minimization of the Gibbs free energy of the system at each grid point. A revision of PhasePlot (scheduled for release to the Mac App Store in December 2012) extends capabilities to include pressure-, entropy-grids (P-S) by system enthalpy minimization, volume-, temperature-grids (V-T) by system Helmholtz energy minimization, and volume-,entropy-grids (V-S) by minimization of the Internal Energy of the system. P-S gridded results may be utilized to visualize phase relations as a function of heat