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Sample records for abnormal visual-evoked potentials

  1. Transdiagnostic psychiatric symptoms related to visual evoked potential abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S; Butler, Pamela D; Chan, Chi C; Trachik, Benjamin J

    2015-12-15

    Visual processing abnormalities have been reported across a range of psychotic and mood disorders, but are typically examined within a particular disorder. The current study used a novel transdiagnostic approach to examine diagnostic classes, clinician-rated current symptoms, and self-reported personality traits in relation to visual processing abnormalities. We examined transient visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) from 48 adults (56% female), representing a wide range of psychotic and mood disorders, as well as individuals with no history of psychiatric disorder. Stimuli were low contrast check arrays presented on green and red backgrounds. Pairwise comparisons between individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD), chronic mood disorders (CMD), and nonpsychiatric controls (NC) revealed no overall differences for either P1 or N1 amplitude. However, there was a significant interaction with the color background in which the NC group showed a significant increase in P1 amplitude to the red, vs. green, background, while the SSD group showed no change. This was related to an increase in social anhedonia and general negative symptoms. Stepwise regressions across the entire sample revealed that individuals with greater apathy and/or eccentric behavior had a reduced P1 amplitude. These relationships provide clues for uncovering the underlying causal pathology for these transdiagnostic symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multifocal visual evoked potential and automated perimetry abnormalities in strabismic amblyopes.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Vivienne C; Eggers, Howard M; Hood, Donald C

    2008-02-01

    To compare visual field abnormalities obtained with standard automated perimetry (SAP) to those obtained with the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) technique in strabismic amblyopes. Humphrey 24-2 visual fields (HVF) and mfVEPs were obtained from each eye of 12 strabismic amblyopes. For the mfVEP, amplitudes and latencies were analyzed and probability plots were derived. Multifocal VEP and HVF hemifields were abnormal if they had clusters of two or more contiguous points at p < 0.01, or three or more contiguous points at p < 0.05 with at least one at p < 0.01. An eye was abnormal if it had an abnormal hemifield. On SAP, amblyopic eyes had significantly higher foveal thresholds (p = 0.003) and lower mean deviation values (p = 0.005) than fellow eyes. For the mfVEP, 11 amblyopic and 6 fellow eyes were abnormal. Of the 11 amblyopic eyes, 6 were abnormal on SAP. The deficits extended from the center to mid periphery. Monocular mfVEP latencies were significantly decreased for amblyopic eyes compared with control eyes (p < 0.0002). Both techniques revealed deficits in visual function across the visual field in strabismic amblyopes, but the mfVEP revealed deficits in fellow eyes and in more amblyopic eyes. In addition, mfVEP response latencies for amblyopic eyes were shorter than normal.

  3. The effects of retinal abnormalities on the multifocal visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, John Y; Hood, Donald C; Odel, Jeffrey G; Behrens, Myles M

    2006-10-01

    To examine the effects on the amplitude and latency of the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) in retinal diseases associated with depressed multifocal electroretinograms (mfERG). Static automated perimetry (SAP), mfERGs, and mfVEPs were obtained from 15 individuals seen by neuro-ophthalmologists and diagnosed with retinal disease based on funduscopic examination, visual field, and mfERG. Optic neuropathy was ruled out in all cases. Diagnoses included autoimmune retinopathy (n = 3), branch retinal arterial occlusion (n = 3), branch retinal vein occlusion (n = 1), vitamin A deficiency (n = 1), digoxin/age-related macular degeneration (n = 1), multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (n = 1), and nonspecific retinal disease (n = 5). Patients were selected from a larger group based on abnormal mfERG amplitudes covering a diameter of 20 degrees or greater. Fourteen (93%) of 15 patients showed significant mfVEP delays, as determined by either mean latency or the probability of a cluster of delayed local responses. Thirteen of 15 patients had normal mfVEP amplitudes in regions corresponding to markedly reduced or nonrecordable mfERG responses. These findings can be mimicked in normal individuals by viewing the display through a neutral-density filter. Retinal diseases can result in mfVEPs of relatively normal amplitudes, often with delays, in regions showing decreased mfERG responses and visual field sensitivity loss. Consequently, a retinal problem can be missed, or dismissed as functional, if a diagnosis is based on an mfVEP of normal or near-normal amplitude. Further, in patients with marked mfVEP delays, a retinal problem could be confused with optic neuritis, especially in a patient with a normal appearing fundus.

  4. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pavel; Zakharov, Sergey; Diblík, Pavel; Pelclová, Daniela; Ridzoň, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP) examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females) was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012-2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test) were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%), 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04). The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1-9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  6. Visual evoked potentials through night vision goggles.

    PubMed

    Rabin, J

    1994-04-01

    Night vision goggles (NVG's) have widespread use in military and civilian environments. NVG's amplify ambient illumination making performance possible when there is insufficient illumination for normal vision. While visual performance through NVG's is commonly assessed by measuring threshold functions such as visual acuity, few attempts have been made to assess vision through NVG's at suprathreshold levels of stimulation. Such information would be useful to better understand vision through NVG's across a range of stimulus conditions. In this study visual evoked potentials (VEP's) were used to evaluate vision through NVG's across a range of stimulus contrasts. The amplitude and latency of the VEP varied linearly with log contrast. A comparison of VEP's recorded with and without NVG's was used to estimate contrast attenuation through the device. VEP's offer an objective, electrophysiological tool to assess visual performance through NVG's at both threshold and suprathreshold levels of visual stimulation.

  7. Chirp-modulated visual evoked potential as a generalization of steady state visual evoked potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Tao; Xin, Yi; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2012-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are of great concern in cognitive and clinical neuroscience as well as in the recent research field of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, a chirp-modulated stimulation was employed to serve as a novel type of visual stimulus. Based on our empirical study, the chirp stimuli visual evoked potential (Chirp-VEP) preserved frequency features of the chirp stimulus analogous to the steady state evoked potential (SSVEP), and therefore it can be regarded as a generalization of SSVEP. Specifically, we first investigated the characteristics of the Chirp-VEP in the time-frequency domain and the fractional domain via fractional Fourier transform. We also proposed a group delay technique to derive the apparent latency from Chirp-VEP. Results on EEG data showed that our approach outperformed the traditional SSVEP-based method in efficiency and ease of apparent latency estimation. For the recruited six subjects, the average apparent latencies ranged from 100 to 130 ms. Finally, we implemented a BCI system with six targets to validate the feasibility of Chirp-VEP as a potential candidate in the field of BCIs.

  8. Visual evoked potentials in the horse.

    PubMed

    Ström, L; Ekesten, B

    2016-06-21

    Electrical potentials generated in the central nervous system in response to brief visual stimuli, flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs), can be recorded non-invasively over the occipital cortex. FVEPs are used clinically in human medicine and also experimentally in a number of animal species, but the method has not yet been evaluated in the horse. The method would potentially allow the ophthalmologist and equine clinician to evaluate visual impairment caused by disorders affecting post-retinal visual pathways. The aim was to establish a method for recording of FVEPs in horses in a clinical setting and to evaluate the waveform morphology in the normal horse. Ten horses were sedated with a continuous detomidine infusion. Responses were recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp. Several positions were evaluated to determine suitable electrode placement. Flash electroretinograms (FERGs) were recorded simultaneously. To evaluate potential contamination of the FVEP from retinal potentials, a retrobulbar nerve block was performed in two horses and transection of the optic nerve was performed in one horse as a terminal procedure. A series of positive (P) and negative (N) peaks in response to light stimuli was recorded in all horses. Reproducible wavelets with mean times-to-peaks of 26 (N1), 55 (P2), 141 (N2) and 216 ms (P4) were seen in all horses in all recordings. Reproducible results were obtained when the active electrode was placed in the midline rostral to the nuchal crest. Recording at lateral positions gave more variable results, possibly due to ear muscle artifacts. Averaging ≥100 responses reduced the impact of noise and artifacts. FVEPs were reproducible in the same horse during the same recording session and between sessions, but were more variable between horses. Retrobulbar nerve block caused a transient loss of the VEP whereas transection of the optic nerve caused an irreversible loss. We describe the waveform of the equine FVEP and our results show

  9. Automatic classification of visual evoked potentials based on wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiakiewicz, Paweł; Dobrowolski, Andrzej P.; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of part of the visual system, that is responsible for conducting compound action potential, is generally based on visual evoked potentials generated as a result of stimulation of the eye by external light source. The condition of patient's visual path is assessed by set of parameters that describe the time domain characteristic extremes called waves. The decision process is compound therefore diagnosis significantly depends on experience of a doctor. The authors developed a procedure - based on wavelet decomposition and linear discriminant analysis - that ensures automatic classification of visual evoked potentials. The algorithm enables to assign individual case to normal or pathological class. The proposed classifier has a 96,4% sensitivity at 10,4% probability of false alarm in a group of 220 cases and area under curve ROC equals to 0,96 which, from the medical point of view, is a very good result.

  10. Multifocal visual evoked potentials for early glaucoma detection.

    PubMed

    Weizer, Jennifer S; Musch, David C; Niziol, Leslie M; Khan, Naheed W

    2012-07-01

    To compare multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) with other detection methods in early open-angle glaucoma. Ten patients with suspected glaucoma and 5 with early open-angle glaucoma underwent mfVEP, standard automated perimetry (SAP), short-wave automated perimetry, frequency-doubling technology perimetry, and nerve fiber layer optical coherence tomography. Nineteen healthy control subjects underwent mfVEP and SAP for comparison. Comparisons between groups involving continuous variables were made using independent t tests; for categorical variables, Fisher's exact test was used. Monocular mfVEP cluster defects were associated with an increased SAP pattern standard deviation (P = .0195). Visual fields that showed interocular mfVEP cluster defects were more likely to also show superior quadrant nerve fiber layer thinning by OCT (P = .0152). Multifocal visual evoked potential cluster defects are associated with a functional and an anatomic measure that both relate to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Combination of blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential recordings for abnormal visual cortex in two types of amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinmei; Cui, Dongmei; Zheng, Ling; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the different neuromechanisms of subjects with strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia compared with normal vision subjects using blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP). Methods Fifty-three subjects, age range seven to 12 years, diagnosed with strabismic amblyopia (17 cases), anisometropic amblyopia (20 cases), and normal vision (16 cases), were examined using the BOLD-fMRI and PR-VEP of UTAS-E3000 techniques. Cortical activation by binocular viewing of reversal checkerboard patterns was examined in terms of the calcarine region of interest (ROI)-based and spatial frequency–dependent analysis. The correlation of cortical activation in fMRI and the P100 amplitude in VEP were analyzed using the SPSS 12.0 software package. Results In the BOLD-fMRI procedure, reduced areas and decreased activation levels were found in Brodmann area (BA) 17 and other extrastriate areas in subjects with amblyopia compared with the normal vision group. In general, the reduced areas mainly resided in the striate visual cortex in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. In subjects with strabismic amblyopia, a more significant cortical impairment was found in bilateral BA 18 and BA 19 than that in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. The activation by high-spatial-frequency stimuli was reduced in bilateral BA 18 and 19 as well as BA 17 in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia, whereas the activation was mainly reduced in BA 18 and BA 19 in subjects with strabismic amblyopia. These findings were further confirmed by the ROI-based analysis of BA 17. During spatial frequency–dependent VEP detection, subjects with anisometropic amblyopia had reduced sensitivity for high spatial frequency compared to subjects with strabismic amblyopia. The cortical activation in fMRI with the calcarine ROI-based analysis of BA 17 was significantly correlated with the P100 amplitude in VEP

  12. Visual Evoked Potential to Assess Retinopathy in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hari Kumar, K V S; Ahmad, F M H; Sood, Sandeep; Mansingh, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated for early retinopathy using the visual evoked potential (VEP) in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. All patients with GDM and type 2 diabetes seen between June and October of 2014 were included in this cross-sectional, observational study. Patients with secondary diabetes, ocular or major illness were excluded from the study. VEP was recorded in both eyes to derive prominent positive peak latency (P100), amplitude and initial negative deflection (N75) latency. The data were compared with 10 gestational age-matched controls with normal glucose tolerance. Appropriate statistical methods were used for comparison among the 3 groups. The study participants (40 with GDM, 10 with type 2 diabetes, 10 with normal glucose tolerance) had a median (25th to 75th interquartile range) age of 26 (24.3, 30) years, a gestational age of 24.5 (21, 27) weeks and weights of 66.8 (63.4, 71.5) kg. The P100 latencies were comparable among the 3 groups (p=0.0577). However, patients with any diabetes (GDM and type 2 diabetes) had prolonged P100 latencies (p=0.0139) and low P100 amplitudes (p=0.0391) in comparison to controls. P100 latency showed a direct correlation with hyperglycemia (p=0.0118). Our data showed that VEP abnormalities are detectable even in the short-term hyperglycemia of GDM and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of rotating shift work on visual reaction time and visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    R V, Hemamalini; N, Krishnamurthy; A, Saravanan

    2014-10-01

    The present day life style is changing the circadian rhythm of the body especially in rotating night shift workers. The impact of this prolongs their reaction time. Night shift also interferes with the circadian variation of pupil size which may affect the visual evoked potential. To compare the visual reaction time, visual evoked potential (VEP) in rotating night shift workers & day workers and also to correlate the changes in visual reaction time with visual evoked potential. Forty healthy male security guards & staff (25 - 35 y) who did rotating night shifts at least for six months & 40 d workers (25 - 35 y) who did not do night shift in last two years were involved in the study. Visual reaction time and the latency & amplitude of VEP were recorded. Kolmogorov- Smirnov test for normalcy showed the latencies & amplitude of VEP to be normally distributed. Student's unpaired t test showed significant difference (p<0.05) in the visual time and in the latencies of VEP between night shift & day workers. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of VEP. Night shift workers who are prone to circadian rhythm alteration will have prolonged visual reaction time & visual evoked potential abnormalities. Implementation of Bright Light Therapy would be beneficial to the night shift worker.

  14. Optimization of visual evoked potential (VEP) recording systems.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, Rustum; Brunet, Donald G; ten Hove, Martin W

    2009-01-01

    To explore the influence of environmental conditions on pattern visual evoked potential (VEP) recordings. Fourteen subjects with no known ocular pathology were recruited for the study. In an attempt to optimize the recording conditions, VEP recordings were performed in both the seated and recumbent positions. Comparisons were made between recordings using either LCD or CRT displays and recordings obtained in silence or with quiet background music. Paired recordings (in which only one variable was changed) were analyzed for changes in P100 latency, RMS noise, and variability. Baseline RMS noise demonstrated a significant decrease in the variability during the first 50msec accompanied by a 73% decrease in recording time for recumbent position when compared to the seated position (p<0.05). Visual evoked potentials recorded using LCD monitors demonstrated a significant increase in the P100 latency when compared to CRT recordings in the same subjects. The addition of background music did not affect the amount of RMS noise during the first 50msec of the recordings. This study demonstrates that the use of the recumbent position increases patient comfort and improves the signal to noise ratio. In contrast, the addition of background music to relax the patient did not improve the recording signal. Furthermore, the study illustrates the importance of avoiding low-contrast visual stimulation patterns obtained with LCD as they lead to higher latencies resulting in false positive recordings. These findings are important when establishing or modifying a pattern VEP recording protocol.

  15. Assessment of visual disability using visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jihoon; Oh, Seiyul; Kyung, Sungeun

    2012-08-06

    The purpose of this study is to validate the use of visual evoked potential (VEP) to objectively quantify visual acuity in normal and amblyopic patients, and determine if it is possible to predict visual acuity in disability assessment to register visual pathway lesions. A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients diagnosed with normal vision, unilateral amblyopia, optic neuritis, and visual disability who visited the university medical center for registration from March 2007 to October 2009. The study included 20 normal subjects (20 right eyes: 10 females, 10 males, ages 9-42 years), 18 unilateral amblyopic patients (18 amblyopic eyes, ages 19-36 years), 19 optic neuritis patients (19 eyes: ages 9-71 years), and 10 patients with visual disability having visual pathway lesions. Amplitude and latencies were analyzed and correlations with visual acuity (logMAR) were derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic subjects. Correlation of VEP amplitude and visual acuity (logMAR) of 19 optic neuritis patients confirmed relationships between visual acuity and amplitude. We calculated the objective visual acuity (logMAR) of 16 eyes from 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic eyes. Linear regression analyses between amplitude of pattern visual evoked potentials and visual acuity (logMAR) of 38 eyes from normal (right eyes) and amblyopic (amblyopic eyes) subjects were significant [y = -0.072x + 1.22, x: VEP amplitude, y: visual acuity (logMAR)]. There were no significant differences between visual acuity prediction values, which substituted amplitude values of 19 eyes with optic neuritis into function. We calculated the objective visual acuity of 16 eyes of 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations of y = -0.072x + 1.22 (-0.072). This resulted in a prediction reference of visual acuity associated with malingering vs. real

  16. Assessment of visual disability using visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to validate the use of visual evoked potential (VEP) to objectively quantify visual acuity in normal and amblyopic patients, and determine if it is possible to predict visual acuity in disability assessment to register visual pathway lesions. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients diagnosed with normal vision, unilateral amblyopia, optic neuritis, and visual disability who visited the university medical center for registration from March 2007 to October 2009. The study included 20 normal subjects (20 right eyes: 10 females, 10 males, ages 9–42 years), 18 unilateral amblyopic patients (18 amblyopic eyes, ages 19–36 years), 19 optic neuritis patients (19 eyes: ages 9–71 years), and 10 patients with visual disability having visual pathway lesions. Amplitude and latencies were analyzed and correlations with visual acuity (logMAR) were derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic subjects. Correlation of VEP amplitude and visual acuity (logMAR) of 19 optic neuritis patients confirmed relationships between visual acuity and amplitude. We calculated the objective visual acuity (logMAR) of 16 eyes from 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations derived from 20 normal and 18 amblyopic eyes. Results Linear regression analyses between amplitude of pattern visual evoked potentials and visual acuity (logMAR) of 38 eyes from normal (right eyes) and amblyopic (amblyopic eyes) subjects were significant [y = −0.072x + 1.22, x: VEP amplitude, y: visual acuity (logMAR)]. There were no significant differences between visual acuity prediction values, which substituted amplitude values of 19 eyes with optic neuritis into function. We calculated the objective visual acuity of 16 eyes of 10 patients to diagnose the presence or absence of visual disability using relations of y = −0.072x + 1.22 (−0.072). This resulted in a prediction reference of visual

  17. Visual evoked potentials and selective attention to points in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Voorhis, S.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded to sequences of flashes delivered to the right and left visual fields while subjects responded promptly to designated stimuli in one field at a time (focused attention), in both fields at once (divided attention), or to neither field (passive). Three stimulus schedules were used: the first was a replication of a previous study (Eason, Harter, and White, 1969) where left- and right-field flashes were delivered quasi-independently, while in the other two the flashes were delivered to the two fields in random order (Bernoulli sequence). VEPs to attended-field stimuli were enhanced at both occipital (O2) and central (Cz) recording sites under all stimulus sequences, but different components were affected at the two scalp sites. It was suggested that the VEP at O2 may reflect modality-specific processing events, while the response at Cz, like its auditory homologue, may index more general aspects of selective attention.

  18. Visual evoked potentials of mildly mentally retarded and control children.

    PubMed

    Gasser, T; Pietz, J; Schellberg, D; Köhler, W

    1988-10-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from 25 10- to 13-year-old mildly mentally retarded children and compared with those from 31 control children of the same age-range. Correlations of VEPs with age were weak, but a relationship between VEPs and IQ was demonstrated for the control group. The retarded group had significantly longer latencies and higher amplitude peaks than the control group, with the differences occurring primarily over non-specific cortex and for secondary components. Analysis also showed that the retarded group were neurophysiologically heterogeneous. Since the same children had been analyzed earlier by quantitative EEG methods, comparisons are made with respect to these two methods of investigating brain function.

  19. Diagnostic value of conventional visual evoked potentials applied to patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balnytė, Renata; Ulozienė, Ingrida; Rastenytė, Daiva; Vaitkus, Antanas; Malcienė, Lina; Laučkaitė, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this classical technique employed at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences for the patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess its possible correlations with affected neurological systems. Pattern shift visual evoked potentials were recorded in 63 patients with multiple sclerosis, 17 (27%) of whom had a history of optic neuritis, and in 63 control patients with other neurological diseases. The latencies and amplitudes of P100 were measured. In total, 126 patients were referred to the inpatient department of neurology for differential diagnosis of demyelinating disorders between January and December of 2007. Abnormalities of visual evoked potentials were observed by 73% more frequently in patients with multiple sclerosis than in control patients (α=0.05, β<0.01). The combined monocular/interocular test showed a specificity of 90.5% and a sensitivity of 82.5%. The probability of an affection of the pyramidal system was 5 times greater (95% CI, 2.2-11.0; P<0.01) and the probability of the optic pathways involvement was 4.8 times greater (95% CI, 1.9-11.9; P<0.01) in patients with multiple sclerosis than in controls. Conventional visual evoked potentials must be reappraised in light of their diagnostic value in multiple sclerosis given their high diagnostic efficiency, relatively easy, short, and cheap implementation, and easy availability in everyday clinical practice.

  20. Maximally reliable spatial filtering of steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Greaves, Alex S; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and robustness to artifacts, steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are a popular technique for studying neural processing in the human visual system. SSVEPs are conventionally analyzed at individual electrodes or linear combinations of electrodes which maximize some variant of the SNR. Here we exploit the fundamental assumption of evoked responses--reproducibility across trials--to develop a technique that extracts a small number of high SNR, maximally reliable SSVEP components. This novel spatial filtering method operates on an array of Fourier coefficients and projects the data into a low-dimensional space in which the trial-to-trial spectral covariance is maximized. When applied to two sample data sets, the resulting technique recovers physiologically plausible components (i.e., the recovered topographies match the lead fields of the underlying sources) while drastically reducing the dimensionality of the data (i.e., more than 90% of the trial-to-trial reliability is captured in the first four components). Moreover, the proposed technique achieves a higher SNR than that of the single-best electrode or the Principal Components. We provide a freely-available MATLAB implementation of the proposed technique, herein termed "Reliable Components Analysis". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pattern visual evoked potentials elicited by organic electroluminescence screen.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Funada, Hideaki; Sasaki, Kakeru; Minoda, Haruka; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether organic electroluminescence (OLED) screens can be used as visual stimulators to elicit pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (p-VEPs). Checkerboard patterns were generated on a conventional cathode-ray tube (S710, Compaq Computer Co., USA) screen and on an OLED (17 inches, 320 × 230 mm, PVM-1741, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) screen. The time course of the luminance changes of each monitor was measured with a photodiode. The p-VEPs elicited by these two screens were recorded from 15 eyes of 9 healthy volunteers (22.0 ± 0.8 years). The OLED screen had a constant time delay from the onset of the trigger signal to the start of the luminescence change. The delay during the reversal phase from black to white for the pattern was 1.0 msec on the cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen and 0.5 msec on the OLED screen. No significant differences in the amplitudes of P100 and the implicit times of N75 and P100 were observed in the p-VEPs elicited by the CRT and the OLED screens. The OLED screen can be used as a visual stimulator to elicit p-VEPs; however the time delay and the specific properties in the luminance change must be taken into account.

  2. Pattern Visual Evoked Potentials Elicited by Organic Electroluminescence Screen

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Funada, Hideaki; Minoda, Haruka

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether organic electroluminescence (OLED) screens can be used as visual stimulators to elicit pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (p-VEPs). Method. Checkerboard patterns were generated on a conventional cathode-ray tube (S710, Compaq Computer Co., USA) screen and on an OLED (17 inches, 320 × 230 mm, PVM-1741, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) screen. The time course of the luminance changes of each monitor was measured with a photodiode. The p-VEPs elicited by these two screens were recorded from 15 eyes of 9 healthy volunteers (22.0 ± 0.8 years). Results. The OLED screen had a constant time delay from the onset of the trigger signal to the start of the luminescence change. The delay during the reversal phase from black to white for the pattern was 1.0 msec on the cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen and 0.5 msec on the OLED screen. No significant differences in the amplitudes of P100 and the implicit times of N75 and P100 were observed in the p-VEPs elicited by the CRT and the OLED screens. Conclusion. The OLED screen can be used as a visual stimulator to elicit p-VEPs; however the time delay and the specific properties in the luminance change must be taken into account. PMID:25197652

  3. The Nature and Process of Development in Averaged Visually Evoked Potentials: Discussion on Pattern Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izawa, Shuji; Mizutani, Tohru

    This paper examines the development of visually evoked EEG patterns in retarded and normal subjects. The paper focuses on the averaged visually evoked potentials (AVEP) in the central and occipital regions of the brain in eyes closed and eyes open conditions. Wave pattern, amplitude, and latency are examined. The first section of the paper reviews…

  4. Aging effect in pattern, motion and cognitive visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Miroslav; Kremláček, Jan; Langrová, Jana; Kubová, Zuzana; Szanyi, Jana; Vít, František

    2012-06-01

    An electrophysiological study on the effect of aging on the visual pathway and various levels of visual information processing (primary cortex, associate visual motion processing cortex and cognitive cortical areas) was performed. We examined visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to pattern-reversal, motion-onset (translation and radial motion) and visual stimuli with a cognitive task (cognitive VEPs - P300 wave) at luminance of 17 cd/m(2). The most significant age-related change in a group of 150 healthy volunteers (15-85 years of age) was the increase in the P300 wave latency (2 ms per 1 year of age). Delays of the motion-onset VEPs (0.47 ms/year in translation and 0.46 ms/year in radial motion) and the pattern-reversal VEPs (0.26 ms/year) and the reductions of their amplitudes with increasing subject age (primarily in P300) were also found to be significant. The amplitude of the motion-onset VEPs to radial motion remained the most constant parameter with increasing age. Age-related changes were stronger in males. Our results indicate that cognitive VEPs, despite larger variability of their parameters, could be a useful criterion for an objective evaluation of the aging processes within the CNS. Possible differences in aging between the motion-processing system and the form-processing system within the visual pathway might be indicated by the more pronounced delay in the motion-onset VEPs and by their preserved size for radial motion (a biologically significant variant of motion) compared to the changes in pattern-reversal VEPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of visual angle on pattern reversal visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ruchi; Singh, Smita; Singh, Ramji; Shukla, A. K.; Bokariya, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to find whether the visual evoked potential (VEP) latencies and amplitude are altered with different visual angles in healthy adult volunteers or not and to determine the visual angle which is the optimum and most appropriate among a wide range of check sizes for the reliable interpretation of pattern reversal VEPs (PRVEPs). Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 40 healthy volunteers. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of 20 individuals (nine males and 11 females) in the age range of 25-57 years and they were exposed to checks subtending a visual angle of 90, 120, and 180 minutes of arc. Another group comprised of 20 individuals (10 males and 10 females) in the age range of 36-60 years and they were subjected to checks subtending a visual angle of 15, 30, and 120 minutes of arc. The stimulus configuration comprised of the transient pattern reversal method in which a black and white checker board is generated (full field) on a VEP Monitor by an Evoked Potential Recorder (RMS EMG. EPMARK II). The statistical analysis was done by One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) using EPI INFO 6. Results: In Group I, the maximum (max.) P100 latency of 98.8 ± 4.7 and the max. P100 amplitude of 10.05 ± 3.1 μV was obtained with checks of 90 minutes. In Group II, the max. P100 latency of 105.19 ± 4.75 msec as well as the max. P100 amplitude of 8.23 ± 3.30 μV was obtained with 15 minutes. The min. P100 latency in both the groups was obtained with checks of 120 minutes while the min. P100 amplitude was obtained with 180 minutes. A statistically significant difference was derived between means of P100 latency for 15 and 30 minutes with reference to its value for 120 minutes and between the mean value of P100 amplitude for 120 minutes and that of 90 and 180 minutes. Conclusion: Altering the size of stimulus (visual angle) has an effect on the PRVEP parameters. Our study found that the 120 is the

  6. [Visual evoked potentials in management of amblyopia in children].

    PubMed

    Gromová, M; Gerinec, A

    2010-11-01

    The authors want to point out the possibility of using the visual evoked potentials (VEP) in the diagnostic process of amblyopia, especially in preverbal children. We also researched the possibility of screening for amblyopia with VEP in young patients with anisometropia without strabismus being present, especially those who come from affected families. The authors followed changes in the course of an occlusion therapy and suggest that VEP could be used to predict a success of the amblyopia therapy. We analyzed group of 45 pediatric patients ages 2-10 years who were investigated in years 2006-2009 at Pediatric Ophthalmology Department of Children University Hospital in Bratislava with amblyopia. This group was compared with a control group of 25 healthy children. The cause of amblyopia in a majority of children (29 patients) was hyperopic anisometropia, 13 children had hyperopic isometropia, 3 patients had myopia over -3D. These causes in 22 children were combined with strabismus. The monocular pattern of VEP was evaluated in all patients. In cooperative children (25) we also evaluated binocular pattern of VEP. 18 patients with amblyopia had a second VEP evaluation done during the occlusion therapy, among those were 23 amblyopic eyes. The time frame from the first VEP evaluation to the second VEP evaluation was 1-11 months, average 5,1 months. The material was statistically evaluated. Our study showed statistically significant prolongation of the latency of both P and N2 waves (p = 0.01) in children with amblyopia.This can be used in diagnostic process of amblyopia in preverbal children as well as in the screening for amblyopia. We also followed changes during the occlusion therapy and we discovered persistent prolongation of the latency of the P wave and also changes in the amplitudes (p = 0.05) During repeated measurements and with applied therapy one can follow the dynamics of amblyopia, course of therapy by VEP changes. Results of our research suggest a great

  7. Visual Evoked Potentials in Infants With Diffuse Periventricular Leukomalacia.

    PubMed

    Carbajal-Valenzuela, Cintli Carolina; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is characterized by necrosis of the cerebral white matter in the dorsolateral portions of the lateral ventricles. PVL causes motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to analyze the conduction characteristics of the visual pathway in infants with diffuse PVL using visual evoked potentials (VEPs). We studied 11 healthy infants (mean age 3.3 ± 1.3 months) and 17 with diffuse PVL (mean age 2.9 ± 0.8 months and mean gestational age 31.9 ± 3.1 weeks). The N75, P100, and N135 wave latencies; the interwave N75-P100 and P100-N135 latencies; and the N75-P100 and P100-N135 amplitudes were measured in the occipital leads. VEPs were recorded during binocular stimulation at an angle of 120' from the Fz-Oz lead. Healthy children had mean N75, P100, and N135 wave latencies of 84.4 ± 5.8, 143.4 ± 30.6 and 222.9 ± 40.4 ms, respectively. The mean interwave N75-P100 and P100-N135 latencies were 59.0 ± 28.6 and 79.5 ± 13.6 ms, respectively. Compared with the healthy group, infants with PVL had longer N75 and N135 latencies at 92.3 ± 15.3 (P = .05) and 265.0 ms ± 60.3 (P = .05), respectively. The interwave latency P100-N135 (105.5 ± 29.1 ms; P = .017) was longer in children with PVL than in healthy infants. Infants with diffuse PVL had mild alterations in their N75, P100 and, particularly, their N135 latencies. These increases in P100-N135 interwave latencies could be because of damage to the geniculocortical pathways and V2-V3 networks. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  8. Properties of visual evoked potentials to onset of movement on a television screen.

    PubMed

    Kubová, Z; Kuba, M; Hubacek, J; Vít, F

    1990-08-01

    In 80 subjects the dependence of movement-onset visual evoked potentials on some measures of stimulation was examined, and these responses were compared with pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials to verify the effectiveness of pattern movement application for visual evoked potential acquisition. Horizontally moving vertical gratings were generated on a television screen. The typical movement-onset reactions were characterized by one marked negative peak only, with a peak time between 140 and 200 ms. In all subjects the sufficient stimulus duration for acquisition of movement-onset-related visual evoked potentials was 100 ms; in some cases it was only 20 ms. Higher velocity (5.6 degree/s) produced higher amplitudes of movement-onset visual evoked potentials than did the lower velocity (2.8 degrees/s). In 80% of subjects, the more distinct reactions were found in the leads from lateral occipital areas (in 60% from the right hemisphere), with no correlation to handedness of subjects. Unlike pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials, the movement-onset responses tended to be larger to extramacular stimulation (annular target of 5 degrees-9 degrees) than to macular stimulation (circular target of 5 degrees diameter).

  9. Sunlight irradiance and habituation of visual evoked potentials in migraine: The environment makes its mark.

    PubMed

    Lisicki, Marco; D'Ostilio, Kevin; Erpicum, Michel; Schoenen, Jean; Magis, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is a complex multifactorial disease that arises from the interaction between a genetic predisposition and an enabling environment. Habituation is considered as a fundamental adaptive behaviour of the nervous system that is often impaired in migraine populations. Given that migraineurs are hypersensitive to light, and that light deprivation is able to induce functional changes in the visual cortex recognizable through visual evoked potentials habituation testing, we hypothesized that regional sunlight irradiance levels could influence the results of visual evoked potentials habituation studies performed in different locations worldwide. Methods We searched the literature for visual evoked potentials habituation studies comparing healthy volunteers and episodic migraine patients and correlated their results with levels of local solar radiation. Results After reviewing the literature, 26 studies involving 1291 participants matched our inclusion criteria. Deficient visual evoked potentials habituation in episodic migraine patients was reported in 19 studies. Mean yearly sunlight irradiance was significantly higher in locations of studies reporting deficient habituation. Correlation analyses suggested that visual evoked potentials habituation decreases with increasing sunlight irradiance in migraine without aura patients. Conclusion Results from this hypothesis generating analysis suggest that variations in sunlight irradiance may induce adaptive modifications in visual processing systems that could be reflected in visual evoked potentials habituation, and thus partially account for the difference in results between studies performed in geographically distant centers. Other causal factors such as genetic differences could also play a role, and therefore well-designed prospective trials are warranted.

  10. Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential in Eyes With Temporal Hemianopia From Chiasmal Compression: Correlation With Standard Automated Perimetry and OCT Findings.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rafael M; Oyamada, Maria K; Cunha, Leonardo P; Monteiro, Mário L R

    2017-09-01

    To verify whether multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) can differentiate eyes with temporal hemianopia due to chiasmal compression from healthy controls. To assess the relationship between mfVEP, standard automated perimetry (SAP), and Fourier domain-optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) macular and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements. Twenty-seven eyes with permanent temporal visual field (VF) defects from chiasmal compression on SAP and 43 eyes of healthy controls were submitted to mfVEP and FD-OCT scanning. Multifocal visual evoked potential was elicited using a stimulus pattern of 60 sectors and the responses were averaged for the four quadrants and two hemifields. Optical coherence tomography macular measurements were averaged in quadrants and halves, while peripapillary RNFL thickness was averaged in four sectors around the disc. Visual field loss was estimated in four quadrants and each half of the 24-2 strategy test points. Multifocal visual evoked potential measurements in the two groups were compared using generalized estimated equations, and the correlations between mfVEP, VF, and OCT findings were quantified. Multifocal visual evoked potential-measured temporal P1 and N2 amplitudes were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. No significant difference in amplitude was observed for nasal parameters. A significant correlation was found between mfVEP amplitudes and temporal VF loss, and between mfVEP amplitudes and the corresponding OCT-measured macular and RNFL thickness parameters. Multifocal visual evoked potential amplitude parameters were able to differentiate eyes with temporal hemianopia from controls and were significantly correlated with VF and OCT findings, suggesting mfVEP is a useful tool for the detection of visual abnormalities in patients with chiasmal compression.

  11. Sensitivity of visual evoked potentials and spectral domain optical coherence tomography in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Raed; Ahmed, Samar; Al-Hashel, Jasem; Rousseff, Rossen T; Alroughani, Raed

    2017-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography are common ancillary studies that assess the visual pathways from a functional and structural aspect, respectively. To compare prevalence of abnormalities of Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). A cross-sectional study of 100 eyes with disease duration of less than 5 years since the diagnosis. Correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion-cell/inner plexiform layer with pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials amplitude and latency and contrast sensitivity was performed. The prevalence of abnormalities in pattern-reversal visual VEP was 56% while that of SOCT was 48% in all eyes. There was significant negative correlations between the average RNFL (r=-0.34, p=0.001) and GCIPL (r=-0.39, p<0.001) with VEP latency. In eyes with prior optic neuritis, a significant negative correlation was seen between average RNFL (r=-0.33, p=0.037) and GCIPL (r=-0.40, p=0.010) with VEP latency. We have found higher prevalence of VEP abnormalities than SCOCT in early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This suggests that VEP has a higher sensitivity for detecting lesions of the visual pathway in patients with early RRMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of visual evoked potentials in neonates. A study using light emitting diode goggles.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, K C; Taylor, M J; Menzies, R; Whyte, H

    1985-01-01

    We used a signal averager with light emitting diode goggles as the photostimulator to study the development of the visual evoked potentials in 40 normal neonates of between 23 and 42 weeks' gestation. All except two infants of less than 24 weeks' gestation had replicable visual evoked potentials. A negative peak of latency (mean (SD), 308 (21) msec) was present in all infants, but the development of the primary positive peak depended on maturity. Only infants of 37 weeks or more had a consistent positive peak of latency (mean (SD), 220 (22) msec). The practical simplicity and reliability of this technique has distinct advantages over previous conventional recording systems. Neonatal visual evoked potentials are shown to change with maturity. PMID:4091582

  13. Implementation of a microprocessor-based visual-evoked cortical potential recording and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A; Fram, D; Sistar, J

    1981-06-01

    An Imsai 8080 microcomputer is being used to simultaneously generate a color graphics stimulus display and to record visual-evoked cortical potentials. A brief description of the hardware and software developed for this system is presented. Data storage and analysis techniques are also discussed.

  14. A Steady State Visually Evoked Potential Investigation of Memory and Ageing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Helen; Pipingas, Andrew; Silberstein, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Old age is generally accompanied by a decline in memory performance. Specifically, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have revealed that there are age-related changes in the neural correlates of episodic and working memory. This study investigated age-associated changes in the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and…

  15. Analysis of the Averaged Visually Evoked Potentials in Normal Children. (RIEEC Research Bulletin 3.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizutani, Tohru; And Others

    Evaluated were the properties and fine structures of averaged visually evoked potentials (AVEP) in 60 normal children between the ages of 2 and 9 years. Electroencephalographic recordings were taken while white diffuse flashes were used to deliver visual stimuli to the Ss. Three types of AVEP patterns were discerned, with no relationship observed…

  16. Attentional Modulation of Visual-Evoked Potentials by Threat: Investigating the Effect of Evolutionary Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher; El-Deredy, Wael; Blanchette, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    In dot-probe tasks, threatening cues facilitate attention to targets and enhance the amplitude of the target P1 peak of the visual-evoked potential. While theories have suggested that evolutionarily relevant threats should obtain preferential neural processing, this has not been examined empirically. In this study we examined the effects of…

  17. A method to detect progression of glaucoma using the multifocal visual evoked potential technique

    PubMed Central

    Wangsupadilok, Boonchai; Kanadani, Fabio N.; Grippo, Tomas M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe a method for monitoring progression of glaucoma using the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) technique. Methods Eighty-seven patients diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma were divided into two groups. Group I, comprised 43 patients who had a repeat mfVEP test within 50 days (mean 0.9 ± 0.5 months), and group II, 44 patients who had a repeat test after at least 6 months (mean 20.7 ± 9.7 months). Monocular mfVEPs were obtained using a 60-sector pattern reversal dartboard display. Monocular and interocular analyses were performed. Data from the two visits were compared. The total number of abnormal test points with P < 5% within the visual field (total scores) and number of abnormal test points within a cluster (cluster size) were calculated. Data for group I provided a measure of test–retest variability independent of disease progression. Data for group II provided a possible measure of progression. Results The difference in the total scores for group II between visit 1 and visit 2 for the interocular and monocular comparison was significant (P < 0.05) as was the difference in cluster size for the interocular comparison (P < 0.05). Group I did not show a significant change in either total score or cluster size. Conclusion The change in the total score and cluster size over time provides a possible method for assessing progression of glaucoma with the mfVEP technique. PMID:18830654

  18. Clinical use of multifocal visual-evoked potentials in a glaucoma practice: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To test a framework that describes how the multifocal visual-evoked potential (mfVEP) technique is used in a particular glaucoma practice. Methods In this prospective, descriptive study, glaucoma suspects, ocular hypertensives and glaucoma patients were referred for mfVEP testing by a single glaucoma specialist over a 2-year period. All patients underwent standard automated perimetry (SAP) and mfVEP testing within 3 months. Two hundred and ten patients (420 eyes) were referred for mfVEP testing for the following reasons: (1) normal SAP tests suspected of early functional loss (ocular hypertensives, n = 43; and glaucoma suspects on the basis of suspicious optic disks, n = 52); (2) normal-tension glaucoma patients with suspected central SAP defects (n = 33); and (3) SAP abnormalities needing confirmation (n = 82). Results All the glaucoma suspects with normal SAP and mfVEP results remained untreated. Of those with abnormal mfVEP results, 68 % (15/22) were treated because the abnormal regions on the mfVEP were consistent with the abnormal regions seen during clinical examination of the optic disk. The mfVEP was abnormal in 86 % (69/80) of eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy and SAP damage, even though it did not result in an altered treatment regimen. In NTG patients, the mfVEP showed central defects in 44 % (12 of 27) of the eyes with apparently normal central fields and confirmed central scotomata in 92 % (36 of 39), leading to more rigorous surveillance of these patients. Conclusions In a clinical practice, the mfVEP was used when clinical examination and subjective visual fields provided insufficient or conflicting information. This information influenced clinical management. PMID:22476612

  19. Clinical use of multifocal visual-evoked potentials in a glaucoma practice: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C

    2012-08-01

    To test a framework that describes how the multifocal visual-evoked potential (mfVEP) technique is used in a particular glaucoma practice. In this prospective, descriptive study, glaucoma suspects, ocular hypertensives and glaucoma patients were referred for mfVEP testing by a single glaucoma specialist over a 2-year period. All patients underwent standard automated perimetry (SAP) and mfVEP testing within 3 months. Two hundred and ten patients (420 eyes) were referred for mfVEP testing for the following reasons: (1) normal SAP tests suspected of early functional loss (ocular hypertensives, n = 43; and glaucoma suspects on the basis of suspicious optic disks, n = 52); (2) normal-tension glaucoma patients with suspected central SAP defects (n = 33); and (3) SAP abnormalities needing confirmation (n = 82). All the glaucoma suspects with normal SAP and mfVEP results remained untreated. Of those with abnormal mfVEP results, 68 % (15/22) were treated because the abnormal regions on the mfVEP were consistent with the abnormal regions seen during clinical examination of the optic disk. The mfVEP was abnormal in 86 % (69/80) of eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy and SAP damage, even though it did not result in an altered treatment regimen. In NTG patients, the mfVEP showed central defects in 44 % (12 of 27) of the eyes with apparently normal central fields and confirmed central scotomata in 92 % (36 of 39), leading to more rigorous surveillance of these patients. In a clinical practice, the mfVEP was used when clinical examination and subjective visual fields provided insufficient or conflicting information. This information influenced clinical management.

  20. Non-provocative diagnostics of photosensitivity using visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Joost; Kalitzin, Stiliyan; Parra, Jaime; Dekker, Erwin; Vossepoel, Albert; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2008-04-01

    Photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) is the most common form of reflex epilepsy. Usually, to find out whether a patient is sensitive, he/she is stimulated visually with, e.g. a stroboscopic light stimulus at variable frequency and intensity until a photo paroxysmal response (PPR) occurs. The research described in this work aims to find whether photosensitivity can be detected without provoking a PPR. Twenty-two subjects, 15 with known photosensitivity, were stimulated with visual stimuli that did not provoke a PPR. Using an "evoked response representation", 18 features were analytically derived from EEG signals. Single- and multi-feature classification paradigms were applied to extract those features that separate best subjects with PSE from controls. Two variables in the "evoked response representation", a frequency term and a goodness of fit term to a particular template, appeared to be best suited to make a prediction about the photosensitivity of a subject. Evoked responses appear to carry information about potential PSE. This result can be useful for screening patients for photosensitivity and it may also help to assess in a quantitative way the effectiveness of medical therapy.

  1. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Transient Visual Evoked Potentials: Optimisation and Applications.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mei Ying; Henry, Bruce Ian; Chu, Byoung Sun; Basahi, Nour; Suttle, Catherine May; Luu, Chi; Leung, Harry; Hing, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) provides a time series signal response to an external visual stimulus at the location of the visual cortex. The major VEP signal components, peak latency and amplitude, may be affected by disease processes. Additionally, the VEP contains fine detailed and non-periodic structure, of presently unclear relevance to normal function, which may be quantified using the fractal dimension. The purpose of this study is to provide a systematic investigation of the key parameters in the measurement of the fractal dimension of VEPs, to develop an optimal analysis protocol for application. VEP time series were mathematically transformed using delay time, τ, and embedding dimension, m, parameters. The fractal dimension of the transformed data was obtained from a scaling analysis based on straight line fits to the numbers of pairs of points with separation less than r versus log(r) in the transformed space. Optimal τ, m, and scaling analysis were obtained by comparing the consistency of results using different sampling frequencies. The optimised method was then piloted on samples of normal and abnormal VEPs. Consistent fractal dimension estimates were obtained using τ = 4 ms, designating the fractal dimension = D2 of the time series based on embedding dimension m = 7 (for 3606 Hz and 5000 Hz), m = 6 (for 1803 Hz) and m = 5 (for 1000Hz), and estimating D2 for each embedding dimension as the steepest slope of the linear scaling region in the plot of log(C(r)) vs log(r) provided the scaling region occurred within the middle third of the plot. Piloting revealed that fractal dimensions were higher from the sampled abnormal than normal achromatic VEPs in adults (p = 0.02). Variances of fractal dimension were higher from the abnormal than normal chromatic VEPs in children (p = 0.01). A useful analysis protocol to assess the fractal dimension of transformed VEPs has been developed.

  2. The steady-state visual evoked potential in vision research: A review

    PubMed Central

    Norcia, Anthony M.; Appelbaum, L. Gregory; Ales, Justin M.; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Periodic visual stimulation and analysis of the resulting steady-state visual evoked potentials were first introduced over 80 years ago as a means to study visual sensation and perception. From the first single-channel recording of responses to modulated light to the present use of sophisticated digital displays composed of complex visual stimuli and high-density recording arrays, steady-state methods have been applied in a broad range of scientific and applied settings.The purpose of this article is to describe the fundamental stimulation paradigms for steady-state visual evoked potentials and to illustrate these principles through research findings across a range of applications in vision science. PMID:26024451

  3. Dichoptic stimulation improves detection of glaucoma with multifocal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart; Grigg, John; Goldberg, Ivan; Klistorner, Asya; Billson, Frank A

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether simultaneous binocular (dichoptic) stimulation for multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) detects glaucomatous defects and decreases intereye variability. Twenty-eight patients with glaucoma and 30 healthy subjects underwent mfVEP on monocular and dichoptic stimulation. Dichoptic stimulation was presented with the use of virtual reality goggles (recording time, 7 minutes). Monocular mfVEPs were recorded sequentially for each eye (recording time, 10 minutes). Comparison of mean relative asymmetry coefficient (RAC; calculated as difference in amplitudes between eyes/sum of amplitudes of both eyes at each segment) on monocular and dichoptic mfVEP revealed significantly lower RAC on dichoptic (0.003 +/- 0.03) compared with monocular testing (-0.02 +/- 0.04; P = 0.002). In all 28 patients, dichoptic mfVEP identified defects with excellent topographic correspondence. Of 56 hemifields (28 eyes), 33 had Humphrey visual field (HFA) scotomas, all of which were detected by dichoptic mfVEP. Among 23 hemifields with normal HFA, two were abnormal on monocular and dichoptic mfVEP. Five hemifields (five patients) normal on HFA and monocular mfVEP were abnormal on dichoptic mfVEP. In all five patients, corresponding rim changes were observed on disc photographs. Mean RAC of glaucomatous eyes was significantly higher on dichoptic (0.283 +/- 0.18) compared with monocular (0.199 +/- 0.12) tests (P = 0.0006). Dichoptic mfVEP not only detects HFA losses, it may identify early defects in areas unaffected on HFA and monocular mfVEP while reducing testing time by 30%. Asymmetry was tighter among healthy subjects but wider in patients with glaucoma on simultaneous binocular stimulation, which is potentially a new tool in the early detection of glaucoma.

  4. Multifocal blue-on-yellow visual evoked potentials in early glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Martins, Alessandra; Grigg, John R; Arvind, Hemamalini; Kumar, Rajesh S; James, Andrew C; Billson, Francis A

    2007-09-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) in early glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. Fifty patients with a confirmed diagnosis of early glaucoma and 60 normal participants. Black-and-white mfVEPs and blue-on-yellow mfVEPs were recorded using the Accumap version 2.0 (ObjectiVision Pty. Ltd., Sydney, Australia). All patients also underwent achromatic standard automated perimetry (SAP). Multifocal VEP amplitude and latency values in glaucoma patients were analyzed and compared with those of the normal controls. Based on the definition of visual field defect, in the group of glaucomatous eyes with SAP defects, amplitude of blue-on-yellow mfVEP was abnormal in all 64 cases (100% sensitivity), whereas black-and-white mfVEP missed 5 cases (92.2% sensitivity). Generally, larger scotomata were noted on blue-on-yellow mfVEP compared with black-and-white mfVEP for the same eyes. There was high topographic correspondence between SAP and amplitude of blue-on-yellow mfVEP and significant (P<0.0001) correlation between them (correlation coefficient, 0.73). Abnormal amplitude was detected in 3 of 60 eyes of control subjects (95% specificity). There was, however, no correlation between visual field defect and latency delay in glaucoma patients. Although there was a significant difference between averaged latency of control and glaucoma eyes, values considerably overlapped. The blue-on-yellow mfVEP is a sensitive and specific tool for detecting early glaucoma based on amplitude analysis.

  5. Evaluation of multifocal visual evoked potentials in patients with Graves' orbitopathy and subclinical optic nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Rodríguez-González, Natividad; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Blanco, Román

    2012-08-01

    Dysthyroid optic neuropathy is the most serious, although infrequent (8-10 %) complication in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). It is known that early stages of compressive optic neuropathy may produce reversible visual field defects, suggesting axoplasmic stasis rather than ganglion cell death. This observational, cross-sectional, case-control study assessed 34 consecutive patients (65 eyes) with Graves' hyperthyroidism and longstanding GO and 31 age-matched control subjects. The patients' multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) were compared to their clinical and psychophysical (standard automated perimetry [SAP]) and structural (optic coherence tomography [OCT]) diagnostic test data. Abnormal cluster defects were found in 12.3 % and 3.1 % of eyes on the interocular and monocular amplitude analysis mfVEP probability plots, respectively. As well, mfVEP latencies delays were found in 13.8 and 20 % of eyes on the interocular and monocular analysis probability plots, respectively. Interestingly, 19 % of patients with GO had ocular hypertension, and a strong correlation between intraocular pressure measured at upgaze and mfVEP latency was found. MfVEP amplitudes and visual acuity were significantly related to each other (P < 0.05), but not with the latencies delays. However, relationships between the interocular or monocular mfVEP amplitudes and latencies analysis and SAP indices or OCT data were not statistically significant. One-third of our patients with GO showed changes in the mfVEP, indicating significant subclinical optic nerve dysfunction. In this sense, the mfVEP may be a useful diagnostic tool in the clinic for early diagnosis and monitoring of optic nerve function abnormalities in patients with GO.

  6. Long-Term Visuo-Gustatory Appetitive and Aversive Conditioning Potentiate Human Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Christoffersen, Gert R. J.; Laugesen, Jakob L.; Møller, Per; Bredie, Wender L. P.; Schachtman, Todd R.; Liljendahl, Christina; Viemose, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Human recognition of foods and beverages are often based on visual cues associated with flavors. The dynamics of neurophysiological plasticity related to acquisition of such long-term associations has only recently become the target of investigation. In the present work, the effects of appetitive and aversive visuo-gustatory conditioning were studied with high density EEG-recordings focusing on late components in the visual evoked potentials (VEPs), specifically the N2-P3 waves. Unfamiliar images were paired with either a pleasant or an unpleasant juice and VEPs evoked by the images were compared before and 1 day after the pairings. In electrodes located over posterior visual cortex areas, the following changes were observed after conditioning: the amplitude from the N2-peak to the P3-peak increased and the N2 peak delay was reduced. The percentage increase of N2-to-P3 amplitudes was asymmetrically distributed over the posterior hemispheres despite the fact that the images were bilaterally symmetrical across the two visual hemifields. The percentage increases of N2-to-P3 amplitudes in each experimental subject correlated with the subject’s evaluation of positive or negative hedonic valences of the two juices. The results from 118 scalp electrodes gave surface maps of theta power distributions showing increased power over posterior visual areas after the pairings. Source current distributions calculated from swLORETA revealed that visual evoked currents rose as a result of conditioning in five cortical regions—from primary visual areas and into the inferior temporal gyrus (ITG). These learning-induced changes were seen after both appetitive and aversive training while a sham trained control group showed no changes. It is concluded that long-term visuo-gustatory conditioning potentiated the N2-P3 complex, and it is suggested that the changes are regulated by the perceived hedonic valence of the US. PMID:28983243

  7. Effect of head circumference on parameters of pattern reversal visual evoked potential in healthy adults of central India.

    PubMed

    Kothari, R; Singh, R; Singh, S; Bokariya, P

    2012-06-01

    Visual evoked response testing has been one of the most exciting clinical tools to be developed from neurophysiologic research in recent years and has provided us with an objective method of identifying abnormalities of the afferent visual pathways. Investigation were carried out to see whether the head circumference influence the pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) parameters. The study comprised of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) recordings in 400 eyes of 200 normal subjects. Two hundred fourty eight eyes were males and 152 eyes were from 76 female subjects recruited from the Central Indian population in the age range of 40-79 years. Visual evoked potential (VEP) recordings were performed in accordance to the standardized methodology of International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN) Committee Recommendations and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV) Guidelines and montages were kept as per 10-20 International System of EEG Electrode placements. The stimulus configuration in this study consisted of the transient pattern reversal method in which a black and white checker board was generated (full field) and displayed on a VEP Monitor by an electronic pattern regenerator inbuilt in an Evoked Potential Recorder (RMS EMG EP MARK II). VEP latencies, duration and amplitude were measured in all subjects and the data were analyzed. The correlation of all the electrophysiological parameters with head circumference was evaluated by Pearson's correlation co-efficient (r) and its statistical significance was evaluated. The prediction equations for all the VEP parameters with respect to head circumference were derived. We found a positive correlation of P 100 latency and N 155 latency with mean head circumference, while a highly significant negative correlation were noted of P 100 amplitude with head circumference. N 70 latency was significantly correlated with head circumference. P 100 duration showed

  8. Matched Filtering of Visual Evoked Potentials to Detect Acceleration (+Gz) Induced Blackout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-03

    FILTERING OF VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS rO DETECT ACCELERATION ( + Gz) INDUCED BLACKOUT John Q. Nelson, Leonid Hrebien and Joseph P. Cammarota Aircraft...8217: , r .,.V -. 1-». .v. IE •> _"->.-"*« A^V :j% _"«;_"V X~«. _~»^"V.i.~» iuTtuTii i."»..-^. .-*._> r /; NOTICES REPORT NUMBERING SYSTEM - The...Potentials to Detect Acceleration (+G2) Induced Blackout 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) John G. Nelson, Leonid Hrebien, Joseph P. Cammarota 13* TYPE OF REPORT

  9. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based communication: impact of harmonic frequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Putz, Gernot R.; Scherer, Reinhold; Brauneis, Christian; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2005-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can be realized on the basis of steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs). These types of brain signals resulting from repetitive stimulation have the same fundamental frequency as the stimulation but also include higher harmonics. This study investigated how the classification accuracy of a 4-class BCI system can be improved by incorporating visually evoked harmonic oscillations. The current study revealed that the use of three SSVEP harmonics yielded a significantly higher classification accuracy than was the case for one or two harmonics. During feedback experiments, the five subjects investigated reached a classification accuracy between 42.5% and 94.4%.

  10. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based communication: impact of harmonic frequency components.

    PubMed

    Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Scherer, Reinhold; Brauneis, Christian; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2005-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can be realized on the basis of steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs). These types of brain signals resulting from repetitive stimulation have the same fundamental frequency as the stimulation but also include higher harmonics. This study investigated how the classification accuracy of a 4-class BCI system can be improved by incorporating visually evoked harmonic oscillations. The current study revealed that the use of three SSVEP harmonics yielded a significantly higher classification accuracy than was the case for one or two harmonics. During feedback experiments, the five subjects investigated reached a classification accuracy between 42.5% and 94.4%.

  11. Feasibility and performance evaluation of generating and recording visual evoked potentials using ambulatory Bluetooth based system.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Roger M; Oken, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Report contains the design overview and key performance measurements demonstrating the feasibility of generating and recording ambulatory visual stimulus evoked potentials using the previously reported custom Complementary and Alternative Medicine physiologic data collection and monitoring system, CAMAS. The methods used to generate visual stimuli on a PDA device and the design of an optical coupling device to convert the display to an electrical waveform which is recorded by the CAMAS base unit are presented. The optical sensor signal, synchronized to the visual stimulus emulates the brain's synchronized EEG signal input to CAMAS normally reviewed for the evoked potential response. Most importantly, the PDA also sends a marker message over the wireless Bluetooth connection to the CAMAS base unit synchronized to the visual stimulus which is the critical averaging reference component to obtain VEP results. Results show the variance in the latency of the wireless marker messaging link is consistent enough to support the generation and recording of visual evoked potentials. The averaged sensor waveforms at multiple CPU speeds are presented and demonstrate suitability of the Bluetooth interface for portable ambulatory visual evoked potential implementation on our CAMAS platform.

  12. Color vision in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot visual evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeon; Banaschewski, Tobias; Tannock, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are reported to manifest visual problems (including ophthalmological and color perception, particularly for blue-yellow stimuli), but findings are inconsistent. Accordingly, this study investigated visual function and color perception in adolescents with ADHD using color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which provides an objective measure of color perception. Thirty-one adolescents (aged 13-18), 16 with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD, and 15 healthy peers, matched for age, gender, and IQ participated in the study. All underwent an ophthalmological exam, as well as electrophysiological testing color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which measured the latency and amplitude of the neural P1 response to chromatic (blue-yellow, red-green) and achromatic stimuli. No intergroup differences were found in the ophthalmological exam. However, significantly larger P1 amplitude was found for blue and yellow stimuli, but not red/green or achromatic stimuli, in the ADHD group (particularly in the medicated group) compared to controls. Larger amplitude in the P1 component for blue-yellow in the ADHD group compared to controls may account for the lack of difference in color perception tasks. We speculate that the larger amplitude for blue-yellow stimuli in early sensory processing (P1) might reflect a compensatory strategy for underlying problems including compromised retinal input of s-cones due to hypo-dopaminergic tone. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Normalization of auditory evoked potential and visual evoked potential in patients with idiot savant.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhang, M; Wang, J; Lou, F; Liang, J

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the variations of auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and visual evoked potentials (VEP) of patients with idiot savant (IS) syndrome. Both AEP and VEP were recorded from 7 patients with IS syndrome, 21 mentally retarded (MR) children without the syndrome and 21 normally age-matched controls, using a Dantec concerto SEEG-16 BEAM instrument. Both AEP and VEP of MR group showed significantly longer latencies (P1 and P2 latencies of AEP, P < 0.01; N1 and N2 latencies of VEP, P < 0.01/0.05), lower P2 amplitudes (P < 0.01) and higher P3 amplitudes (P < 0.01), as compared with normal controls. But none of above-mentioned changes was found with IS group. Almost all MR patients (90.1%) presented P4 component in both AEP and VEP, which was also in sharp contrast with its incidence in other 2 groups (IS: 14.3%; normal controls: 9.5%). Patients with idiot savant syndrome presented normalized AEP and VEP.

  14. Surgical decompression in endocrine orbitopathy. Visual evoked potential evaluation and effect on the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Luigi C; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galie', Manlio; Franco, Filippo; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine orbitopathy (EO) represents the most frequent and important extrathyroidal stigma of Graves disease. This chronic autoimmune condition involves the orbital contents, including extraocular muscles, periorbital connective-fatty tissue and lacrimal gland. The increase of fat tissue and the enlargement of extraocular muscles within the bony confines of the orbit leads to proptosis, and in the most severe cases optic neuropathy, caused by compression and stretching of the optic nerve. The congestion and the pressure of the enlarged muscles, constrict the nerve and can lead to reduced sight or loss of vision with the so called "orbital apex syndrome". Generally surgical treatment of EO, based on fat and/or orbital wall expansion, is possible and effective in improving exophthalmos and diplopia. Since there are limited reports focussing on optic neuropathy recovery after fat and/or orbital walls decompression the Authors decided to perform a retrospective analysis on a series of patients affected by EO. The study population was composed of 10 patients affected by EO and presenting to the Unit of Cranio Maxillofacial Surgery, Center for Craniofacial Deformities & Orbital Surgery St. Anna Hospital and University, Ferrara, Italy, for evaluation and treatment. A complete Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP) evaluation was performed. There were seven women and three men with a median age of 55 years. Optic nerve VEP amplitude and latency were recorded as normal or pathological. Abnormal results were scored as moderate, mild and severe. Differences in VEP pre and post-operatively were recorded as present or absent (i.e. VEP Delta). Pearson chi square test was applied. There were 20 operated orbits. The first VEP evaluation was performed 3.2 months before surgery and post-operative VEP control was done after a mean of 18.7 months. Fat decompression was performed in all cases and eight patients had also bony decompression. VEP amplitude and latency were affected in 10 and 15

  15. Beta-zone parapapillary atrophy and multifocal visual evoked potentials in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Ketner, Scott; Teng, Christopher C; Ehrlich, Joshua R; Raza, Ali S; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C

    2011-08-01

    We investigated changes in multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) responses due to beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (ßPPA). Patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) with or without standard achromatic perimetry (SAP) abnormalities were referred for mfVEP testing during a 2-year period. Eyes with good quality optic disc stereophotographs and reliable SAP results were included. The mfVEP monocular mean latency delays (ms) and amplitudes (SNR) were analyzed. Age, SAP mean deviation (MD), pattern standard deviation (PSD), and spherical equivalent (SE) were analyzed in the multivariate model. Generalized estimated equations were used for comparisons between groups after adjusting for inter-eye associations. Of 394 eyes of 200 patients, 223 (57%) had ßPPA. The ßPPA eyes were older (59.6 ± 13.7 vs. 56.5 ± 13.7 year, P = 0.02), more myopic (-4.0 ± 3.5 vs. -1.3 ± 3.5 D, P < 0.01), and had poorer SAP scores (MD: -4.9 ± 5.2 vs. -2.6 ± 5.2 dB, P < 0.01; PSD: 4.3 ± 2.9 vs. 2.5 ± 3.0 dB, P < 0.01). By univariate analysis, mean latencies were longer in ßPPA eyes (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 4.0 ± 5.5 ms, P < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in SE, age, and SAP MD, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.09). ßPPA eyes had lower amplitude log SNR (0.49 ± 0.16 vs. 0.56 ± 0.15, P < 0.01), which lost significance (P = 0.51) after adjusting for MD and PSD. Although eyes with ßPPA had significantly lower amplitudes and prolonged latencies than eyes without ßPPA, these differences were attributable to differences in SAP severity, age, and refractive error. Thus, ßPPA does not appear to be an independent factor affecting mfVEP responses in eyes with GON.

  16. Beta-zone parapapillary atrophy and multifocal visual evoked potentials in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ketner, Scott; Teng, Christopher C.; Ehrlich, Joshua R.; Raza, Ali S.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) responses due to beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (βPPA). Patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) with or without standard achromatic perimetry (SAP) abnormalities were referred for mfVEP testing during a 2-year period. Eyes with good quality optic disc stereophotographs and reliable SAP results were included. The mfVEP monocular mean latency delays (ms) and amplitudes (SNR) were analyzed. Age, SAP mean deviation (MD), pattern standard deviation (PSD), and spherical equivalent (SE) were analyzed in the multivariate model. Generalized estimated equations were used for comparisons between groups after adjusting for inter-eye associations. Of 394 eyes of 200 patients, 223 (57%) had βPPA. The βPPA eyes were older (59.6 ± 13.7 vs. 56.5 ± 13.7 year, P = 0.02), more myopic (−4.0 ± 3.5 vs. −1.3 ± 3.5 D, P < 0.01), and had poorer SAP scores (MD: −4.9 ± 5.2 vs. −2.6 ± 5.2 dB, P < 0.01; PSD: 4.3 ± 2.9 vs. 2.5 ± 3.0 dB, P < 0.01). By univariate analysis, mean latencies were longer in βPPA eyes (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 4.0 ± 5.5 ms, P < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in SE, age, and SAP MD, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.09). βPPA eyes had lower amplitude log SNR (0.49 ± 0.16 vs. 0.56 ± 0.15, P < 0.01), which lost significance (P = 0.51) after adjusting for MD and PSD. Although eyes with βPPA had significantly lower amplitudes and prolonged latencies than eyes without βPPA, these differences were attributable to differences in SAP severity, age, and refractive error. Thus, βPPA does not appear to be an independent factor affecting mfVEP responses in eyes with GON. PMID:21735265

  17. Control of humanoid robot via motion-onset visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates controlling humanoid robot behavior via motion-onset specific N200 potentials. In this study, N200 potentials are induced by moving a blue bar through robot images intuitively representing robot behaviors to be controlled with mind. We present the individual impact of each subject on N200 potentials and discuss how to deal with individuality to obtain a high accuracy. The study results document the off-line average accuracy of 93% for hitting targets across over five subjects, so we use this major component of the motion-onset visual evoked potential (mVEP) to code people's mental activities and to perform two types of on-line operation tasks: navigating a humanoid robot in an office environment with an obstacle and picking-up an object. We discuss the factors that affect the on-line control success rate and the total time for completing an on-line operation task. PMID:25620918

  18. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Implantation and Recording of Wireless Electroretinogram and Visual Evoked Potential in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Charng, Jason; He, Zheng; Bui, Bang; Vingrys, Algis; Ivarsson, Magnus; Fish, Rebecca; Gurrell, Rachel; Nguyen, Christine

    2016-06-29

    The full-field electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP) are useful tools to assess retinal and visual pathway integrity in both laboratory and clinical settings. Currently, preclinical ERG and VEP measurements are performed with anesthesia to ensure stable electrode placements. However, the very presence of anesthesia has been shown to contaminate normal physiological responses. To overcome these anesthesia confounds, we develop a novel platform to assay ERG and VEP in conscious rats. Electrodes are surgically implanted sub-conjunctivally on the eye to assay the ERG and epidurally over the visual cortex to measure the VEP. A range of amplitude and sensitivity/timing parameters are assayed for both the ERG and VEP at increasing luminous energies. The ERG and VEP signals are shown to be stable and repeatable for at least 4 weeks post surgical implantation. This ability to record ERG and VEP signals without anesthesia confounds in the preclinical setting should provide superior translation to clinical data.

  20. Spatial adaptation of the cortical visual evoked potential of the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonds, A B

    1984-06-01

    Adaptation that is spatially specific for the adapting pattern has been seen psychophysically in humans. This is indirect evidence for independent analyzers (putatively single units) that are specific for orientation and spatial frequency in the human visual system, but it is unclear how global adaptation characteristics may be related to single unit performance. Spatially specific adaptation was sought in the cat visual evoked potential (VEP), with a view towards relating this phenomenon with what we know of cat single units. Adaptation to sine-wave gratings results in a temporary loss of cat VEP amplitude, with induction and recovery similar to that seen in human psychophysical experiments. The amplitude loss was specific for both the spatial frequency and orientation of the adapting pattern. The bandwidth of adaptation was not unlike the average selectivity of a population of cat single units.

  1. Possible long term effects of chemical warfare using visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Abbas; Hafezi, Rhamatollah; Babaei, Mahmoud; Naderi, Mostafa

    2014-09-01

    Some studies have already addressed the effects of occupational organic solvent exposure on the visually evoked potentials (VEPs). Visual system is an important target for Sulphur Mustard (SM) toxicity. A number of Iranian victims of Sulphur Mustard (SM) agent were apprehensive about the delay effect of SM on their vision and a possible delay effect of SM on their visual cortex. This investigation was performed on 34 individuals with a history of chemical exposure and a control group of 15 normal people. The Toennies electro-diagnosis device was used and its signals were saved as the latencies. The mean of N75, N140 and P100 of victims of chemical warfare (VCWs) and control group indicated no significant results (P>0.05). The VCWs did not show any visual symptoms and there was no clear deficit in their VEPs.

  2. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Effects on Neglect: A Visual-Evoked Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Spinelli, Donatella; Vallar, Giuseppe; Di Russo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in six right-brain-damaged patients with left unilateral spatial neglect (USN), using both standard clinical tests (reading, line, and letter cancelation, and line bisection), and electrophysiological measures (steady-state visual-evoked potentials, SSVEP). TENS was applied on left neck muscles for 15′, and measures were recorded before, immediately after, and 60′ after stimulation. Behavioral results showed that the stimulation temporarily improved the deficit in all patients. In cancelation tasks, omissions and performance asymmetries between the two hand-sides were reduced, as well as the rightward deviation in line bisection. Before TENS, SSVEP average latency to stimuli displayed in the left visual half-field [LVF (160 ms)] was remarkably longer than to stimuli shown in the right visual half-field [RVF (120 ms)]. Immediately after TENS, latency to LVF stimuli was 130 ms; 1 h after stimulation the effect of TENS faded, with latency returning to baseline. TENS similarly affected also the latency SSVEP of 12 healthy participants, and their line bisection performance, with effects smaller in size. The present study, first, replicates evidence concerning the positive behavioral effects of TENS on the manifestations of left USN in right-brain-damaged patients; second, it shows putatively related electrophysiological effects on the SSVEP latency. These behavioral and novel electrophysiological results are discussed in terms of specific directional effects of left somatosensory stimulation on egocentric coordinates, which in USN patients are displaced toward the side of the cerebral lesion. Showing that visual-evoked potentials latency is modulated by proprioceptive stimulation, we provide electrophysiological evidence to the effect that TENS may improve some manifestations of USN, with implications for its rehabilitation. PMID:23966919

  3. Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity Development in Children: Sweep Visually Evoked Potential and Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Almoqbel, Fahad M; Irving, Elizabeth L; Leat, Susan J

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of visual acuity (VA) and contrast sensitivity in children as measured with objective (sweep visually evoked potential) and subjective, psychophysical techniques, including signal detection theory (SDT), which attempts to control for differences in criterion or behavior between adults and children. Furthermore, this study examines the possibility of applying SDT methods with children. Visual acuity and contrast thresholds were measured in 12 children 6 to 7 years old, 10 children 8 to 9 years old, 10 children 10 to 12 years old, and 16 adults. For sweep visually evoked potential measurements, spatial frequency was swept from 1 to 40 cpd to measure VA, and contrast of sine-wave gratings (1 or 8 cpd) was swept from 0.33 to 30% to measure contrast thresholds. For psychophysical measurements, VA and contrast thresholds (1 or 8 cpd) were measured using a temporal two-alternative forced-choice staircase procedure and also with a yes-no SDT procedure. Optotype (logMAR [log of the minimum angle of resolution]) VA was also measured. The results of the various procedures were in agreement showing that there are age-related changes in threshold values and logMAR VA after the age of 6 years and that these visual functions do not become adult-like until the age of 8 to 9 years at the earliest. It was also found that children can participate in SDT procedures and do show differences in criterion compared with adults in psychophysical testing. These findings confirm a slightly later development of VA and contrast sensitivity (8 years or older) and indicate the importance of using SDT or forced-choice procedures in any developmental study to attempt to overcome the effect of criterion in children.

  4. Multifocal visual evoked potentials reveal normal optic nerve projections in human carriers of oculocutaneous albinism type 1a.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michael B; Wolynski, Barbara; Meltendorf, Synke; Behrens-Baumann, Wolfgang; Käsmann-Kellner, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    In albinism, part of the temporal retina projects abnormally to the contralateral hemisphere. A residual misprojection is also evident in feline carriers that are heterozygous for tyrosinase-related albinism. This study was conducted to test whether such residual abnormalities can also be identified in human carriers of oculocutaneous tyrosinase-related albinism (OCA1a). In eight carriers heterozygous for OCA1a and in eight age- and sex-matched control subjects, monocular pattern-reversal and -onset multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) were recorded at 60 locations comprising a visual field of 44 degrees diameter (VERIS 5.01; EDI, San Mateo, CA). For each eye and each stimulus location, interhemispheric difference potentials were calculated and correlated with each other, to assess the lateralization of the responses: positive and negative correlations indicate lateralizations on the same or opposite hemispheres, respectively. Misrouted optic nerves are expected to yield negative interocular correlations. The analysis also allowed for the assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of the detection of projection abnormalities. No significant differences were obtained for the distributions of the interocular correlation coefficients of controls and carriers. Consequently, no local representation abnormalities were observed in the group of OCA1a carriers. For pattern-reversal and -onset stimulation, an assessment of the control data yielded similar specificity (97.9% and 94.6%) and sensitivity (74.4% and 74.8%) estimates for the detection of projection abnormalities. The absence of evidence for projection abnormalities in human OCA1a carriers contrasts with the previously reported evidence for abnormalities in cat-carriers of tyrosinase-related albinism. This discrepancy suggests that animal models of albinism may not provide a match to human albinism.

  5. Altered Automatic Face Processing in Individuals with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita, Takako; Kamio, Yoko; Yamasaki, Takao; Yasumoto, Sawa; Hirose, Shinichi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have different automatic responses to faces than typically developing (TD) individuals. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 10 individuals with high-functioning ASD (HFASD) and 10 TD individuals. Visual stimuli consisted of upright and inverted faces (fearful and neutral) and objects…

  6. Steady-state pattern electroretinogram and short-duration transient visual evoked potentials in glaucomatous and healthy eyes.

    PubMed

    Amarasekera, Dilru C; Resende, Arthur F; Waisbourd, Michael; Puri, Sanjeev; Moster, Marlene R; Hark, Lisa A; Katz, L Jay; Fudemberg, Scott J; Mantravadi, Anand V

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluates two rapid electrophysiological glaucoma diagnostic tests that may add a functional perspective to glaucoma diagnosis. This study aimed to determine the ability of two office-based electrophysiological diagnostic tests, steady-state pattern electroretinogram and short-duration transient visual evoked potentials, to discern between glaucomatous and healthy eyes. This is a cross-sectional study in a hospital setting. Forty-one patients with glaucoma and 41 healthy volunteers participated in the study. Steady-state pattern electroretinogram and short-duration transient visual evoked potential testing was conducted in glaucomatous and healthy eyes. A 64-bar-size stimulus with both a low-contrast and high-contrast setting was used to compare steady-state pattern electroretinogram parameters in both groups. A low-contrast and high-contrast checkerboard stimulus was used to measure short-duration transient visual evoked potential parameters in both groups. Steady-state pattern electroretinogram parameters compared were MagnitudeD, MagnitudeD/Magnitude ratio, and the signal-to-noise ratio. Short-duration transient visual evoked potential parameters compared were amplitude and latency. MagnitudeD was significantly lower in glaucoma patients when using a low-contrast (P = 0.001) and high-contrast (P < 0.001) 64-bar-size steady-state pattern electroretinogram stimulus. MagnitudeD/Magnitude ratio and SNR were significantly lower in the glaucoma group when using a high-contrast 64-bar-size stimulus (P < 0.001 and P = 0.010, respectively). Short-duration transient visual evoked potential amplitude and latency were not significantly different between the two groups. Steady-state pattern electroretinogram was effectively able to discern between glaucomatous and healthy eyes. Steady-state pattern electroretinogram may thus have a role as a clinically useful electrophysiological diagnostic tool. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of

  7. Effect of binasal occlusion (BNO) on the visual-evoked potential (VEP) in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Yadav, Naveen K; Ludlam, Diana P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to assess the effect of binasal occlusion (BNO) on the visually-evoked potential (VEP) in visually-normal (VN) individuals and in those with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) for whom BNO frequently reduces their primary symptoms related to abnormally-increased visual motion sensitivity (VMS). Subjects were comprised of asymptomatic VN adults (n = 10) and individuals with mTBI (n = 10) having the symptom of VMS. Conventional full-field VEP testing was employed under two conditions: without BNO and with opaque BNO which blocked regions on either side of the VEP test stimulus. Subjective impressions were also assessed. In VN, the mean VEP amplitude decreased significantly with BNO in all subjects. In contrast, in mTBI, the mean VEP amplitude increased significantly with BNO in all subjects. Latency was normal and unaffected in all cases. Repeat VEP testing in three subjects from each group revealed similar test-re-test findings. Visuomotor activities improved, with reduced symptoms, with BNO in the mTBI group. It is speculated that individuals with mTBI habitually attempt to suppress visual information in the near retinal periphery to reduce their abnormal VMS, with addition of the BNO negating the suppressive influence and thus producing a widespread disinhibition effect and resultant increase in VEP amplitude.

  8. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A high-speed brain speller using steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yijun; Wang, Yu-Te; Mitsukura, Yasue; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Implementing a complex spelling program using a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) remains a challenge due to difficulties in stimulus presentation and target identification. This study aims to explore the feasibility of mixed frequency and phase coding in building a high-speed SSVEP speller with a computer monitor. A frequency and phase approximation approach was developed to eliminate the limitation of the number of targets caused by the monitor refresh rate, resulting in a speller comprising 32 flickers specified by eight frequencies (8-15 Hz with a 1 Hz interval) and four phases (0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°). A multi-channel approach incorporating Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) and SSVEP training data was proposed for target identification. In a simulated online experiment, at a spelling rate of 40 characters per minute, the system obtained an averaged information transfer rate (ITR) of 166.91 bits/min across 13 subjects with a maximum individual ITR of 192.26 bits/min, the highest ITR ever reported in electroencephalogram (EEG)-based BCIs. The results of this study demonstrate great potential of a high-speed SSVEP-based BCI in real-life applications.

  10. The locus of color sensation: Cortical color loss and the chromatic visual evoked potential

    PubMed Central

    Crognale, Michael A.; Duncan, Chad S.; Shoenhard, Hannah; Peterson, Dwight J.; Berryhill, Marian E.

    2013-01-01

    Color losses of central origin (cerebral achromatopsia and dyschromatopsia) can result from cortical damage and are most commonly associated with stroke. Such cases have the potential to provide useful information regarding the loci of the generation of the percept of color. One available tool to examine this issue is the chromatic visual evoked potential (cVEP). The cVEP has been used successfully to objectively quantify losses in color vision capacity in both congenital and acquired deficiencies of retinal origin but has not yet been applied to cases of color losses of cortical origin. In addition, it is not known with certainty which cortical sites are responsible for the generation of the cVEP waveform components. Here we report psychophysical and electrophysiological examination of a patient with color deficits resulting from a bilateral cerebral infarct in the ventral occipitotemporal region. Although this patient demonstrated pronounced color losses of a general nature, the waveform of the cVEP remains unaffected. Contrast response functions of the cVEP are also normal for this patient. The results suggest that the percept of color arises after the origin of the cVEP and that normal activity in those areas that give rise to the characteristic negative wave of the cVEP are not sufficient to provide for the normal sensation of color. PMID:23986535

  11. Stimulus novelty, task relevance and the visual evoked potential in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchesne, E.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of task relevance on P3 (waveform of human evoked potential) waves and the methodologies used to deal with them are outlined. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from normal adult subjects performing in a visual discrimination task. Subjects counted the number of presentations of the numeral 4 which was interposed rarely and randomly within a sequence of tachistoscopically flashed background stimuli. Intrusive, task-irrelevant (not counted) stimuli were also interspersed rarely and randomly in the sequence of 2s; these stimuli were of two types: simples, which were easily recognizable, and novels, which were completely unrecognizable. It was found that the simples and the counted 4s evoked posteriorly distributed P3 waves while the irrelevant novels evoked large, frontally distributed P3 waves. These large, frontal P3 waves to novels were also found to be preceded by large N2 waves. These findings indicate that the P3 wave is not a unitary phenomenon but should be considered in terms of a family of waves, differing in their brain generators and in their psychological correlates.

  12. Changes in visual-evoked potential habituation induced by hyperventilation in migraine.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Gianluca; Currà, Antonio; Sava, Simona Liliana; Alibardi, Alessia; Parisi, Vincenzo; Pierelli, Francesco; Schoenen, Jean

    2010-12-01

    Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that worsens just before the attack. Hyperventilation slows electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and decreases the functional response in the occipital cortex during visual stimulation. The neural mechanisms underlying deficient-evoked potential habituation in migraineurs remain unclear. To find out whether hyperventilation alters VEP habituation, we recorded VEPs before and after experimentally induced hyperventilation lasting 3 min in 18 healthy subjects and 18 migraine patients between attacks. We measured VEP P100 amplitudes in six sequential blocks of 100 sweeps and habituation as the change in amplitude over the six blocks. In healthy subjects, hyperventilation decreased VEP amplitude in block 1 and abolished the normal VEP habituation. In migraine patients, hyperventilation further decreased the already low block 1 amplitude and worsened the interictal habituation deficit. Hyperventilation worsens the habituation deficit in migraineurs possibly by increasing dysrhythmia in the brainstem-thalamo-cortical network.

  13. The correlation dimension: a useful objective measure of the transient visual evoked potential?

    PubMed

    Boon, Mei Ying; Henry, Bruce I; Suttle, Catherine M; Dain, Stephen J

    2008-01-14

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) may be analyzed by examination of the morphology of their components, such as negative (N) and positive (P) peaks. However, methods that rely on component identification may be unreliable when dealing with responses of complex and variable morphology; therefore, objective methods are also useful. One potentially useful measure of the VEP is the correlation dimension. Its relevance to the visual system was investigated by examining its behavior when applied to the transient VEP in response to a range of chromatic contrasts (42%, two times psychophysical threshold, at psychophysical threshold) and to the visually unevoked response (zero contrast). Tests of nonlinearity (e.g., surrogate testing) were conducted. The correlation dimension was found to be negatively correlated with a stimulus property (chromatic contrast) and a known linear measure (the Fourier-derived VEP amplitude). It was also found to be related to visibility and perception of the stimulus such that the dimension reached a maximum for most of the participants at psychophysical threshold. The latter suggests that the correlation dimension may be useful as a diagnostic parameter to estimate psychophysical threshold and may find application in the objective screening and monitoring of congenital and acquired color vision deficiencies, with or without associated disease processes.

  14. Steady-state visually evoked potential correlates of human body perception.

    PubMed

    Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie; Jurilj, Verena; Gruber, Thomas; Vocks, Silja

    2016-11-01

    In cognitive neuroscience, interest in the neuronal basis underlying the processing of human bodies is steadily increasing. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, it is assumed that the processing of pictures of human bodies is anchored in a network of specialized brain areas comprising the extrastriate and the fusiform body area (EBA, FBA). An alternative to examine the dynamics within these networks is electroencephalography, more specifically so-called steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs). In SSVEP tasks, a visual stimulus is presented repetitively at a predefined flickering rate and typically elicits a continuous oscillatory brain response at this frequency. This brain response is characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio-a major advantage for source reconstructions. The main goal of present study was to demonstrate the feasibility of this method to study human body perception. To that end, we presented pictures of bodies and contrasted the resulting SSVEPs to two control conditions, i.e., non-objects and pictures of everyday objects (chairs). We found specific SSVEPs amplitude differences between bodies and both control conditions. Source reconstructions localized the SSVEP generators to a network of temporal, occipital and parietal areas. Interestingly, only body perception resulted in activity differences in middle temporal and lateral occipitotemporal areas, most likely reflecting the EBA/FBA.

  15. Cortical Double-Opponent Cells in Color Perception: Perceptual Scaling and Chromatic Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Valerie; Shapley, Robert M; Gordon, James

    2018-01-01

    In the early visual cortex V1, there are currently only two known neural substrates for color perception: single-opponent and double-opponent cells. Our aim was to explore the relative contributions of these neurons to color perception. We measured the perceptual scaling of color saturation for equiluminant color checkerboard patterns (designed to stimulate double-opponent neurons preferentially) and uniformly colored squares (designed to stimulate only single-opponent neurons) at several cone contrasts. The spatially integrative responses of single-opponent neurons would produce the same response magnitude for checkerboards as for uniform squares of the same space-averaged cone contrast. However, perceived saturation of color checkerboards was higher than for the corresponding squares. The perceptual results therefore imply that double-opponent cells are involved in color perception of patterns. We also measured the chromatic visual evoked potential (cVEP) produced by the same stimuli; checkerboard cVEPs were much larger than those for corresponding squares, implying that double-opponent cells also contribute to the cVEP response. The total Fourier power of the cVEP grew sublinearly with cone contrast. However, the 6-Hz Fourier component's power grew linearly with contrast-like saturation perception. This may also indicate that cortical coding of color depends on response dynamics.

  16. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    Objective. We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). Approach. By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Main results. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. Significance. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  17. Steady-state visual evoked potentials as a research tool in social affective neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Miskovic, Vladimir; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Like many other primates, humans place a high premium on social information transmission and processing. One important aspect of this information concerns the emotional state of other individuals, conveyed by distinct visual cues such as facial expressions, overt actions, or by cues extracted from the situational context. A rich body of theoretical and empirical work has demonstrated that these socio-emotional cues are processed by the human visual system in a prioritized fashion, in the service of optimizing social behavior. Furthermore, socio-emotional perception is highly dependent on situational contexts and previous experience. Here, we review current issues in this area of research and discuss the utility of the steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP) technique for addressing key empirical questions. Methodological advantages and caveats are discussed with particular regard to quantifying time-varying competition among multiple perceptual objects, trial-by-trial analysis of visual cortical activation, functional connectivity, and the control of low-level stimulus features. Studies on facial expression and emotional scene processing are summarized, with an emphasis on viewing faces and other social cues in emotional contexts, or when competing with each other. Further, because the ssVEP technique can be readily accommodated to studying the viewing of complex scenes with multiple elements, it enables researchers to advance theoretical models of socio-emotional perception, based on complex, quasi-naturalistic viewing situations. PMID:27699794

  18. Enhancing detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials using individual training data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yu-Te; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Although the performance of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) has improved gradually in the past decades, it still does not meet the requirement of a high communication speed in many applications. A major challenge is the interference of spontaneous background EEG activities in discriminating SSVEPs. An SSVEP BCI using frequency coding typically does not have a calibration procedure since the frequency of SSVEPs can be recognized by power spectrum density analysis (PSDA). However, the detection rate can be deteriorated by the spontaneous EEG activities within the same frequency range because phase information of SSVEPs is ignored in frequency detection. To address this problem, this study proposed to incorporate individual SSVEP training data into canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to improve the frequency detection of SSVEPs. An eight-class SSVEP dataset recorded from 10 subjects in a simulated online BCI experiment was used for performance evaluation. Compared to the standard CCA method, the proposed method obtained significantly improved detection accuracy (95.2% vs. 88.4%, p<0.05) and information transfer rates (ITR) (104.6 bits/min vs. 89.1 bits/min, p<0.05). The results suggest that the employment of individual SSVEP training data can significantly improve the detection rate and thereby facilitate the implementation of a high-speed BCI.

  19. The locus of origin of augmenting and reducing of visual evoked potentials in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J; Gayle, D; Sharma, A; Driscoll, P

    1996-07-01

    Humans who are high sensation seekers and cats who demonstrate comparable behavioral traits show increasing amplitudes of the early components of the cortical visual evoked potential (VEP) to increasing intensities of light flash; low sensation seekers show VEP reducing. Roman high-avoidance (RHA) and Roman low-avoidance (RLA) rats have behavioral traits comparable to human and cat high and low sensation seekers, respectively. Previously, we showed that RHA and RLA rats are cortical VEP augmenters and reducers, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine if augmenting-reducing is in fact a property of the visual cortex or if it originates at the lateral geniculate nucleus and is merely reflected in recordings from the cortex. EPs to five flash intensities were recorded from the visual cortex and dorsal lateral geniculate of RHA and RLA rats. As in the previous study, the slope of the first cortical component as a function of flash intensity was greater in the RHA than in the RLA rats. The amplitude of the geniculate component that has a latency shorter than the first cortical component was no different in the two lines of rats. The finding from the cortex confirms the earlier finding of augmenting and reducing in RHA and RLA rats, respectively. The major new finding is that the augmenting-reducing difference recorded at the cortex does not occur at the thalamus, indicating that it is truly a cortical phenomenon.

  20. Effect of extending grating length and width on human visually evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Milena S; Hristov, Ivan; Racheva, Kalina; Totev, Tsvetalin; Mitov, Dimitar

    2015-01-01

    Visually evoked potentials (VEPs) were elicited by Gabor gratings with different lengths and widths at three spatial frequencies (SFs): low, 1.45 c/deg, medium, 2.9 c/deg and high, 5.8 c/deg and at a contrast 3 times above the detection threshold at each SF. An increase of grating length enhanced N1 amplitude at occipital and parietal positions stronger than the increase of grating width at aspect ratios (length : width) above 4:1. The stronger effect of stimulus length than width was reflected also in the amplitude of the later P1 component at central and parietal positions. The larger effect of stimulus length than width on the VEP amplitude was SF specific: it was stronger at 5.8 c/deg, smaller at 2.9 c/deg and vanished at 1.45 c/deg. The results obtained suggest anisotropy in the physiological mechanisms that underlie grating perception and involve bottom- up processes initiated in the occipital cortex.

  1. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  2. Visuocortical Changes During Delay and Trace Aversive Conditioning: Evidence From Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Vladimir; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The visual system is biased towards sensory cues that have been associated with danger or harm through temporal co-occurrence. An outstanding question about conditioning-induced changes in visuocortical processing is the extent to which they are driven primarily by top-down factors such as expectancy or by low-level factors such as the temporal proximity between conditioned stimuli and aversive outcomes. Here, we examined this question using two different differential aversive conditioning experiments: participants learned to associate a particular grating stimulus with an aversive noise that was presented either in close temporal proximity (delay conditioning experiment) or after a prolonged stimulus-free interval (trace conditioning experiment). In both experiments we probed cue-related cortical responses by recording steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs). Although behavioral ratings indicated that all participants successfully learned to discriminate between the grating patterns that predicted the presence versus absence of the aversive noise, selective amplification of population-level responses in visual cortex for the conditioned danger signal was observed only when the grating and the noise were temporally contiguous. Our findings are in line with notions purporting that changes in the electrocortical response of visual neurons induced by aversive conditioning are a product of Hebbian associations among sensory cell assemblies rather than being driven entirely by expectancy-based, declarative processes. PMID:23398582

  3. L-/M-cone opponency in visual evoked potentials of human cortex.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Martins, Cristiane Maria Gomes; Bonci, Daniela Maria Oliveria; Hauzman, Einat; Aher, Avinash; Tsai, Tina I; Kremers, Jan; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2017-08-01

    L and M cones send their signals to the cortex using two chromatic (parvocellular and blue-yellow koniocellular) and one luminance (magnocellular) pathways. These pathways contain ON and OFF subpathways that respond to excitation increments and decrements respectively. Here, we report on visually evoked potentials (VEP) recordings that reflect L- and M-cone driven increment (LI and MI) and decrement (LD and MD) activity. VEP recordings were performed on 12 trichromats and four dichromats (two protanopes and two deuteranopes). We found that the responses to LI strongly resembled those to MD, and that LD and MI responses were very similar. Moreover, the lack of a photoreceptor type (L or M) in the dichromats led to a dominance of the ON pathway of the remaining photoreceptor type. These results provide electrophysiological evidence that antagonistic L/M signal processing, already present in the retina and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), is also observed at the visual cortex. These data are in agreement with results from human psychophysics where MI stimuli lead to a perceived brightness decrease whereas LI stimuli resulted in perceived brightness increases. VEP recording is a noninvasive tool that can be easily and painlessly applied. We propose that the technique may provide information in the diagnosis of color vision deficiencies.

  4. [Relationship between magnocellular function and reading skills in children: a study using visual evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tomoka; Inagaki, Masumi; Yamazaki, Hiroko; Kita, Yosuke; Kaga, Makiko; Oka, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. The magnocellular deficit theory is one of several hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of DD. In this study, we investigated magnocellular system dysfunction in Japanese dyslexic children. Subjects were 19 dyslexic children (DD group) and 19 aged-matched healthy children (TD group). They were aged between 7 and 16 years. Reversed patterns of black and white sinusoidal gratings generated at a low spatial frequency, high reversal frequency of 7.5 Hz, and low contrasts were used specifically to stimulate the magnocellular system. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEP) from the occipital area and examined their relationship with reading and naming tasks, such as the time to read hiragana characters, rapid automatized naming of pictured objects, and phonological manipulation. Compared to the TD group, the DD group showed a significantly lower peak amplitude of VEPs through the complex demodulation method. Structural equation modeling showed that VEP peak amplitudes were related to the rapid automatized naming of pictured objects, and better rapid automatized naming resulted in higher reading skills. There was no correlation between VEP findings and the capacity for phonological manipulation. VEPs in response to the magnocellular system are useful for understanding the pathophysiology of DD. Single phonological deficit may not be sufficient to cause DD.

  5. Relationship between vitamin D deficiency and visually evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    López-Méndez, P; Sosa-Henríquez, M; Ruiz-Pérez, Á

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the possible relationship between serum 25-OH vitamin D levels and visually evoked potentials (VEP) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), residents in the south zone of Gran Canaria. The study included 49 patients with MS, on whom 25-OH-vitamin D was determined, along with VEP, and a neurological examination to determine incapacity. Clinical variables, such as a history of optic neuritis were recorded. The mean value of 25-OH-vitamin D of the patients was 28.1±9.5ng/ml. The VEP latency was 119.1±23.2ms and the amplitude, 8.5±4.4 μV. Patients with a higher 25-OH-vitamin D had a greater number of outbreaks in the year prior to the study (P=.049), and those with vitamin D deficiency and previous optic neuritis showed no reduction in the amplitude of the VEP (P=.006). Patients with vitamin D deficiency have lower clinical activity of the MS and show no axonal involvement in VEP after having suffered optic neuritis. These relationships, although statistically significant, do not seem clinically plausible, thus new studies are needed to try and confirm this possible relationship. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A steady state visually evoked potential investigation of memory and ageing.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Helen; Pipingas, Andrew; Silberstein, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Old age is generally accompanied by a decline in memory performance. Specifically, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have revealed that there are age-related changes in the neural correlates of episodic and working memory. This study investigated age-associated changes in the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and latency associated with memory performance. Participants were 15 older (59-67 years) and 14 younger (20-30 years) adults who performed an object working memory (OWM) task and a contextual recognition memory (CRM) task, whilst the SSVEP was recorded from 64 electrode sites. Retention of a single object in the low demand OWM task was characterised by smaller frontal SSVEP amplitude and latency differences in older adults than in younger adults, indicative of an age-associated reduction in neural processes. Recognition of visual images in the more difficult CRM task was accompanied by larger, more sustained SSVEP amplitude and latency decreases over temporal parietal regions in older adults. In contrast, the more transient, frontally mediated pattern of activity demonstrated by younger adults suggests that younger and older adults utilize different neural resources to perform recognition judgements. The results provide support for compensatory processes in the aging brain; at lower task demands, older adults demonstrate reduced neural activity, whereas at greater task demands neural activity is increased.

  7. Code-modulated visual evoked potentials using fast stimulus presentation and spatiotemporal beamformer decoding.

    PubMed

    Wittevrongel, Benjamin; Van Wolputte, Elia; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2017-11-08

    When encoding visual targets using various lagged versions of a pseudorandom binary sequence of luminance changes, the EEG signal recorded over the viewer's occipital pole exhibits so-called code-modulated visual evoked potentials (cVEPs), the phase lags of which can be tied to these targets. The cVEP paradigm has enjoyed interest in the brain-computer interfacing (BCI) community for the reported high information transfer rates (ITR, in bits/min). In this study, we introduce a novel decoding algorithm based on spatiotemporal beamforming, and show that this algorithm is able to accurately identify the gazed target. Especially for a small number of repetitions of the coding sequence, our beamforming approach significantly outperforms an optimised support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier, which is considered state-of-the-art in cVEP-based BCI. In addition to the traditional 60 Hz stimulus presentation rate for the coding sequence, we also explore the 120 Hz rate, and show that the latter enables faster communication, with a maximal median ITR of 172.87 bits/min. Finally, we also report on a transition effect in the EEG signal following the onset of the stimulus sequence, and recommend to exclude the first 150 ms of the trials from decoding when relying on a single presentation of the stimulus sequence.

  8. Visually Evoked Potentials after Panretinal Photocoagulation in Omani Patients with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Radha; Al-Belushi, Habiba; Al-Ajmi, Sadiqa; Al-Nabhani, Susan Margaret; Ganguly, Shyam Sunder; Bialasiewicz, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To report on the changes of latency and amplitudes of the pattern VEP in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus II and I before and after panretinal laser treatment. Design: Single center hospital based comparative study. Methods: One hundred eyes of patients with proliferative diabetic vitreoretinopathy, and HbA1C ≥ 10 percent were subjected to Pattern Visually Evoked Potentials (Medtronic keyopint system, Nicolet) prior to and 4 weeks after PRP. Results were compared to age-matched non-diabetic controls. Chi-Square test, and paired ‘t’ test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Preoperative mean VEP amplitude was 8.35mV±3.71, and not significantly different to the control group (mean 10.51mV±3.34) (chi square test p=1). Mean preoperative P100 latency was 106.93±7.90ms and significantly different to the control group (103.21±7.65ms) (paired t-test p=0.001). After laser treatment, VEP amplitudes decreased in 48/100 eyes (mean total 5.11mV±2.4), and P100 latency increased in 75/100 eyes (mean total 110.47±7.35ms). Conclusion: In this study, PRP was followed by a significant decrease in VEP amplitudes in 48 percent and increase in latency in 75 percent of eyes. PMID:21346837

  9. Cortical Double-Opponent Cells in Color Perception: Perceptual Scaling and Chromatic Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shapley, Robert M.; Gordon, James

    2018-01-01

    In the early visual cortex V1, there are currently only two known neural substrates for color perception: single-opponent and double-opponent cells. Our aim was to explore the relative contributions of these neurons to color perception. We measured the perceptual scaling of color saturation for equiluminant color checkerboard patterns (designed to stimulate double-opponent neurons preferentially) and uniformly colored squares (designed to stimulate only single-opponent neurons) at several cone contrasts. The spatially integrative responses of single-opponent neurons would produce the same response magnitude for checkerboards as for uniform squares of the same space-averaged cone contrast. However, perceived saturation of color checkerboards was higher than for the corresponding squares. The perceptual results therefore imply that double-opponent cells are involved in color perception of patterns. We also measured the chromatic visual evoked potential (cVEP) produced by the same stimuli; checkerboard cVEPs were much larger than those for corresponding squares, implying that double-opponent cells also contribute to the cVEP response. The total Fourier power of the cVEP grew sublinearly with cone contrast. However, the 6-Hz Fourier component’s power grew linearly with contrast-like saturation perception. This may also indicate that cortical coding of color depends on response dynamics. PMID:29375753

  10. Connectopathy in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Takao; Maekawa, Toshihiko; Fujita, Takako; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show superior performance in processing fine details; however, they often exhibit impairments of gestalt face, global motion perception, and visual attention as well as core social deficits. Increasing evidence has suggested that social deficits in ASD arise from abnormal functional and structural connectivities between and within distributed cortical networks that are recruited during social information processing. Because the human visual system is characterized by a set of parallel, hierarchical, multistage network systems, we hypothesized that the altered connectivity of visual networks contributes to social cognition impairment in ASD. In the present review, we focused on studies of altered connectivity of visual and attention networks in ASD using visual evoked potentials (VEPs), event-related potentials (ERPs), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A series of VEP, ERP, and DTI studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated complex alterations (impairment and enhancement) of visual and attention networks in ASD. Recent data have suggested that the atypical visual perception observed in ASD is caused by altered connectivity within parallel visual pathways and attention networks, thereby contributing to the impaired social communication observed in ASD. Therefore, we conclude that the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of ASD constitutes a “connectopathy.” PMID:29170625

  11. Multifocal and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials vs. automated perimetry frequency-doubling technology matrix in optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Nebbioso, Marcella; Steigerwalt, Robert D; Pecori-Giraldi, Josè; Vingolo, Enzo M

    2013-01-01

    Background: To compare the usefulness of the traditional pattern-reversal Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP) with multifocal VEP (mfVEP) and Frequency-Doubling Technology (FDT) perimetry in the evaluation of the ocular abnormalities induced by acute or subacute optic neuritis (ON). Materials and Methods: The test results of 24 ON patients were compared with those obtained in 40 normal control subjects. MfVEP recordings were obtained by using an Optoelectronic Stimulator that extracts topographic VEP using a pseudorandom m-sequence stimulus. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to determine the sensitivity and specificity of abnormal values. Results: The frequency of the abnormal ocular findings differed in the ON patients according to the used technique. Reduced visual sensitivity was demonstrated in 12 eyes (54.5%) using FDT perimetry; 17 eyes (77.2%) showed decreased amplitude and/or an increase in the implicit time of the P1 wave in mfVEP and 20 eyes (90.9%) showed an abnormal decrease in the amplitude and/or an increase in the latency of the P100 peak at VEP examination. The areas under the ROC curves ranged from 0.743 to 0.935, with VEP having the largest areas. The VEP and mfVEP amplitudes and latencies yielded the greatest sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions: The mfVEP and the FDT perimetry can be used for the evaluation and monitoring of visual impairment in patients with ON. The most sensitive and practical diagnostic tool in patients with ON is, however, the traditional VEP. The mfVEP can be utilized in those cases with doubtful or negative VEP results. PMID:23412522

  12. Chromatic spatial contrast sensitivity estimated by visual evoked cortical potential and psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Barboni, M.T.S.; Gomes, B.D.; Souza, G.S.; Rodrigues, A.R.; Ventura, D.F.; Silveira, L.C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure contrast sensitivity to equiluminant gratings using steady-state visual evoked cortical potential (ssVECP) and psychophysics. Six healthy volunteers were evaluated with ssVECPs and psychophysics. The visual stimuli were red-green or blue-yellow horizontal sinusoidal gratings, 5° × 5°, 34.3 cd/m2 mean luminance, presented at 6 Hz. Eight spatial frequencies from 0.2 to 8 cpd were used, each presented at 8 contrast levels. Contrast threshold was obtained by extrapolating second harmonic amplitude values to zero. Psychophysical contrast thresholds were measured using stimuli at 6 Hz and static presentation. Contrast sensitivity was calculated as the inverse function of the pooled cone contrast threshold. ssVECP and both psychophysical contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) were low-pass functions for red-green gratings. For electrophysiology, the highest contrast sensitivity values were found at 0.4 cpd (1.95 ± 0.15). ssVECP CSF was similar to dynamic psychophysical CSF, while static CSF had higher values ranging from 0.4 to 6 cpd (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Blue-yellow chromatic functions showed no specific tuning shape; however, at high spatial frequencies the evoked potentials showed higher contrast sensitivity than the psychophysical methods (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Evoked potentials can be used reliably to evaluate chromatic red-green CSFs in agreement with psychophysical thresholds, mainly if the same temporal properties are applied to the stimulus. For blue-yellow CSF, correlation between electrophysiology and psychophysics was poor at high spatial frequency, possibly due to a greater effect of chromatic aberration on this kind of stimulus. PMID:23369980

  13. Research on steady-state visual evoked potentials in 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Yi; Lee, Chia-Ying; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Ko, Li-Wei; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2015-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are intuitive systems for users to communicate with outer electronic devices. Steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the common inputs for BCI systems due to its easy detection and high information transfer rates. An advanced interactive platform integrated with liquid crystal displays is leading a trend to provide an alternative option not only for the handicapped but also for the public to make our lives more convenient. Many SSVEP-based BCI systems have been studied in a 2D environment; however there is only little literature about SSVEP-based BCI systems using 3D stimuli. 3D displays have potentials in SSVEP-based BCI systems because they can offer vivid images, good quality in presentation, various stimuli and more entertainment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two important 3D factors (disparity and crosstalk) on SSVEPs. Twelve participants participated in the experiment with a patterned retarder 3D display. The results show that there is a significant difference (p-value<0.05) between large and small disparity angle, and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of small disparity angles is higher than those of large disparity angles. The 3D stimuli with smaller disparity and lower crosstalk are more suitable for applications based on the results of 3D perception and SSVEP responses (SNR). Furthermore, we can infer the 3D perception of users by SSVEP responses, and modify the proper disparity of 3D images automatically in the future.

  14. Multifocal visual evoked potential in optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy and compressive optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Manju; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar; Ravi, Priya; Sen, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of optic neuritis (ON), ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) and compressive optic neuropathy (CON) on multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) amplitudes and latencies, and to compare the parameters among three optic nerve disorders. Materials and Methods: mfVEP was recorded for 71 eyes of controls and 48 eyes of optic nerve disorders with subgroups of optic neuritis (ON, n = 21 eyes), ischemic optic neuropathy (ION, n = 14 eyes), and compressive optic neuropathy (CON, n = 13 eyes). The size of defect in mfVEP amplitude probability plots and relative latency plots were analyzed. The pattern of the defect in amplitude probability plot was classified according to the visual field profile of optic neuritis treatment trail (ONTT). Results: Median of mfVEP amplitude (log SNR) averaged across 60 sectors were reduced in ON (0.17 (0.13-0.33)), ION (0.14 (0.12-0.21)) and CON (0.21 (0.14-0.30)) when compared to controls. The median mfVEP relative latencies compared to controls were significantly prolonged in ON and CON group of 10.53 (2.62-15.50) ms and 5.73 (2.67-14.14) ms respectively compared to ION group (2.06 (-4.09-13.02)). The common mfVEP amplitude defects observed in probability plots were diffuse pattern in ON, inferior altitudinal defect in ION and temporal hemianopia in CON eyes. Conclusions: Optic nerve disorders cause reduction in mfVEP amplitudes. The extent of delayed latency noted in ischemic optic neuropathy was significantly lesser compared to subjects with optic neuritis and compressive optic neuropathy. mfVEP amplitudes can be used to objectively assess the topography of the visual field defect. PMID:24088641

  15. Distinct Visual Evoked Potential Morphological Patterns for Apparent Motion Processing in School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Measures of visual cortical development in children demonstrate high variability and inconsistency throughout the literature. This is partly due to the specificity of the visual system in processing certain features. It may then be advantageous to activate multiple cortical pathways in order to observe maturation of coinciding networks. Visual stimuli eliciting the percept of apparent motion and shape change is designed to simultaneously activate both dorsal and ventral visual streams. However, research has shown that such stimuli also elicit variable visual evoked potential (VEP) morphology in children. The aim of this study was to describe developmental changes in VEPs, including morphological patterns, and underlying visual cortical generators, elicited by apparent motion and shape change in school-aged children. Forty-one typically developing children underwent high-density EEG recordings in response to a continuously morphing, radially modulated, circle-star grating. VEPs were then compared across the age groups of 5-7, 8-10, and 11-15 years according to latency and amplitude. Current density reconstructions (CDR) were performed on VEP data in order to observe activated cortical regions. It was found that two distinct VEP morphological patterns occurred in each age group. However, there were no major developmental differences between the age groups according to each pattern. CDR further demonstrated consistent visual generators across age and pattern. These results describe two novel VEP morphological patterns in typically developing children, but with similar underlying cortical sources. The importance of these morphological patterns is discussed in terms of future studies and the investigation of a relationship to visual cognitive performance.

  16. Advancing the detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials in brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Peer, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    Spatial filtering has proved to be a powerful pre-processing step in detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials and boosted typical detection rates both in offline analysis and online SSVEP-based brain-computer interface applications. State-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby share many common foundations as they all build upon the second order statistics of the acquired Electroencephalographic (EEG) data, that is, its spatial autocovariance and cross-covariance with what is assumed to be a pure SSVEP response. The present study aims at highlighting the similarities and differences between these methods. We consider the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method as a basis for the theoretical and empirical (with real EEG data) analysis of the state-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby. We build upon the findings of this analysis and prior research and propose a new detection method (CVARS) that combines the power of the canonical variates and that of the autoregressive spectral analysis in estimating the signal and noise power levels. We found that the multivariate synchronization index method and the maximum contrast combination method are variations of the CCA method. All three methods were found to provide relatively unreliable detections in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. CVARS and the minimum energy combination methods were found to provide better estimates for different SNR levels. Our theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that the proposed CVARS method outperforms other state-of-the-art detection methods when used in an unsupervised fashion. Furthermore, when used in a supervised fashion, a linear classifier learned from a short training session is able to estimate the hidden user intention, including the idle state (when the user is not attending to any stimulus), rapidly, accurately and reliably.

  17. The Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Visual Evoked Potentials in Professional Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melinda L.; Croft, Rodney J.; Owens, Katherine; Pierce, Robert J.; Kennedy, Gerard A.; Crewther, David; Howard, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    RJ; Kennedy GA; Crewther D; Howard ME. The effect of acute sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials in professional drivers. SLEEP 2008;31(9):1261-1269. PMID:18788651

  18. Advancing the detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials in brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Peer, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Spatial filtering has proved to be a powerful pre-processing step in detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials and boosted typical detection rates both in offline analysis and online SSVEP-based brain-computer interface applications. State-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby share many common foundations as they all build upon the second order statistics of the acquired Electroencephalographic (EEG) data, that is, its spatial autocovariance and cross-covariance with what is assumed to be a pure SSVEP response. The present study aims at highlighting the similarities and differences between these methods. Approach. We consider the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method as a basis for the theoretical and empirical (with real EEG data) analysis of the state-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby. We build upon the findings of this analysis and prior research and propose a new detection method (CVARS) that combines the power of the canonical variates and that of the autoregressive spectral analysis in estimating the signal and noise power levels. Main results. We found that the multivariate synchronization index method and the maximum contrast combination method are variations of the CCA method. All three methods were found to provide relatively unreliable detections in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. CVARS and the minimum energy combination methods were found to provide better estimates for different SNR levels. Significance. Our theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that the proposed CVARS method outperforms other state-of-the-art detection methods when used in an unsupervised fashion. Furthermore, when used in a supervised fashion, a linear classifier learned from a short training session is able to estimate the hidden user intention, including the idle state (when the user is not attending to any stimulus), rapidly, accurately and reliably.

  19. Effect of higher frequency on the classification of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Won, Dong-Ok; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Dähne, Sven; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2016-02-01

    Most existing brain-computer interface (BCI) designs based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) primarily use low frequency visual stimuli (e.g., <20 Hz) to elicit relatively high SSVEP amplitudes. While low frequency stimuli could evoke photosensitivity-based epileptic seizures, high frequency stimuli generally show less visual fatigue and no stimulus-related seizures. The fundamental objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on the usability of an SSVEP-based BCI system. We developed an SSVEP-based BCI speller using multiple LEDs flickering with low frequencies (6-14.9 Hz) with a duty-cycle of 50%, or higher frequencies (26-34.7 Hz) with duty-cycles of 50%, 60%, and 70%. The four different experimental conditions were tested with 26 subjects in order to investigate the impact of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on performance and visual fatigue, and evaluated with a questionnaire survey. Resting state alpha powers were utilized to interpret our results from the neurophysiological point of view. The stimulation method employing higher frequencies not only showed less visual fatigue, but it also showed higher and more stable classification performance compared to that employing relatively lower frequencies. Different duty-cycles in the higher frequency stimulation conditions did not significantly affect visual fatigue, but a duty-cycle of 50% was a better choice with respect to performance. The performance of the higher frequency stimulation method was also less susceptible to resting state alpha powers, while that of the lower frequency stimulation method was negatively correlated with alpha powers. These results suggest that the use of higher frequency visual stimuli is more beneficial for performance improvement and stability as time passes when developing practical SSVEP-based BCI applications.

  20. Paired-pulse flash-visual evoked potentials: new methods revive an old test.

    PubMed

    Cantello, Roberto; Strigaro, Gionata; Prandi, Paolo; Varrasi, Claudia; Mula, Marco; Monaco, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    We aimed at reviving with modern technology the paired flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) testing of the visual system excitability. In the 1960s, methodological problems hindered this test, which was expected to provide important physiologic information. We studied 22 consenting healthy subjects (10 men). We recorded F-VEPs from electrodes over occipital and central brain regions. We delivered single flashes, mixed at random to flash pairs at the interstimulus interval (ISI) of 333, 125, 62.5, 50, 33, and 16.5 ms, (i.e. an internal frequency (IF) of 3, 8, 16, 20, 30, and 60 Hz). Recordings were performed with the subject's eyes closed and opened. The F-VEP was split into a "main complex" and an "afterdischarge", which we analyzed statistically in relation to the eye state (closed or open) and to the changes due to paired stimulation. The eye state affected the single F-VEP size, latency and shape significantly (p<0.05). On paired stimulation, the test (second) F-VEP exhibited significant (p<0.05), ISI-dependent size changes, such as a progressive decrease for ISIs from 62.5 to 16.5 ms (IFs of 16-60 Hz), whose timing/amount varied significantly (p<0.05) according to the eye state and to the F-VEP epoch considered. Suppression of the test F-VEP was never complete, even for the shortest ISI (ISI=16.5 ms, IF=60 Hz). The eye state (closed or open) must be considered meticulously when studying F-VEPs. F-VEP changes on paired stimulation express neural inhibition within the visual system, which can be depicted as ISI-dependent curves. Modern equipment and simplified measures render this an easy test, with statistical validity, providing specific information on the excitability properties of the visual system. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of higher frequency on the classification of steady-state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Dong-Ok; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Dähne, Sven; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Most existing brain-computer interface (BCI) designs based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) primarily use low frequency visual stimuli (e.g., <20 Hz) to elicit relatively high SSVEP amplitudes. While low frequency stimuli could evoke photosensitivity-based epileptic seizures, high frequency stimuli generally show less visual fatigue and no stimulus-related seizures. The fundamental objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on the usability of an SSVEP-based BCI system. Approach. We developed an SSVEP-based BCI speller using multiple LEDs flickering with low frequencies (6-14.9 Hz) with a duty-cycle of 50%, or higher frequencies (26-34.7 Hz) with duty-cycles of 50%, 60%, and 70%. The four different experimental conditions were tested with 26 subjects in order to investigate the impact of stimulation frequency and duty-cycle on performance and visual fatigue, and evaluated with a questionnaire survey. Resting state alpha powers were utilized to interpret our results from the neurophysiological point of view. Main results. The stimulation method employing higher frequencies not only showed less visual fatigue, but it also showed higher and more stable classification performance compared to that employing relatively lower frequencies. Different duty-cycles in the higher frequency stimulation conditions did not significantly affect visual fatigue, but a duty-cycle of 50% was a better choice with respect to performance. The performance of the higher frequency stimulation method was also less susceptible to resting state alpha powers, while that of the lower frequency stimulation method was negatively correlated with alpha powers. Significance. These results suggest that the use of higher frequency visual stimuli is more beneficial for performance improvement and stability as time passes when developing practical SSVEP-based BCI applications.

  2. Visually Evoked Potential Markers of Concussion History in Patients with Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Lederer, Paul; Cox, Laurie Kopko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated whether differences in the pattern visual evoked potentials exist between patients with convergence insufficiency and those with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion using stimuli designed to differentiate between magnocellular (transient) and parvocellular (sustained) neural pathways. Methods Sustained stimuli included 2-rev/s, 85% contrast checkerboard patterns of 1- and 2-degree check sizes, whereas transient stimuli comprised 4-rev/s, 10% contrast vertical sinusoidal gratings with column width of 0.25 and 0.50 cycles/degree. We tested two models: an a priori clinical model based on an assumption of at least a minimal (beyond instrumentation’s margin of error) 2-millisecond lag of transient response latencies behind sustained response latencies in concussed patients and a statistical model derived from the sample data. Results Both models discriminated between concussed and nonconcussed groups significantly above chance (with 76% and 86% accuracy, respectively). In the statistical model, patients with mean vertical sinusoidal grating response latencies greater than 119 milliseconds to 0.25-cycle/degree stimuli (or mean vertical sinusoidal latencies >113 milliseconds to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli) and mean vertical sinusoidal grating amplitudes of less than 14.75 mV to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli were classified as having had a history of concussion. The resultant receiver operating characteristic curve for this model had excellent discrimination between the concussed and nonconcussed (area under the curve = 0.857; P < .01) groups with sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.80. Conclusions The results suggest a promising electrophysiological approach to identifying individuals with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion. PMID:28609417

  3. Empirical mode decomposition processing to improve multifocal-visual-evoked-potential signal analysis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Objective To study the performance of multifocal-visual-evoked-potential (mfVEP) signals filtered using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) in discriminating, based on amplitude, between control and multiple sclerosis (MS) patient groups, and to reduce variability in interocular latency in control subjects. Methods MfVEP signals were obtained from controls, clinically definitive MS and MS-risk progression patients (radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS)). The conventional method of processing mfVEPs consists of using a 1–35 Hz bandpass frequency filter (XDFT). The EMD algorithm was used to decompose the XDFT signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). This signal processing was assessed by computing the amplitudes and latencies of the XDFT and IMF signals (XEMD). The amplitudes from the full visual field and from ring 5 (9.8–15° eccentricity) were studied. The discrimination index was calculated between controls and patients. Interocular latency values were computed from the XDFT and XEMD signals in a control database to study variability. Results Using the amplitude of the mfVEP signals filtered with EMD (XEMD) obtains higher discrimination index values than the conventional method when control, MS-risk progression (RIS and CIS) and MS subjects are studied. The lowest variability in interocular latency computations from the control patient database was obtained by comparing the XEMD signals with the XDFT signals. Even better results (amplitude discrimination and latency variability) were obtained in ring 5 (9.8–15° eccentricity of the visual field). Conclusions Filtering mfVEP signals using the EMD algorithm will result in better identification of subjects at risk of developing MS and better accuracy in latency studies. This could be applied to assess visual cortex activity in MS diagnosis and evolution studies. PMID:29677200

  4. Usefulness of Intraoperative Monitoring of Visual Evoked Potentials in Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    KAMIO, Yoshinobu; SAKAI, Naoto; SAMESHIMA, Tetsuro; TAKAHASHI, Goro; KOIZUMI, Shinichiro; SUGIYAMA, Kenji; NAMBA, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative visual outcome is a major concern in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Intraoperative visual evoked potential (VEP) monitoring has been reported to have little usefulness in predicting postoperative visual outcome. To re-evaluate its usefulness, we adapted a high-power light-stimulating device with electroretinography (ERG) to ascertain retinal light stimulation. Intraoperative VEP monitoring was conducted in TSSs in 33 consecutive patients with sellar and parasellar tumors under total venous anesthesia. The detectability rates of N75, P100, and N135 were 94.0%, 85.0%, and 79.0%, respectively. The mean latencies and amplitudes of N75, P100, and N135 were 76.8 ± 6.4 msec and 4.6 ± 1.8 μV, 98.0 ± 8.6 msec and 5.0 ± 3.4 μV, and 122.1 ± 16.3 msec and 5.7 ± 2.8 μV, respectively. The amplitude was defined as the voltage difference from N75 to P100 or P100 to N135. The criterion for amplitude changes was defined as a > 50% increase or 50% decrease in amplitude compared to the control level. The surgeon was immediately alerted when the VEP changed beyond these thresholds, and the surgical manipulations were stopped until the VEP recovered. Among the 28 cases with evaluable VEP recordings, the VEP amplitudes were stable in 23 cases and transiently decreased in 4 cases. In these 4 cases, no postoperative vision deterioration was observed. One patient, whose VEP amplitude decreased without subsequent recovery, developed vision deterioration. Intraoperative VEP monitoring with ERG to ascertain retinal light stimulation by the new stimulus device was reliable and feasible in preserving visual function in patients undergoing TSS. PMID:25070017

  5. Distinct Visual Evoked Potential Morphological Patterns for Apparent Motion Processing in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Measures of visual cortical development in children demonstrate high variability and inconsistency throughout the literature. This is partly due to the specificity of the visual system in processing certain features. It may then be advantageous to activate multiple cortical pathways in order to observe maturation of coinciding networks. Visual stimuli eliciting the percept of apparent motion and shape change is designed to simultaneously activate both dorsal and ventral visual streams. However, research has shown that such stimuli also elicit variable visual evoked potential (VEP) morphology in children. The aim of this study was to describe developmental changes in VEPs, including morphological patterns, and underlying visual cortical generators, elicited by apparent motion and shape change in school-aged children. Forty-one typically developing children underwent high-density EEG recordings in response to a continuously morphing, radially modulated, circle-star grating. VEPs were then compared across the age groups of 5–7, 8–10, and 11–15 years according to latency and amplitude. Current density reconstructions (CDR) were performed on VEP data in order to observe activated cortical regions. It was found that two distinct VEP morphological patterns occurred in each age group. However, there were no major developmental differences between the age groups according to each pattern. CDR further demonstrated consistent visual generators across age and pattern. These results describe two novel VEP morphological patterns in typically developing children, but with similar underlying cortical sources. The importance of these morphological patterns is discussed in terms of future studies and the investigation of a relationship to visual cognitive performance. PMID:27445738

  6. [Effect of acupuncture on pattern-visual evoked potential in rats with monocular visual deprivation].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-Ke; Dong, Li-Li; Liu, An-Guo; Wang, Jun-Yan; Ma, Chong-Bing; Zhu, Tian-Tian

    2013-08-01

    To explore electrophysiology mechanism of acupuncture for treatment and prevention of visual deprivation effect. Eighteen healthy 15-day Evans rats were randomly divided into a normal group, a model group and an acupuncture group, 6 rats in each one. Deprivation amblyopia model was established by monocular eyelid suture in the model group and acupuncture group. Acupuncture was applied at "Jingming" (BL 1), "Chengqi" (ST 1), "Qiuhou" (EX-HN 7) and "Cuanzhu" (BL 2) in the acupuncture group. The bilateral acupoints were selected alternately, one side for a day, and totally 14 days were required. The effect of acupuncture on visual evoked potential in different spatial frequencies was observed. Under three different kinds of spatial frequencies of 2 X 2, 4 X 4 and 8 X 8, compared with normal group, there was obvious visual deprivation effect in the model group where P1 peak latency was delayed (P<0.01) while N1 -P1 amplitude value was decreased (P<0.01). Compared with model group, P1 peak latency was obviously ahead of time (P<0.01) while N1-P1 amplitude value was increased (P<0.01) in the acupuncture group, there was no statistical significance compared with normal group (P>0.05). Under spatial frequency of 4 X 4, N1-P1 amplitude value was maximum in the normal group and acupuncture group. With this spatial frequency the rat's eye had best resolving ability, indicating it could be the best spatial frequency for rat visual system. The visual system has obvious electrophysiology plasticity in sensitive period. Acupuncture treatment could adjust visual deprivation-induced suppression and slow of visual response in order to antagonism deprivation effect.

  7. Sweep visually evoked potentials and visual findings in children with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Dotto, Patrícia; Cavascan, Nívea Nunes; Berezovsky, Adriana; Sacai, Paula Yuri; Rocha, Daniel Martins; Pereira, Josenilson Martins; Salomão, Solange Rios

    2014-03-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a type of early childhood epilepsy characterized by progressive neurological development deterioration that includes vision. To demonstrate the clinical importance of grating visual acuity thresholds (GVA) measurement by sweep visually evoked potentials technique (sweep-VEP) as a reliable tool for evaluation of the visual cortex status in WS children. This is a retrospective study of the best-corrected binocular GVA and ophthalmological features of WS children referred for the Laboratory of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision of UNIFESP from 1998 to 2012 (Committee on Ethics in Research of UNIFESP n° 0349/08). The GVA deficit was calculated by subtracting binocular GVA score (logMAR units) of each patient from the median values of age norms from our own lab and classified as mild (0.1-0.39 logMAR), moderate (0.40-0.80 logMAR) or severe (>0.81 logMAR). Associated ophthalmological features were also described. Data from 30 WS children (age from 6 to 108 months, median = 14.5 months, mean ± SD = 22.0 ± 22.1 months; 19 male) were analyzed. The majority presented severe GVA deficit (0.15-1.44 logMAR; mean ± SD = 0.82 ± 0.32 logMAR; median = 0.82 logMAR), poor visual behavior, high prevalence of strabismus and great variability in ocular positioning. The GVA deficit did not vary according to gender (P = .8022), WS type (P = .908), birth age (P = .2881), perinatal oxygenation (P = .7692), visual behavior (P = .8789), ocular motility (P = .1821), nystagmus (P = .2868), risk of drug-induced retinopathy (P = .4632) and participation in early visual stimulation therapy (P = .9010). The sweep-VEP technique is a reliable tool to classify visual system impairment in WS children, in agreement with the poor visual behavior exhibited by them. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Visual evoked potential in RCS rats with Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis (OUReP™) implantation.

    PubMed

    Alamusi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hosoya, Osamu; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2017-06-01

    Photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, designated Okayama University type-retinal prosthesis or OUReP™, generates light-evoked surface electric potentials and stimulates neurons. The dye-coupled films or plain films were implanted subretinally in both eyes of 10 Royal College of Surgeons rats with hereditary retinal dystrophy at the age of 6 weeks. Visual evoked potentials in response to monocular flashing light stimuli were recorded from cranially-fixed electrodes, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the implantation. After the recording, subretinal film implantation was confirmed histologically in 7 eyes with dye-coupled films and 7 eyes with plain films. The recordings from these 7 eyes in each group were used for statistical analysis. The amplitudes of visual evoked potentials in the consecutive time points from 125 to 250 ms after flash were significantly larger in the 7 eyes with dye-coupled film implantation, compared to the 7 eyes with plain film implantation at 8 weeks after the implantation (P < 0.05, repeated-measure ANOVA). The photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, as retinal prosthesis, gave rise to visual evoked potential in response to flashing light.

  9. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential as a Predictor of Occlusion Therapy for Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woosuk; Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Bok

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to investigate the role of the pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) as a predictor of occlusion therapy for patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. The secondary aim was to compare the characteristics of pVEP between strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia. Methods This retrospective comparative case series included 120 patients who had received occlusion therapy or a glasses prescription for correction of strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia (20 patients had strabismic amblyopia, 41 patients had anisometropic amblyopia, and 59 patients had isometropic amblyopia). For each patient, the value of the P100 latency on pVEP at the time of the initial diagnosis of amblyopia was collected. Subsequently, the P100 latency was compared according to types of amblyopia. Fifty of 120 patients (7 patients with strabismic amblyopia, 21 patients with anisometropic amblyopia, and 22 patients with isometropic amblyopia) who were followed-up for longer than 6 months were divided into two groups based on the value of their P100 latency (Group 1, P100 latency 120 msec or less; Group 2, P100 latency longer than 120 msec.) The amount of visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was compared between two study groups. Results The mean P100 latency was 119.7±25.2 msec in eyes with strabismic amblyopia and 111.9±17.8 msec in eyes with non-strabismic (anisometropic or isometropic) amblyopia (p=0.213). In Group 1, the mean visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was 3.69±2.14 lines on Dr. Hahn's standard test chart; in Group 2, the mean improvement was 2.27±2.21 lines (p=0.023). Conclusions The P100 latency on pVEP at the time of initial diagnosis was significantly related to the visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses in patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. Therefore, it was presumed that patients with a delayed P100 latency might have less

  10. Pattern visual evoked potential as a predictor of occlusion therapy for amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woosuk; Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Bok; Han, Sueng-Han

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of the pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) as a predictor of occlusion therapy for patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. The secondary aim was to compare the characteristics of pVEP between strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia. This retrospective comparative case series included 120 patients who had received occlusion therapy or a glasses prescription for correction of strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia (20 patients had strabismic amblyopia, 41 patients had anisometropic amblyopia, and 59 patients had isometropic amblyopia). For each patient, the value of the P100 latency on pVEP at the time of the initial diagnosis of amblyopia was collected. Subsequently, the P100 latency was compared according to types of amblyopia. Fifty of 120 patients (7 patients with strabismic amblyopia, 21 patients with anisometropic amblyopia, and 22 patients with isometropic amblyopia) who were followed-up for longer than 6 months were divided into two groups based on the value of their P100 latency (Group 1, P100 latency 120 msec or less; Group 2, P100 latency longer than 120 msec.) The amount of visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was compared between two study groups. The mean P100 latency was 119.7+/-25.2 msec in eyes with strabismic amblyopia and 111.9+/-17.8 msec in eyes with non-strabismic (anisometropic or isometropic) amblyopia (p=0.213). In Group 1, the mean visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was 3.69+/-2.14 lines on Dr. Hahn's standard test chart; in Group 2, the mean improvement was 2.27+/-2.21 lines (p=0.023). The P100 latency on pVEP at the time of initial diagnosis was significantly related to the visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses in patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. Therefore, it was presumed that patients with a delayed P100 latency might have less visual improvement after

  11. Amplitude modulation of steady-state visual evoked potentials by event-related potentials in a working memory task

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Dezhong; Tang, Yu; Huang, Yilan; Su, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude and phase of the steady-state visual-evoked potential (SSVEP) can be influenced by a cognitive task, yet the mechanism of this influence has not been understood. As the event-related potential (ERP) is the direct neural electric response to a cognitive task, studying the relationship between the SSVEP and ERP would be meaningful in understanding this underlying mechanism. In this work, the traditional average method was applied to extract the ERP directly, following the stimulus of a working memory task, while a technique named steady-state probe topography was utilized to estimate the SSVEP under the simultaneous stimulus of an 8.3-Hz flicker and a working memory task; a comparison between the ERP and SSVEP was completed. The results show that the ERP can modulate the SSVEP amplitude, and for regions where both SSVEP and ERP are strong, the modulation depth is large. PMID:19960240

  12. Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging in correlation to visual-evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis: a tract-based spatial statistics analysis.

    PubMed

    Lobsien, D; Ettrich, B; Sotiriou, K; Classen, J; Then Bergh, F; Hoffmann, K-T

    2014-01-01

    Functional correlates of microstructural damage of the brain affected by MS are incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations of visual-evoked potentials with microstructural brain changes as determined by DTI in patients with demyelinating central nervous disease. Sixty-one patients with clinically isolated syndrome or MS were prospectively recruited. The mean P100 visual-evoked potential latencies of the right and left eyes of each patient were calculated and used for the analysis. For DTI acquisition, a single-shot echo-planar imaging pulse sequence with 80 diffusion directions was performed at 3T. Fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity were calculated and correlated with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials by tract-based spatial statistics. Significant negative correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and fractional anisotropy and significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and radial diffusivity were found widespread over the whole brain. The highest significance was found in the optic radiation, frontoparietal white matter, and corpus callosum. Significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and axial diffusivity were less widespread, notably sparing the optic radiation. Microstructural changes of the whole brain correlated significantly with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials. The distribution of the correlations showed clear differences among axial diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and radial diffusivity, notably in the optic radiation. This finding suggests a stronger correlation of mean P100 visual-evoked potentials to demyelination than to axonal damage. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Flash visual evoked potentials are not specific enough to identify parieto-occipital lobe involvement in term neonates after significant hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyuan; Gu, Qiufang; Zhu, Zhen; Yang, Chenhao; Chen, Chao; Cao, Yun; Zhou, Wenhao

    2014-08-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a significant problem in high-risk neonates and predominant parieto-occipital lobe involvement has been observed after severe hypoglycaemic insult. We explored the use of flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) in detecting parieto-occipital lobe involvement after significant hypoglycaemia. Full-term neonates (n = 15) who underwent FVEP from January 2008 to May 2013 were compared with infants (n = 11) without hypoglycaemia or parietal-occipital lobe injury. Significant hypoglycaemia was defined as being symptomatic or needing steroids, glucagon or a glucose infusion rate of ≥12 mg/kg/min. The hypoglycaemia group exhibited delayed latency of the first positive waveform on FVEP. The initial detected time for hypoglycaemia was later in the eight subjects with seizures (median 51-h-old) than those without (median 22-h-old) (P = 0.003). Magnetic resonance imaging showed that 80% of the hypoglycaemia group exhibited occipital-lobe injuries, and they were more likely to exhibit abnormal FVEP morphology (P = 0.007) than the controls. FVEP exhibited 100% sensitivity, but only 25% specificity, for detecting injuries to the parieto-occipital lobes. Flash visual evoked potential (FVEP) was sensitive, but not sufficiently specific, in identifying parieto-occipital lobe injuries among term neonates exposed to significant hypoglycaemia. Larger studies exploring the potential role of FVEP in neonatal hypoglycaemia are required. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Repeatability of short-duration transient visual evoked potentials in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Tello, Celso; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V; Prata, Tiago S; Derr, Peter; Patel, Jayson; Siegfried, John; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the within-session and inter-session repeatability of a new, short-duration transient visual evoked potential (SD-tVEP) device on normal individuals, we tested 30 normal subjects (20/20 visual acuity, normal 24-2 SITA Standard VF) with SD-tVEP. Ten of these subjects had their tests repeated within 1-2 months from the initial visit. Synchronized single-channel EEG was recorded using a modified Diopsys Enfant System (Diopsys, Inc., Pine Brook, New Jersey, USA). A checkerboard stimulus was modulated at two reversals per second. Two different contrasts of checkerboard reversal patterns were used: 85% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 66.25 cd/m(2) and 10% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 112 cd/m(2). Each test lasted 20 s. Both eyes, independently and together, were tested 10 times (5 times at each contrast level). The following information was identified from the filtered N75-P100-N135 complex: N75 amplitude, N75 latency, P100 amplitude, P100 latency, and Delta Amplitude (N75-P100). The median values for each eye's five SD-tVEP parameters were calculated and grouped into two data sets based on contrast level. Mean age was 27.3 +/- 5.2 years. For OD only, the median (95% confidence intervals) of Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitudes at 10% and 85% contrast were 4.6 uV (4.1-5.9) and 7.1 uV (5.15-9.31). The median P100 latencies were 115.2 ms (112.0-117.7) and 104.0 ms (99.9-106.0). There was little within-session variability for any of these parameters. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.64 and 0.98, and within subject coefficients of variation were 3-5% (P100 latency) and 15-30% (Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitude). Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement between the first and fifth test sessions (85% contrast Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) delta amplitude, mean difference, 0.48 mV, 95% CI, -0.18-1.12; 85% contrast P100 latency delay, -0.82 ms, 95% CI, -3.12-1.46; 10% contrast Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitude, 0

  15. [Visual evoked potentials produced by monocular flash stimuli in the cerebral cortex of the rabbit. I. Typography].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cobo, J C; Ruiz-Beramendi, M; Pérez-Arroyo, M

    1990-12-01

    The visually evoked potentials in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated eye in rabbit, can be described topographically as follows. While a positive wave (P1) begins forming in the anterior zones and in the V I binocular zone, the N0 wave, at times very large, is produced in a more occipital zone, which corresponds to the visual streak. Immediately afterwards, the positivity, P1, practically invades the whole of the hemisphere. After this, the N1 wave which is produced in the most posterior parts of the V I, begins forming. The whole phenomenon comes to an end when the P2 wave is generated in the most occipital zones.

  16. Rhesus macaque model of chronic opiate dependence and neuro-AIDS: longitudinal assessment of auditory brainstem responses and visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Riazi, Mariam; Marcario, Joanne K; Samson, Frank K.; Kenjale, Himanshu; Adany, Istvan; Staggs, Vincent; Ledford, Emily; Marquis, Janet; Narayan, Opendra; Cheney, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Our work characterizes the effects of opiate (morphine) dependence on auditory brainstem and visual evoked responses in a rhesus macaque model of neuro-AIDS utilizing a chronic continuous drug delivery paradigm. The goal of this study was to clarify whether morphine is protective, or if it exacerbates simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) related systemic and neurological disease. Our model employs a macrophage tropic CD4/CCR5 co-receptor virus, SIVmac239 (R71/E17), which crosses the blood brain barrier shortly after inoculation and closely mimics the natural disease course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The cohort was divided into 3 groups: morphine only, SIV only, and SIV + morphine. Evoked potential (EP) abnormalities in sub-clinically infected macaques were evident as early as eight weeks post-inoculation. Prolongations in EP latencies were observed in SIV-infected macaques across all modalities. Animals with the highest CSF viral loads and clinical disease showed more abnormalities than those with sub-clinical disease, confirming our previous work (Raymond et al, 1998, 1999, 2000). Although some differences were observed in auditory and visual evoked potentials in morphine treated compared to untreated SIV-infected animals, the effects were relatively small and not consistent across evoked potential type. However, morphine treated animals with subclinical disease had a clear tendency toward higher virus loads in peripheral and CNS tissues (Marcario et al., 2008) suggesting that if had been possible to follow all animals to end-stage disease, a clearer pattern of evoked potential abnormality might have emerged. PMID:19283490

  17. Non-linearity of visual evoked potentials in cerveau isolé and midpontine pretrigeminal cats.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, M; Kiyono, S; Kawashima, T; Watanabe, S

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the visual evoked responses to the flickering flash stimulation were studied in the cerveau isolé and midpontine pretrigeminal cats. The flash stimulation frequency was changed stepwise between 1 and 30 Hz in increasing and decreasing order. In all cases of both preparations, with drawing of fixed sweep speed of 200 msec in whole length, P1 and N1 latencies in the successive response slightly prolonged progressively 1 to about 20 Hz and thereafter shortened about 20-30 Hz stimulus frequencies in the course of the increasing phase, and vice versa in the course of the decreasing phase. Moreover, no difference in each latency (P1, N1, P2, N2) was found at the same stimulus frequency during increasing and decreasing phases. In the amplitude taken from the P1-N1 component, the peak was found in 5-9 Hz frequency bands. This peak was higher during the decreasing phase than during the increasing phase, which indicated a hysteresis phenomenon. A peak of power for the 1st harmonics was found at 3-6 Hz driving frequency bands, and that of the 2nd harmonics at 6-10 Hz. In the state without flash stimulus, no peaks or valleys in the power spectrum were found in specific frequencies, for example 3-10 Hz. The peak in the amplitude and that in the power spectrum at 3-10 Hz stimulus frequency bands suggested an entrainment phenomenon induced by forced oscillation. The phenomena of entrainment and hysteresis suggest the existence of a non-linear structure in the oscillation generating systems of visual evoked response.

  18. Correlation of pattern reversal visual evoked potential parameters with the pattern standard deviation in primary open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Ruchi; Bokariya, Pradeep; Singh, Ramji; Singh, Smita; Narang, Purvasha

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether glaucomatous visual field defect particularly the pattern standard deviation (PSD) of Humphrey visual field could be associated with visual evoked potential (VEP) parameters of patients having primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Visual field by Humphrey perimetry and simultaneous recordings of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) were assessed in 100 patients with POAG. The stimulus configuration for VEP recordings consisted of the transient pattern reversal method in which a black and white checker board pattern was generated (full field) and displayed on VEP monitor (colour 14″) by an electronic pattern regenerator inbuilt in an evoked potential recorder (RMS EMG EP MARK II). The results of our study indicate that there is a highly significant (P<0.001) negative correlation of P100 amplitude and a statistically significant (P<0.05) positive correlation of N70 latency, P100 latency and N155 latency with the PSD of Humphrey visual field in the subjects of POAG in various age groups as evaluated by Student's t-test. Prolongation of VEP latencies were mirrored by a corresponding increase of PSD values. Conversely, as PSD increases the magnitude of VEP excursions were found to be diminished.

  19. Stimulus specificity of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kian B; Bradley, Andrew P; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of neural excitation and inhibition when given a visual stimulus are well studied. It has been established that changing stimulus specificity such as luminance contrast or spatial frequency can alter the neuronal activity and thus modulate the visual-evoked response. In this paper, we study the effect that stimulus specificity has on the classification performance of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). For example, we investigate how closely two visual stimuli can be placed before they compete for neural representation in the cortex and thus influence BCI classification accuracy. We characterize stimulus specificity using the four stimulus parameters commonly encountered in SSVEP-BCI design: temporal frequency, spatial size, number of simultaneously displayed stimuli and their spatial proximity. By varying these quantities and measuring the SSVEP-BCI classification accuracy, we are able to determine the parameters that provide optimal performance. Our results show that superior SSVEP-BCI accuracy is attained when stimuli are placed spatially more than 5° apart, with size that subtends at least 2° of visual angle, when using a tagging frequency of between high alpha and beta band. These findings may assist in deciding the stimulus parameters for optimal SSVEP-BCI design.

  20. Stimulus specificity of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kian B.; Bradley, Andrew P.; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of neural excitation and inhibition when given a visual stimulus are well studied. It has been established that changing stimulus specificity such as luminance contrast or spatial frequency can alter the neuronal activity and thus modulate the visual-evoked response. In this paper, we study the effect that stimulus specificity has on the classification performance of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). For example, we investigate how closely two visual stimuli can be placed before they compete for neural representation in the cortex and thus influence BCI classification accuracy. We characterize stimulus specificity using the four stimulus parameters commonly encountered in SSVEP-BCI design: temporal frequency, spatial size, number of simultaneously displayed stimuli and their spatial proximity. By varying these quantities and measuring the SSVEP-BCI classification accuracy, we are able to determine the parameters that provide optimal performance. Our results show that superior SSVEP-BCI accuracy is attained when stimuli are placed spatially more than 5° apart, with size that subtends at least 2° of visual angle, when using a tagging frequency of between high alpha and beta band. These findings may assist in deciding the stimulus parameters for optimal SSVEP-BCI design.

  1. Comparison of multifocal visual evoked potential, standard automated perimetry and optical coherence tomography in assessing visual pathway in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Laron, Michal; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Bin; Schiffman, Jade S.; Tang, Rosa A.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) measure local response amplitude and latency in the field of vision Objective To compare the sensitivity of mfVEP, Humphrey visual field (HVF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting visual abnormality in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods MfVEP, HVF, and OCT (retinal nerve fiber layer [RNFL]) were performed in 47 MS-ON eyes (last optic neuritis (ON) attack ≥ 6 months prior) and 65 MS-no-ON eyes without ON history. Criteria to define an eye as abnormal were: mfVEP 1) amplitude/latency: either amplitude or latency probability plots meeting cluster criteria with 95% specificity 2) amplitude or latency alone (specificity: 97% and 98%, respectively); HVF and OCT, mean deviation and RNFL thickness meeting p < 0.05, respectively. Results MfVEP (amplitude/latency) identified more abnormality in MS-ON eyes (89%) than HVF (72%), OCT (62%), mfVEP amplitude (66%) or latency (67%) alone. 18% of MS-no-ON eyes were abnormal for both mfVEP (amplitude/latency) and HVF compared to 8% with OCT. Agreement between tests ranged from 60% to 79%. MfVEP (amplitude/latency) categorized an additional 15% of MS-ON eyes as abnormal compared to HVF and OCT combined. Conclusions MfVEP, which detects both demyelination (increased latency) and neural degeneration (reduced amplitude) revealed more abnormality than HVF or OCT in MS patients. PMID:20207786

  2. A fast visual evoked potential method for functional assessment and follow-up of childhood optic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Trisciuzzi, Maria Teresa S; Riccardi, Riccardo; Piccardi, Marco; Iarossi, Giancarlo; Buzzonetti, Luca; Dickmann, Anna; Colosimo, Cesare; Ruggiero, Antonio; Di Rocco, Concezio; Falsini, Benedetto

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate a fast technique of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) recording, in response to steady-state luminance stimuli (SS-LVEPs), for functional assessment and follow-up of childhood optic gliomas (OGs). Eighteen OG patients (age range: 3.5-18 years), with different degrees of optic pathway damage severity, were examined. Sixteen age-matched normal subjects served as controls. Ten of the 18 OG patients were re-tested 1-3 months after the first examination. SS-LVEPs were elicited by a sinusoidally-modulated flickering (8 Hz) uniform field, generated by a light emitting diode (LED)-array and presented monocularly in a mini-ganzfeld. Amplitude and phase of the Fourier-analyzed response fundamental (1F) and second harmonic (2F) were measured. The full VEP protocol had a median duration of 6 min (range: 4-12). When compared to normal control values, median 1F and 2F SS-LVEP amplitudes of OG patients were reduced (P<0.01), with a borderline increase in 2F phase lag (P<0.05). In 11 OG patients with asymmetric optic pathway damage in between-eye comparisons, median 1F amplitude losses were greater (P<0.01) in fellow eyes with more severe damage. No significant interocular difference was observed in control subjects. Median test-retest changes of 1F and 2F component were <20% and 30 degrees for amplitude and phase, respectively. In individual OG patients, 1F and 2F amplitudes were positively correlated (P<0.01) with visual acuity. 1F amplitude losses were correlated (P=0.01) with the severity of optic disc atrophy. Considering both 1F and 2F abnormalities, diagnostic sensitivity of SS-LVEP in detecting OG-induced optic pathways damage was 83.3%. The present findings support the use of this technique, as an alternative to pattern VEPs, for functional assessment and follow-up of OG in uncooperative children.

  3. Single-trial detection of visual evoked potentials by common spatial patterns and wavelet filtering for brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiheng; Huang, Gan; Hung, Yeung Sam; Hu, Li; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are widely used in brain-computer interface (BCI) systems as input signals conveying a subject's intention. A fast and reliable single-trial ERP detection method can be used to develop a BCI system with both high speed and high accuracy. However, most of single-trial ERP detection methods are developed for offline EEG analysis and thus have a high computational complexity and need manual operations. Therefore, they are not applicable to practical BCI systems, which require a low-complexity and automatic ERP detection method. This work presents a joint spatial-time-frequency filter that combines common spatial patterns (CSP) and wavelet filtering (WF) for improving the signal-to-noise (SNR) of visual evoked potentials (VEP), which can lead to a single-trial ERP-based BCI.

  4. Anxiety affects the amplitudes of red and green color-elicited flash visual evoked potentials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Yuki; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Urushihara, Ryo; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that negative emotional changes and conditions affect the visual faculties of humans at the neural level. On the other hand, the effects of emotion on color perception in particular, which are based on evoked potentials, are unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether different anxiety levels affect the color information processing for each of 3 wavelengths by using flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. In results, significant positive correlations were observed between FVEP amplitudes and state or trait anxiety scores in the long (sensed as red) and middle (sensed as green) wavelengths. On the other hand, short-wavelength-evoked FVEPs were not correlated with anxiety level. Our results suggest that negative emotional conditions may affect color sense processing in humans.

  5. Recording Visual Evoked Potentials and Auditory Evoked P300 at 9.4T Static Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N. Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4T were not different from those recorded at 0T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4T when compared to recordings at 0T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses. PMID:23650538

  6. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Arrubla, Jorge; Neuner, Irene; Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  7. Orientation-modulated attention effect on visual evoked potential: Application for PIN system using brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Wilaiprasitporn, Theerawit; Yagi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    This research demonstrates the orientation-modulated attention effect on visual evoked potential. We combined this finding with our previous findings about the motion-modulated attention effect and used the result to develop novel visual stimuli for a personal identification number (PIN) application based on a brain-computer interface (BCI) framework. An electroencephalography amplifier with a single electrode channel was sufficient for our application. A computationally inexpensive algorithm and small datasets were used in processing. Seven healthy volunteers participated in experiments to measure offline performance. Mean accuracy was 83.3% at 13.9 bits/min. Encouraged by these results, we plan to continue developing the BCI-based personal identification application toward real-time systems.

  8. Flash visual evoked potentials in patients with periventricular leucomalacia in children less than 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Jethani, Jitendra; Jethani, Monika

    2013-11-01

    Children with periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) are known to have visual impairment of various forms starting from reduced vision, field defects, congnitive problems, and problems with hand eye coordination. There is very scant data/literature on the visual evoked potentials (VEPs) at an early age in children with PVL. We did a study to evaluate the flash visual evoked potentials (fVEPs) in children with PVL less than 1 year of age. A total of nine children diagnosed as having PVL on magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The mean age was 9.7μ 3.5 months. All children underwent handheld fVEPs under sedation at two different flash frequencies 1.4 and 8 Hz. The mean latency of N1 and P1 on stimulation with 1.4 Hz was 47.9μ 15.2 and 77.7μ 26.0 ms, respectively. However, on stimulation with 8 Hz the mean latency of N1 and P1 was 189.8μ 25.6 and 238.4μ 33.6 ms, respectively. The mean amplitude with 1.4 Hz and 8 stimulation frequency was 5.6μ 4.5 and 5.59μ 3 mV, respectively. We have found for the first time that there is a change in the latency and the delay occurs at 8 Hz frequency but not at 1.4 Hz. We also conclude that amplitudes by fVEPs may be normal even in presence of periventricular changes. The amplitudes of fVEPs are not reliable in children with PVL.

  9. Flash visual evoked potentials in patients with periventricular leucomalacia in children less than 1 year of age

    PubMed Central

    Jethani, Jitendra; Jethani, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Children with periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) are known to have visual impairment of various forms starting from reduced vision, field defects, congnitive problems, and problems with hand eye coordination. There is very scant data/literature on the visual evoked potentials (VEPs) at an early age in children with PVL. We did a study to evaluate the flash visual evoked potentials (fVEPs) in children with PVL less than 1 year of age. Materials and Methods: A total of nine children diagnosed as having PVL on magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The mean age was 9.7± 3.5 months. All children underwent handheld fVEPs under sedation at two different flash frequencies 1.4 and 8 Hz. Results: The mean latency of N1 and P1 on stimulation with 1.4 Hz was 47.9± 15.2 and 77.7± 26.0 ms, respectively. However, on stimulation with 8 Hz the mean latency of N1 and P1 was 189.8± 25.6 and 238.4± 33.6 ms, respectively. The mean amplitude with 1.4 Hz and 8 stimulation frequency was 5.6± 4.5 and 5.59± 3 mV, respectively. Conclusion: We have found for the first time that there is a change in the latency and the delay occurs at 8 Hz frequency but not at 1.4 Hz. We also conclude that amplitudes by fVEPs may be normal even in presence of periventricular changes. The amplitudes of fVEPs are not reliable in children with PVL. PMID:24343595

  10. Auditory- and visual-evoked potentials in Mexican infants are not affected by maternal supplementation with 400 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid in the second half of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Aryeh D; Wang, Meng; Rivera, Juan A; Martorell, Reynaldo; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2012-08-01

    The evidence relating prenatal supplementation with DHA to offspring neurological development is limited. We investigated the effect of prenatal DHA supplementation on infant brainstem auditory-evoked responses and visual- evoked potentials in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Pregnant women were supplemented daily with 400 mg DHA or placebo from gestation wk 18-22 through delivery. DHA and placebo groups did not differ in maternal characteristics at randomization or infant characteristics at birth. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were measured at 1 and 3 mo in 749 and 664 infants, respectively, and visual-evoked potentials were measured at 3 and 6 mo in 679 and 817 infants, respectively. Left-right brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were moderately correlated (range, 0.26-0.43; all P < 0.001) and left-right visual-evoked potentials were strongly correlated (range, 0.79-0.94; all P < 0.001) within any assessment. Correlations across visits were modest to moderate (range, 0.09-0.38; all P < 0.01). The offspring of DHA-supplemented women did not differ from those of control women with respect to any outcome measure (all comparisons P > 0.10). We conclude that DHA supplementation during pregnancy did not influence brainstem auditory-evoked responses at 1 and 3 mo or visual-evoked potentials at 3 and 6 mo.

  11. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method;more » Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.« less

  12. Functional assessment of the visual pathway with multifocal visual evoked potentials, and their relationship with disability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Román; Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Puertas-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Boquete, Luciano; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan

    2014-02-01

    To objectively evaluate the visual function, and the relationship between disability and optic nerve dysfunction, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON), using multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP). This observational, cross-sectional study assessed 28 consecutive patients with clinically definite MS, according to the McDonald criteria, and 19 age-matched healthy subjects. Disability was recorded using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score. The patients' mfVEP were compared to their clinical, psychophysical (Humphrey perimetry) and structural (optic coherence tomography (OCT)) diagnostic test data. We observed a significant agreement between mfVEP amplitude and Humphrey perimetry/OCT in MS-ON eyes, and between mfVEP amplitude and OCT in MS but non-ON eyes. We found significant differences in EDSS score between patients with abnormal and normal mfVEP amplitudes. Abnormal mfVEP amplitude defects (from interocular and monocular probability analysis) were found in 67.9% and 73.7% of the MS-ON and MS-non-ON group eyes, respectively. Delayed mfVEP latencies (interocular and monocular probability analysis) were seen in 70.3% and 73.7% of the MS-ON and MS-non-ON groups, respectively. We found a significant relationship between mfVEP amplitude and disease severity, as measured by EDSS score, that suggested there is a role for mfVEP amplitude as a functional biomarker of axonal loss in MS.

  13. Simultaneous detection of P300 and steady-state visually evoked potentials for hybrid brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Combaz, Adrien; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    We study the feasibility of a hybrid Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) combining simultaneous visual oddball and Steady-State Visually Evoked Potential (SSVEP) paradigms, where both types of stimuli are superimposed on a computer screen. Potentially, such a combination could result in a system being able to operate faster than a purely P300-based BCI and encode more targets than a purely SSVEP-based BCI. We analyse the interactions between the brain responses of the two paradigms, and assess the possibility to detect simultaneously the brain activity evoked by both paradigms, in a series of 3 experiments where EEG data are analysed offline. Despite differences in the shape of the P300 response between pure oddball and hybrid condition, we observe that the classification accuracy of this P300 response is not affected by the SSVEP stimulation. We do not observe either any effect of the oddball stimulation on the power of the SSVEP response in the frequency of stimulation. Finally results from the last experiment show the possibility of detecting both types of brain responses simultaneously and suggest not only the feasibility of such hybrid BCI but also a gain over pure oddball- and pure SSVEP-based BCIs in terms of communication rate.

  14. Neurocognitive effects of multivitamin supplementation on the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) measure of brain activity in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Helen; Silberstein, Richard; Pipingas, Andrew

    2012-10-10

    Growing evidence suggests that dietary supplementation with selected micronutrients and nutraceuticals may have the potential to improve cognition in older adults. Fewer studies have investigated the effects of these substances on brain activity. This study was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, conducted to explore the effects of 16 weeks supplementation with a combined multivitamin, mineral and herbal formula on the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) measure of brain electrical activity. Participants were elderly women aged between 64 and 79 years, with subjective memory complaints. Baseline and post-treatment SSVEP data was obtained for 22 participants in the multivitamin group and 19 in the placebo group. A spatial working memory delayed response task (DRT) was performed during the recording of the SSVEP. The results revealed that when compared to placebo, multivitamin supplementation delayed SSVEP latency during retrieval, interpreted as an increase in inhibitory neural processes. Behavioural performance on the DRT was not improved by the multivitamin, however improved performance accuracy was associated with increased midline central SSVEP latency. There were no multivitamin-related effects on SSVEP amplitude. These findings indicate that in the elderly, multivitamin supplementation may enhance neural efficiency during memory retrieval. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Athletic training in badminton players modulates the early C1 component of visual evoked potentials: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Xu, Guiping; Zhang, John X; Ye, Zuoer; Wang, Shufang; Zhao, Lun; Lin, Chong-De; Mo, Lei

    2010-12-01

    One basic question in brain plasticity research is whether individual life experience in the normal population can affect very early sensory-perceptual processing. Athletes provide a possible model to explore plasticity of the visual cortex as athletic training in confrontational ball games is quite often accompanied by training of the visual system. We asked professional badminton players to watch video clips related to their training experience and predict where the ball would land and examined whether they differed from non-player controls in the elicited C1, a visual evoked potential indexing V1 activity. Compared with controls, the players made judgments significantly more accurately, albeit not faster. An early ERP component peaking around 65 ms post-stimulus with a scalp topography centering at the occipital pole (electrode Oz) was observed in both groups and interpreted as the C1 component. With comparable latency, amplitudes of this component were significantly enhanced for the players than for the non-players, suggesting that it can be modulated by long-term physical training. The results present a clear case of experience-induced brain plasticity in primary visual cortex for very early sensory processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Time course of affective bias in visual attention: convergent evidence from steady-state visual evoked potentials and behavioral data.

    PubMed

    Hindi Attar, Catherine; Andersen, Søren K; Müller, Matthias M

    2010-12-01

    Selective attention to a primary task can be biased by the occurrence of emotional distractors that involuntary attract attention due to their intrinsic stimulus significance. What is largely unknown is the time course and magnitude of competitive interactions between a to-be-attended foreground task and emotional distractors. We used pleasant, unpleasant and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) that were either presented in intact or phase-scrambled form. Pictures were superimposed by a flickering display of moving random dots, which constituted the primary task and enabled us to record steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as a continuous measure of attentional resource allocation directed to the task. Subjects were required to attend to the dots and to detect short intervals of coherent motion while ignoring the background pictures. We found that pleasant and unpleasant relative to neutral pictures more strongly influenced task-related processing as reflected in a significant decrease in SSVEP amplitudes and target detection rates, both covering a time window of several hundred milliseconds. Strikingly, the effect of semantic relative to phase-scrambled pictures on task-related activity was much larger, emerged earlier and lasted longer in time compared to the specific effect of emotion. The observed differences in size and duration of time courses of semantic and emotional picture processing strengthen the assumption of separate functional mechanisms for both processes rather than a general boosting of neural activity in favor of emotional stimulus processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hyper +Gz acceleration on cardiovascular function, visual evoked potentials and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, K; Satake, H; Konishi, T

    1998-07-01

    Sustained hyper-gravity acceleration, particularly along the long axis of the body of animals or man (Gz), produces significant mal-effects on subjects, and hence it has been well studied, The most common syndromes of Gz application were cardio-vascular de-conditioning, and black-out, red-out, and loss of consciousness, which finally lead subjects into death. However, in most previous studies, the duration of applied Gz was rather short. In the present experiments, we can use longer duration of 1000 seconds. In addition, recent technological innovation make it possible to record directly local cerebral blood flow at a target cortical area with a Laser Doppler flow meter. We used this innovated method to measure local cerebral blood flow of rats in relation to visual evoked potentials (VEPs) under hyper-Gz acceleration. Also we recorded cardio-vascular parameters like heart rate from ECG, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and correlated them with cerebral blood flow and VEPs.

  18. Comparison of visual evoked potential monitoring during spine surgeries under total intravenous anesthesia versus balanced general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alberto A; Mendel, Ehud; Peters, Zoe A; Shneker, Bassel F; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bergese, Sergio D

    2017-10-01

    To determine the comparison of its clinical utility and safety profile for visual evoked potential (VEP) monitoring during prone spine surgeries under total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) versus balanced general anesthesia using the SightSaver™ visual stimulator. The protocol was designed asa pilot, single center, prospective, randomized, and double-arm study. Subjects were randomized to receive either TIVA or balanced general anesthesia. Following induction and intubation, 8 electrodes were placed subcutaneously to collect VEP recordings. The SightSaver™ visual stimulator was placed on the subject's scalp before prone positioning. VEP waveforms were recorded every 30min and assessed by a neurophysiologist throughout the length of surgery. A total of 19 subjects were evaluated and VEP waveforms were successfully collected. TIVA group showed higher amplitude and lower latency than balanced anesthesia. Our data suggested that TIVA is associated with higher VEP amplitude and shorter latencies than balanced general anesthesia; therefore, TIVA could be the most efficient anesthesia regimen for VEP monitoring. The findings help to better understand the effect of different anesthesia regimens on intra-operative VEP monitoring. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency-doubling technology perimetry and multifocal visual evoked potential in glaucoma, suspected glaucoma, and control patients

    PubMed Central

    Kanadani, Fabio N; Mello, Paulo AA; Dorairaj, Syril K; Kanadani, Tereza CM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The gold standard in functional glaucoma evaluation is standard automated perimetry (SAP). However, SAP depends on the reliability of the patients’ responses and other external factors; therefore, other technologies have been developed for earlier detection of visual field changes in glaucoma patients. The frequency-doubling perimetry (FDT) is believed to detect glaucoma earlier than SAP. The multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) is an objective test for functional evaluation. Objective To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of FDT and mfVEP tests in normal, suspect, and glaucomatous eyes and compare the monocular and interocular mfVEP. Methods Ninety-five eyes from 95 individuals (23 controls, 33 glaucoma suspects, 39 glaucomatous) were enrolled. All participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination, followed by SAP, FDT, and mfVEP tests. Results The area under the curve for mean deviation and pattern standard deviation were 0.756 and 0.761, respectively, for FDT, 0.564 and 0.512 for signal and alpha for interocular mfVEP, and 0.568 and 0.538 for signal and alpha for monocular mfVEP. This difference between monocular and interocular mfVEP was not significant. Conclusion The FDT Matrix was superior to mfVEP in glaucoma detection. The difference between monocular and interocular mfVEP in the diagnosis of glaucoma was not significant. PMID:25075173

  20. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on contrast sensitivity and visual evoked potential amplitude in adults with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaofeng; Li, Jinrong; Spiegel, Daniel P.; Chen, Zidong; Chan, Lily; Luo, Guangwei; Yuan, Junpeng; Deng, Daming; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision that occurs when the visual cortex receives decorrelated inputs from the two eyes during an early critical period of development. Amblyopic eyes are subject to suppression from the fellow eye, generate weaker visual evoked potentials (VEPs) than fellow eyes and have multiple visual deficits including impairments in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. Primate models and human psychophysics indicate that stronger suppression is associated with greater deficits in amblyopic eye contrast sensitivity and visual acuity. We tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex would modulate VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity in adults with amblyopia. tDCS can transiently alter cortical excitability and may influence suppressive neural interactions. Twenty-one patients with amblyopia and twenty-seven controls completed separate sessions of anodal (a-), cathodal (c-) and sham (s-) visual cortex tDCS. A-tDCS transiently and significantly increased VEP amplitudes for amblyopic, fellow and control eyes and contrast sensitivity for amblyopic and control eyes. C-tDCS decreased VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity and s-tDCS had no effect. These results suggest that tDCS can modulate visual cortex responses to information from adult amblyopic eyes and provide a foundation for future clinical studies of tDCS in adults with amblyopia. PMID:26763954

  1. Asynchronous steady-state visual evoked potential based BCI control of a 2-DoF artificial upper limb.

    PubMed

    Horki, Petar; Neuper, Christa; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2010-12-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) provides a direct connection between the human brain and a computer. One type of BCI can be realized using steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), resulting from repetitive stimulation. The aim of this study was the realization of an asynchronous SSVEP-BCI, based on canonical correlation analysis, suitable for the control of a 2-degrees of freedom (DoF) hand and elbow neuroprosthesis. To determine whether this BCI is suitable for the control of 2-DoF neuroprosthetic devices, online experiments with a virtual and a robotic limb feedback were conducted with eight healthy subjects and one tetraplegic patient. All participants were able to control the artificial limbs with the BCI. In the online experiments, the positive predictive value (PPV) varied between 69% and 83% and the false negative rate (FNR) varied between 1% and 17%. The spinal cord injured patient achieved PPV and FNR values within one standard deviation of the mean for all healthy subjects.

  2. Generating visual flickers for eliciting robust steady-state visual evoked potentials at flexible frequencies using monitor refresh rate.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masaki; Wang, Yijun; Wang, Yu-Te; Mitsukura, Yasue; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    In the study of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), it remains a challenge to present visual flickers at flexible frequencies using monitor refresh rate. For example, in an SSVEP-based brain-computer interface (BCI), it is difficult to present a large number of visual flickers simultaneously on a monitor. This study aims to explore whether or how a newly proposed frequency approximation approach changes signal characteristics of SSVEPs. At 10 Hz and 12 Hz, the SSVEPs elicited using two refresh rates (75 Hz and 120 Hz) were measured separately to represent the approximation and constant-period approaches. This study compared amplitude, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), phase, latency, scalp distribution, and frequency detection accuracy of SSVEPs elicited using the two approaches. To further prove the efficacy of the approximation approach, this study implemented an eight-target BCI using frequencies from 8-15 Hz. The SSVEPs elicited by the two approaches were found comparable with regard to all parameters except amplitude and SNR of SSVEPs at 12 Hz. The BCI obtained an averaged information transfer rate (ITR) of 95.0 bits/min across 10 subjects with a maximum ITR of 120 bits/min on two subjects, the highest ITR reported in the SSVEP-based BCIs. This study clearly showed that the frequency approximation approach can elicit robust SSVEPs at flexible frequencies using monitor refresh rate and thereby can largely facilitate various SSVEP-related studies in neural engineering and visual neuroscience.

  3. Effect of oculomotor vision rehabilitation on the visual-evoked potential and visual attention in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Naveen K; Thiagarajan, Preethi; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the effect of oculomotor vision rehabilitation (OVR) on the visual-evoked potential (VEP) and visual attention in the mTBI population. Subjects (n = 7) were adults with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Each received 9 hours of OVR over a 6-week period. The effects of OVR on VEP amplitude and latency, the attention-related alpha band (8-13 Hz) power (µV(2)) and the clinical Visual Search and Attention Test (VSAT) were assessed before and after the OVR. After the OVR, the VEP amplitude increased and its variability decreased. There was no change in VEP latency, which was normal. Alpha band power increased, as did the VSAT score, following the OVR. The significant changes in most test parameters suggest that OVR affects the visual system at early visuo-cortical levels, as well as other pathways which are involved in visual attention.

  4. Effect of ethanol on the visual-evoked potential in rat: dynamics of ON and OFF responses.

    PubMed

    Dulinskas, Redas; Buisas, Rokas; Vengeliene, Valentina; Ruksenas, Osvaldas

    2017-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on the flash visual-evoked potential (VEP) was investigated in numerous studies. However, it is still unclear which brain structures are responsible for the differences observed in stimulus onset (ON) and offset (OFF) responses and how these responses are modulated by ethanol. The aim of our study was to investigate the pattern of ON and OFF responses in the visual system, measured as amplitude and latency of each VEP component following acute administration of ethanol. VEPs were recorded at the onset and offset of a 500 ms visual stimulus in anesthetized male Wistar rats. The effect of alcohol on VEP latency and amplitude was measured for one hour after injection of 2 g/kg ethanol dose. Three VEP components - N63, P89 and N143 - were analyzed. Our results showed that, except for component N143, ethanol increased the latency of both ON and OFF responses in a similar manner. The latency of N143 during OFF response was not affected by ethanol but its amplitude was reduced. Our study demonstrated that the activation of the visual system during the ON response to a 500 ms visual stimulus is qualitatively different from that during the OFF response. Ethanol interfered with processing of the stimulus duration at the level of the visual cortex and reduced the activation of cortical regions.

  5. The hybrid BCI system for movement control by combining motor imagery and moving onset visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Deng, Lili; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Li, Fali; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Movement control is an important application for EEG-BCI (EEG-based brain-computer interface) systems. A single-modality BCI cannot provide an efficient and natural control strategy, but a hybrid BCI system that combines two or more different tasks can effectively overcome the drawbacks encountered in single-modality BCI control. In the current paper, we developed a new hybrid BCI system by combining MI (motor imagery) and mVEP (motion-onset visual evoked potential), aiming to realize the more efficient 2D movement control of a cursor. The offline analysis demonstrates that the hybrid BCI system proposed in this paper could evoke the desired MI and mVEP signal features simultaneously, and both are very close to those evoked in the single-modality BCI task. Furthermore, the online 2D movement control experiment reveals that the proposed hybrid BCI system could provide more efficient and natural control commands. The proposed hybrid BCI system is compensative to realize efficient 2D movement control for a practical online system, especially for those situations in which P300 stimuli are not suitable to be applied.

  6. Exploring Cognitive Flexibility With a Noninvasive BCI Using Simultaneous Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials and Sensorimotor Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Bradley J; Meng, Jianjun; Gulachek, Nicholas; Cline, Christopher C; He, Bin

    2018-05-01

    EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology creates non-biological pathways for conveying a user's mental intent solely through noninvasively measured neural signals. While optimizing the performance of a single task has long been the focus of BCI research, in order to translate this technology into everyday life, realistic situations, in which multiple tasks are performed simultaneously, must be investigated. In this paper, we explore the concept of cognitive flexibility, or multitasking, within the BCI framework by utilizing a 2-D cursor control task, using sensorimotor rhythms (SMRs), and a four-target visual attention task, using steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), both individually and simultaneously. We found no significant difference between the accuracy of the tasks when executing them alone (SMR-57.9% ± 15.4% and SSVEP-59.0% ± 14.2%) and simultaneously (SMR-54.9% ± 17.2% and SSVEP-57.5% ± 15.4%). These modest decreases in performance were supported by similar, non-significant changes in the electrophysiology of the SSVEP and SMR signals. In this sense, we report that multiple BCI tasks can be performed simultaneously without a significant deterioration in performance; this finding will help drive these systems toward realistic daily use in which a user's cognition will need to be involved in multiple tasks at once.

  7. [A wireless smart home system based on brain-computer interface of steady state visual evoked potential].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Xing, Xiao; Guo, Xuhong; Liu, Zehua; He, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) system is a system that achieves communication and control among humans and computers and other electronic equipment with the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. This paper describes the working theory of the wireless smart home system based on the BCI technology. We started to get the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) using the single chip microcomputer and the visual stimulation which composed by LED lamp to stimulate human eyes. Then, through building the power spectral transformation on the LabVIEW platform, we processed timely those EEG signals under different frequency stimulation so as to transfer them to different instructions. Those instructions could be received by the wireless transceiver equipment to control the household appliances and to achieve the intelligent control towards the specified devices. The experimental results showed that the correct rate for the 10 subjects reached 100%, and the control time of average single device was 4 seconds, thus this design could totally achieve the original purpose of smart home system.

  8. Exploring the temporal dynamics of sustained and transient spatial attention using steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai; Röder, Brigitte

    2017-05-01

    While the behavioral dynamics as well as the functional network of sustained and transient attention have extensively been studied, their underlying neural mechanisms have most often been investigated in separate experiments. In the present study, participants were instructed to perform an audio-visual spatial attention task. They were asked to attend to either the left or the right hemifield and to respond to deviant transient either auditory or visual stimuli. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) elicited by two task irrelevant pattern reversing checkerboards flickering at 10 and 15 Hz in the left and the right hemifields, respectively, were used to continuously monitor the locus of spatial attention. The amplitude and phase of the SSVEPs were extracted for single trials and were separately analyzed. Sustained attention to one hemifield (spatial attention) as well as to the auditory modality (intermodal attention) increased the inter-trial phase locking of the SSVEP responses, whereas briefly presented visual and auditory stimuli decreased the single-trial SSVEP amplitude between 200 and 500 ms post-stimulus. This transient change of the single-trial amplitude was restricted to the SSVEPs elicited by the reversing checkerboard in the spatially attended hemifield and thus might reflect a transient re-orienting of attention towards the brief stimuli. Thus, the present results demonstrate independent, but interacting neural mechanisms of sustained and transient attentional orienting.

  9. The hybrid BCI system for movement control by combining motor imagery and moving onset visual evoked potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Deng, Lili; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Li, Fali; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Movement control is an important application for EEG-BCI (EEG-based brain-computer interface) systems. A single-modality BCI cannot provide an efficient and natural control strategy, but a hybrid BCI system that combines two or more different tasks can effectively overcome the drawbacks encountered in single-modality BCI control. Approach. In the current paper, we developed a new hybrid BCI system by combining MI (motor imagery) and mVEP (motion-onset visual evoked potential), aiming to realize the more efficient 2D movement control of a cursor. Main result. The offline analysis demonstrates that the hybrid BCI system proposed in this paper could evoke the desired MI and mVEP signal features simultaneously, and both are very close to those evoked in the single-modality BCI task. Furthermore, the online 2D movement control experiment reveals that the proposed hybrid BCI system could provide more efficient and natural control commands. Significance. The proposed hybrid BCI system is compensative to realize efficient 2D movement control for a practical online system, especially for those situations in which P300 stimuli are not suitable to be applied.

  10. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on contrast sensitivity and visual evoked potential amplitude in adults with amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaofeng; Li, Jinrong; Spiegel, Daniel P; Chen, Zidong; Chan, Lily; Luo, Guangwei; Yuan, Junpeng; Deng, Daming; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2016-01-14

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision that occurs when the visual cortex receives decorrelated inputs from the two eyes during an early critical period of development. Amblyopic eyes are subject to suppression from the fellow eye, generate weaker visual evoked potentials (VEPs) than fellow eyes and have multiple visual deficits including impairments in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. Primate models and human psychophysics indicate that stronger suppression is associated with greater deficits in amblyopic eye contrast sensitivity and visual acuity. We tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex would modulate VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity in adults with amblyopia. tDCS can transiently alter cortical excitability and may influence suppressive neural interactions. Twenty-one patients with amblyopia and twenty-seven controls completed separate sessions of anodal (a-), cathodal (c-) and sham (s-) visual cortex tDCS. A-tDCS transiently and significantly increased VEP amplitudes for amblyopic, fellow and control eyes and contrast sensitivity for amblyopic and control eyes. C-tDCS decreased VEP amplitude and contrast sensitivity and s-tDCS had no effect. These results suggest that tDCS can modulate visual cortex responses to information from adult amblyopic eyes and provide a foundation for future clinical studies of tDCS in adults with amblyopia.

  11. Complex sparse spatial filter for decoding mixed frequency and phase coded steady-state visually evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Islam, Md Rabiul

    2018-07-01

    Mixed frequency and phase coding (FPC) can achieve the significant increase of the number of commands in steady-state visual evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). However, the inconsistent phases of the SSVEP over channels in a trial and the existence of non-contributing channels due to noise effects can decrease accurate detection of stimulus frequency. We propose a novel command detection method based on a complex sparse spatial filter (CSSF) by solving ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization problems for a mixed-coded SSVEP-BCI. In particular, ℓ 2,1 -regularization (aka group sparsification) can lead to the rejection of electrodes that are not contributing to the SSVEP detection. A calibration data based canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and CSSF with ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization cases were demonstrated for a 16-target stimuli with eleven subjects. The results of statistical test suggest that the proposed method with ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization significantly achieved the highest ITR. The proposed approaches do not need any reference signals, automatically select prominent channels, and reduce the computational cost compared to the other mixed frequency-phase coding (FPC)-based BCIs. The experimental results suggested that the proposed method can be usable implementing BCI effectively with reduce visual fatigue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pattern visual evoked potentials in eyes with disc swelling due to cat scratch disease-associated neuroretinitis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yuzhu; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Hirayama, Atsuko; Yotsukura, Jiro; Yamazaki, Hiroko

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate optic nerve function by pattern visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in eyes with optic disc swelling due to neuroretinitis associated with cat scratch disease (CSD). Four eyes of four patients with marked optic disc swelling resembling optic neuritis but diagnosed serologically as CSD received systemic steroid treatment. VEPs elicited by black and white checkerboard stimuli created on a TV monitor were recorded before the treatment. The visual acuity (VA) in the affected eyes was decreased to 20/50 in two eyes and finger counting in two eyes at their initial visits. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed neuroretinitis characterized by severe optic disc swelling, chorioretinal exudates, and macular edema in all eyes. Anti-Bartonella henselae serum antibody was markedly elevated in all patients confirming the diagnosis of CSD. The P100 of the transient VEPs was only mildly reduced without a delay in the implicit times in three eyes and only slightly delayed in the other eye. The steady-state VEPs were mildly reduced in two eyes and phase-reversed in other two eyes. The VA fully recovered after systemic steroid treatment in all patients. Although all examined patients showed marked swelling of the optic disc and visual decrease, the pattern VEPs were not affected as severely as in idiopathic optic neuritis. However, the degree of change of the pattern VEPs varied among patients.

  13. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  14. The Relationship of Visual Evoked Potential Asymmetries to the Performance of Sonar Operators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-11

    also been related to EP variability. Schizophrenic adults and patients with Korsakoff’s Syndrome have shown higher evoked potential variability than...average evoked response in Korsakoff patients. J. Psychiatry Res. 6: 253-260, 1969. Santoro, T. and D. Fender. Rules for the perception of

  15. Comparison of multifocal visual evoked potential, static automated perimetry, and optical coherence tomography findings for assessing visual pathways in patients with pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Nidan; Zhang, Yichao; Ye, Zhao; Shen, Ming; Shou, Xuefei; Wang, Yongfei; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Min; Zhao, Yao

    2015-10-01

    There have been no studies investigating the correlation between structural [thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT)] and functional [Humphrey visual field (HVF) or visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude] measures of optic nerve integrity in patients with pituitary adenomas (PA). Patients with PAs were recruited between September 2010 and September 2013. OCT, standard automated perimetry (SAP), and multifical VEP (mfVEP) were performed. Agreement between OCT, SAP, and mfVEP values in classifying eyes/quadrants was determined using AC1 statistics. Pearson's correlation was used to examine relationships between structural and functional data. In total, 88.7% of the eyes tested showed abnormal SAP findings and 93.7% showed abnormal mfVEP findings. Only 14.8% of the eyes showed abnormal OCT findings. The agreement between SAP and mfVEP findings was 88.9% (AC1 = 0.87). The agreement between OCT and mfVEP findings was 24.2% (AC1 = -0.52), and that between OCT and SAP findings was 21.5% (AC1 = -0.56). The correlation values between RNFL thickness and the functional measurements were -0.601 for the mfVEP score (P = 0.000) and -0.441 for the SAP score (P = 0.000). The correlation between the mfVEP and SAP scores was -0.617 (P = 0.000). mfVEP, SAP, and OCT provided complementary information for detecting visual pathway abnormalities in patients with PAs. Good agreement was demonstrated between SAP and mfVEP and quantitative analysis of structure-function measurements revealed a moderate correlation.

  16. Primary Generators of Visually Evoked Field Potentials Recorded in the Macaque Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Smiley, John F; Schroeder, Charles E

    2017-10-18

    Prior studies have reported "local" field potential (LFP) responses to faces in the macaque auditory cortex and have suggested that such face-LFPs may be substrates of audiovisual integration. However, although field potentials (FPs) may reflect the synaptic currents of neurons near the recording electrode, due to the use of a distant reference electrode, they often reflect those of synaptic activity occurring in distant sites as well. Thus, FP recordings within a given brain region (e.g., auditory cortex) may be "contaminated" by activity generated elsewhere in the brain. To determine whether face responses are indeed generated within macaque auditory cortex, we recorded FPs and concomitant multiunit activity with linear array multielectrodes across auditory cortex in three macaques (one female), and applied current source density (CSD) analysis to the laminar FP profile. CSD analysis revealed no appreciable local generator contribution to the visual FP in auditory cortex, although we did note an increase in the amplitude of visual FP with cortical depth, suggesting that their generators are located below auditory cortex. In the underlying inferotemporal cortex, we found polarity inversions of the main visual FP components accompanied by robust CSD responses and large-amplitude multiunit activity. These results indicate that face-evoked FP responses in auditory cortex are not generated locally but are volume-conducted from other face-responsive regions. In broader terms, our results underscore the caution that, unless far-field contamination is removed, LFPs in general may reflect such "far-field" activity, in addition to, or in absence of, local synaptic responses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Field potentials (FPs) can index neuronal population activity that is not evident in action potentials. However, due to volume conduction, FPs may reflect activity in distant neurons superimposed upon that of neurons close to the recording electrode. This is problematic as the

  17. Primary Generators of Visually Evoked Field Potentials Recorded in the Macaque Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, John F.; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies have reported “local” field potential (LFP) responses to faces in the macaque auditory cortex and have suggested that such face-LFPs may be substrates of audiovisual integration. However, although field potentials (FPs) may reflect the synaptic currents of neurons near the recording electrode, due to the use of a distant reference electrode, they often reflect those of synaptic activity occurring in distant sites as well. Thus, FP recordings within a given brain region (e.g., auditory cortex) may be “contaminated” by activity generated elsewhere in the brain. To determine whether face responses are indeed generated within macaque auditory cortex, we recorded FPs and concomitant multiunit activity with linear array multielectrodes across auditory cortex in three macaques (one female), and applied current source density (CSD) analysis to the laminar FP profile. CSD analysis revealed no appreciable local generator contribution to the visual FP in auditory cortex, although we did note an increase in the amplitude of visual FP with cortical depth, suggesting that their generators are located below auditory cortex. In the underlying inferotemporal cortex, we found polarity inversions of the main visual FP components accompanied by robust CSD responses and large-amplitude multiunit activity. These results indicate that face-evoked FP responses in auditory cortex are not generated locally but are volume-conducted from other face-responsive regions. In broader terms, our results underscore the caution that, unless far-field contamination is removed, LFPs in general may reflect such “far-field” activity, in addition to, or in absence of, local synaptic responses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Field potentials (FPs) can index neuronal population activity that is not evident in action potentials. However, due to volume conduction, FPs may reflect activity in distant neurons superimposed upon that of neurons close to the recording electrode. This is

  18. Cortical sources of visual evoked potentials during consciousness of executive processes.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Iacoboni, Marco; Buffo, Paola; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2009-03-01

    What is the timing of cortical activation related to consciousness of visuo-spatial executive functions? Electroencephalographic data (128 channels) were recorded in 13 adults. Cue stimulus briefly appeared on right or left (equal probability) monitor side for a period, inducing about 50% of recognitions. It was then masked and followed (2 s) by a central visual go stimulus. Left (right) mouse button had to be clicked after right (left) cue stimulus. This "inverted" response indexed executive processes. Afterward, subjects said "seen" if they had detected the cue stimulus or "not seen" when it was missed. Sources of event-related potentials (ERPs) were estimated by LORETA software. The inverted responses were about 95% in seen trials and about 60% in not seen trials. Cue stimulus evoked frontal-parietooccipital potentials, having the same peak latencies in the seen and not seen data. Maximal difference in amplitude of the seen and not seen ERPs was detected at about +300-ms post-stimulus (P3). P3 sources were higher in amplitude in the seen than not seen trials in dorsolateral prefrontal, premotor and parietooccipital areas. This was true in dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortex even when percentage of the inverted responses and reaction time were paired in the seen and not seen trials. These results suggest that, in normal subjects, the primary consciousness enhances the efficacy of visuo-spatial executive processes and is sub-served by a late (100- to 400-ms post-stimulus) enhancement of the neural synchronization in frontal areas.

  19. Prediction of visual evoked potentials at any surface location from a set of three recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mazinani, Babac A E; Waberski, Till D; van Ooyen, Andre; Walter, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Purpose of this study was to introduce a mathematical model which allows the calculation of a source dipole as the origin of the evoked activity based on the data of three simultaneously recorded VEPs from different locations at the scalp surface to predict field potentials at any neighboring location and to validate this model by comparison with actual recordings. In 10 healthy subjects (25-38, mean 29 years) continuous VEPs were recorded via 96 channels. On the base of the recordings at the positions POz', O1' and O2', a source dipole vector was calculated for each time point of the recordings and VEP responses were back projected for any of the 96 electrode positions. Differences between the calculated and the actually recorded responses were quantified by coefficients of variation (CV). The prediction precision and response size depended on the distance between the electrode of the predicted response and the recording electrodes. After compensating this relationship using a polynomial function, the CV of the mean difference between calculated and recorded responses of the 10 subjects was 2.8 +/- 1.2%. In conclusion, the "Mini-Brainmapping" model can provide precise topographical information with minimal additional recording efforts with good reliability. The implementation of this method in a routine diagnostic setting as an "easy-to-do" procedure would allow to examine a large number of patients and normal subjects in a short time, and thus, a solid data base could be created to correlate well defined pathologies with topographical VEP changes.

  20. Visual Evoked Cortical Potential (VECP) Elicited by Sinusoidal Gratings Controlled by Pseudo-Random Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Carolina S.; Souza, Givago S.; Gomes, Bruno D.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of contrast detection mechanisms to the visual cortical evoked potential (VECP) have been investigated studying the contrast-response and spatial frequency-response functions. Previously, the use of m-sequences for stimulus control has been almost restricted to multifocal electrophysiology stimulation and, in some aspects, it substantially differs from conventional VECPs. Single stimulation with spatial contrast temporally controlled by m-sequences has not been extensively tested or compared to multifocal techniques. Our purpose was to evaluate the influence of spatial frequency and contrast of sinusoidal gratings on the VECP elicited by pseudo-random stimulation. Nine normal subjects were stimulated by achromatic sinusoidal gratings driven by pseudo random binary m-sequence at seven spatial frequencies (0.4–10 cpd) and three stimulus sizes (4°, 8°, and 16° of visual angle). At 8° subtence, six contrast levels were used (3.12–99%). The first order kernel (K1) did not provide a consistent measurable signal across spatial frequencies and contrasts that were tested–signal was very small or absent–while the second order kernel first (K2.1) and second (K2.2) slices exhibited reliable responses for the stimulus range. The main differences between results obtained with the K2.1 and K2.2 were in the contrast gain as measured in the amplitude versus contrast and amplitude versus spatial frequency functions. The results indicated that K2.1 was dominated by M-pathway, but for some stimulus condition some P-pathway contribution could be found, while the second slice reflected the P-pathway contribution. The present work extended previous findings of the visual pathways contribution to VECP elicited by pseudorandom stimulation for a wider range of spatial frequencies. PMID:23940546

  1. Extracting Visual Evoked Potentials from EEG Data Recorded During fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes. PMID:24893706

  2. An automated and fast approach to detect single-trial visual evoked potentials with application to brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiheng; Hung, Yeung Sam; Hu, Li; Huang, Gan; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    This study aims (1) to develop an automated and fast approach for detecting visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in single trials and (2) to apply the single-trial VEP detection approach in designing a real-time and high-performance brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The single-trial VEP detection approach uses common spatial pattern (CSP) as a spatial filter and wavelet filtering (WF) a temporal-spectral filter to jointly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single-trial VEPs. The performance of the joint spatial-temporal-spectral filtering approach was assessed in a four-command VEP-based BCI system. The offline classification accuracy of the BCI system was significantly improved from 67.6±12.5% (raw data) to 97.3±2.1% (data filtered by CSP and WF). The proposed approach was successfully implemented in an online BCI system, where subjects could make 20 decisions in one minute with classification accuracy of 90%. The proposed single-trial detection approach is able to obtain robust and reliable VEP waveform in an automatic and fast way and it is applicable in VEP based online BCI systems. This approach provides a real-time and automated solution for single-trial detection of evoked potentials or event-related potentials (EPs/ERPs) in various paradigms, which could benefit many applications such as BCI and intraoperative monitoring. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Can somatosensory and visual evoked potentials predict neurological outcome during targeted temperature management in post cardiac arrest patients?

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Pill; Park, Kyu Nam; Wee, Jung Hee; Park, Jeong Ho; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Han Joon; Oh, Sang Hoon; Oh, Yoon Sang; Kim, Soo Hyun; Oh, Joo Suk

    2017-10-01

    In cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM), it is not certain if somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) can predict neurological outcomes during TTM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of SEPs and VEPs during TTM and after rewarming. This retrospective cohort study included comatose patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest and treated with TTM between March 2007 and July 2015. SEPs and VEPs were recorded during TTM and after rewarming in these patients. Neurological outcome was assessed at discharge by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) Scale. In total, 115 patients were included. A total of 175 SEPs and 150 VEPs were performed. Five SEPs during treated with TTM and nine SEPs after rewarming were excluded from outcome prediction by SEPs due to an indeterminable N20 response because of technical error. Using 80 SEPs and 85 VEPs during treated with TTM, absent SEPs yielded a sensitivity of 58% and a specificity of 100% for poor outcome (CPC 3-5), and absent VEPs predicted poor neurological outcome with a sensitivity of 44% and a specificity of 96%. The AUC of combination of SEPs and VEPs was superior to either test alone (0.788 for absent SEPs and 0.713 for absent VEPs compared with 0.838 for the combination). After rewarming, absent SEPs and absent VEPs predicted poor neurological outcome with a specificity of 100%. When SEPs and VEPs were combined, VEPs slightly increased the prognostic accuracy of SEPs alone. Although one patient with absent VEP during treated with TTM had a good neurological outcome, none of the patients with good neurological outcome had an absent VEP after rewarming. Absent SEPs could predict poor neurological outcome during TTM as well as after rewarming. Absent VEPs may predict poor neurological outcome in both periods and VEPs may provide additional prognostic value in outcome prediction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortical visual evoked potentials recorded after optic tract near field stimulation during GPi-DBS in non-cooperative patients.

    PubMed

    Landi, Andrea; Pirillo, David; Cilia, Roberto; Antonini, Angelo; Sganzerla, Erik P

    2011-02-01

    Neurophysiologic monitoring during deep brain stimulation (DBS) interventions in the globus pallidus internum (Gpi) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease or primary dystonia is generally based upon microelectrode recordings (MER); moreover, MER request sophisticated technology and high level trained personnel for a reliable monitoring. Recordings of cortical visual evoked potentials (CVEPs) obtained after stimulation of the optic tract may be a potential option to MER; since optic tract lies just beneath the best target for Gpi DBS, changes in CVEPs during intraoperative exploration may drive a correct electrode positioning. Cortical VEPs from optic tract stimulation (OT C-CEPs) have been recorded in seven patients during GPi-DBS for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and primary dystonia under general sedation. OT C-VEPs were obtained after near-field monopolar stimulation of the optic tract; recording electrodes were at the scalp. Cortical responses after optic tract versus standard visual stimulation were compared. After intraoperative near-field OT stimulation a biphasic wave, named N40-P70, was detected in all cases. N40-P70 neither change in morphology nor in latency at different depths, but increased in amplitude approaching the optic tract. The electrode tip was positioned just 1mm above the point where OT-CVEPs showed the larger amplitude. No MERs were obtained in these patients; OT CVEPs were the only method to detect the Gpi before positioning the electrodes. OT CVEPs seem to be as reliable as MER to detail the optimal target in Gpi surgery: in addition they are less expensive, faster to perform and easier to decode. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Longitudinal assessment of childhood optic gliomas: relationship between flicker visual evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Falsini, Benedetto; Ziccardi, Lucia; Lazzareschi, Ilaria; Ruggiero, Antonio; Placentino, Luca; Dickmann, Anna; Liotti, Lucia; Piccardi, Marco; Balestrazzi, Emilio; Colosimo, Cesare; Di Rocco, Concezio; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinally functional and neuro-radiologic findings in childhood optic gliomas (OG), by comparing flicker visual evoked potentials (F-VEPs) with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Fourteen children (age range: 1-13 years) with OGs underwent serial F-VEP, MRI and neuro-ophthalmic examinations over a 38 month (median, range: 6-76) follow-up. F-VEPs were elicited by 8 Hz sine-wave flicker stimuli presented in a mini-Ganzfeld. Contrast-enhanced MRI examinations were performed. Results of both tests were blindly assessed by independent evaluators. F-VEPs were judged to be improved, stable or worsened if changes in the amplitude and/or phase angle of the response exceeded the limits of test-retest variability (+/-90th percentile) established for the same patients. MRI results were judged to show regression, stabilization or progression of OG based on its changes in size (+/-20%) or extension. Two to seven pairs of F-VEP/MRI examinations per patient (median: 4) were collected. Based on a total of 38 pairs of F-VEP/MRI examinations, both tests agreed in showing worsening (progression), stabilization and improvement (regression) in 5, 15 and 10 cases, respectively. In 3 cases, F-VEPs showed a worsening and MRI a stabilization, while in 5 cases F-VEPs showed an improvement and MRI a stabilization. Agreement between F-VEP and MRI changes was 78.9% (95% CI: +/- 37%, K statistics = 0.67, P < 0.001). The results indicate that longitudinal F-VEP changes can predict changes in MRI-assessed OG size and extension, providing a non-invasive functional assay, complementary to neuro-imaging, for OG follow-up.

  6. Role of inter-hemispheric transfer in generating visual evoked potentials in V1-damaged brain hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Kavcic, Voyko; Triplett, Regina L.; Das, Anasuya; Martin, Tim; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2015-01-01

    Partial cortical blindness is a visual deficit caused by unilateral damage to the primary visual cortex, a condition previously considered beyond hopes of rehabilitation. However, recent data demonstrate that patients may recover both simple and global motion discrimination following intensive training in their blind field. The present experiments characterized motion-induced neural activity of cortically blind (CB) subjects prior to the onset of visual rehabilitation. This was done to provide information about visual processing capabilities available to mediate training-induced visual improvements. Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were recorded from two experimental groups consisting of 9 CB subjects and 9 age-matched, visually-intact controls. VEPs were collected following lateralized stimulus presentation to each of the 4 visual field quadrants. VEP waveforms were examined for both stimulus-onset (SO) and motion-onset (MO) related components in postero-lateral electrodes. While stimulus presentation to intact regions of the visual field elicited normal SO-P1, SO-N1, SO-P2 and MO-N2 amplitudes and latencies in contralateral brain regions of CB subjects, these components were not observed contralateral to stimulus presentation in blind quadrants of the visual field. In damaged brain hemispheres, SO-VEPs were only recorded following stimulus presentation to intact visual field quadrants, via inter-hemispheric transfer. MO-VEPs were only recorded from damaged left brain hemispheres, possibly reflecting a native left/right asymmetry in inter-hemispheric connections. The present findings suggest that damaged brain hemispheres contain areas capable of responding to visual stimulation. However, in the absence of training or rehabilitation, these areas only generate detectable VEPs in response to stimulation of the intact hemifield of vision. PMID:25575450

  7. An approach for brain-controlled prostheses based on Scene Graph Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Hanzhe; Zhang, Liming; Lu, Zhufeng; Chen, Jiangcheng

    2018-08-01

    Brain control technology can restore communication between the brain and a prosthesis, and choosing a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) paradigm to evoke electroencephalogram (EEG) signals is an essential step for developing this technology. In this paper, the Scene Graph paradigm used for controlling prostheses was proposed; this paradigm is based on Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs) regarding the Scene Graph of a subject's intention. A mathematic model was built to predict SSVEPs evoked by the proposed paradigm and a sinusoidal stimulation method was used to present the Scene Graph stimulus to elicit SSVEPs from subjects. Then, a 2-degree of freedom (2-DOF) brain-controlled prosthesis system was constructed to validate the performance of the Scene Graph-SSVEP (SG-SSVEP)-based BCI. The classification of SG-SSVEPs was detected via the Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) approach. To assess the efficiency of proposed BCI system, the performances of traditional SSVEP-BCI system were compared. Experimental results from six subjects suggested that the proposed system effectively enhanced the SSVEP responses, decreased the degradation of SSVEP strength and reduced the visual fatigue in comparison with the traditional SSVEP-BCI system. The average signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SG-SSVEP was 6.31 ± 2.64 dB, versus 3.38 ± 0.78 dB of traditional-SSVEP. In addition, the proposed system achieved good performances in prosthesis control. The average accuracy was 94.58% ± 7.05%, and the corresponding high information transfer rate (IRT) was 19.55 ± 3.07 bit/min. The experimental results revealed that the SG-SSVEP based BCI system achieves the good performance and improved the stability relative to the conventional approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus affects resting EEG and visual evoked potentials in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jech, Robert; Růzicka, Evzen; Urgosík, Dusan; Serranová, Tereza; Volfová, Markéta; Nováková, Olga; Roth, Jan; Dusek, Petr; Mecír, Petr

    2006-05-01

    We studied changes of the EEG spectral power induced by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Also analyzed were changes of visual evoked potentials (VEP) with DBS on and off. Eleven patients with advanced PD treated with bilateral DBS STN were examined after an overnight withdrawal of L-DOPA and 2 h after switching off the neurostimulators. All underwent clinical examination followed by resting EEG and VEP recordings, a procedure repeated after DBS STN was switched on. With DBS switched on, the dominant EEG frequency increased from 9.44+/-1.3 to 9.71+/-1.3 Hz (P<0.01) while its relative spectral power dropped by 11% on average (P<0.05). Switching on the neurostimulators caused a decrease in the N70/P100 amplitude of the VEP (P<0.01), which inversely correlated with the intensity of DBS (black-and-white pattern: P<0.01; color pattern: P<0.05). Despite artifacts generated by neurostimulators, the VEP and resting EEG were suitable for the detection of effects related to DBS STN. The acceleration of dominant frequency in the alpha band may be evidence of DBS STN influence on speeding up of intracortical oscillations. The spectral power decrease, seen mainly in the fronto-central region, might reflect a desynchronization in the premotor and motor circuits, though no movement was executed. Similarly, desynchronization of the cortical activity recorded posteriorly may by responsible for the VEP amplitude decrease implying DBS STN-related influence even on the visual system. Changes in idling EEG activity observed diffusely over scalp together with involvement of the VEP suggest that the effects of DBS STN reach far beyond the motor system influencing the basic mechanisms of rhythmic cortical oscillations.

  9. Pattern Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials Provide Clinical Evidence of CNS Modulation of High- and Low-Contrast VEP Latency in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sponsel, William E.; Johnson, Susan L.; Trevino, Rick; Gonzalez, Alberto; Groth, Sylvia L.; Majcher, Carolyn; Fulton, Diane C.; Reilly, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Both pattern electroretinography (PERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP) can be performed using low- (15%; Lc) and high- (85%; Hc) contrast gratings that may preferentially stimulate the magno- and parvocellular pathways. We observed that among glaucomatous patients showing only one VEP latency deficit per eye, there appeared to be a very strong tendency for an Hc delay in one eye and an Lc delay in the other. Methods Diopsys NOVA-LX system was used to measure VEP Hc and Lc latency among a clinical glaucoma population to find all individuals with either a single Hc or Lc latency abnormality in each eye (group 1), or with greater than 0 and less than 4 Hc or Lc VEP latency abnormalities in the two eyes (group 2) to determine whether a significant inverse correlation existed for these values in either group. Hc and Lc PERG data were also evaluated to assess associated retinal ganglion cell responses. Results A strong inverse correlation (P = 0.0000003) was observed between the Hc and Lc VEP latency values among the 64 eyes in group 1. Group 2 provided a comparable result (n = 143; 286 eyes; P = 0.0005). PERG (n = 81; 162 eyes) also showed strong bilateral symmetry for magnitude values (P < 0.0001 for both Lc and Hc in groups 1 and 2). Conclusions Bilateral retention of both low-resolution/high-speed and high-resolution/low-speed function may persist with both eyes open despite symmetrically pathologic retinal ganglion cell PERG waveform asynchrony for Hc and Lc stimuli in the paired eyes. Translational Relevance Clinical electrophysiology strongly suggests binocular compensation for dynamic dysfunction operates under central nervous system (CNS) control in glaucoma. PMID:29134137

  10. The role of visual evoked potential and electroretinography in the preoperative assessment of osteo-keratoprosthesis or osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Aline L; Charoenrook, Victor; de la Paz, Maria F; Temprano, Jose; Barraquer, Rafael I; Michael, Ralph

    2012-09-01

    To determine the value of electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP) in predicting visual outcome in patients undergoing osteo-keratoprosthesis (OKP) or osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) surgery. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 143 eyes in 101 patients who underwent OKP or OOKP surgery. The subjects underwent ERG, VEP testing or both up to 6 months prior to surgery. The ERG and VEP results were classified into four categories based on wave amplitude, latency and configuration. The main outcome was the maximum best-corrected visual acuity (maxBCVA) reached at any time postoperatively. One hundred thirty-four cases had undergone preoperative ERG, 82 VEP and 73 both examinations. The sensitivities of ERG and VEP to detect maxBCVA≥0.05 were 68.5% and 87%, respectively, while the specificity was 63.2% for ERG and 47.4% for VEP. The maxBCVA was significantly better in patients with normal ERG (p=0.033) and those with normal VEP (p=0.048), once having defined appropriate normal and abnormal cut-off levels. When comparing fellow eyes in patients who underwent surgery in both eyes, maxBCVA was better in the eyes that had better VEP results (p=0.013). Eyes demonstrating normal ERG or VEP achieved better visual outcome than those with abnormal results. In addition, VEP proved instrumental in determining the eye with the best prognosis when comparing both eyes of a given patient. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  11. Visually Evoked 3-5 Hz Membrane Potential Oscillations Reduce the Responsiveness of Visual Cortex Neurons in Awake Behaving Mice.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Michael C; Polack, Pierre-Olivier; Tran, Duy T; Golshani, Peyman

    2017-05-17

    Low-frequency membrane potential ( V m ) oscillations were once thought to only occur in sleeping and anesthetized states. Recently, low-frequency V m oscillations have been described in inactive awake animals, but it is unclear whether they shape sensory processing in neurons and whether they occur during active awake behavioral states. To answer these questions, we performed two-photon guided whole-cell V m recordings from primary visual cortex layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in awake mice during passive visual stimulation and performance of visual and auditory discrimination tasks. We recorded stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations where the V m baseline hyperpolarized as the V m underwent high amplitude rhythmic fluctuations lasting 1-2 s in duration. When 3-5 Hz V m oscillations coincided with visual cues, excitatory neuron responses to preferred cues were significantly reduced. Despite this disruption to sensory processing, visual cues were critical for evoking 3-5 Hz V m oscillations when animals performed discrimination tasks and passively viewed drifting grating stimuli. Using pupillometry and animal locomotive speed as indicators of arousal, we found that 3-5 Hz oscillations were not restricted to unaroused states and that they occurred equally in aroused and unaroused states. Therefore, low-frequency V m oscillations play a role in shaping sensory processing in visual cortical neurons, even during active wakefulness and decision making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A neuron's membrane potential ( V m ) strongly shapes how information is processed in sensory cortices of awake animals. Yet, very little is known about how low-frequency V m oscillations influence sensory processing and whether they occur in aroused awake animals. By performing two-photon guided whole-cell recordings from layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the visual cortex of awake behaving animals, we found visually evoked stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations that disrupt

  12. Subadditive responses to extremely short blue and green pulsed light on visual evoked potentials, pupillary constriction and electroretinograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Uchiyama, Yuria; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2017-11-17

    The simultaneous exposure to blue and green light was reported to result in less melatonin suppression than monochromatic exposure to blue or green light. Here, we conducted an experiment using extremely short blue- and green-pulsed light to examine their visual and nonvisual effects on visual evoked potentials (VEPs), pupillary constriction, electroretinograms (ERGs), and subjective evaluations. Twelve adult male subjects were exposed to three light conditions: blue-pulsed light (2.5-ms pulse width), green-pulsed light (2.5-ms pulse width), and simultaneous blue- and green-pulsed light with white background light. We measured the subject's pupil diameter three times in each condition. Then, after 10 min of rest, the subject was exposed to the same three light conditions. We measured the averaged ERG and VEP during 210 pulsed-light exposures in each condition. We also determined subjective evaluations using a visual analog scale (VAS) method. The pupillary constriction during the simultaneous exposure to blue- and green-pulsed light was significantly lower than that during the blue-pulsed light exposure despite the double irradiance intensity of the combination. We also found that the b/|a| wave of the ERGs during the simultaneous exposure to blue- and green-pulsed light was lower than that during the blue-pulsed light exposure. We confirmed the subadditive response to pulsed light on pupillary constriction and ERG. However, the P100 of the VEPs during the blue-pulsed light were smaller than those during the simultaneous blue- and green-pulsed light and green-pulsed light, indicating that the P100 amplitude might depend on the luminance of light. Our findings demonstrated the effect of the subadditive response to extremely short pulsed light on pupillary constriction and ERG responses. The effects on ipRGCs by the blue-pulsed light exposure are apparently reduced by the simultaneous irradiation of green light. The blue versus yellow (b/y) bipolar cells in the

  13. A comparative study of the usefulness of color vision, photostress recovery time, and visual evoked potential tests in early detection of ocular toxicity from hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Heravian, Javad; Saghafi, Massoud; Shoeibi, Naser; Hassanzadeh, Samira; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sharepoor, Maria

    2011-08-01

    Ocular toxicity from hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is rare, but its potential permanence and severity makes it imperative to employ measures and screening protocols to minimize its occurrence. This study was performed to assess the usefulness of color vision, photo stress recovery time (PSRT), and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in early detection of ocular toxicity of HCQ, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). 86 patients were included in the study and divided into three groups: (1) with history of HCQ use: interventional 1 (Int.1) without fundoscopic changes and Int.2 with fundoscopic changes; and (2) without history of HCQ use, as control. Visual field, color vision, PSRT and VEP results were recorded for all patients and the effect of age, disease duration, treatment duration and cumulative dose of HCQ on each test was assessed in each group. There was a significant relationship among PSRT and age, treatment duration, cumulative dose of HCQ and disease duration (P<0.001 for all). Color vision was normal in all the cases. P100 amplitude was not different between the three groups (P=0.846), but P100 latency was significantly different (P=0.025) and for Int.2 it was greater than the others. The percentage of abnormal visual fields for Int.2 was more than Int.1 and control groups (P=0.002 and P=0.005 respectively), but Int.1 and control groups were not significantly different (P>0.50). In the early stages of maculopathy, P100 latencies of VEP and PSRT are useful predictors of HCQ ocular toxicity. In patients without ocular symptoms and fundoscopic changes, the P100 latency of VEP predicts more precisely than the others.

  14. A Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential Brain-Computer Interface System Evaluation as an In-Vehicle Warning Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyahi, Pouria

    This thesis is part of current research at Center for Intelligence Systems Research (CISR) at The George Washington University for developing new in-vehicle warning systems via Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs). The purpose of conducting this research is to contribute to the current gap between BCI and in-vehicle safety studies. It is based on the premise that accurate and timely monitoring of human (driver) brain's signal to external stimuli could significantly aide in detection of driver's intentions and development of effective warning systems. The thesis starts with introducing the concept of BCI and its development history while it provides a literature review on the nature of brain signals. The current advancement and increasing demand for commercial and non-medical BCI products are described. In addition, the recent research attempts in transportation safety to study drivers' behavior or responses through brain signals are reviewed. The safety studies, which are focused on employing a reliable and practical BCI system as an in-vehicle assistive device, are also introduced. A major focus of this thesis research has been on the evaluation and development of the signal processing algorithms which can effectively filter and process brain signals when the human subject is subjected to Visual LED (Light Emitting Diodes) stimuli at different frequencies. The stimulated brain generates a voltage potential, referred to as Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP). Therefore, a newly modified analysis algorithm for detecting the brain visual signals is proposed. These algorithms are designed to reach a satisfactory accuracy rate without preliminary trainings, hence focusing on eliminating the need for lengthy training of human subjects. Another important concern is the ability of the algorithms to find correlation of brain signals with external visual stimuli in real-time. The developed analysis models are based on algorithms which are capable of generating results

  15. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  16. Comparison of isolated-check visual evoked potential and standard automated perimetry in early glaucoma and high-risk ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Wu; Zhao, Ying-Xi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the diagnostic performance of isolated-check visual evoked potential (icVEP) and standard automated perimetry (SAP), for evaluating the application values of icVEP in the detection of early glaucoma. METHODS Totally 144 subjects (288 eyes) were enrolled in this study. icVEP testing was performed with the Neucodia visual electrophysiological diagnostic system. A 15% positive-contrast (bright) condition pattern was used in this device to differentiate between glaucoma patients and healthy control subjects. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were derived based on a multivariate statistic. The eyes were judged as abnormal if the test yielded an SNR≤1. SAP testing was performed with the Humphrey Field Analyzer II. The visual fields were deemed as abnormality if the glaucoma hemifield test results outside normal limits; or the pattern standard deviation with P<0.05; or the cluster of three or more non-edge points on the pattern deviation plot in a single hemifield with P<0.05, one of which must have a P<0.01. Disc photographs were graded as either glaucomatous optic neuropathy or normal by two experts who were masked to all other patient information. Moorfields regression analysis (MRA) used as a separate diagnostic classification was performed by Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT). RESULTS When the disc photograph grader was used as diagnostic standard, the sensitivity for SAP and icVEP was 32.3% and 38.5% respectively and specificity was 82.3% and 77.8% respectively. When the MRA Classifier was used as the diagnostic standard, the sensitivity for SAP and icVEP was 48.6% and 51.4% respectively and specificity was 84.1% and 78.0% respectively. When the combined structural assessment was used as the diagnostic standard, the sensitivity for SAP and icVEP was 59.2% and 53.1% respectively and specificity was 84.2% and 84.6% respectivlely. There was no statistical significance between the sensitivity or specificity of SAP and icVEP, regardless of which diagnostic

  17. The Role of Visual Noise in Influencing Mental Load and Fatigue in a Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potential-Based Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Luo, Ailing; Li, Min; Zhang, Sicong; Han, Chengcheng; Yan, Wenqiang

    2017-08-14

    As a spatial selective attention-based brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigm, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) BCI has the advantages of high information transfer rate, high tolerance to artifacts, and robust performance across users. However, its benefits come at the cost of mental load and fatigue occurring in the concentration on the visual stimuli. Noise, as a ubiquitous random perturbation with the power of randomness, may be exploited by the human visual system to enhance higher-level brain functions. In this study, a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP, i.e., one kind of SSVEP)-based BCI paradigm with spatiotemporal visual noise was used to investigate the influence of noise on the compensation of mental load and fatigue deterioration during prolonged attention tasks. Changes in α , θ , θ + α powers, θ / α ratio, and electroencephalography (EEG) properties of amplitude, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and online accuracy, were used to evaluate mental load and fatigue. We showed that presenting a moderate visual noise to participants could reliably alleviate the mental load and fatigue during online operation of visual BCI that places demands on the attentional processes. This demonstrated that noise could provide a superior solution to the implementation of visual attention controlling-based BCI applications.

  18. Analogue mouse pointer control via an online steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John J.; Palaniappan, Ramaswamy

    2011-04-01

    The steady state visual evoked protocol has recently become a popular paradigm in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Typically (regardless of function) these applications offer the user a binary selection of targets that perform correspondingly discrete actions. Such discrete control systems are appropriate for applications that are inherently isolated in nature, such as selecting numbers from a keypad to be dialled or letters from an alphabet to be spelled. However motivation exists for users to employ proportional control methods in intrinsically analogue tasks such as the movement of a mouse pointer. This paper introduces an online BCI in which control of a mouse pointer is directly proportional to a user's intent. Performance is measured over a series of pointer movement tasks and compared to the traditional discrete output approach. Analogue control allowed subjects to move the pointer faster to the cued target location compared to discrete output but suffers more undesired movements overall. Best performance is achieved when combining the threshold to movement of traditional discrete techniques with the range of movement offered by proportional control.

  19. The dynamic allocation of attention to emotion: simultaneous and independent evidence from the late positive potential and steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Hajcak, Greg; MacNamara, Annmarie; Foti, Dan; Ferri, Jamie; Keil, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Emotional stimuli capture and hold attention without explicit instruction. The late positive potential (LPP) component of the event related potential can be used to track motivated attention toward emotional stimuli, and is larger for emotional compared to neutral pictures. In the frequency domain, the steady state visual evoked potential (ssVEP) has also been used to track attention to stimuli flickering at a particular frequency. Like the LPP, the ssVEP is also larger for emotional compared to neutral pictures. Prior work suggests that both the LPP and ssVEP are sensitive to "top-down" manipulations of attention, however the LPP and ssVEP have not previously been examined using the same attentional manipulation in the same participants. In the present study, LPP and ssVEP amplitudes were simultaneously elicited by unpleasant and neutral pictures. Partway through picture presentation, participants' attention was directed toward an arousing or non-arousing region of unpleasant pictures. In line with prior work, the LPP was reduced when attention was directed toward non-arousing compared to arousing regions of unpleasant pictures; similar results were observed for the ssVEP. Thus, both electrocortical measures index affective salience and are sensitive to directed (here: spatial) attention. Variation in the LPP and ssVEP was unrelated, suggesting that these measures are not redundant with each other and may capture different neurophysiological aspects of affective stimulus processing and attention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Examining sensory ability, feature matching and assessment-based adaptation for a brain-computer interface using the steady-state visually evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Brumberg, Jonathan S; Nguyen, Anh; Pitt, Kevin M; Lorenz, Sean D

    2018-01-31

    We investigated how overt visual attention and oculomotor control influence successful use of a visual feedback brain-computer interface (BCI) for accessing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices in a heterogeneous population of individuals with profound neuromotor impairments. BCIs are often tested within a single patient population limiting generalization of results. This study focuses on examining individual sensory abilities with an eye toward possible interface adaptations to improve device performance. Five individuals with a range of neuromotor disorders participated in four-choice BCI control task involving the steady state visually evoked potential. The BCI graphical interface was designed to simulate a commercial AAC device to examine whether an integrated device could be used successfully by individuals with neuromotor impairment. All participants were able to interact with the BCI and highest performance was found for participants able to employ an overt visual attention strategy. For participants with visual deficits to due to impaired oculomotor control, effective performance increased after accounting for mismatches between the graphical layout and participant visual capabilities. As BCIs are translated from research environments to clinical applications, the assessment of BCI-related skills will help facilitate proper device selection and provide individuals who use BCI the greatest likelihood of immediate and long term communicative success. Overall, our results indicate that adaptations can be an effective strategy to reduce barriers and increase access to BCI technology. These efforts should be directed by comprehensive assessments for matching individuals to the most appropriate device to support their complex communication needs. Implications for Rehabilitation Brain computer interfaces using the steady state visually evoked potential can be integrated with an augmentative and alternative communication device to provide access

  1. A Different View on the Checkerboard? Alterations in Early and Late Visually Evoked EEG Potentials in Asperger Observers

    PubMed Central

    Kornmeier, Juergen; Wörner, Rike; Riedel, Andreas; Bach, Michael; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Background Asperger Autism is a lifelong psychiatric condition with highly circumscribed interests and routines, problems in social cognition, verbal and nonverbal communication, and also perceptual abnormalities with sensory hypersensitivity. To objectify both lower-level visual and cognitive alterations we looked for differences in visual event-related potentials (EEG) between Asperger observers and matched controls while they observed simple checkerboard stimuli. Methods In a balanced oddball paradigm checkerboards of two checksizes (0.6° and 1.2°) were presented with different frequencies. Participants counted the occurrence times of the rare fine or rare coarse checkerboards in different experimental conditions. We focused on early visual ERP differences as a function of checkerboard size and the classical P3b ERP component as an indicator of cognitive processing. Results We found an early (100–200 ms after stimulus onset) occipital ERP effect of checkerboard size (dominant spatial frequency). This effect was weaker in the Asperger than in the control observers. Further a typical parietal/central oddball-P3b occurred at 500 ms with the rare checkerboards. The P3b showed a right-hemispheric lateralization, which was more prominent in Asperger than in control observers. Discussion The difference in the early occipital ERP effect between the two groups may be a physiological marker of differences in the processing of small visual details in Asperger observers compared to normal controls. The stronger lateralization of the P3b in Asperger observers may indicate a stronger involvement of the right-hemispheric network of bottom-up attention. The lateralization of the P3b signal might be a compensatory consequence of the compromised early checksize effect. Higher-level analytical information processing units may need to compensate for difficulties in low-level signal analysis. PMID:24632708

  2. A different view on the checkerboard? Alterations in early and late visually evoked EEG potentials in Asperger observers.

    PubMed

    Kornmeier, Juergen; Wörner, Rike; Riedel, Andreas; Bach, Michael; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Asperger Autism is a lifelong psychiatric condition with highly circumscribed interests and routines, problems in social cognition, verbal and nonverbal communication, and also perceptual abnormalities with sensory hypersensitivity. To objectify both lower-level visual and cognitive alterations we looked for differences in visual event-related potentials (EEG) between Asperger observers and matched controls while they observed simple checkerboard stimuli. In a balanced oddball paradigm checkerboards of two checksizes (0.6° and 1.2°) were presented with different frequencies. Participants counted the occurrence times of the rare fine or rare coarse checkerboards in different experimental conditions. We focused on early visual ERP differences as a function of checkerboard size and the classical P3b ERP component as an indicator of cognitive processing. We found an early (100-200 ms after stimulus onset) occipital ERP effect of checkerboard size (dominant spatial frequency). This effect was weaker in the Asperger than in the control observers. Further a typical parietal/central oddball-P3b occurred at 500 ms with the rare checkerboards. The P3b showed a right-hemispheric lateralization, which was more prominent in Asperger than in control observers. The difference in the early occipital ERP effect between the two groups may be a physiological marker of differences in the processing of small visual details in Asperger observers compared to normal controls. The stronger lateralization of the P3b in Asperger observers may indicate a stronger involvement of the right-hemispheric network of bottom-up attention. The lateralization of the P3b signal might be a compensatory consequence of the compromised early checksize effect. Higher-level analytical information processing units may need to compensate for difficulties in low-level signal analysis.

  3. Auditory- and Visual-Evoked Potentials in Mexican Infants Are Not Affected by Maternal Supplementation with 400 mg/d Docosahexaenoic Acid in the Second Half of Pregnancy1234

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Aryeh D.; Wang, Meng; Rivera, Juan A.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2012-01-01

    The evidence relating prenatal supplementation with DHA to offspring neurological development is limited. We investigated the effect of prenatal DHA supplementation on infant brainstem auditory-evoked responses and visual- evoked potentials in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Pregnant women were supplemented daily with 400 mg DHA or placebo from gestation wk 18–22 through delivery. DHA and placebo groups did not differ in maternal characteristics at randomization or infant characteristics at birth. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were measured at 1 and 3 mo in 749 and 664 infants, respectively, and visual-evoked potentials were measured at 3 and 6 mo in 679 and 817 infants, respectively. Left-right brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were moderately correlated (range, 0.26–0.43; all P < 0.001) and left-right visual-evoked potentials were strongly correlated (range, 0.79–0.94; all P < 0.001) within any assessment. Correlations across visits were modest to moderate (range, 0.09–0.38; all P < 0.01). The offspring of DHA-supplemented women did not differ from those of control women with respect to any outcome measure (all comparisons P > 0.10). We conclude that DHA supplementation during pregnancy did not influence brainstem auditory-evoked responses at 1 and 3 mo or visual-evoked potentials at 3 and 6 mo. PMID:22739364

  4. Analysis of User Interaction with a Brain-Computer Interface Based on Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials: Case Study of a Game

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sarah Negreiros; Costa, Thiago Bulhões da Silva; Attux, Romis; Hornung, Heiko Horst; Arantes, Dalton Soares

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic analysis of a game controlled by a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) based on Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP). The objective is to understand BCI systems from the Human-Computer Interface (HCI) point of view, by observing how the users interact with the game and evaluating how the interface elements influence the system performance. The interactions of 30 volunteers with our computer game, named “Get Coins,” through a BCI based on SSVEP, have generated a database of brain signals and the corresponding responses to a questionnaire about various perceptual parameters, such as visual stimulation, acoustic feedback, background music, visual contrast, and visual fatigue. Each one of the volunteers played one match using the keyboard and four matches using the BCI, for comparison. In all matches using the BCI, the volunteers achieved the goals of the game. Eight of them achieved a perfect score in at least one of the four matches, showing the feasibility of the direct communication between the brain and the computer. Despite this successful experiment, adaptations and improvements should be implemented to make this innovative technology accessible to the end user. PMID:29849549

  5. Effect of binasal occlusion (BNO) and base-in prisms on the visual-evoked potential (VEP) in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Naveen K; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    To assess quantitatively the effect and relative contribution of binasal occlusion (BNO) and base-in prisms (BI) on visually-evoked potential (VEP) responsivity in persons with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and the symptom of visual motion sensitivity (VMS), as well as in visually-normal (VN) individuals. Subjects were comprised of 20 VN adults and 15 adults with mTBI and VMS. There were four test conditions: (1) conventional pattern VEP, which served as the baseline comparison condition; (2) VEP with BNO alone; (3) VEP with 2 pd BI prisms before each eye; and (4) VEP with the above BNO and BI prism combination. In mTBI, the mean VEP amplitude increased significantly in nearly all subjects (∼90%) with BNO alone. In contrast, in VN, it decreased significantly with BNO alone in all subjects (100%), as compared to the other test conditions. These objective findings were consistent with improvements in visual impressions and sensorimotor tasks in the group with mTBI. Latency remained within normal limits under all test conditions in both groups. Only the BNO condition demonstrated significant, but opposite and consistent, directional effects on the VEP amplitude in both groups. The BNO-VEP test condition may be used clinically for the objectively-based, differential diagnosis of persons suspected of having mTBI and VMS from the VNs.

  6. Analysis of User Interaction with a Brain-Computer Interface Based on Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials: Case Study of a Game.

    PubMed

    Leite, Harlei Miguel de Arruda; de Carvalho, Sarah Negreiros; Costa, Thiago Bulhões da Silva; Attux, Romis; Hornung, Heiko Horst; Arantes, Dalton Soares

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic analysis of a game controlled by a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) based on Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP). The objective is to understand BCI systems from the Human-Computer Interface (HCI) point of view, by observing how the users interact with the game and evaluating how the interface elements influence the system performance. The interactions of 30 volunteers with our computer game, named "Get Coins," through a BCI based on SSVEP, have generated a database of brain signals and the corresponding responses to a questionnaire about various perceptual parameters, such as visual stimulation, acoustic feedback, background music, visual contrast, and visual fatigue. Each one of the volunteers played one match using the keyboard and four matches using the BCI, for comparison. In all matches using the BCI, the volunteers achieved the goals of the game. Eight of them achieved a perfect score in at least one of the four matches, showing the feasibility of the direct communication between the brain and the computer. Despite this successful experiment, adaptations and improvements should be implemented to make this innovative technology accessible to the end user.

  7. Changes in the visual-evoked P1 potential as a function of schizotypy and background color in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S; Chan, Chi C; Trachik, Benjamin J; Rassovsky, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    Research has suggested a hypoactive visual magnocellular (M) pathway in individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and traits, along with a unique response of this pathway to red light. As these abnormalities only appear in a subset of these samples, they may reflect unknown subtypes with unique etiologies and corresponding neuropathologies. The P1 transient visual-evoked component has been found to be influenced by M-pathway activity; therefore, the current study assessed the P1 component in response to a 64% contrast checker stimulus on white, red, and green background conditions. The sample consisted of 28 undergraduate participants (61% male) who endorsed a continuous range of total scores from the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Participants with higher total SPQ scores had a reduced P1 mean amplitude with the white (baseline) background, which was primarily related to the SPQ Magical Thinking subscale score. In addition, while participants with lower total SPQ scores showed the expected reduction in P1 amplitude to the red (vs. green) background, participants with higher total SPQ scores showed no change, which was primarily related to the SPQ Ideas of Reference subscale. This differential change to the red background remained after covarying for the P1 amplitude to the green background, thus representing a relatively independent effect. Further confirmation of these early visual processing relationships to particular clusters of symptoms in related psychiatric samples may assist in revealing unique, currently unknown, subtypes of particular psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. This can direct treatment efforts toward more homogeneous neuropathology targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute inhalation of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane alters visual evoked potentials and signal detection behaviour of rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volatile organic compound 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP, “isooctane”) is a primary constituent of gasoline for which the current health effects data are insufficient to permit EPA to conduct a risk assessment. We evaluated potential neurological impairment from acute inhalati...

  9. Acute Inhalation of 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane Alters Visual Evoked Potentials and Signal Detection Behavior in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volatile organic compound 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP, "isooctane") is a constituent of gasoline for which the current health effects data are insufficient to permit the US Environmental Protection Agency to conduct a risk assessment. The potential neurological impairment fro...

  10. Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials Can Be Explained by Temporal Superposition of Transient Event-Related Responses

    PubMed Central

    Capilla, Almudena; Pazo-Alvarez, Paula; Darriba, Alvaro; Campo, Pablo; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background One common criterion for classifying electrophysiological brain responses is based on the distinction between transient (i.e. event-related potentials, ERPs) and steady-state responses (SSRs). The generation of SSRs is usually attributed to the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the stimulus train. However, a more parsimonious account suggests that SSRs might result from the linear addition of the transient responses elicited by each stimulus. This study aimed to investigate this possibility. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded brain potentials elicited by a checkerboard stimulus reversing at different rates. We modeled SSRs by sequentially shifting and linearly adding rate-specific ERPs. Our results show a strong resemblance between recorded and synthetic SSRs, supporting the superposition hypothesis. Furthermore, we did not find evidence of entrainment of a neural oscillation at the stimulation frequency. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that visual SSRs can be explained as a superposition of transient ERPs. These findings have critical implications in our current understanding of brain oscillations. Contrary to the idea that neural networks can be tuned to a wide range of frequencies, our findings rather suggest that the oscillatory response of a given neural network is constrained within its natural frequency range. PMID:21267081

  11. [Impact of hypoglycemic episodes on nerves conduction and auditory and visual evoked potentials in children with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Trippenbach-Dulska, Hanna; Emeryk-Szajewska, Barbara; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Pańkowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an acute disturbance of energy, especially impacting the central nervous system, but direct influence on peripheral nervous function is not detected. The aim of the study was to establish the influence of hypoglycemic moderate and severe episodes on the function of peripheral nerves, hearing and visual pathway. 97 children with type 1 diabetes (mean age 15.4+/-2.16 years, mean duration of diabetes 8.11+/-2.9 years, mean HbA1c 8,58+/-1.06%), at least 10 years old and with at least 3 years duration of diabetes, were included to study. Nerve conduction studies, visual (VEP) and auditory (ABR) evoked potentials were performed with standard surface stimulating and recording techniques. Moderate hypoglycemic episodes were defined as events of low glycemia requiring help of another person but without loss of consciousness and/or convulsions but recurrent frequently in at least one year. Severe hypoglycemia was defined as events with loss of consciousness and/or convulsions. Univariate ANOVA tests of significance or H Kruskal-Wallis test were used, depending on normality of distribution. The subgroups with a history of hypoglycemic episodes had significant delay in all conduction parameters in the sural nerve (amplitude p<0.05, sensory latency p<0.05, and velocity p<0.005) and in motor potential amplitude of tibial nerve (p<0.005). In ABR wave III latency and interval I-III in subgroups with episodes of hypoglycemia (p<0,05) were significantly prolonged. In analyses of VEP parameters no differences were detected. The study showed influence of hypoglycemic episodes on function of all sural nerve parameters and tibial motor amplitude, and in ABR on wave III and interval I-III. Frequent moderate hypoglycemic episodes were strong risk factors for damage of the peripheral and central nervous systems, comparable with impact of several severe hypoglycemias.

  12. Functional hemispheric asymmetries of global/local processing mirrored by the steady-state visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Martens, Ulla; Hübner, Ronald

    2013-03-01

    While hemispheric differences in global/local processing have been reported by various studies, it is still under dispute at which processing stage they occur. Primarily, it was assumed that these asymmetries originate from an early perceptual stage. Instead, the content-level binding theory (Hübner & Volberg, 2005) suggests that the hemispheres differ at a later stage at which the stimulus information is bound to its respective level. The present study tested this assumption by means of steady-state evoked potentials (SSVEPs). In particular, we presented hierarchical letters flickering at 12Hz while participants categorised the letters at a pre- cued level (global or local). The information at the two levels could be congruent or incongruent with respect to the required response. Since content-binding is only necessary if there is a response conflict, asymmetric hemispheric processing should be observed only for incongruent stimuli. Indeed, our results show that the cue and congruent stimuli elicited equal SSVEP global/local effects in both hemispheres. In contrast, incongruent stimuli elicited lower SSVEP amplitudes for a local than for a global target level at left posterior electrodes, whereas a reversed pattern was seen at right hemispheric electrodes. These findings provide further evidence for a level-specific hemispheric advantage with respect to content-level binding. Moreover, the fact that the SSVEP is sensitive to these processes offers the possibility to separately track global and local processing by presenting both level contents with different frequencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Processing of emotional words measured simultaneously with steady-state visually evoked potentials and near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koban, Leonie; Ninck, Markus; Li, Jun; Gisler, Thomas; Kissler, Johanna

    2010-07-27

    Emotional stimuli are preferentially processed compared to neutral ones. Measuring the magnetic resonance blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response or EEG event-related potentials, this has also been demonstrated for emotional versus neutral words. However, it is currently unclear whether emotion effects in word processing can also be detected with other measures such as EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) or optical brain imaging techniques. In the present study, we simultaneously performed SSVEP measurements and near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS), a new optical technique for the non-invasive measurement of brain function, to measure brain responses to neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant nouns flickering at a frequency of 7.5 Hz. The power of the SSVEP signal was significantly modulated by the words' emotional content at occipital electrodes, showing reduced SSVEP power during stimulation with pleasant compared to neutral nouns. By contrast, the DWS signal measured over the visual cortex showed significant differences between stimulation with flickering words and baseline periods, but no modulation in response to the words' emotional significance. This study is the first investigation of brain responses to emotional words using simultaneous measurements of SSVEPs and DWS. Emotional modulation of word processing was detected with EEG SSVEPs, but not by DWS. SSVEP power for emotional, specifically pleasant, compared to neutral words was reduced, which contrasts with previous results obtained when presenting emotional pictures. This appears to reflect processing differences between symbolic and pictorial emotional stimuli. While pictures prompt sustained perceptual processing, decoding the significance of emotional words requires more internal associative processing. Reasons for an absence of emotion effects in the DWS signal are discussed.

  14. The effect of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status of brain in normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ozkan, Ayse; Parlak, Hande; Aslan, Mutay; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Agar, Aysel

    2016-07-01

    Sulfite, commonly used as a preservative in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals, is a very reactive and potentially toxic molecule which is detoxified by sulfite oxidase (SOX). Changes induced by aging may be exacerbated by exogenous chemicals like sulfite. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain antioxidant statuses by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Brain lipid oxidation status was also determined via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in normal- and SOX-deficient aged rats. Rats do not mimic the sulfite responses seen in humans because of their relatively high SOX activity level. Therefore this study used SOX-deficient rats since they are more appropriate models for studying sulfite toxicity. Forty male Wistar rats aged 24 months were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), sulfite (S), SOX-deficient (D) and SOX-deficient + sulfite (DS). SOX deficiency was established by feeding rats with low molybdenum (Mo) diet and adding 200 ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite in the form of sodium metabisulfite (25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given by gavage. Treatment continued for 6 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, flash VEPs were recorded. Hepatic SOX activity was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. SOX-deficient rats had an approximately 10-fold decrease in hepatic SOX activity compared with the normal rats. The activity of SOX in deficient rats was thus in the range of humans. There was no significant difference between control and treated groups in either latence or amplitude of VEP components. Brain SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and brain TBARS levels were similar in all experimental groups compared with the control group. Our results indicate that exogenous administration of sulfite does not affect VEP components and the antioxidant/oxidant status of aged rat brains. © The Author

  15. Clinical feasibility of brain-computer interface based on steady-state visual evoked potential in patients with locked-in syndrome: Case studies.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Han-Jeong; Han, Chang-Hee; Lim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Wook; Choi, Soo-In; An, Kwang-Ok; Lee, Jun-Hak; Cha, Ho-Seung; Hyun Kim, Seung; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Although the feasibility of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems based on steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) has been extensively investigated, only a few studies have evaluated its clinical feasibility in patients with locked-in syndrome (LIS), who are the main targets of BCI technology. The main objective of this case report was to share our experiences of SSVEP-based BCI experiments involving five patients with LIS, thereby providing researchers with useful information that can potentially help them to design BCI experiments for patients with LIS. In our experiments, a four-class online SSVEP-based BCI system was implemented and applied to four of five patients repeatedly on multiple days to investigate its test-retest reliability. In the last experiments with two of the four patients, the practical usability of our BCI system was tested using a questionnaire survey. All five patients showed clear and distinct SSVEP responses at all four fundamental stimulation frequencies (6, 6.66, 7.5, 10 Hz), and responses at harmonic frequencies were also observed in three patients. Mean classification accuracy was 76.99% (chance level = 25%). The test-retest reliability experiments demonstrated stable performance of our BCI system over different days even when the initial experimental settings (e.g., electrode configuration, fixation time, visual angle) used in the first experiment were used without significant modifications. Our results suggest that SSVEP-based BCI paradigms might be successfully used to implement clinically feasible BCI systems for severely paralyzed patients. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Covert enaction at work: Recording the continuous movements of visuospatial attention to visible or imagined targets by means of Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs).

    PubMed

    Gregori Grgič, Regina; Calore, Enrico; de'Sperati, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Whereas overt visuospatial attention is customarily measured with eye tracking, covert attention is assessed by various methods. Here we exploited Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs) - the oscillatory responses of the visual cortex to incoming flickering stimuli - to record the movements of covert visuospatial attention in a way operatively similar to eye tracking (attention tracking), which allowed us to compare motion observation and motion extrapolation with and without eye movements. Observers fixated a central dot and covertly tracked a target oscillating horizontally and sinusoidally. In the background, the left and the right halves of the screen flickered at two different frequencies, generating two SSVEPs in occipital regions whose size varied reciprocally as observers attended to the moving target. The two signals were combined into a single quantity that was modulated at the target frequency in a quasi-sinusoidal way, often clearly visible in single trials. The modulation continued almost unchanged when the target was switched off and observers mentally extrapolated its motion in imagery, and also when observers pointed their finger at the moving target during covert tracking, or imagined doing so. The amplitude of modulation during covert tracking was ∼25-30% of that measured when observers followed the target with their eyes. We used 4 electrodes in parieto-occipital areas, but similar results were achieved with a single electrode in Oz. In a second experiment we tested ramp and step motion. During overt tracking, SSVEPs were remarkably accurate, showing both saccadic-like and smooth pursuit-like modulations of cortical responsiveness, although during covert tracking the modulation deteriorated. Covert tracking was better with sinusoidal motion than ramp motion, and better with moving targets than stationary ones. The clear modulation of cortical responsiveness recorded during both overt and covert tracking, identical for motion observation

  17. Visual evoked potential measurement of contrast sensitivity in a case of retinal laser injury reveals visual function loss despite normal acuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Harrison, Joseph M.; Zwick, Harry; Longbotham, Harold G.; Ballentine, Charles S.; Pierce, Bennie

    1996-04-01

    Although visual function following retinal laser injuries has traditionally been assessed by measuring visual acuity, this measure only indicates the highest spatial frequency resolvable under high-contrast viewing conditions. Another visual psychophysical parameter is contrast sensitivity (CS), which measures the minimum contrast required for detection of targets over a range of spatial frequencies, and may evaluate visual mechanisms that do not directly subserve acuity. We used the visual evoked potential (VEP) to measure CS in a population of normal subjects and in patients with ophthalmic conditions affecting retinal function, including one patient with a laser injury in the macula. In this patient, the acuity had recovered from

  18. Steady-state multifocal visual evoked potential (ssmfVEP) using dartboard stimulation as a possible tool for objective visual field assessment.

    PubMed

    Horn, Folkert K; Selle, Franziska; Hohberger, Bettina; Kremers, Jan

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether a conventional, monitor-based multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) system can be used to record steady-state mfVEP (ssmfVEP) in healthy subjects and to study the effects of temporal frequency, electrode configuration and alpha waves. Multifocal pattern reversal VEP measurements were performed at 58 dartboard fields using VEP recording equipment. The responses were measured using m-sequences with four pattern reversals per m-step. Temporal frequencies were varied between 6 and 15 Hz. Recordings were obtained from nine normal subjects with a cross-shaped, four-electrode device (two additional channels were derived). Spectral analyses were performed on the responses at all locations. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was computed for each response using the signal amplitude at the reversal frequency and the noise at the neighbouring frequencies. Most responses in the ssmfVEP were significantly above noise. The SNR was largest for an 8.6-Hz reversal frequency. The individual alpha electroencephalogram (EEG) did not strongly influence the results. The percentage of the records in which each of the 6 channels had the largest SNR was between 10.0 and 25.2 %. Our results in normal subjects indicate that reliable mfVEP responses can be achieved by steady-state stimulation using a conventional dartboard stimulator and multi-channel electrode device. The ssmfVEP may be useful for objective visual field assessment as spectrum analysis can be used for automated evaluation of responses. The optimal reversal frequency is 8.6 Hz. Alpha waves have only a minor influence on the analysis. Future studies must include comparisons with conventional mfVEP and psychophysical visual field tests.

  19. Visual Evoked Potential and Magnetic Resonance Imaging are More Effective Markers of Multiple Sclerosis Progression than Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation.

    PubMed

    Kantorová, Ema; Ziak, Peter; Kurča, Egon; Koyšová, Mária; Hladká, Mária; Zeleňák, Kamil; Michalik, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEP) as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes) and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes) completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON) with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes) and another group (NON) without it (24 patients, 48 eyes). The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx) examination of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). In the MS group, we also examined: Kurtzke "expanded disability status scale" (EDSS), the duration of the disorder, VEP - latency and amplitude, and conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman correlation analyses. In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON-patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r = -0.15) and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8). In NON-patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6) and amplitudes (r = -0.3, r = -4.2) was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5). Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinization and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON-patients. In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx) can be used for the detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinization and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring

  20. Brain-computer interfaces for 1-D and 2-D cursor control: designs using volitional control of the EEG spectrum or steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Trejo, Leonard J; Rosipal, Roman; Matthews, Bryan

    2006-06-01

    We have developed and tested two electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for users to control a cursor on a computer display. Our system uses an adaptive algorithm, based on kernel partial least squares classification (KPLS), to associate patterns in multichannel EEG frequency spectra with cursor controls. Our first BCI, Target Practice, is a system for one-dimensional device control, in which participants use biofeedback to learn voluntary control of their EEG spectra. Target Practice uses a KPLS classifier to map power spectra of 62-electrode EEG signals to rightward or leftward position of a moving cursor on a computer display. Three subjects learned to control motion of a cursor on a video display in multiple blocks of 60 trials over periods of up to six weeks. The best subject's average skill in correct selection of the cursor direction grew from 58% to 88% after 13 training sessions. Target Practice also implements online control of two artifact sources: 1) removal of ocular artifact by linear subtraction of wavelet-smoothed vertical and horizontal electrooculograms (EOG) signals, 2) control of muscle artifact by inhibition of BCI training during periods of relatively high power in the 40-64 Hz band. The second BCI, Think Pointer, is a system for two-dimensional cursor control. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are triggered by four flickering checkerboard stimuli located in narrow strips at each edge of the display. The user attends to one of the four beacons to initiate motion in the desired direction. The SSVEP signals are recorded from 12 electrodes located over the occipital region. A KPLS classifier is individually calibrated to map multichannel frequency bands of the SSVEP signals to right-left or up-down motion of a cursor on a computer display. The display stops moving when the user attends to a central fixation point. As for Target Practice, Think Pointer also implements wavelet-based online removal of ocular

  1. Effect of recording duration on the diagnostic performance of multifocal visual-evoked potentials in high-risk ocular hypertension and early glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Brad; Zhang, Xian; Hood, Donald C; Demirel, Shaban; Patterson, Emily; Jamil, Annisa; Mansberger, Steven L; Cioffi, George A; Johnson, Chris A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect on diagnostic performance of reducing multifocal visual-evoked potential (mfVEP) recording duration from 16 to 8 minutes per eye. Both eyes of 185 individuals with high-risk ocular hypertension or early glaucoma were studied. Two 8-minute mfVEP recordings were obtained for each eye in an ABBA order using VERIS. The first recording for each eye was compared against single run (1-Run) mfVEP normative data; the average of both recordings for each eye was compared against 2-Run normative data. Visual fields (VFs) were obtained by standard automated perimetry (SAP) within 22.3+/-27.0 days of the mfVEP. Stereo disc photographs and Heidelberg Retina Tomograph images were obtained together, within 24.8+/-50.4 days of the mfVEP and 33.1+/-62.9 days of SAP. Masked experts graded disc photographs as either glaucomatous optic neuropathy or normal. The overall Moorfields Regression Analysis result from the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph was used as a separate diagnostic classification. Thus, 4 diagnostic standards were applied in total, 2 based on optic disc structure alone and 2 others based on disc structure and SAP. Agreement between the 1-Run and 2-Run mfVEP was 90%. Diagnostic performance of the 1-Run mfVEP was similar to that of the 2-Run mfVEP for all 4 diagnostic standards. Sensitivity was slightly higher for the 2-Run mfVEP, whereas specificity was slightly higher for the 1-Run mfVEP. If higher sensitivity is sought, the 2-Run mfVEP will provide better discrimination between groups of eyes with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (eg, early glaucoma or high-risk suspects). But if higher specificity is a more important goal, the 1-Run mfVEP provides adequate sensitivity and requires only half the test time. Considered alongside prior studies, the present results suggest that the 1-Run mfVEP is an efficient way to confirm (or refute) the extent of VF loss in patients with moderate or advanced glaucoma, particularly in those with unreliable VFs

  2. Effect of Recording Duration on the Diagnostic Performance of Multifocal Visual-evoked Potentials in High-risk Ocular Hypertension and Early Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Zhang, Xian; Hood, Donald C.; Demirel, Shaban; Patterson, Emily; Jamil, Annisa; Mansberger, Steven L.; Cioffi, George A.; Johnson, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect on diagnostic performance of reducing multifocal visual-evoked potential (mfVEP) recording duration from 16 to 8 minutes per eye. Methods Both eyes of 185 individuals with high-risk ocular hypertension or early glaucoma were studied. Two 8-minute mfVEP recordings were obtained for each eye in an ABBA order using VERIS. The first recording for each eye was compared against single run (1-Run) mfVEP normative data; the average of both recordings for each eye was compared against 2-Run normative data. Visual fields (VFs) were obtained by standard automated perimetry (SAP) within 22.3±27.0 days of the mfVEP. Stereo disc photographs and Heidelberg Retina Tomograph images were obtained together, within 24.8±50.4 days of the mfVEP and 33.1±62.9 days of SAP. Masked experts graded disc photographs as either glaucomatous optic neuropathy or normal. The overall Moorfields Regression Analysis result from the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph was used as a separate diagnostic classification. Thus, 4 diagnostic standards were applied in total, 2 based on optic disc structure alone and 2 others based on disc structure and SAP. Results Agreement between the 1-Run and 2-Run mfVEP was 90%. Diagnostic performance of the 1-Run mfVEP was similar to that of the 2-Run mfVEP for all 4 diagnostic standards. Sensitivity was slightly higher for the 2-Run mfVEP, whereas specificity was slightly higher for the 1-Run mfVEP. Conclusions If higher sensitivity is sought, the 2-Run mfVEP will provide better discrimination between groups of eyes with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (eg, early glaucoma or high-risk suspects). But if higher specificity is a more important goal, the 1-Run mfVEP provides adequate sensitivity and requires only half the test time. Considered alongside prior studies, the present results suggest that the 1-Run mfVEP is an efficient way to confirm (or refute) the extent of VF loss in patients with moderate or advanced glaucoma, particularly

  3. Evaluation of hemifield sector analysis protocol in multifocal visual evoked potential objective perimetry for the diagnosis and early detection of glaucomatous field defects.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Mohammad F; Cubbidge, Robert P; Al-Mansouri, Fatima; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-02-01

    Multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) is a newly introduced method used for objective visual field assessment. Several analysis protocols have been tested to identify early visual field losses in glaucoma patients using the mfVEP technique, some were successful in detection of field defects, which were comparable to the standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual field assessment, and others were not very informative and needed more adjustment and research work. In this study we implemented a novel analysis approach and evaluated its validity and whether it could be used effectively for early detection of visual field defects in glaucoma. Three groups were tested in this study; normal controls (38 eyes), glaucoma patients (36 eyes) and glaucoma suspect patients (38 eyes). All subjects had a two standard Humphrey field analyzer (HFA) test 24-2 and a single mfVEP test undertaken in one session. Analysis of the mfVEP results was done using the new analysis protocol; the hemifield sector analysis (HSA) protocol. Analysis of the HFA was done using the standard grading system. Analysis of mfVEP results showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the three groups in the mean signal to noise ratio (ANOVA test, p < 0.001 with a 95% confidence interval). The difference between superior and inferior hemispheres in all subjects were statistically significant in the glaucoma patient group in all 11 sectors (t-test, p < 0.001), partially significant in 5 / 11 (t-test, p < 0.01), and no statistical difference in most sectors of the normal group (1 / 11 sectors was significant, t-test, p < 0.9). Sensitivity and specificity of the HSA protocol in detecting glaucoma was 97% and 86%, respectively, and for glaucoma suspect patients the values were 89% and 79%, respectively. The new HSA protocol used in the mfVEP testing can be applied to detect glaucomatous visual field defects in both glaucoma and glaucoma suspect patients. Using this protocol can provide

  4. Evaluation of Hemifield Sector Analysis Protocol in Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential Objective Perimetry for the Diagnosis and Early Detection of Glaucomatous Field Defects

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Mohammad F.; Cubbidge, Robert P.; Al-Mansouri, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) is a newly introduced method used for objective visual field assessment. Several analysis protocols have been tested to identify early visual field losses in glaucoma patients using the mfVEP technique, some were successful in detection of field defects, which were comparable to the standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual field assessment, and others were not very informative and needed more adjustment and research work. In this study we implemented a novel analysis approach and evaluated its validity and whether it could be used effectively for early detection of visual field defects in glaucoma. Methods Three groups were tested in this study; normal controls (38 eyes), glaucoma patients (36 eyes) and glaucoma suspect patients (38 eyes). All subjects had a two standard Humphrey field analyzer (HFA) test 24-2 and a single mfVEP test undertaken in one session. Analysis of the mfVEP results was done using the new analysis protocol; the hemifield sector analysis (HSA) protocol. Analysis of the HFA was done using the standard grading system. Results Analysis of mfVEP results showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the three groups in the mean signal to noise ratio (ANOVA test, p < 0.001 with a 95% confidence interval). The difference between superior and inferior hemispheres in all subjects were statistically significant in the glaucoma patient group in all 11 sectors (t-test, p < 0.001), partially significant in 5 / 11 (t-test, p < 0.01), and no statistical difference in most sectors of the normal group (1 / 11 sectors was significant, t-test, p < 0.9). Sensitivity and specificity of the HSA protocol in detecting glaucoma was 97% and 86%, respectively, and for glaucoma suspect patients the values were 89% and 79%, respectively. Conclusions The new HSA protocol used in the mfVEP testing can be applied to detect glaucomatous visual field defects in both glaucoma and glaucoma suspect

  5. Objective evaluation of fatigue by EEG spectral analysis in steady-state visual evoked potential-based brain-computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The fatigue that users suffer when using steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can cause a number of serious problems such as signal quality degradation and system performance deterioration, users’ discomfort and even risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures, posing heavy restrictions on the applications of SSVEP-based BCIs. Towards alleviating the fatigue, a fundamental step is to measure and evaluate it but most existing works adopt self-reported questionnaire methods which are subjective, offline and memory dependent. This paper proposes an objective and real-time approach based on electroencephalography (EEG) spectral analysis to evaluate the fatigue in SSVEP-based BCIs. Methods How the EEG indices (amplitudes in δ, θ, α and β frequency bands), the selected ratio indices (θ/α and (θ + α)/β), and SSVEP properties (amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)) changes with the increasing fatigue level are investigated through two elaborate SSVEP-based BCI experiments, one validates mainly the effectiveness and another considers more practical situations. Meanwhile, a self-reported fatigue questionnaire is used to provide a subjective reference. ANOVA is employed to test the significance of the difference between the alert state and the fatigue state for each index. Results Consistent results are obtained in two experiments: the significant increases in α and (θ + α)/β, as well as the decrease in θ/α are found associated with the increasing fatigue level, indicating that EEG spectral analysis can provide robust objective evaluation of the fatigue in SSVEP-based BCIs. Moreover, the results show that the amplitude and SNR of the elicited SSVEP are significantly affected by users’ fatigue. Conclusions The experiment results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method as an objective and real-time evaluation of the fatigue in SSVEP-based BCIs. This method would

  6. Brain-Computer Interfaces for 1-D and 2-D Cursor Control: Designs Using Volitional Control of the EEG Spectrum or Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Matthews, Bryan; Rosipal, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and tested two EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for users to control a cursor on a computer display. Our system uses an adaptive algorithm, based on kernel partial least squares classification (KPLS), to associate patterns in multichannel EEG frequency spectra with cursor controls. Our first BCI, Target Practice, is a system for one-dimensional device control, in which participants use biofeedback to learn voluntary control of their EEG spectra. Target Practice uses a KF LS classifier to map power spectra of 30-electrode EEG signals to rightward or leftward position of a moving cursor on a computer display. Three subjects learned to control motion of a cursor on a video display in multiple blocks of 60 trials over periods of up to six weeks. The best subject s average skill in correct selection of the cursor direction grew from 58% to 88% after 13 training sessions. Target Practice also implements online control of two artifact sources: a) removal of ocular artifact by linear subtraction of wavelet-smoothed vertical and horizontal EOG signals, b) control of muscle artifact by inhibition of BCI training during periods of relatively high power in the 40-64 Hz band. The second BCI, Think Pointer, is a system for two-dimensional cursor control. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are triggered by four flickering checkerboard stimuli located in narrow strips at each edge of the display. The user attends to one of the four beacons to initiate motion in the desired direction. The SSVEP signals are recorded from eight electrodes located over the occipital region. A KPLS classifier is individually calibrated to map multichannel frequency bands of the SSVEP signals to right-left or up-down motion of a cursor on a computer display. The display stops moving when the user attends to a central fixation point. As for Target Practice, Think Pointer also implements wavelet-based online removal of ocular artifact; however, in Think Pointer muscle

  7. Effect of Postural Control Demands on Early Visual Evoked Potentials during a Subjective Visual Vertical Perception Task in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tzu; Meng, Ling-Fu; Chang, Chun-Ju; Lai, Po-Liang; Lung, Chi-Wen; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2017-01-01

    Subjective visual vertical (SVV) judgment and standing stability were separately investigated among patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Although, one study has investigated the central mechanism of stability control in the AIS population, the relationships between SVV, decreased standing stability, and AIS have never been investigated. Through event-related potentials (ERPs), the present study examined the effect of postural control demands (PDs) on AIS central mechanisms related to SVV judgment and standing stability to elucidate the time-serial stability control process. Thirteen AIS subjects (AIS group) and 13 age-matched adolescents (control group) aged 12-18 years were recruited. Each subject had to complete an SVV task (i.e., the modified rod-and-frame [mRAF] test) as a stimulus, with online electroencephalogram recording being performed in the following three standing postures: feet shoulder-width apart standing, feet together standing, and tandem standing. The behavioral performance in terms of postural stability (center of pressure excursion), SVV (accuracy and reaction time), and mRAF-locked ERPs (mean amplitude and peak latency of the P1, N1, and P2 components) was then compared between the AIS and control groups. In the behavioral domain, the results revealed that only the AIS group demonstrated a significantly accelerated SVV reaction time as the PDs increased. In the cerebral domain, significantly larger P2 mean amplitudes were observed during both feet shoulder-width-apart standing and feet together standing postures compared with during tandem standing. No group differences were noted in the cerebral domain. The results indicated that (1) during the dual-task paradigm, a differential behavioral strategy of accelerated SVV reaction time was observed in the AIS group only when the PDs increased and (2) the decrease in P2 mean amplitudes with the increase in the PD levels might be direct evidence of the competition for central

  8. Neuropathies of the optic nerve and visual evoked potentials with special reference to color vision and differential light threshold measured with the computer perimeter OCTOPUS.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, H

    1984-10-31

    The contrast evoked potentials (VEPs) to different check sizes were recorded in about 200 cases of discrete optic neuropathies (ON) of different origin. Differential light threshold (DLT) was tested with the computer perimeter OCTOPUS. Saturated and desaturated tests were applied to evaluate the degree of acquired color vision deficiency. Delayed VEP responses are not confined to optic neuritis (RBN) alone and the different latency times obtained from other ON are confluent. The delay may be due to demyelination, to an increasing dominance of paramacular VEP subcomponents or to an increasing dominance of the upper half-field responses. Recording with smaller check sizes has the advantage that discrete dysfunctions in the visual field (VF) center are more easily detected: a correlation between amplitudes and visual acuity is best in strabismic amblyopias, is less expressed in maculopathies of the retina and weak in ON. The absence or reduction of amplitudes to smaller check sizes, however, is an important indication of a disorder in the VF center of ON in an early or recovered stage. Acquired color vision defects of the tritan-like type are more confined to discrete ON, whereas the red/green type is reserved to more severe ON. The DLT of the VF center is reduced in a different, significant and non significant extent in discrete optic neuropathies and the correlation between DLT and visual acuity is weak. A careful numerical analysis is needed in types of discrete ON where the central DLT lies within normal statistical limits: a side difference of the DLT between the affected and the normal fellow eye is always present. Evaluation of visual fatigue effects and of the relative sensitivity loss of VF center and VF periphery may provide further diagnostic information.

  9. Effect of Postural Control Demands on Early Visual Evoked Potentials during a Subjective Visual Vertical Perception Task in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Tzu; Meng, Ling-Fu; Chang, Chun-Ju; Lai, Po-Liang; Lung, Chi-Wen; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2017-01-01

    Subjective visual vertical (SVV) judgment and standing stability were separately investigated among patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Although, one study has investigated the central mechanism of stability control in the AIS population, the relationships between SVV, decreased standing stability, and AIS have never been investigated. Through event-related potentials (ERPs), the present study examined the effect of postural control demands (PDs) on AIS central mechanisms related to SVV judgment and standing stability to elucidate the time-serial stability control process. Thirteen AIS subjects (AIS group) and 13 age-matched adolescents (control group) aged 12–18 years were recruited. Each subject had to complete an SVV task (i.e., the modified rod-and-frame [mRAF] test) as a stimulus, with online electroencephalogram recording being performed in the following three standing postures: feet shoulder-width apart standing, feet together standing, and tandem standing. The behavioral performance in terms of postural stability (center of pressure excursion), SVV (accuracy and reaction time), and mRAF-locked ERPs (mean amplitude and peak latency of the P1, N1, and P2 components) was then compared between the AIS and control groups. In the behavioral domain, the results revealed that only the AIS group demonstrated a significantly accelerated SVV reaction time as the PDs increased. In the cerebral domain, significantly larger P2 mean amplitudes were observed during both feet shoulder-width-apart standing and feet together standing postures compared with during tandem standing. No group differences were noted in the cerebral domain. The results indicated that (1) during the dual-task paradigm, a differential behavioral strategy of accelerated SVV reaction time was observed in the AIS group only when the PDs increased and (2) the decrease in P2 mean amplitudes with the increase in the PD levels might be direct evidence of the competition for central

  10. Interhemispheric Asymmetries in Visual Evoked Potential Amplitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-12

    Layne, 1965) and of patients with Korsakoff’s syndrome (Malerstein and Callaway, 1969) . In the schizophrenics, the high variability is related to poor...communication. Malerstein, A. J., Callaway, E. Two-tone average evoked response in Korsakoff patients. J. Psychiatr. Res. 6: 253-260, 1969. Marsh, G

  11. Functional Brain Activity Changes after 4 Weeks Supplementation with a Multi-Vitamin/Mineral Combination: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Exploring Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials during Working Memory.

    PubMed

    White, David J; Cox, Katherine H M; Hughes, Matthew E; Pipingas, Andrew; Peters, Riccarda; Scholey, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the neurocognitive effects of 4 weeks daily supplementation with a multi-vitamin and -mineral combination (MVM) in healthy adults (aged 18-40 years). Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, participants underwent assessments of brain activity using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI; n = 32, 16 females) and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential recordings (SSVEP; n = 39, 20 females) during working memory and continuous performance tasks at baseline and following 4 weeks of active MVM treatment or placebo. There were several treatment-related effects suggestive of changes in functional brain activity associated with MVM administration. SSVEP data showed latency reductions across centro-parietal regions during the encoding period of a spatial working memory task following 4 weeks of active MVM treatment. Complementary results were observed with the fMRI data, in which a subset of those completing fMRI assessment after SSVEP assessment ( n = 16) demonstrated increased BOLD response during completion of the Rapid Visual Information Processing task (RVIP) within regions of interest including bilateral parietal lobes. No treatment-related changes in fMRI data were observed in those who had not first undergone SSVEP assessment, suggesting these results may be most evident under conditions of fatigue. Performance on the working memory and continuous performance tasks did not significantly differ between treatment groups at follow-up. In addition, within the fatigued fMRI sample, increased RVIP BOLD response was correlated with the change in number of target detections as part of the RVIP task. This study provides preliminary evidence of changes in functional brain activity during working memory associated with 4 weeks of daily treatment with a multi-vitamin and -mineral combination in healthy adults, using two distinct but complementary measures of functional brain activity.

  12. Functional Brain Activity Changes after 4 Weeks Supplementation with a Multi-Vitamin/Mineral Combination: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Exploring Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials during Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    White, David J.; Cox, Katherine H. M.; Hughes, Matthew E.; Pipingas, Andrew; Peters, Riccarda; Scholey, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the neurocognitive effects of 4 weeks daily supplementation with a multi-vitamin and -mineral combination (MVM) in healthy adults (aged 18–40 years). Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, participants underwent assessments of brain activity using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI; n = 32, 16 females) and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential recordings (SSVEP; n = 39, 20 females) during working memory and continuous performance tasks at baseline and following 4 weeks of active MVM treatment or placebo. There were several treatment-related effects suggestive of changes in functional brain activity associated with MVM administration. SSVEP data showed latency reductions across centro-parietal regions during the encoding period of a spatial working memory task following 4 weeks of active MVM treatment. Complementary results were observed with the fMRI data, in which a subset of those completing fMRI assessment after SSVEP assessment (n = 16) demonstrated increased BOLD response during completion of the Rapid Visual Information Processing task (RVIP) within regions of interest including bilateral parietal lobes. No treatment-related changes in fMRI data were observed in those who had not first undergone SSVEP assessment, suggesting these results may be most evident under conditions of fatigue. Performance on the working memory and continuous performance tasks did not significantly differ between treatment groups at follow-up. In addition, within the fatigued fMRI sample, increased RVIP BOLD response was correlated with the change in number of target detections as part of the RVIP task. This study provides preliminary evidence of changes in functional brain activity during working memory associated with 4 weeks of daily treatment with a multi-vitamin and -mineral combination in healthy adults, using two distinct but complementary measures of functional brain activity. PMID:27994548

  13. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  14. Adaptive Acceleration of Visually Evoked Smooth Eye Movements in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The optokinetic response (OKR) consists of smooth eye movements following global motion of the visual surround, which suppress image slip on the retina for visual acuity. The effective performance of the OKR is limited to rather slow and low-frequency visual stimuli, although it can be adaptably improved by cerebellum-dependent mechanisms. To better understand circuit mechanisms constraining OKR performance, we monitored how distinct kinematic features of the OKR change over the course of OKR adaptation, and found that eye acceleration at stimulus onset primarily limited OKR performance but could be dramatically potentiated by visual experience. Eye acceleration in the temporal-to-nasal direction depended more on the ipsilateral floccular complex of the cerebellum than did that in the nasal-to-temporal direction. Gaze-holding following the OKR was also modified in parallel with eye-acceleration potentiation. Optogenetic manipulation revealed that synchronous excitation and inhibition of floccular complex Purkinje cells could effectively accelerate eye movements in the nasotemporal and temporonasal directions, respectively. These results collectively delineate multiple motor pathways subserving distinct aspects of the OKR in mice and constrain hypotheses regarding cellular mechanisms of the cerebellum-dependent tuning of movement acceleration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although visually evoked smooth eye movements, known as the optokinetic response (OKR), have been studied in various species for decades, circuit mechanisms of oculomotor control and adaptation remain elusive. In the present study, we assessed kinematics of the mouse OKR through the course of adaptation training. Our analyses revealed that eye acceleration at visual-stimulus onset primarily limited working velocity and frequency range of the OKR, yet could be dramatically potentiated during OKR adaptation. Potentiation of eye acceleration exhibited different properties between the nasotemporal and

  15. Preventive drugs restore visual evoked habituation and attention in migraineurs.

    PubMed

    Ince, Ferda; Erdogan-Bakar, Emel; Unal-Cevik, Isin

    2017-06-01

    Visual system pathway dysfunction has been postulated in migraineurs. We wanted to investigate if any difference exists interictally in visual attention and visual evoked habituation of frequently attacked migraineurs compared to the healthy control group. The effects of 3-month prophylactic migraine treatment on these parameters were also assessed. The migraineurs at headache-free interval (n = 52) and age, sex-matched healthy controls (n = 35) were compared by habituation response to 10 blocks of repetitive pattern-reversal visual stimuli (each block consisted 100 responses). The amplitude changes of 5th and 10th blocks were further compared with that of block 1 to assess the response of habituation (i.e., decrease) or potentiation (i.e., increase). The level of sustained visual attention was assessed by Cancellation test. Migraineurs were randomized to three different preventive treatments: propranolol 40 mg tid, flunarizine 5 mg bid, or topiramate 50 mg bid. After 3 months of preventive treatment, migraineurs data were compared with their baseline values. The groups did not differ by sex and age. In electrophysiological studies, the habituation ability observed in the healthy group was not observed in migraineurs. However, it was restored 3 months after preventive treatment. In migraineurs, compared to their baseline values, the distorted visual attention parameters also improved after treatment. All drugs were effective. The loss of habituation ability and low visual attention performance in migraineurs can be restored by migraine preventive treatment. This electrophysiological study accompanied by neuropsychological test may aid an objective and quantitative assessment tool for understanding migraine pathophysiology.

  16. Video-signal synchronizes registration of visual evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Vít, F; Kuba, M; Kremlácek, J; Kubová, Z; Horevaj, M

    1996-01-01

    Autodesk Animator software offers the suitable technique for visual stimulation in the registration of visual evoked responses (VERs). However, it is not possible to generate pulses that are synchronous with the animated sequences on any output port of the computer. These pulses are necessary for the synchronization of the computer that makes the registration of the VERs. The principle of the circuit is presented that is able to provide the synchronization of the analyzer with the stimulation computer using Autodesk Animator software.

  17. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  18. Effects of refractive errors on visual evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaya; Nagae, Mizuki; Nagata, Yuko; Kumagai, Naoya; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-11-09

    The latency and amplitude of visual evoked cortical responses are known to be affected by refractive states, suggesting that they may be used as an objective index of refractive errors. In order to establish an easy and reliable method for this purpose, we herein examined the effects of refractive errors on visual evoked magnetic fields (VEFs). Binocular VEFs following the presentation of a simple grating of 0.16 cd/m(2) in the lower visual field were recorded in 12 healthy volunteers and compared among four refractive states: 0D, +1D, +2D, and +4D, by using plus lenses. The low-luminance visual stimulus evoked a main MEG response at approximately 120 ms (M100) that reversed its polarity between the upper and lower visual field stimulations and originated from the occipital midline area. When refractive errors were induced by plus lenses, the latency of M100 increased, while its amplitude decreased with an increase in power of the lens. Differences from the control condition (+0D) were significant for all three lenses examined. The results of dipole analyses showed that evoked fields for the control (+0D) condition were explainable by one dipole in the primary visual cortex (V1), while other sources, presumably in V3 or V6, slightly contributed to shape M100 for the +2D or +4D condition. The present results showed that the latency and amplitude of M100 are both useful indicators for assessing refractive states. The contribution of neural sources other than V1 to M100 was modest under the 0D and +1D conditions. By considering the nature of the activity of M100 including its high sensitivity to a spatial frequency and lower visual field dominance, a simple low-luminance grating stimulus at an optimal spatial frequency in the lower visual field appears appropriate for obtaining data on high S/N ratios and reducing the load on subjects.

  19. Effect of word familiarity on visually evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Harada, N; Iwaki, S; Nakagawa, S; Yamaguchi, M; Tonoike, M

    2004-11-30

    This study investigated the effect of word familiarity of visual stimuli on the word recognizing function of the human brain. Word familiarity is an index of the relative ease of word perception, and is characterized by facilitation and accuracy on word recognition. We studied the effect of word familiarity, using "Hiragana" (phonetic characters in Japanese orthography) characters as visual stimuli, on the elicitation of visually evoked magnetic fields with a word-naming task. The words were selected from a database of lexical properties of Japanese. The four "Hiragana" characters used were grouped and presented in 4 classes of degree of familiarity. The three components were observed in averaged waveforms of the root mean square (RMS) value on latencies at about 100 ms, 150 ms and 220 ms. The RMS value of the 220 ms component showed a significant positive correlation (F=(3/36); 5.501; p=0.035) with the value of familiarity. ECDs of the 220 ms component were observed in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Increments in the RMS value of the 220 ms component, which might reflect ideographical word recognition, retrieving "as a whole" were enhanced with increments of the value of familiarity. The interaction of characters, which increased with the value of familiarity, might function "as a large symbol"; and enhance a "pop-out" function with an escaping character inhibiting other characters and enhancing the segmentation of the character (as a figure) from the ground.

  20. Compression and reflection of visually evoked cortical waves

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weifeng; Huang, Xiaoying; Takagaki, Kentaroh; Wu, Jian-young

    2007-01-01

    Summary Neuronal interactions between primary and secondary visual cortical areas are important for visual processing, but the spatiotemporal patterns of the interaction are not well understood. We used voltage-sensitive dye imaging to visualize neuronal activity in rat visual cortex and found novel visually evoked waves propagating from V1 to other visual areas. A primary wave originated in the monocular area of V1 and was “compressed” when propagating to V2. A reflected wave initiated after compression and propagated backward into V1. The compression occurred at the V1/V2 border, and local GABAA inhibition is important for the compression. The compression/reflection pattern provides a two-phase modulation: V1 is first depolarized by the primary wave and then V1 and V2 are simultaneously depolarized by the reflected and primary waves, respectively. The compression/reflection pattern only occurred for evoked but not for spontaneous waves, suggesting that it is organized by an internal mechanism associated with visual processing. PMID:17610821

  1. Delayed P100-Like Latencies in Multiple Sclerosis: A Preliminary Investigation Using Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiiski, Hanni S. M.; Ní Riada, Sinéad; Lalor, Edmund C.; Gonçalves, Nuno R.; Nolan, Hugh; Whelan, Robert; Lonergan, Róisín; Kelly, Siobhán; O'Brien, Marie Claire; Kinsella, Katie; Bramham, Jessica; Burke, Teresa; Ó Donnchadha, Seán; Hutchinson, Michael; Tubridy, Niall; Reilly, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Conduction along the optic nerve is often slowed in multiple sclerosis (MS). This is typically assessed by measuring the latency of the P100 component of the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) using electroencephalography. The Visual Evoked Spread Spectrum Analysis (VESPA) method, which involves modulating the contrast of a continuous visual stimulus over time, can produce a visually evoked response analogous to the P100 but with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and potentially higher sensitivity to individual differences in comparison to the VEP. The main objective of the study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the utility of the VESPA method for probing and monitoring visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The latencies and amplitudes of the P100-like VESPA component were compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients, and multiple sclerosis subgroups. The P100-like VESPA component activations were examined at baseline and over a 3-year period. The study included 43 multiple sclerosis patients (23 relapsing-remitting MS, 20 secondary-progressive MS) and 42 healthy controls who completed the VESPA at baseline. The follow-up sessions were conducted 12 months after baseline with 24 MS patients (15 relapsing-remitting MS, 9 secondary-progressive MS) and 23 controls, and again at 24 months post-baseline with 19 MS patients (13 relapsing-remitting MS, 6 secondary-progressive MS) and 14 controls. The results showed P100-like VESPA latencies to be delayed in multiple sclerosis compared to healthy controls over the 24-month period. Secondary-progressive MS patients had most pronounced delay in P100-like VESPA latency relative to relapsing-remitting MS and controls. There were no longitudinal P100-like VESPA response differences. These findings suggest that the VESPA method is a reproducible electrophysiological method that may have potential utility in the assessment of visual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26726800

  2. Electrophysiological abnormalities associated with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Tay, Su Ann; Sanjay, Srinivasan

    2012-07-01

    An observational case report of electrophysiological abnormalities in a patient with anisomyopic amblyopia as a result of unilateral extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MNFs) is illustrated. The electrophysiological readings revealed an abnormal pattern electroretinogram (PERG) but normal full-field electroretinogram readings in the affected eye. The visual-evoked potential was also undetectable in that eye. Our findings suggest that extensive MNFs can be associated with electrophysiological abnormalities, in particular the PERG, which can aid in diagnosing the cause of impaired vision when associated with amblyopia.

  3. Electrophysiological abnormalities associated with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Su Ann; Sanjay, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    An observational case report of electrophysiological abnormalities in a patient with anisomyopic amblyopia as a result of unilateral extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MNFs) is illustrated. The electrophysiological readings revealed an abnormal pattern electroretinogram (PERG) but normal full-field electroretinogram readings in the affected eye. The visual-evoked potential was also undetectable in that eye. Our findings suggest that extensive MNFs can be associated with electrophysiological abnormalities, in particular the PERG, which can aid in diagnosing the cause of impaired vision when associated with amblyopia. PMID:22824610

  4. Multifocal visual evoked responses to dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles: Multifocal VER to dichoptic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Grigg, John R

    2006-05-01

    Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) have demonstrated good diagnostic capabilities in glaucoma and optic neuritis. This study aimed at evaluating the possibility of simultaneously recording mfVEP for both eyes with dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles and also to determine the stimulus characteristics that yield maximum amplitude. ten healthy volunteers were recruited and temporally sparse pattern pulse stimuli were presented dichoptically using virtual reality goggles. Experiment 1 involved recording responses to dichoptically presented checkerboard stimuli and also confirming true topographic representation by switching off specific segments. Experiment 2 involved monocular stimulation and comparison of amplitude with Experiment 1. In Experiment 3, orthogonally oriented gratings were dichoptically presented. Experiment 4 involved dichoptic presentation of checkerboard stimuli at different levels of sparseness (5.0 times/s, 2.5 times/s, 1.66 times/s and 1.25 times/s), where stimulation of corresponding segments of two eyes were separated by 16.7, 66.7,116.7 & 166.7 ms respectively. Experiment 1 demonstrated good traces in all regions and confirmed topographic representation. However, there was suppression of amplitude of responses to dichoptic stimulation by 17.9+/-5.4% compared to monocular stimulation. Experiment 3 demonstrated similar suppression between orthogonal and checkerboard stimuli (p = 0.08). Experiment 4 demonstrated maximum amplitude and least suppression (4.8%) with stimulation at 1.25 times/s with 166.7 ms separation between eyes. It is possible to record mfVEP for both eyes during dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles, which present binocular simultaneous patterns driven by independent sequences. Interocular suppression can be almost eliminated by using a temporally sparse stimulus of 1.25 times/s with a separation of 166.7 ms between stimulation of corresponding segments of the two eyes.

  5. Recognition and surprise alter the human visual evoked response.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, H; Snyder, E; Woods, D; Galambos, R

    1982-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to colored slides contained a late positive component that was significantly enhanced when adults recognized the person, place, or painting in the photograph. Additionally, two late components change in amplitude, corresponding to the amount of surprise reported. Because subjects received no instructions to differentiate among the slides, these changes in brain potentials reflect natural classifications made according to their perceptions and evaluations of the pictorial material. This may be a useful paradigm with which to assess perception, memory, and orienting capacities in populations such as infants who cannot follow verbal instructions. Images PMID:6952260

  6. Early event related fields during visually evoked pain anticipation.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Burgess, Richard C; Plow, Ela B; Floden, Darlene P; Machado, Andre G

    2016-03-01

    Pain experience is not only a function of somatosensory inputs. Rather, it is strongly influenced by cognitive and affective pathways. Pain anticipatory phenomena, an important limitation to rehabilitative efforts in the chronic state, are processed by associative and limbic networks, along with primary sensory cortices. Characterization of neurophysiological correlates of pain anticipation, particularly during very early stages of neural processing is critical for development of therapeutic interventions. Here, we utilized magnetoencephalography to study early event-related fields (ERFs) in healthy subjects exposed to a 3 s visual countdown task that preceded a painful stimulus, a non-painful stimulus or no stimulus. We found that the first countdown cue, but not the last cue, evoked critical ERFs signaling anticipation, attention and alertness to the noxious stimuli. Further, we found that P2 and N2 components were significantly different in response to first-cues that signaled incoming painful stimuli when compared to non-painful or no stimuli. The findings indicate that early ERFs are relevant neural substrates of pain anticipatory phenomena and could be potentially serve as biomarkers. These measures could assist in the development of neurostimulation approaches aimed at curbing the negative effects of pain anticipation during rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The VERRUN and VERNAL software systems for steady-state visual evoked response experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two digital computer programs were developed for use in experiments involving steady-state visual evoked response (VER): VERRUN, whose primary functions are to generate a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus and to digitize and store electro-cortical response; and VERNAL, which provides both time- and frequency-domain metrics of the evoked response. These programs were coded in FORTRAN for operation on the PDP-11/34, using the RSX-11 Operating System, and the PDP-11/23, using the RT-11 Operating System. Users' and programmers' guides to these programs are provided, and guidelines for model analysis of VER data are suggested.

  8. Identification of visual evoked response parameters sensitive to pilot mental state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Systems analysis techniques were developed and demonstrated for modeling the electroencephalographic (EEG) steady state visual evoked response (ssVER), for use in EEG data compression and as an indicator of mental workload. The study focused on steady state frequency domain stimulation and response analysis, implemented with a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus generator and an off-line describing function response analyzer. Three major tasks were conducted: (1) VER related systems identification material was reviewed; (2) Software for experiment control and data analysis was developed and implemented; and (3) ssVER identification and modeling was demonstrated, via a mental loading experiment. It was found that a systems approach to ssVER functional modeling can serve as the basis for eventual development of a mental workload indicator. The review showed how transient visual evoked response (tVER) and ssVER research are related at the functional level, the software development showed how systems techniques can be used for ssVER characterization, and the pilot experiment showed how a simple model can be used to capture the basic dynamic response of the ssVER, under varying loads.

  9. Acetazolamide-induced vasodilation does not inhibit the visually evoked flow response

    PubMed Central

    Yonai, Yaniv; Boms, Neta; Molnar, Sandor; Rosengarten, Bernhard; Bornstein, Natan M; Csiba, Laszlo; Olah, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Different methods are used to assess the vasodilator ability of cerebral blood vessels; however, the exact mechanism of cerebral vasodilation, induced by different stimuli, is not entirely known. Our aim was to investigate whether the potent vasodilator agent, acetazolamide (AZ), inhibits the neurovascular coupling, which also requires vasodilation. Therefore, visually evoked flow parameters were examined by transcranial Doppler in ten healthy subjects before and after AZ administration. Pulsatility index and peak systolic flow velocity changes, evoked by visual stimulus, were recorded in the posterior cerebral arteries before and after intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg AZ. Repeated-measures ANOVA did not show significant group main effect between the visually evoked relative flow velocity time courses before and after AZ provocation (P=0.43). Visual stimulation induced significant increase of relative flow velocity and decrease of pulsatility index not only before but also at the maximal effect of AZ. These results suggest that maximal cerebral vasodilation cannot be determined by the clinically accepted dose of AZ (15 mg/kg) and prove that neurovascular coupling remains preserved despite AZ-induced vasodilation. Our observation indicates independent regulation of vasodilation during neurovascular coupling, allowing the adaptation of cerebral blood flow according to neuronal activity even if other processes require significant vasodilation. PMID:19809468

  10. Modulation of Visually Evoked Postural Responses by Contextual Visual, Haptic and Auditory Information: A ‘Virtual Reality Check’

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Georg F.; Shao, Fei; White, Mark D.; Hopkins, Carl; Robotham, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Externally generated visual motion signals can cause the illusion of self-motion in space (vection) and corresponding visually evoked postural responses (VEPR). These VEPRs are not simple responses to optokinetic stimulation, but are modulated by the configuration of the environment. The aim of this paper is to explore what factors modulate VEPRs in a high quality virtual reality (VR) environment where real and virtual foreground objects served as static visual, auditory and haptic reference points. Data from four experiments on visually evoked postural responses show that: 1) visually evoked postural sway in the lateral direction is modulated by the presence of static anchor points that can be haptic, visual and auditory reference signals; 2) real objects and their matching virtual reality representations as visual anchors have different effects on postural sway; 3) visual motion in the anterior-posterior plane induces robust postural responses that are not modulated by the presence of reference signals or the reality of objects that can serve as visual anchors in the scene. We conclude that automatic postural responses for laterally moving visual stimuli are strongly influenced by the configuration and interpretation of the environment and draw on multisensory representations. Different postural responses were observed for real and virtual visual reference objects. On the basis that automatic visually evoked postural responses in high fidelity virtual environments should mimic those seen in real situations we propose to use the observed effect as a robust objective test for presence and fidelity in VR. PMID:23840760

  11. An objective method for measuring face detection thresholds using the sweep steady-state visual evoked response

    PubMed Central

    Ales, Justin M.; Farzin, Faraz; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a sensitive method for measuring face detection thresholds rapidly, objectively, and independently of low-level visual cues. The method is based on the swept parameter steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP), in which a stimulus is presented at a specific temporal frequency while parametrically varying (“sweeping”) the detectability of the stimulus. Here, the visibility of a face image was increased by progressive derandomization of the phase spectra of the image in a series of equally spaced steps. Alternations between face and fully randomized images at a constant rate (3/s) elicit a robust first harmonic response at 3 Hz specific to the structure of the face. High-density EEG was recorded from 10 human adult participants, who were asked to respond with a button-press as soon as they detected a face. The majority of participants produced an evoked response at the first harmonic (3 Hz) that emerged abruptly between 30% and 35% phase-coherence of the face, which was most prominent on right occipito-temporal sites. Thresholds for face detection were estimated reliably in single participants from 15 trials, or on each of the 15 individual face trials. The ssVEP-derived thresholds correlated with the concurrently measured perceptual face detection thresholds. This first application of the sweep VEP approach to high-level vision provides a sensitive and objective method that could be used to measure and compare visual perception thresholds for various object shapes and levels of categorization in different human populations, including infants and individuals with developmental delay. PMID:23024355

  12. Habituation of visual evoked responses in neonates and fetuses: A MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Matuz, Tamara; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Preissl, Hubert; Siegel, Eric R.; Muenssinger, Jana; Murphy, Pamela; Ware, Maureen; Lowery, Curtis L.; Eswaran, Hari

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to develop a habituation paradigm that allows the investigation of response decrement and response recovery and examine its applicability for measuring the habituation of the visually evoked responses (VERs) in neonatal and fetal magnetoencephalographic recordings. Two paradigms, one with a long and one with a short inter-train interval (ITI), were developed and tested in separate studies. Both paradigms consisted of a train of four light flashes; each train being followed by a 500 Hz burst tone. Healthy pregnant women underwent two prenatal measurements and returned with their babies for a neonatal investigation. The amplitudes of the neonatal VERs in the long-ITI condition showed within-train response decrement. An increased response to the auditory dishabituator was found confirming response recovery. In the short-ITI condition, neonatal amplitude decrement could not be demonstrated while response recovery was present. In both ITI conditions, the response rate of the cortical responses was much lower in the fetuses than in the neonates. Fetal VERs in the long-ITI condition indicate amplitude decline from the first to the second flash with no further decrease. The long-ITI paradigm might be useful to investigate habituation of the VERs in neonates and fetuses, although the latter requires precaution. PMID:22483416

  13. Parvocellular Pathway Impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita, Takako; Yamasaki, Takao; Kamio, Yoko; Hirose, Shinichi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2011-01-01

    In humans, visual information is processed via parallel channels: the parvocellular (P) pathway analyzes color and form information, whereas the magnocellular (M) stream plays an important role in motion analysis. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often show superior performance in processing fine detail, but impaired performance in…

  14. The effects of luminance contribution from large fields to chromatic visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Rafal M; Duncan, Chad S; Crognale, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Though useful from a clinical and practical standpoint uniform, large-field chromatic stimuli are likely to contain luminance contributions from retinal inhomogeneities. Such contribution can significantly influence psychophysical thresholds. However, the degree to which small luminance artifacts influence the chromatic VEP has been debated. In particular, claims have been made that band-pass tuning observed in chromatic VEPs result from luminance intrusion. However, there has been no direct evidence presented to support these claims. Recently, large-field isoluminant stimuli have been developed to control for intrusion from retinal inhomogeneities with particular regard to the influence of macular pigment. We report here the application of an improved version of these full-field stimuli to directly test the influence of luminance intrusion on the temporal tuning of the chromatic VEP. Our results show that band-pass tuning persists even when isoluminance is achieved throughout the extent of the stimulus. In addition, small amounts of luminance intrusion affect neither the shape of the temporal tuning function nor the major components of the VEP. These results support the conclusion that the chromatic VEP can depart substantially from threshold psychophysics with regard to temporal tuning and that obtaining a low-pass function is not requisite evidence of selective chromatic activation in the VEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Auditory and Visual Evoked Potentials as a Function of Sleep Deprivation and Irregular Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-15

    and a slow diminution in amplitude within a block of 35 targets. The gradual decrement between blocks is presumably due to the "waning of attention...scoring of the CNV. With the stimulus parameters used in the present study, the CNV is a slow negative wave which begins from 260-460 ms after tone onset...attended (e.g., Hillyard, Hink , Schwent, & Picton, 1973; Schwent & Hillyard, 1975), little research has focused on the effects when a particular

  16. Visual evoked potential assessment of the effects of glaucoma on visual subsystems.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, V C; Seliger, S; Zemon, V; Ritch, R

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that glaucoma leads to selective deficits in parallel pathways or channels. Sweep VEPs were obtained to isolated-check stimuli that were modulated sinusoidally in either isoluminant chromatic contrast or in positive and negative luminance contrast. Response functions were obtained from 14 control subjects, 15 patients with open-angle glaucoma, and seven glaucoma suspects. For all three groups of subjects we found characteristic differences between the VEP response functions to isoluminant chromatic contrast stimuli and to luminance contrast stimuli. The isoluminant chromatic stimulus conditions appeared to favor activity of the P-pathway, whereas the luminance contrast stimuli at low depths of modulation favored M-pathway activity. VEP responses for patients with OAG were significantly reduced for chromatic contrast and luminance contrast conditions, whereas VEP responses for glaucoma suspects were significantly reduced only for the 15-Hz positive luminance contrast condition. Our results suggest that both M- and P-pathways are affected by glaucoma.

  17. Effects of Form Perception and Meaning on the Visual Evoked Potential with Author’s Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    2001. Controlling binocular rivalry. Vision Research. 41: 2943-2950. Freud , S. 1995. The Basic Writings of Sigmund Freud (Psychopathology of... Freud , S. 1990. The Ego and the Id (The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud ). P. Gay, Introduction. New York...1935), and psychoanalytic talk therapies associated with S. Freud (1995, 1990), gave results that were less accessible to scientific method. In short

  18. The effect of acute sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials in professional drivers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Croft, Rodney J; Owens, Katherine; Pierce, Robert J; Kennedy, Gerard A; Crewther, David; Howard, Mark E

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that as little as 18 hours of sleep deprivation can cause deleterious effects on performance. It has also been suggested that sleep deprivation can cause a "tunnel-vision" effect, in which attention is restricted to the center of the visual field. The current study aimed to replicate these behavioral effects and to examine the electrophysiological underpinnings of these changes. Repeated-measures experimental study. University laboratory. Nineteen professional drivers (1 woman; mean age = 45.3 +/- 9.1 years). Two experimental sessions were performed; one following 27 hours of sleep deprivation and the other following a normal night of sleep, with control for circadian effects. A tunnel-vision task (central versus peripheral visual discrimination) and a standard checkerboard-viewing task were performed while 32-channel EEG was recorded. For the tunnel-vision task, sleep deprivation resulted in an overall slowing of reaction times and increased errors of omission for both peripheral and foveal stimuli (P < 0.05). These changes were related to reduced P300 amplitude (indexing cognitive processing) but not measures of early visual processing. No evidence was found for an interaction effect between sleep deprivation and visual-field position, either in terms of behavior or electrophysiological responses. Slower processing of the sustained parvocellular visual pathway was demonstrated. These findings suggest that performance deficits on visual tasks during sleep deprivation are due to higher cognitive processes rather than early visual processing. Sleep deprivation may differentially impair processing of more-detailed visual information. Features of the study design (eg, visual angle, duration of sleep deprivation) may influence whether peripheral visual-field neglect occurs.

  19. Acute Exposure to Perchlorethylene alters Rat Visual Evoked Potentials in Relation to Brain Concentration

    EPA Science Inventory

    These experiments sought to establish a dose-effect relationship between the concentration of perchloroethylene (PCE) in brain tissue and concurrent changes in visual function. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was implemented to predict concentrations of PCE ...

  20. Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials and Phase Synchronization in Migraine Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, L.; Tommaso, M. De; Guido, M.; Hu, K.; Ivanov, P. Ch.; Marinazzo, D.; Nardulli, G.; Nitti, L.; Pellicoro, M.; Pierro, C.; Stramaglia, S.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in the presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  1. Visual Evoked Potential Augmenting-Reducing and Personality: The Vertex Augmenter is a Sensation Seeker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    disinhibition (DIS) measures a hedonistic , extraverted lifestyle including drinking, parties, sex and gambling; boredom susceptibility (BS) indicates an...has reported that the correlation with A/R is often the strongest with the disinhibition scale, which measures a hedonistic pursuit of extraverted

  2. An "oblique effect" in the visual evoked potential of the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonds, A B

    1982-01-01

    An oblique effect was observed in the amplitude of the VEP recorded from area 17 of the cat. The ratio of the responses to oblique gratings compared with responses to horizontal and vertical gratings averaged 0.77. Orientation dependence was strongest at low spatial frequencies, unlike the effect found in primates.

  3. Improved method for retinotopy constrained source estimation of visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.; Dale, Anders M.

    2011-01-01

    Retinotopy constrained source estimation (RCSE) is a method for non-invasively measuring the time courses of activation in early visual areas using magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). Unlike conventional equivalent current dipole or distributed source models, the use of multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations to simultaneously constrain the solutions allows for the estimation of independent waveforms for visual areas V1, V2, and V3, despite their close proximity to each other. We describe modifications that improve the reliability and efficiency of this method. First, we find that increasing the number and size of visual stimuli results in source estimates that are less susceptible to noise. Second, to create a more accurate forward solution, we have explicitly modeled the cortical point spread of individual visual stimuli. Dipoles are represented as extended patches on the cortical surface, which take into account the estimated receptive field size at each location in V1, V2, and V3 as well as the contributions from contralateral, ipsilateral, dorsal, and ventral portions of the visual areas. Third, we implemented a map fitting procedure to deform a template to match individual subject retinotopic maps derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This improves the efficiency of the overall method by allowing automated dipole selection, and it makes the results less sensitive to physiological noise in fMRI retinotopy data. Finally, the iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) method was used to reduce the contribution from stimulus locations with high residual error for robust estimation of visual evoked responses. PMID:22102418

  4. Simultaneous EEG/fMRI analysis of the resonance phenomena in steady-state visual evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Ali; Bayraktaroglu, Zubeyir; Karahan, Esin; Erdogan, Basri; Bilgic, Basar; Ozker, Muge; Kasikci, Itir; Duru, Adil D; Ademoglu, Ahmet; Oztürk, Cengizhan; Arikan, Kemal; Tarhan, Nevzat; Demiralp, Tamer

    2011-04-01

    The stability of the steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) across trials and subjects makes them a suitable tool for the investigation of the visual system. The reproducible pattern of the frequency characteristics of SSVEPs shows a global amplitude maximum around 10 Hz and additional local maxima around 20 and 40 Hz, which have been argued to represent resonant behavior of damped neuronal oscillators. Simultaneous electroencephalogram/functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) measurement allows testing of the resonance hypothesis about the frequency-selective increases in SSVEP amplitudes in human subjects, because the total synaptic activity that is represented in the fMRI-Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (fMRI-BOLD) response would not increase but get synchronized at the resonance frequency. For this purpose, 40 healthy volunteers were visually stimulated with flickering light at systematically varying frequencies between 6 and 46 Hz, and the correlations between SSVEP amplitudes and the BOLD responses were computed. The SSVEP frequency characteristics of all subjects showed 3 frequency ranges with an amplitude maximum in each of them, which roughly correspond to alpha, beta and gamma bands of the EEG. The correlation maps between BOLD responses and SSVEP amplitude changes across the different stimulation frequencies within each frequency band showed no significant correlation in the alpha range, while significant correlations were obtained in the primary visual area for the beta and gamma bands. This non-linear relationship between the surface recorded SSVEP amplitudes and the BOLD responses of the visual cortex at stimulation frequencies around the alpha band supports the view that a resonance at the tuning frequency of the thalamo-cortical alpha oscillator in the visual system is responsible for the global amplitude maximum of the SSVEP around 10 Hz. Information gained from the SSVEP/fMRI analyses in the present study might be extrapolated to the

  5. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Annual Report for 15 May 2012 – 14 May 2013 8 Table 5. Summary of Gaze Evoked Nystagmus Tests (no differences between groups) Target...abnormalities of vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Specific Aim 1: Characterize horizontal VOR post-rotary nystagmus ...without optokinetic feedback using a velocity step test. We hypothesize that in ASD vertical eye movement intrusions during horizontal nystagmus will

  6. Neurotoxic effects of n-hexane on the human central nervous system: evoked potential abnormalities in n-hexane polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y C

    1987-01-01

    An outbreak of n-hexane polyneuropathy as a result of industrial exposure occurred in printing factories in Taipei area from December 1983 to February 1985. Multimodality evoked potentials study was performed on 22 of the polyneuropathy cases, five of the subclinical cases, and seven of the unaffected workers. The absolute and interpeak latencies of patterned visual evoked potential (pVEP) in both the polyneuropathy and subclinical groups were longer than in the normal controls. The pVEP interpeak amplitude was also decreased in the polyneuropathy cases. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP), showed no difference of wave I latency between factory workers and normal controls, but prolongation of the wave I-V interpeak latencies was noted, corresponding with the severity of the polyneuropathy. In somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), both the absolute latencies and central conduction time (CCT) were longer in subclinical and polyneuropathy cases than in the unaffected workers and normal controls. From this evoked potentials study, chronic toxic effects of n-hexane on the central nervous system were shown. PMID:3031221

  7. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Visually evoked changes in the rat retinal blood flow measured with Doppler optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bingyao; Mason, Erik; MacLellan, Ben; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2017-02-01

    Visually evoked changes of retinal blood flow can serve as an important research tool to investigate eye disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this study we used a combined, research-grade, high-resolution Doppler OCT+ERG system to study changes in the retinal blood flow (RBF) and retinal neuronal activity in response to visual stimuli of different intensities, durations and type (flicker vs single flash). Specifically, we used white light stimuli of 10 ms and 200 ms single flash, 1s and 2s for flickers stimuli of 20% duty cycle. The study was conducted in-vivo in pigmented rats. Both single flash (SF) and flicker stimuli caused increase in the RBF. The 10 ms SF stimulus did not generate any consistent measurable response, while the 200 ms SF of the same intensity generated 4% change in the RBF peaking at 1.5 s after the stimulus onset. Single flash stimuli introduced 2x smaller change in RBF and 30% earlier RBF peak response compared to flicker stimuli of the same intensity and duration. Doubling the intensity of SF or flicker stimuli increased the RBF peak magnitude by 1.5x. Shortening the flicker stimulus duration by 2x increased the RBF recovery rate by 2x, however, had no effect on the rate of RBF change from baseline to peak.

  9. Microbiota abnormalities in inflammatory airway diseases - Potential for therapy.

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, Eva S; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly the development of novel therapeutic strategies is taking into consideration the contribution of the intestinal microbiota to health and disease. Dysbiosis of the microbial communities colonizing the human intestinal tract has been described for a variety of chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and asthma. In particular, reduction of several so-called probiotic species including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria that are generally considered to be beneficial, as well as an outgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria is often reported. Thus a tempting therapeutic approach is to shape the constituents of the microbiota in an attempt to restore the microbial balance towards the growth of 'health-promoting' bacterial species. A twist to this scenario is the recent discovery that the respiratory tract also harbors a microbiota under steady-state conditions. Investigators have shown that the microbial composition of the airway flora is different between healthy lungs and those with chronic lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as cystic fibrosis. This is an emerging field, and thus far there is very limited data showing a direct contribution of the airway microbiota to the onset and progression of disease. However, should future studies provide such evidence, the airway microbiota might soon join the intestinal microbiota as a target for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made describing the microbiota in chronic lung disease and discuss current and future approaches concerning manipulation of the microbiota for the treatment and prevention of disease. © 2013.

  10. Time-varying bispectral analysis of visually evoked multi-channel EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical foundations of higher order spectral analysis are revisited to examine the use of time-varying bicoherence on non-stationary signals using a classical short-time Fourier approach. A methodology is developed to apply this to evoked EEG responses where a stimulus-locked time reference is available. Short-time windowed ensembles of the response at the same offset from the reference are considered as ergodic cyclostationary processes within a non-stationary random process. Bicoherence can be estimated reliably with known levels at which it is significantly different from zero and can be tracked as a function of offset from the stimulus. When this methodology is applied to multi-channel EEG, it is possible to obtain information about phase synchronization at different regions of the brain as the neural response develops. The methodology is applied to analyze evoked EEG response to flash visual stimulii to the left and right eye separately. The EEG electrode array is segmented based on bicoherence evolution with time using the mean absolute difference as a measure of dissimilarity. Segment maps confirm the importance of the occipital region in visual processing and demonstrate a link between the frontal and occipital regions during the response. Maps are constructed using bicoherence at bifrequencies that include the alpha band frequency of 8Hz as well as 4 and 20Hz. Differences are observed between responses from the left eye and the right eye, and also between subjects. The methodology shows potential as a neurological functional imaging technique that can be further developed for diagnosis and monitoring using scalp EEG which is less invasive and less expensive than magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Functional Hemispheric Asymmetries of Global/Local Processing Mirrored by the Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Ulla; Hubner, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    While hemispheric differences in global/local processing have been reported by various studies, it is still under dispute at which processing stage they occur. Primarily, it was assumed that these asymmetries originate from an early perceptual stage. Instead, the content-level binding theory (Hubner & Volberg, 2005) suggests that the hemispheres…

  12. Potential asphyxia and brainstem abnormalities in sudden and unexpected death in infants.

    PubMed

    Randall, Bradley B; Paterson, David S; Haas, Elisabeth A; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Duncan, Jhodie R; Mena, Othon J; Krous, Henry F; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Kinney, Hannah C

    2013-12-01

    Sudden and unexplained death is a leading cause of infant mortality. Certain characteristics of the sleep environment increase the risk for sleep-related sudden and unexplained infant death. These characteristics have the potential to generate asphyxial conditions. We tested the hypothesis that infants may be exposed to differing degrees of asphyxia in sleep environments, such that vulnerable infants with a severe underlying brainstem deficiency in serotonergic, γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic, or 14-3-3 transduction proteins succumb even without asphyxial triggers (e.g., supine), whereas infants with intermediate or borderline brainstem deficiencies require asphyxial stressors to precipitate death. We classified cases of sudden infant death into categories relative to a "potential asphyxia" schema in a cohort autopsied at the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office. Controls were infants who died with known causes of death established at autopsy. Analysis of covariance tested for differences between groups. Medullary neurochemical abnormalities were present in both infants dying suddenly in circumstances consistent with asphyxia and infants dying suddenly without obvious asphyxia-generating circumstances. There were no differences in the mean neurochemical measures between these 2 groups, although mean measures were both significantly lower (P < .05) than those of controls dying of known causes. We found no direct relationship between the presence of potentially asphyxia conditions in the sleep environment and brainstem abnormalities in infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly. Brainstem abnormalities were associated with both asphyxia-generating and non-asphyxia generating conditions. Heeding safe sleep messages is essential for all infants, especially given our current inability to detect underlying vulnerabilities.

  13. Potential Asphyxia and Brainstem Abnormalities in Sudden and Unexpected Death in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Bradley B.; Paterson, David S.; Haas, Elisabeth A.; Broadbelt, Kevin G.; Duncan, Jhodie R.; Mena, Othon J.; Krous, Henry F.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sudden and unexplained death is a leading cause of infant mortality. Certain characteristics of the sleep environment increase the risk for sleep-related sudden and unexplained infant death. These characteristics have the potential to generate asphyxial conditions. We tested the hypothesis that infants may be exposed to differing degrees of asphyxia in sleep environments, such that vulnerable infants with a severe underlying brainstem deficiency in serotonergic, γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic, or 14-3-3 transduction proteins succumb even without asphyxial triggers (eg, supine), whereas infants with intermediate or borderline brainstem deficiencies require asphyxial stressors to precipitate death. METHODS: We classified cases of sudden infant death into categories relative to a “potential asphyxia” schema in a cohort autopsied at the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office. Controls were infants who died with known causes of death established at autopsy. Analysis of covariance tested for differences between groups. RESULTS: Medullary neurochemical abnormalities were present in both infants dying suddenly in circumstances consistent with asphyxia and infants dying suddenly without obvious asphyxia-generating circumstances. There were no differences in the mean neurochemical measures between these 2 groups, although mean measures were both significantly lower (P < .05) than those of controls dying of known causes. CONCLUSIONS: We found no direct relationship between the presence of potentially asphyxia conditions in the sleep environment and brainstem abnormalities in infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly. Brainstem abnormalities were associated with both asphyxia-generating and non–asphyxia generating conditions. Heeding safe sleep messages is essential for all infants, especially given our current inability to detect underlying vulnerabilities. PMID:24218471

  14. Reduced laser-evoked potential habituation detects abnormal central pain processing in painful radiculopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Hüllemann, P; von der Brelie, C; Manthey, G; Düsterhöft, J; Helmers, A K; Synowitz, M; Baron, R

    2017-05-01

    Repetitive painful laser stimuli lead to physiological laser-evoked potential (LEP) habituation, measurable by a decrement of the N2/P2 amplitude. The time course of LEP-habituation is reduced in the capsaicin model for peripheral and central sensitization and in patients with migraine and fibromyalgia. In the present investigation, we aimed to assess the time course of LEP-habituation in a neuropathic pain syndrome, i.e. painful radiculopathy. At the side of radiating pain, four blocks of 25 painful laser stimuli each were applied to the ventral thigh at the L3 dermatome in 27 patients with painful radiculopathy. Inclusion criteria were (1) at least one neurological finding of radiculopathy, (2) low back pain with radiation into the foot and (3) a positive one-sided compression of the L5 and/or S1 root in the MRI. The time course of LEP-habituation was compared to 20 healthy height and age matched controls. Signs of peripheral (heat hyperalgesia) and central sensitization (dynamic mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia) at the affected L5 or S1 dermatome were assessed with quantitative sensory testing. Painful radiculopathy patients showed decreased LEP-habituation compared to controls. Patients with signs of central sensitization showed a more prominent LEP-habituation decrease within the radiculopathy patient group. Laser-evoked potential habituation is reduced in painful radiculopathy patients, which indicates an abnormal central pain processing. Central sensitization seems to be a major contributor to abnormal LEP habituation. The LEP habituation paradigm might be useful as a clinical tool to assess central pain processing alterations in nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Abnormal central pain processing in neuropathic pain conditions may be revealed with the laser-evoked potential habituation paradigm. In painful radiculopathy patients, LEP-habituation is reduced compared to healthy controls. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  15. Correlation of Visually Evoked Functional and Blood Flow Changes in the Rat Retina Measured With a Combined OCT+ERG System.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bingyao; Mason, Erik; MacLellan, Benjamin; Bizheva, Kostadinka K

    2017-03-01

    To correlate visually evoked functional and blood flow changes in the rat retina measured simultaneously with a combined optical coherence tomography and electroretinography system (OCT+ERG). Male Brown Norway (n = 6) rats were dark adapted and anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Visually evoked changes in the retinal blood flow (RBF) and functional response were measured simultaneously with an OCT+ERG system with 3-μm axial resolution in retinal tissue and 47-kHz image acquisition rate. Both single flash (10 and 200 ms) and flicker (10 Hz, 20% duty cycle, 1- and 2-second duration) stimuli were projected onto the retina with a custom visual stimulator, integrated into the OCT imaging probe. Total axial RBF was calculated from circular Doppler OCT scans by integrating over the arterial and venal flow. Temporary increase in the RBF was observed with the 10- and 200-ms continuous stimuli (∼1% and ∼4% maximum RBF change, respectively) and the 10-Hz flicker stimuli (∼8% for 1-second duration and ∼10% for 2-second duration). Doubling the flicker stimulus duration resulted in ∼25% increase in the RBF peak magnitude with no significant change in the peak latency. Single flash (200 ms) and flicker (10 Hz, 1 second) stimuli of the same illumination intensity and photon flux resulted in ∼2× larger peak RBF magnitude and ∼25% larger RBF peak latency for the flicker stimulus. Short, single flash and flicker stimuli evoked measureable RBF changes with larger RBF magnitude and peak latency observed for the flicker stimuli.

  16. Characterizing abnormal behavior in a large population of zoo-housed chimpanzees: prevalence and potential influencing factors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sarah L.; Bloomsmith, Mollie A.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal behaviors in captive animals are generally defined as behaviors that are atypical for the species and are often considered to be indicators of poor welfare. Although some abnormal behaviors have been empirically linked to conditions related to elevated stress and compromised welfare in primates, others have little or no evidence on which to base such a relationship. The objective of this study was to investigate a recent claim that abnormal behavior is endemic in the captive population by surveying a broad sample of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), while also considering factors associated with the origins of these behaviors. We surveyed animal care staff from 26 accredited zoos to assess the prevalence of abnormal behavior in a large sample of chimpanzees in the United States for which we had information on origin and rearing history. Our results demonstrated that 64% of this sample was reported to engage in some form of abnormal behavior in the past two years and 48% of chimpanzees engaged in abnormal behavior other than coprophagy. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the historical variables that best predicted the occurrence of all abnormal behavior, any abnormal behavior that was not coprophagy, and coprophagy. Rearing had opposing effects on the occurrence of coprophagy and the other abnormal behaviors such that mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform coprophagy, whereas non-mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform other abnormal behaviors. These results support the assertion that coprophagy may be classified separately when assessing abnormal behavior and the welfare of captive chimpanzees. This robust evaluation of the prevalence of abnormal behavior in our sample from the U.S. zoo population also demonstrates the importance of considering the contribution of historical variables to present behavior, in order to better understand the causes of these behaviors and any potential relationship to psychological

  17. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential in patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis: abnormal VEMP and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kentaro; Ohashi, Toru; Watanabe, Shoji

    2003-02-01

    The incidence of inferior vestibular nerve disorders in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular neuritis and the recovery of these disorders were evaluated by monitoring the vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Eight patients ranged from 21 to 73 years that suffered from unilateral vestibular neuritis underwent VEMP and caloric testing. Abnormal VEMP was observed in two of the eight patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis. Two patients were diagnosed as having an inferior vestibular nerve disorder. One of these patients showed recovery of the inferior vestibular nerve function as assessed by the VEMP. Disorders of the inferior vestibular nerve function and their recovery was confirmed by our current results. The time course of recoveries of the superior and inferior vestibular nerve systems were similar in the two patients.

  18. Mechanisms defining the electrotonic potential abnormalities in simulated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Krustev, S M; Negrev, N

    2012-06-01

    Electrotonic potentials allow the accommodative processes to polarizing stimuli to be assessed. Electrotonic potential transients in response to applied polarizing stimuli are caused by the kinetics of underlying axonal conductances. Here, we study these transients using our multi-layered model of the human motor nerve, in three simulated cases of the motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): ALS1, ALS2 and ALS3 are three consecutively greater degrees of uniform axonal dysfunctions along the human motor nerve fibre. The results show that the responses in the ALS1 case are quite similar to the normal case. In contrast, in the ALS2 and ALS3 cases, long-lasting (100 ms) subthreshold depolarizing stimuli activate the classical "transient" Na(+) channels in the nodal and in the internodal axolemma beneath the myelin sheath; this leads to action potential generation during the early parts of the electrotonic responses in all compartments along the fibre length. The results also show that the electrotonic potentials in response to long-lasting (100 ms) subthreshold hyperpolarizing stimuli in the ALS1 and ALS2 cases are quiet similar to those of the normal case. However, the current kinetics in the ALS3 case differs from the normal case after the termination of the long-lasting hyperpolarizing stimuli. In the most abnormal ALS3 case, the activation of the Na(+) channels in the nodal and in the internodal axolemma leads to repetitive action potential generation in the late parts (100-200 ms) of the hyperpolarizing electrotonic responses. The results show that the repetitive firing, due to the progressively increased nodal and internodal ion channel dysfunction, are consistent with the loss of functional potassium channels involving both the fast and the slow potassium channel types. The results confirm that the electrotonic potentials in the three simulated ALS cases are specific indicators for the motor neuron disease ALS. The mechanisms underlying the

  19. Immunological abnormalities as potential biomarkers in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Brenu, Ekua W; van Driel, Mieke L; Staines, Don R; Ashton, Kevin J; Ramos, Sandra B; Keane, James; Klimas, Nancy G; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M

    2011-05-28

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is characterised by severe prolonged fatigue, and decreases in cognition and other physiological functions, resulting in severe loss of quality of life, difficult clinical management and high costs to the health care system. To date there is no proven pathomechanism to satisfactorily explain this disorder. Studies have identified abnormalities in immune function but these data are inconsistent. We investigated the profile of markers of immune function (including novel markers) in CFS/ME patients. We included 95 CFS/ME patients and 50 healthy controls. All participants were assessed on natural killer (NK) and CD8(+) T cell cytotoxic activities, Th1 and Th2 cytokine profile of CD4(+) T cells, expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VPACR2), levels of NK phenotypes (CD56(bright) and CD56(dim)) and regulatory T cells expressing FoxP3 transcription factor. Compared to healthy individuals, CFS/ME patients displayed significant increases in IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, FoxP3 and VPACR2 expression. Cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8(+) T cells and NK phenotypes, in particular the CD56(bright) NK cells were significantly decreased in CFS/ME patients. Additionally granzyme A and granzyme K expression were reduced while expression levels of perforin were significantly increased in the CFS/ME population relative to the control population. These data suggest significant dysregulation of the immune system in CFS/ME patients. Our study found immunological abnormalities which may serve as biomarkers in CFS/ME patients with potential for an application as a diagnostic tool.

  20. Losing the sugar coating: potential impact of perineuronal net abnormalities on interneurons in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Sabina; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Markota, Matej; Brown, Christopher; Batzianouli, Eleni T

    2015-09-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) were shown to be markedly altered in subjects with schizophrenia. In particular, decreases of PNNs have been detected in the amygdala, entorhinal cortex and prefrontal cortex. The formation of these specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) aggregates during postnatal development, their functions, and association with distinct populations of GABAergic interneurons, bear great relevance to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PNNs gradually mature in an experience-dependent manner during late stages of postnatal development, overlapping with the prodromal period/age of onset of schizophrenia. Throughout adulthood, PNNs regulate neuronal properties, including synaptic remodeling, cell membrane compartmentalization and subsequent regulation of glutamate receptors and calcium channels, and susceptibility to oxidative stress. With the present paper, we discuss evidence for PNN abnormalities in schizophrenia, the potential functional impact of such abnormalities on inhibitory circuits and, in turn, cognitive and emotion processing. We integrate these considerations with results from recent genetic studies showing genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia associated with genes encoding for PNN components, matrix-regulating molecules and immune system factors. Notably, the composition of PNNs is regulated dynamically in response to factors such as fear, reward, stress, and immune response. This regulation occurs through families of matrix metalloproteinases that cleave ECM components, altering their functions and affecting plasticity. Several metalloproteinases have been proposed as vulnerability factors for schizophrenia. We speculate that the physiological process of PNN remodeling may be disrupted in schizophrenia as a result of interactions between matrix remodeling processes and immune system dysregulation. In turn, these mechanisms may contribute to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Immunological abnormalities as potential biomarkers in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is characterised by severe prolonged fatigue, and decreases in cognition and other physiological functions, resulting in severe loss of quality of life, difficult clinical management and high costs to the health care system. To date there is no proven pathomechanism to satisfactorily explain this disorder. Studies have identified abnormalities in immune function but these data are inconsistent. We investigated the profile of markers of immune function (including novel markers) in CFS/ME patients. Methods We included 95 CFS/ME patients and 50 healthy controls. All participants were assessed on natural killer (NK) and CD8+T cell cytotoxic activities, Th1 and Th2 cytokine profile of CD4+T cells, expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VPACR2), levels of NK phenotypes (CD56bright and CD56dim) and regulatory T cells expressing FoxP3 transcription factor. Results Compared to healthy individuals, CFS/ME patients displayed significant increases in IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CD4+CD25+ T cells, FoxP3 and VPACR2 expression. Cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8+T cells and NK phenotypes, in particular the CD56bright NK cells were significantly decreased in CFS/ME patients. Additionally granzyme A and granzyme K expression were reduced while expression levels of perforin were significantly increased in the CFS/ME population relative to the control population. These data suggest significant dysregulation of the immune system in CFS/ME patients. Conclusions Our study found immunological abnormalities which may serve as biomarkers in CFS/ME patients with potential for an application as a diagnostic tool. PMID:21619669

  2. Similar prevalence and magnitude of auditory-evoked and visually evoked activity in the frontal eye fields: implications for multisensory motor control.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Valeria C; Pages, Daniel S; Sommer, Marc A; Groh, Jennifer M

    2016-06-01

    Saccadic eye movements can be elicited by more than one type of sensory stimulus. This implies substantial transformations of signals originating in different sense organs as they reach a common motor output pathway. In this study, we compared the prevalence and magnitude of auditory- and visually evoked activity in a structure implicated in oculomotor processing, the primate frontal eye fields (FEF). We recorded from 324 single neurons while 2 monkeys performed delayed saccades to visual or auditory targets. We found that 64% of FEF neurons were active on presentation of auditory targets and 87% were active during auditory-guided saccades, compared with 75 and 84% for visual targets and saccades. As saccade onset approached, the average level of population activity in the FEF became indistinguishable on visual and auditory trials. FEF activity was better correlated with the movement vector than with the target location for both modalities. In summary, the large proportion of auditory-responsive neurons in the FEF, the similarity between visual and auditory activity levels at the time of the saccade, and the strong correlation between the activity and the saccade vector suggest that auditory signals undergo tailoring to match roughly the strength of visual signals present in the FEF, facilitating accessing of a common motor output pathway. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Abnormal Error Monitoring in Math-Anxious Individuals: Evidence from Error-Related Brain Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena; Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Colomé, Àngels

    2013-01-01

    This study used event-related brain potentials to investigate whether math anxiety is related to abnormal error monitoring processing. Seventeen high math-anxious (HMA) and seventeen low math-anxious (LMA) individuals were presented with a numerical and a classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of trait or state anxiety. We found enhanced error-related negativity (ERN) in the HMA group when subjects committed an error on the numerical Stroop task, but not on the classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of the correct-related negativity component (CRN), the error positivity component (Pe), classical behavioral measures or post-error measures. The amplitude of the ERN was negatively related to participants’ math anxiety scores, showing a more negative amplitude as the score increased. Moreover, using standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) we found greater activation of the insula in errors on a numerical task as compared to errors in a non-numerical task only for the HMA group. The results were interpreted according to the motivational significance theory of the ERN. PMID:24236212

  4. Basic abnormalities in visual processing affect face processing at an early age in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Vlamings, Petra Hendrika Johanna Maria; Jonkman, Lisa Marthe; van Daalen, Emma; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Kemner, Chantal

    2010-12-15

    A detailed visual processing style has been noted in autism spectrum disorder (ASD); this contributes to problems in face processing and has been directly related to abnormal processing of spatial frequencies (SFs). Little is known about the early development of face processing in ASD and the relation with abnormal SF processing. We investigated whether young ASD children show abnormalities in low spatial frequency (LSF, global) and high spatial frequency (HSF, detailed) processing and explored whether these are crucially involved in the early development of face processing. Three- to 4-year-old children with ASD (n = 22) were compared with developmentally delayed children without ASD (n = 17). Spatial frequency processing was studied by recording visual evoked potentials from visual brain areas while children passively viewed gratings (HSF/LSF). In addition, children watched face stimuli with different expressions, filtered to include only HSF or LSF. Enhanced activity in visual brain areas was found in response to HSF versus LSF information in children with ASD, in contrast to control subjects. Furthermore, facial-expression processing was also primarily driven by detail in ASD. Enhanced visual processing of detailed (HSF) information is present early in ASD and occurs for neutral (gratings), as well as for socially relevant stimuli (facial expressions). These data indicate that there is a general abnormality in visual SF processing in early ASD and are in agreement with suggestions that a fast LSF subcortical face processing route might be affected in ASD. This could suggest that abnormal visual processing is causative in the development of social problems in ASD. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Abnormalities in cervical smears stored in plastic bags: potential cause of false negatives].

    PubMed

    Ortega-González, Patricia; González-Bravo, Margarita S; Jiménez-Muñoz-Ledo, Gustavo; Macías, Alejandro E

    2011-01-01

    Cervical smear is the most economic and efficient diagnostic tool for the screening of cervical cancer. However, since plastic bags have been used in Guanajuato to transport and store smears, we have observed cytological abnormalities which difficult the diagnosis and lead to false negatives. To describe those abnormalities. Out of 340 women registered in a primary care center in Mexico, 68 were selected through systematic random sampling during 2007. A cervical smear was obtained and placed on two slides. The first sample was allowed to dry but the second one was placed into the plastic bag immediately after fixation. After 15 days all the smears were stained with the Papanicolaou technique. A certified pathologist, blinded about the variable of study, interpreted the samples according to the Bethesda system, and evaluated the presence of necrosis, edema, holes, and opportunistic microorganisms. Of the 68 smears exposed to a humid storage, 36 (53%) were inadequate for diagnosis (Fisher's exact probability < 0.001). From them, 36 (53%) had holes or lagoons, 34 (50%) had edema, 31 (46%) had necrosis, and 15 (22%) had fungus. On the other hand, the 68 dried cervical smears were all adequate for diagnosis and none had the changes or cytological abnormalities. The humid transport and storage of cervical smears produced abnormalities in the normal morphology that could lead to false negative results. The guideline for the handling of cervical smears must stress the importance of allowing the smears to dry completely after fixation and before storing them in plastic bags.

  6. Subcortical Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in Healthy Bipolar Offspring: Potential Neuroanatomical Risk Marker for Bipolar Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Nau, Sharon; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to examine the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with gray matter volume abnormalities in brain regions in healthy bipolar offspring relative to age-matched controls. Results show increased gray matter volume in the parahippocampus/hippocampus in healthy offspring at genetic risk for BD.

  7. Functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and musical consonance in schizophrenia: evidence from an evoked potential study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated functional and structural temporal lobe abnormalities located close to the auditory cortical regions in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to determine whether functional abnormalities exist in the cortical processing of musical sound in schizophrenia. Methods Twelve schizophrenic patients and twelve age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited, and participants listened to a random sequence of two kinds of sonic entities, intervals (tritones and perfect fifths) and chords (atonal chords, diminished chords, and major triads), of varying degrees of complexity and consonance. The perception of musical sound was investigated by the auditory evoked potentials technique. Results Our results showed that schizophrenic patients exhibited significant reductions in the amplitudes of the N1 and P2 components elicited by musical stimuli, to which consonant sounds contributed more significantly than dissonant sounds. Schizophrenic patients could not perceive the dissimilarity between interval and chord stimuli based on the evoked potentials responses as compared with the healthy controls. Conclusion This study provided electrophysiological evidence of functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and music consonance in schizophrenia. The preliminary findings warrant further investigations for the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23721126

  8. Enteric nervous system abnormalities are present in human necrotizing enterocolitis: potential neurotransplantation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal dysmotility following human necrotizing enterocolitis suggests that the enteric nervous system is injured during the disease. We examined human intestinal specimens to characterize the enteric nervous system injury that occurs in necrotizing enterocolitis, and then used an animal model of experimental necrotizing enterocolitis to determine whether transplantation of neural stem cells can protect the enteric nervous system from injury. Methods Human intestinal specimens resected from patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 18), from control patients with bowel atresia (n = 8), and from necrotizing enterocolitis and control patients undergoing stoma closure several months later (n = 14 and n = 6 respectively) were subjected to histologic examination, immunohistochemistry, and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to examine the myenteric plexus structure and neurotransmitter expression. In addition, experimental necrotizing enterocolitis was induced in newborn rat pups and neurotransplantation was performed by administration of fluorescently labeled neural stem cells, with subsequent visualization of transplanted cells and determination of intestinal integrity and intestinal motility. Results There was significant enteric nervous system damage with increased enteric nervous system apoptosis, and decreased neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in myenteric ganglia from human intestine resected for necrotizing enterocolitis compared with control intestine. Structural and functional abnormalities persisted months later at the time of stoma closure. Similar abnormalities were identified in rat pups exposed to experimental necrotizing enterocolitis. Pups receiving neural stem cell transplantation had improved enteric nervous system and intestinal integrity, differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells into functional neurons, significantly improved intestinal transit, and significantly decreased

  9. Abnormal Neural Connectivity in Schizophrenia and fMRI-Brain-Computer Interface as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2012-01-01

    Considering that single locations of structural and functional abnormalities are insufficient to explain the diverse psychopathology of schizophrenia, new models have postulated that the impairments associated with the disease arise from a failure to integrate the activity of local and distributed neural circuits: the “abnormal neural connectivity hypothesis.” In the last years, new evidence coming from neuroimaging have supported and expanded this theory. However, despite the increasing evidence that schizophrenia is a disorder of neural connectivity, so far there are no treatments that have shown to produce a significant change in brain connectivity, or that have been specifically designed to alleviate this problem. Brain-Computer Interfaces based on real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI-BCI) are novel techniques that have allowed subjects to achieve self-regulation of circumscribed brain regions. In recent studies, experiments with this technology have resulted in new findings suggesting that this methodology could be used to train subjects to enhance brain connectivity, and therefore could potentially be used as a therapeutic tool in mental disorders including schizophrenia. The present article summarizes the findings coming from hemodynamics-based neuroimaging that support the abnormal connectivity hypothesis in schizophrenia, and discusses a new approach that could address this problem. PMID:23525496

  10. Visual abnormalities associated with enhanced optic nerve myelination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minzhong; Narayanan, S Priyadarshini; Wang, Feng; Morse, Emily; Macklin, Wendy B; Peachey, Neal S

    2011-02-16

    Expression of the constitutively active serine/threonine kinase Akt in oligodendrocytes results in enhanced myelination in the CNS. Here, we have examined the effects of this Akt overexpression on optic nerve structure and on optic nerve function, assessed using the visual evoked potential (VEP). Transgenic mice have been generated with the Plp promoter driving expression of a modified form of Akt, in which aspartic acids are substituted for Thr308 and Ser473. These Plp-Akt-DD (Akt-DD) mice, and littermate controls, were studied at different ages. Optic nerves were examined anatomically at 2 and 6 months of age. At 2 months of age, optic nerves were substantially thicker in Akt-DD mice, reflecting an increase in myelination of optic nerve axons. By electron microscopy, myelin thickness was increased in Akt-DD optic nerve, with extended paranodal domains having excess paranodal loops, and the density of nodes of Ranvier was reduced, relative to control mice. We recorded VEPs in response to strobe flash ganzfeld stimuli presented after overnight dark- and light-adapted conditions at ages ranging from 1 to 10 months. It was possible to record a clear VEP from Akt-DD mice at all ages examined. At 1 month of age, VEP implicit times were somewhat shorter in Akt-DD transgenic mice than in control animals. Beyond 6months of age, VEP latencies were consistently delayed in Akt-DD transgenic mice. These abnormalities did not reflect an alteration in retinal function as there were no significant differences between ERGs obtained from control or Akt-DD transgenic mice. In young mice, the somewhat faster responses may reflect improved transmission due to increased myelination of optic nerve axons. In older mice, where the Akt-DD optic nerve is markedly thicker than control, it is remarkable that optic nerves continue to function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal late visual responses and alpha oscillations in neurofibromatosis type 1: a link to visual and attention deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) affects several areas of cognitive function including visual processing and attention. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the visual deficits of children and adolescents with NF1 by studying visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain oscillations during visual stimulation and rest periods. Methods Electroencephalogram/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) responses were measured during visual processing (NF1 n = 17; controls n = 19) and idle periods with eyes closed and eyes open (NF1 n = 12; controls n = 14). Visual stimulation was chosen to bias activation of the three detection mechanisms: achromatic, red-green and blue-yellow. Results We found significant differences between the groups for late chromatic VEPs and a specific enhancement in the amplitude of the parieto-occipital alpha amplitude both during visual stimulation and idle periods. Alpha modulation and the negative influence of alpha oscillations in visual performance were found in both groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest abnormal later stages of visual processing and enhanced amplitude of alpha oscillations supporting the existence of deficits in basic sensory processing in NF1. Given the link between alpha oscillations, visual perception and attention, these results indicate a neural mechanism that might underlie the visual sensitivity deficits and increased lapses of attention observed in individuals with NF1. PMID:24559228

  12. Microbiota abnormalities and the therapeutic potential of probiotics in the treatment of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Rios, Adiel C; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni-Graiff, Maiara; Asevedo, Elson; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Wieck, Andrea; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; McIntyre, Roger S; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Brietzke, Elisa

    2017-10-26

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are among the leading causes of burden and disability worldwide. Despite intensified research efforts to improve the treatment options and remission rates in mood disorders, no disease modifying treatment exists for these disorders. Accumulating evidence implicates the involvement of the gut microbiota in processes relevant to etiopathology of central nervous system-based disorders. The objective of this article was to critically evaluate the evidence supporting the link between gastrointestinal microbiota and mood disorders and to discuss the potential benefits of using probiotics in the treatment of MDD and BD. The concept of psychobiotics, which is bacterial-based interventions with mental health benefit, is emerging in the field. On the other hand, while probiotics might potentially represent a significant advance, specific roles of microbiota in the pathophysiology of mood disorders still need further investigation along with intervention studies.

  13. Antioxidant potential of fungal metabolite nigerloxin during eye lens abnormalities in galactose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Suresha, Bharathinagar S; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2013-10-01

    The role of osmotic and oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of cataract. Nigerloxin, a fungal metabolite, has been shown to possess aldose reductase inhibition and improved antioxidant defense system in lens of diabetic rats. In the present study, the beneficial influence of nigerloxin was investigated in galactose-induced cataract in experimental animals. Cataract was induced in Wistar rats by feeding 30% galactose in diet. Groups of galactose-fed rats were orally administered with nigerloxin (25 and 100 mg/kg body weight/day) for 24 days. Lens aldose reductase activity was increased significantly in galactose-fed animals. Lens lipid peroxides and advanced glycation end products were also significantly increased. Antioxidant molecule - reduced glutathione, total thiols and activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the lens of galactose-fed animals. Oral administration of nigerloxin once a day for 24 days at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight, significantly decreased lens lipid peroxides and advanced glycation end products in galactose-fed rats. Lens aldose reductase activity was reduced and lens antioxidant molecules and antioxidant enzyme activities were elevated significantly by nigerloxin administration. The results suggest that alteration in polyol pathway and antioxidant defense system were countered by nigerloxin in the lens of galactose-fed animals, suggesting the potential of nigerloxin in ameliorating the development of galactose-induced cataract in experimental animals.

  14. Fasting glucose measurement as a potential first step screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities in women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M; Goverde, Angelique J; van Haeften, Timon W; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2013-08-01

    Is routine screening by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) needed for all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities of PCOS patients by an OGTT could potentially be limited to patients who present with a fasting glucose concentration between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l only. Women with PCOS are at increased risk of developing diabetes. This study proposes a stepwise screening strategy for (pre)diabetes for PCOS patients based on risk stratification by fasting plasma glucose. A cross-sectional study of 226 women diagnosed with anovulatory PCOS. A consecutive series of 226 patients, diagnosed with PCOS at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, were screened for glucose metabolism abnormalities by OGTT (75 g glucose load). The majority of the 226 women (mean age: 29.6 ± 4.3 years; BMI: 27.3 ± 6.7 kg/m(2); 81% Caucasian) presented with a normal OGTT (169 women (75%)). Of the 57 (25%) women presenting with mild to moderate glucose abnormalities, 53 (93%) could be identified by fasting glucose concentrations only. Diabetes was diagnosed in a total of eight women (3.5%). In six women, the diagnosis was based on fasting glucose >7.0 mmol/l. The other two cases of diabetes initially presented with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l and were diagnosed by OGTT assessment. No women diagnosed with diabetes presented with fasting glucose levels below 6.1 mmol/l. We therefore conclude that all diabetes patients could potentially be found by initial fasting glucose assessment followed by OGTT only in patients with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l. Before general implementation can be advised, this screening algorithm should be validated in a prospective study of a similar or greater number of PCOS women. Our study comprised of a mostly Caucasian (81%) population, therefore generalization to other ethnic populations should be done with caution. No external finance was involved in this study. B

  15. Screening for Electrophysiological Abnormalities in Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Peripheral Neuropathy and Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KÖŞKDERELİOĞLU, Aslı; ORTAN, Pınar; ARI, Alpay; GEDİZLİOĞLU, Muhteşem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the existence of peripheral and optic neuropathies in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection. Methods Thirty consecutive patients who were followed in a hepatitis C outpatient clinic were recruited for electrophysiological evaluation together with 30 age- and gender-compatible healthy controls. All patients had a detailed neurological examination. The information regarding the disease duration and management with interferons were collected. Nerve conduction studies and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in all subjects. The results of the patient and control groups were statistically compared. Results Of the patients with hepatitis C infection, 16 were females and 14 males. The mean age was 57.5 years, and the average disease duration was 6.43 years. The P100 latencies in the patient group were within normal limits, while the amplitudes were meaningfully small by comparison with the controls. There were some abnormalities in the nerve conduction studies of 15 patients. Sensorial neuropathy was detected in two patients, sensorimotor polyneuropathy in four, carpal tunnel syndrome in seven, and carpal tunnel syndrome and sensorimotor polyneuropathy as comorbid states in another two patients. The nerve conduction studies and VEP parameters were entirely normal in the control group. Conclusion Hepatitis C-related neurological abnormalities may occur both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Mononeuritis multiplex, sensorial axonal neuropathy, and multiple mononeuropathies are some of the presentations of the peripheral nervous system involvement. The mode of infection is considered to be via vasculitic mechanisms. In addition, optic neuropathy is a known complication of interferon treatment. Autoantibodies, cytokines, chemokines, and cryoglobulins are accused to play roles in the pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the peripheral nervous system and optic nerves in a group of patients

  16. Screening for Electrophysiological Abnormalities in Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Peripheral Neuropathy and Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Köşkderelioğlu, Aslı; Ortan, Pınar; Ari, Alpay; Gedizlioğlu, Muhteşem

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the existence of peripheral and optic neuropathies in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection. Thirty consecutive patients who were followed in a hepatitis C outpatient clinic were recruited for electrophysiological evaluation together with 30 age- and gender-compatible healthy controls. All patients had a detailed neurological examination. The information regarding the disease duration and management with interferons were collected. Nerve conduction studies and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in all subjects. The results of the patient and control groups were statistically compared. Of the patients with hepatitis C infection, 16 were females and 14 males. The mean age was 57.5 years, and the average disease duration was 6.43 years. The P100 latencies in the patient group were within normal limits, while the amplitudes were meaningfully small by comparison with the controls. There were some abnormalities in the nerve conduction studies of 15 patients. Sensorial neuropathy was detected in two patients, sensorimotor polyneuropathy in four, carpal tunnel syndrome in seven, and carpal tunnel syndrome and sensorimotor polyneuropathy as comorbid states in another two patients. The nerve conduction studies and VEP parameters were entirely normal in the control group. Hepatitis C-related neurological abnormalities may occur both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Mononeuritis multiplex, sensorial axonal neuropathy, and multiple mononeuropathies are some of the presentations of the peripheral nervous system involvement. The mode of infection is considered to be via vasculitic mechanisms. In addition, optic neuropathy is a known complication of interferon treatment. Autoantibodies, cytokines, chemokines, and cryoglobulins are accused to play roles in the pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the peripheral nervous system and optic nerves in a group of patients with hepatitis C. The results were in

  17. Carcinogenic Activities and Sperm Abnormalities of Methicillin Resistance Staphylococcus aureus and Inhibition of Their Virulence Potentials by Ayamycin.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy Abbas Ahmed; Abdel-Wahhab, Khaled G; Mannaa, Fathia A; Farghaly, Ayman A; El-Bondkly, Ahmed M A

    2017-11-01

    This investigation aimed to study the in vivo harmful effects of the subcutaneous injection of different methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus extracts (MRSA2, MRSA4, MRSA10, MRSA69, MRSA70, MRSA76, and MRSA78). Such strains represented the highest minimum inhibition concentration toward methicillin with various multidrug-resistant patterns. The obtained results revealed that rats injected with the MRSA4 extract died immediately after the last dose indicating the high cytotoxicity of MRSA4 strain (100% mortality). While the mortalities in other groups injected by the other MRSA extracts ranged from 50 to 75%. In comparison with the normal animal group, all MRSA extracts induced a hepatotoxic effect which was indicated from the significant (p < 0.01) increases in the activities of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) enzymes. Moreover, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) combined with a partial nephrotoxicity that was monitored from the significant elevation of serum urea concentration. While serum creatinine levels did not affect. Similarly, a significant elevation was recorded in serum levels of tumor biomarkers (alpha fetoprotein; AFP, carcinoembryonic antigen; CEA, and lactate dehydrogenase; LDH) reflecting their carcinogenic potential. On the other hand, the percentage of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes from bone marrow cells was statistically significant in all groups as compared to the control group. The percentage of sperm abnormalities was statistically significant compared to the control. Different types of head abnormalities and coiled tail were recorded. Consequently, the current study focused on fighting MRSA virulence factors by the new compound ayamycin, which proved to be potent anti-virulence factor against all MRSA strains under study by significant decreasing of their streptokinase activities, hemolysin synthesis, biofilm formation, and their cell surface hydrophobicity.

  18. Abnormalities of P300 cortical current density in unmedicated depressed patients revealed by LORETA analysis of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Shin; Wang, Jijun; Hokama, Hiroto; Hiramatsu, Kenichi

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the neural substrates underlying event-related potential (ERP) abnormalities, with respect to the generators of the ERP components in depressed patients. Using an oddball paradigm, ERP from auditory stimuli were recorded from 22 unmedicated patients with current depressive episodes and compared with those from 22 age- and gender-matched normal controls. Cortical current densities of the N100 and P300 components were analyzed using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Group differences in cortical current density were mapped on a 3-D cortex model. The results revealed that N100 cortical current densities did not differ between the two groups, while P300 cortical current densities were significantly lower in depressed patients over the bilateral temporal lobes, the left frontal region, and the right temporal-parietal area. Furthermore, the cortical area in which the group difference in P300 current density had been identified was remarkably larger over the right than the left hemisphere, thus supporting the hypothesis of right hemisphere dysfunction in depression.

  19. Evoked potentials are useful for diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ohnari, Keiko; Okada, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Mafune, Kosuke; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-05-15

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) has been differentiated from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) by clinical, laboratory, and pathological findings, including the presence of the anti-aquaporin 4 antibody. Measurement of evoked potentials (EPs) is often used for the diagnosis of RRMS, although the possibility of applying EPs to the diagnosis of NMOSD has not been investigated in detail. Eighteen patients with NMOSD and 28 patients with RRMS were included in this study. The patients' neurological symptoms and signs were examined and their EPs were recorded. Characteristic findings were absence of visual evoked potentials and absence of motor evoked potentials in the lower extremities in patients with NMOSD, and a delay in these potentials in patients with RRMS. Most patients with NMOSD did not present abnormal subclinical EPs, whereas many patients with RRMS did. None of the patients with NMOSD showed abnormalities in auditory brainstem responses. NMOSD can be differentiated from RRMS by EP data obtained in the early stages of these diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis of Normal and Abnormal Color Vision with Cone-Specific VEPs.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Jeff C; Kryder, Andrew C; Lam, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Normal color vision depends on normal long wavelength (L), middle wavelength (M), and short wavelength sensitive (S) cones. Hereditary "red-green" color vision deficiency (CVD) is due to a shift in peak sensitivity or lack of L or M cones. Hereditary S cone CVD is rare but can be acquired as an early sign of disease. Current tests detect CVD but few diagnose type or severity, critical for linking performance to real-world demands. The anomaloscope and newer subjective tests quantify CVD but are not applicable to infants or cognitively impaired patients. Our purpose was to develop an objective test of CVD with sensitivity and specificity comparable to current tests. A calibrated visual-evoked potential (VEP) display and Food and Drug Administration-approved system was used to record L, M, and S cone-specific pattern-onset VEPs from 18 color vision normals (CVNs) and 13 hereditary CVDs. VEP amplitudes and latencies were compared between groups to establish VEP sensitivity and specificity. Cone VEPs show 100% sensitivity for diagnosis of CVD and 94% specificity for confirming CVN. L cone (protan) CVDs showed a significant increase in L cone latency (53.1 msec, P < 0.003) and decreased amplitude (10.8 uV, P < 0.0000005) but normal M and S cone VEPs ( P > 0.31). M cone (deutan) CVDs showed a significant increase in M cone latency (31.0 msec, P < 0.000004) and decreased amplitude (8.4 uV, P < 0.006) but normal L and S cone VEPs ( P > 0.29). Cone-specific VEPs offer a rapid, objective test to diagnose hereditary CVD and show potential for detecting acquired CVD in various diseases. This paper describes the efficacy of cone-specific color VEPs for quantification of normal and abnormal color vision. The rapid, objective nature of this approach makes it suitable for detecting color sensitivity loss in infants and the cognitively impaired.

  1. The potential impact of NIPT as a second-tier screen on the outcomes of high-risk pregnancies with rare chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Susannah; Dickinson, Jan E; Murch, Ashleigh; O'Leary, Peter

    2015-10-01

    To describe the potential impact of using noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as a second-tier test, on the diagnosis and outcomes of pregnancies identified as high risk through first trimester screening (FTS) in a cohort of real pregnancies. Western Australian FTS and diagnostic data (2007-2009) were linked to pregnancy outcomes. Karyotype results from invasive prenatal testing in high-risk women were analysed. The outcomes of abnormal results that would not be detected by NIPT, assuming a panel of trisomy 21/18/13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies, and the likelihood of diagnosis in a screening model using NIPT as a second-tier test are described. Abnormal karyotype results were reported in 224 of 1488 (15%) women with high-risk pregnancies having invasive diagnostic testing. NIPT potentially would have identified 85%. The 33 abnormalities unidentifiable by NIPT were triploidies (n = 7, 21%), balanced (n = 8, 24%) and unbalanced rearrangements (n = 10, 30%) and level III mosaicisms (n = 8, 24%). For conditions not identifiable by NIPT, fetal sonographic appearance was likely to have led to invasive testing for 10 of 17 (59%) pathogenic abnormalities. If a policy was adopted recommending invasive testing for FTS risk >1:50 and/or ultrasound detected abnormality, the residual risk of an unidentified pathogenic chromosomal abnormality in those without a diagnosis would have been 0.33% (95% CI 0.01-0.65%). A screening model with NIPT as a second-tier for high-risk pregnancies would be unlikely to have changed the outcome for the majority of pregnancies. Optimising the diagnosis of rare pathogenic abnormalities requires clear indicators for invasive testing over NIPT. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  3. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  4. Beyond static measures: A review of functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its potential to investigate dynamic glutamatergic abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Luke A; King, Sinead; Mullins, Paul G; Stone, James M

    2018-05-01

    Abnormalities of the glutamate system are increasingly implicated in schizophrenia but their exact nature remains unknown. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), while fundamental in revealing glutamatergic alterations in schizophrenia, has, until recently, been significantly limited and thought to only provide static measures. Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS), which uses sequential scans for dynamic measurement of a range of brain metabolites in activated brain areas, has lately been applied to a variety of task or stimulus conditions, producing interesting insights into neurometabolite responses to neural activation. Here, we summarise the existing 1 H-MRS studies of brain glutamate in schizophrenia. We then present a comprehensive review of research studies that have utilised fMRS, and lastly consider how fMRS methods might further the understanding of glutamatergic abnormalities in schizophrenia.

  5. Abnormal regional homogeneity as a potential imaging biomarker for adolescent-onset schizophrenia: A resting-state fMRI study and support vector machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Luxian; Wu, Renrong; Fan, Xiaoduo; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2018-02-01

    Structural and functional abnormalities have been reported in the brain of patients with adolescent-onset schizophrenia (AOS). The brain regional functional synchronization in patients with AOS remains unclear. We analyzed resting-state functional magnetic resonance scans in 48 drug-naive patients with AOS and 31 healthy controls by using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measurement that reflects brain local functional connectivity or synchronization and indicates regional integration of information processing. Then, receiver operating characteristic curves and support vector machines were used to evaluate the effect of abnormal regional homogeneity in differentiating patients from controls. Patients with AOS showed significantly increased ReHo values in the bilateral superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and significantly decreased ReHo values in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG), right precentral lobule, right inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and left paracentral lobule when compared with controls. A combination of the ReHo values in bilateral superior MPFC, left STG, and right IPL was able to discriminate patients from controls with the sensitivity of 88.24%, specificity of 91.89%, and accuracy of 90.14%. The brain regional functional synchronization abnormalities exist in drug-naive patients with AOS. A combination of ReHo values in these abnormal regions might serve as potential imaging biomarker to identify patients with AOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Visual field asymmetries in visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral responses to visual stimuli exhibit visual field asymmetries, but cortical folding and the close proximity of visual cortical areas make electrophysiological comparisons between different stimulus locations problematic. Retinotopy-constrained source estimation (RCSE) uses distributed dipole models simultaneously constrained by multiple stimulus locations to provide separation between individual visual areas that is not possible with conventional source estimation methods. Magnetoencephalography and RCSE were used to estimate time courses of activity in V1, V2, V3, and V3A. Responses to left and right hemifield stimuli were not significantly different. Peak latencies for peripheral stimuli were significantly shorter than those for perifoveal stimuli in V1, V2, and V3A, likely related to the greater proportion of magnocellular input to V1 in the periphery. Consistent with previous results, sensor magnitudes for lower field stimuli were about twice as large as for upper field, which is only partially explained by the proximity to sensors for lower field cortical sources in V1, V2, and V3. V3A exhibited both latency and amplitude differences for upper and lower field responses. There were no differences for V3, consistent with previous suggestions that dorsal and ventral V3 are two halves of a single visual area, rather than distinct areas V3 and VP. PMID:25527151

  8. Signal Analysis of Visual Evoked Responses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    T-IE PRO3LEM The interest of the Air Force was in the study of: initially, animal VERs; and, later, human subject VERs. Fo,. obvious reasons, the...data re- oorded from human subjects were restricted to scalp electrode recordings. By ;ontrast, in the animal preparations, epitural bipolar electrode...left em sherechannel # 1 rigt hemisphere_______ _______ channel # 3 HP HPJ HP bT channel # 4 it 5 #t 6 Figure 6.4. Specification of channels. HP

  9. Abnormal polyamine metabolism is unique to the neuropathic forms of MPS: potential for biomarker development and insight into pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Katz, Nathan; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Bell, Peter; Tolar, Jakub; Orchard, Paul J; Lund, Troy C; Nayal, Mohamad; Weng, Liwei; Mesaros, Clementina; de Souza, Carolina F M; Dalla Corte, Amauri; Giugliani, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2017-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are rare genetic disorders marked by severe somatic and neurological symptoms. Development of treatments for the neurological manifestations of MPS has been hindered by the lack of objective measures of central nervous system disease burden. Identification of biomarkers for central nervous system disease in MPS patients would facilitate the evaluation of new agents in clinical trials. High throughput metabolite screening of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from a canine model of MPS I revealed a marked elevation of the polyamine, spermine, in affected animals, and gene therapy studies demonstrated that reduction of CSF spermine reflects correction of brain lesions in these animals. In humans, CSF spermine was elevated in neuropathic subtypes of MPS (MPS I, II, IIIA, IIIB), but not in subtypes in which cognitive function is preserved (MPS IVA, VI). In MPS I patients, elevated CSF spermine was restricted to patients with genotypes associated with CNS disease and was reduced following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is the only therapy currently capable of improving cognitive outcomes. Additional studies in cultured neurons from MPS I mice showed that elevated spermine was essential for the abnormal neurite overgrowth exhibited by MPS neurons. These findings offer new insights into the pathogenesis of CNS disease in MPS patients, and support the use of spermine as a new biomarker to facilitate the development of next generation therapeutics for MPS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  12. Striking hematological abnormalities in patients with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): a potential role of pericentrin in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Alanay, Yasemin; Cetin, Mualla; Boduroglu, Koray; Utine, Eda; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Huber, Celine; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Kilic, Esra; Simsek Kiper, Ozlem Pelin; Gumruk, Fatma

    2014-02-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a rare primordial dwarfism that is similar to Seckel syndrome. Seckel syndrome is known to be associated with various hematological abnormalities; however, hematological findings in MOPD II patients have not been previously reported. The present study aimed to describe the hematological findings in a series of eight patients with MOPD II from a single center. The study included eight patients with MOPD II that were analyzed via molecular testing, and physical and laboratory examinations. Molecular testing showed that seven of the eight patients had pericentrin (PCNT) gene mutations. Hematological evaluation showed that 7 (87.5%) patients had thrombocytosis, 6 (75%) had leukocytosis, 5 (62.5%) had both leukocytosis and thrombocytosis, and 2 (25%) had anemia. We report leukocytosis and thrombocytosis as a common hematologic abnormality in patients with MOPD II. The present findings may improve our understanding of the potential function of the PCNT gene in hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evoked potentials recorded during routine EEG predict outcome after perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Marchi, Viviana; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Toiviainen-Salo, Sanna; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Lauronen, Leena

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the added value of somatosensory (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) recorded simultaneously with routine EEG in early outcome prediction of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy under modern intensive care. We simultaneously recorded multichannel EEG, median nerve SEPs, and flash VEPs during the first few postnatal days in 50 term newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. EEG background was scored into five grades and the worst two grades were considered to indicate poor cerebral recovery. Evoked potentials were classified as absent or present. Clinical outcome was determined from the medical records at a median age of 21months. Unfavorable outcome included cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, severe epilepsy, or death. The accuracy of outcome prediction was 98% with SEPs compared to 90% with EEG. EEG alone always predicted unfavorable outcome when it was inactive (n=9), and favorable outcome when it was normal or only mildly abnormal (n=17). However, newborns with moderate or severe EEG background abnormality could have either favorable or unfavorable outcome, which was correctly predicted by SEP in all but one newborn (accuracy in this subgroup 96%). Absent VEPs were always associated with an inactive EEG, and an unfavorable outcome. However, presence of VEPs did not guarantee a favorable outcome. SEPs accurately predict clinical outcomes in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and improve the EEG-based prediction particularly in those newborns with severely or moderately abnormal EEG findings. SEPs should be added to routine EEG recordings for early bedside assessment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochemical phenotyping unravels novel metabolic abnormalities and potential biomarkers associated with treatment of GLUT1 deficiency with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Pinelli, Michele; Alagia, Marianna; Donti, Taraka; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; De Giorgis, Valentina; Lunghi, Simona; Vari, Maria Stella; Striano, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kennedy, Adam D; Elsea, Sarah H

    2017-01-01

    Global metabolomic profiling offers novel opportunities for the discovery of biomarkers and for the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms that might lead to the development of novel therapies. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism due to reduced function of glucose transporter type 1. Clinical presentation of GLUT1-DS is heterogeneous and the disorder mirrors patients with epilepsy, movement disorders, or any paroxysmal events or unexplained neurological manifestation triggered by exercise or fasting. The diagnostic biochemical hallmark of the disease is a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood glucose ratio and the only available treatment is ketogenic diet. This study aimed at advancing our understanding of the biochemical perturbations in GLUT1-DS pathogenesis through biochemical phenotyping and the treatment of GLUT1-DS with a ketogenic diet. Metabolomic analysis of three CSF samples from GLUT1-DS patients not on ketogenic diet was feasible inasmuch as CSF sampling was used for diagnosis before to start with ketogenic diet. The analysis of plasma and urine samples obtained from GLUT1-DS patients treated with a ketogenic diet showed alterations in lipid and amino acid profiles. While subtle, these were consistent findings across the patients with GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet, suggesting impacts on mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, low levels of free carnitine were present suggesting its consumption in GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine, 3-methyladipate, and N-acetylglycine were identified as potential biomarkers of GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. This is the first study to identify CSF, plasma, and urine metabolites associated with GLUT1-DS, as well as biochemical changes impacted by a ketogenic diet. Potential biomarkers and metabolic insights deserve further investigation.

  15. Biochemical phenotyping unravels novel metabolic abnormalities and potential biomarkers associated with treatment of GLUT1 deficiency with ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Pinelli, Michele; Alagia, Marianna; Donti, Taraka; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; De Giorgis, Valentina; Lunghi, Simona; Vari, Maria Stella; Striano, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kennedy, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Global metabolomic profiling offers novel opportunities for the discovery of biomarkers and for the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms that might lead to the development of novel therapies. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism due to reduced function of glucose transporter type 1. Clinical presentation of GLUT1-DS is heterogeneous and the disorder mirrors patients with epilepsy, movement disorders, or any paroxysmal events or unexplained neurological manifestation triggered by exercise or fasting. The diagnostic biochemical hallmark of the disease is a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood glucose ratio and the only available treatment is ketogenic diet. This study aimed at advancing our understanding of the biochemical perturbations in GLUT1-DS pathogenesis through biochemical phenotyping and the treatment of GLUT1-DS with a ketogenic diet. Metabolomic analysis of three CSF samples from GLUT1-DS patients not on ketogenic diet was feasible inasmuch as CSF sampling was used for diagnosis before to start with ketogenic diet. The analysis of plasma and urine samples obtained from GLUT1-DS patients treated with a ketogenic diet showed alterations in lipid and amino acid profiles. While subtle, these were consistent findings across the patients with GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet, suggesting impacts on mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, low levels of free carnitine were present suggesting its consumption in GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine, 3-methyladipate, and N-acetylglycine were identified as potential biomarkers of GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. This is the first study to identify CSF, plasma, and urine metabolites associated with GLUT1-DS, as well as biochemical changes impacted by a ketogenic diet. Potential biomarkers and metabolic insights deserve further investigation. PMID:28961260

  16. Abnormal self-schema in semantic memory in major depressive disorder: Evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Michael; Farzan, Faranak; Blumberger, Daniel M; Kutas, Marta; McKinnon, Margaret C; Kansal, Vinay; Rajji, Tarek K; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2017-05-01

    An overly negative self-schema is a proposed cognitive mechanism of major depressive disorder (MDD). Self-schema - one's core conception of self, including how strongly one believes one possesses various characteristics - is part of semantic memory (SM), our knowledge about concepts and their relationships. We used the N400 event-related potential (ERP) - elicited by meaningful stimuli, and reduced by greater association of the stimulus with preceding context - to measure association strength between self-concept and positive, negative, and neutral characteristics in SM. ERPs were recorded from MDD patients (n=16) and controls (n=16) who viewed trials comprising a self-referential phrase followed by a positive, negative, or neutral adjective. Participants' task was to indicate via button-press whether or not they felt each adjective described themselves. Controls endorsed more positive adjectives than did MDD patients, but the opposite was true for negative adjectives. Patients had smaller N400s than controls specifically for negative adjectives, suggesting that MDD is associated with stronger than normal functional neural links between self-concept and negative characteristics in SM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of Genotoxic Potential of Hridayarnava Rasa (A Herbo-Mineralo-Metallic Ayurvedic Formulation) Using Chromosomal Aberration and Sperm Abnormality Assays

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Chandrashekhar Y.; Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Thakkar, Jalaram H.; Galib, R.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Herbo-mineral formulations are being successfully used in therapeutics since centuries. But recently, they came under the scanner for their metallic contents especially the presence of heavy metals. Hence it is the need of the hour to assess and establish the safety of these formulations through toxicity studies. In line with the various toxicity studies that are being carried out, Government of India expressed the need for conducting genotoxicity studies of different metal- or mineral-based drugs. Till date very few Ayurvedic herbo-mineral formulations have been studied for their genotoxic potential. The present study is aimed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Hridayarnava Rasa. Materials and Methods: It was prepared as per classical guidelines and administered to Swiss albino mice for 14 consecutive days. Chromosomal aberration and sperm abnormality assay were done to evaluate the genotoxic potential of the test drugs. Cyclophosphamide (CP) was taken as positive group and results were compared. Results: All treated groups exhibited significant body weight gain in comparison to CP group. Results revealed no structural deformity in the above parameters in comparison to the CP-treated group. Conclusion: Reported data showed that both tested samples of Hridayarnava Rasa does not possess genotoxic potential under the experimental conditions and can be safely used. PMID:25948961

  18. Abnormal sympathetic nerve activity in women exposed to cigarette smoke: a potential mechanism to explain increased cardiac risk.

    PubMed

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Park, Jeanie; Agrawal, Harsh; Gornbein, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-15

    In women, cardiac deaths attributable to tobacco exposure have reached the same high levels as men. Normally, sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) fluctuates according to the menstrual phase, but in habitual smokers, SNA levels remain constant. Our purpose is to extend these observations to other groups of women exposed to tobacco smoke and to explore potential mechanisms. We hypothesize that women exposed to secondhand smoke, but not former smokers, have nonfluctuating SNA compared with never smokers, and that impaired baroreflex suppression of SNA, and/or heightened central SNA responses, underlie this nonfluctuating SNA. We also hypothesize that female smokers have impaired nocturnal blood pressure dipping, normally mediated by modulation of SNA. In 49 females (19 never, 12 current, 9 former, 9 passive smokers), SNA was recorded (microneurography) during high- and low-hormone ovarian phases at rest, during pharmacological baroreflex testing, and during the cold pressor test (CPT). Twenty-four hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring was performed. Current and passive smokers, but not former smokers, had a nonfluctuating pattern of SNA, unlike never smokers in whom SNA varied with the menstrual phase. Baroreflex control of SNA was significantly blunted in current smokers, independent of menstrual phase. In passive smokers, SNA response to CPT was markedly increased. Nondipping was unexpectedly high in all groups. SNA does not vary during the menstrual cycle in active and passive smokers, unlike never and former smokers. Baroreflex control of SNA is blunted in current smokers, whereas SNA response to CPT is heightened in passive smokers. Smoking cessation is associated with return of the altered SNA pattern to normal.

  19. Multimodal evoked potentials in patients with multiple sclerosis in assessment of the course of the disease.

    PubMed

    Łabuz-Roszak, Beata; Torbus, Magdalena; Kubicka-Bączyk, Katarzyna; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka; Kierber, Agata; Borucka, Katarzyna; Zellner, Małgorzata; Starostak-Tatar, Anna; Pierzchała, Krystyna

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a multifocal damage. The assessment of the MS course by multimodal evoked potentials (EP). We evaluated 95 patients (63 female, 32 male) with relapsing-remitting MS in the average age of 36.4±10.4. The average disease duration was 4.6±7.4 year. Among them, 48 patients (50.5%) were treated with immunomodulatory drugs. All patients underwent neurological examination and EP testing: VEP (visual evoked potentials), SEP (somatosensory evoked potentials), endogenous potential P300. The latencies of following waves were evaluated: P100 (VEP), N4 , N9 , N13, N20, P22 (SEP) and P300, with the reference values of the Neurophysiological Research Laboratory of the Department of Neurology in Zabrze. Abnormal VEP(I) was found in 80 patients (84.2%), SEP(I) in 9 patients (9.5%), P300(I) in 15 patients (15.8%). Abnormal result of the control research VEP (II) was found in 23 patients (82.1%), SEP(II) in 1 patient (3.6%), P300(II) in 4 patients (14.3%). The average values of the waves latencies in the control study were higher, however the statistical significance was not found. The correlation was observed between EDSS, and N20 and P22. No relationship was found between EP and age, disease duration, number of relapses and treatment. In the era of neuroimaging, usage of EP in the diagnosis and assessment of MS is limited. Electrophysiological studies may be used in addition to the clinical examination to confirm the multifocal damage.

  20. Abnormal neural activity as a potential biomarker for drug-naive first-episode adolescent-onset schizophrenia with coherence regional homogeneity and support vector machine analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Luxian; Wu, Renrong; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with adolescent-onset schizophrenia (AOS) hold the same but severe form of symptoms with adult-onset schizophrenia, and with worse outcome and poor treatment response to antipsychotics. Several dominant brain regions of schizophrenia patients show significantly abnormal structural and functional connectivity during resting-state scans. However, coherence regional homogeneity (Cohe-ReHo) in drug-naive first-episode patients with AOS remains unclear. A total of 48 drug-naive first-episode AOS outpatients and 31 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance scans. Cohe-ReHo and support vector machine analyses were used to analyze the data. Compared with the healthy controls, the AOS group showed significantly decreased Cohe-ReHo values distributed over brain regions, including the left postcentral gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, left paracentral lobule, right precentral gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule (IPL), right middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral precuneus. No region with increased Cohe-ReHo values was observed in the AOS group compared with healthy controls. In addition, the right IPL was correlated with fluency (r=-0.324, p=0.030). However, the correlation was not significant after the Bonferroni correction at p<0.0083 (0.05/6). A combination of the Cohe-ReHo values in the bilateral precuneus and right IPL discriminated the patients from controls with the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 91.67%, 87.10%, and 89.87%, respectively. Our findings suggested that the AOS patients exhibited diminished Cohe-ReHo values in some regions within the DMN network and sensorimotor network. The abnormalities in particular brain regions (bilateral precuneus and right IPL) may serve as potential biomarkers for AOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal UP/DOWN Membrane Potential Dynamics Coupled with the Neocortical Slow Oscillation in Dentate Granule Cells during the Latent Phase of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David W; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Marti, Geoffrey; Robbe, David; Crépel, Valérie; Epsztein, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus, a major entry point to the hippocampus, gates (or filters) incoming information from the cortex. During sleep or anesthesia, the slow-wave oscillation (SWO) orchestrates hippocampus-neocortex communication, which is important for memory formation. The dentate gate is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) early during epileptogenesis, which favors the propagation of pathological activities. Yet, whether the gating of physiological SWO by dentate granule cells (DGCs) is altered in TLE has remained unexplored. We combined intracellular recordings of membrane potential (V m) of DGCs and local field potential recordings of the SWO in parietal cortex in anesthetized rats early during epileptogenesis [post-status epilepticus (SE) rats]. As expected, in control rats, the V m of DGCs weakly and rarely oscillated in the SWO frequency range. In contrast, in post-SE rats, the V m of DGCs displayed strong and long-lasting SWO. In these cells, clear UP and DOWN states, in phase with the neocortical SWO, led to a bimodal V m distribution. In post-SE rats, the firing of DGCs was increased and more temporally modulated by the neocortical SWO. We conclude that UP/DOWN state dynamics dominate the V m of DGCs and firing early during epileptogenesis. This abnormally strong neocortical influence on the dynamics of DGCs may profoundly modify the hippocampus-neocortex dialogue during sleep and associated cognitive functions.

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  4. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  5. Transient abnormal Q waves during exercise electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Alameddine, F F; Zafari, A M

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia during exercise electrocardiography is usually manifested by ST segment depression or elevation. Transient abnormal Q waves are rare, as Q waves indicate an old myocardial infarction. The case of a patient with exercise induced transient abnormal Q waves is reported. The potential mechanisms involved in the development of such an abnormality and its clinical implications are discussed. PMID:14676264

  6. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  7. Endocrine abnormalities in lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Gabriella; Mishra, Vinita; Nikolova, Stanka

    2017-10-01

    Lithium toxicity can manifest as a variety of biochemical -abnormalities. This case report describes a patient -presenting to the emergency department with neuropsychiatric -symptoms on a background of bipolar disorder, for which she was prescribed lithium for 26 years previously. Cases of lithium toxicity are rare but can be severe and this case report -demonstrates to clinicians that they must be thorough in investigating patients with lithium toxicity, as there are many potential abnormalities that can manifest concurrently. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. Timely Follow-Up of Abnormal Diagnostic Imaging Test Results in an Outpatient Setting: Are Electronic Medical Records Achieving Their Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Thomas, Eric J.; Mani, Shrinidi; Sittig, Dean; Arora, Harvinder; Espadas, Donna; Khan, Myrna M.; Petersen, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Given the fragmentation of outpatient care, timely follow-up of abnormal diagnostic test results remains a challenge. We hypothesized that an EMR that facilitates the transmission and availability of critical imaging results through either automated notification (alerting) or direct access to the primary report would eliminate this problem. Methods We studied critical imaging alert notifications in the outpatient setting of a tertiary care VA facility from November 2007 to June 2008. Tracking software determined whether the alert was acknowledged (i.e. provider opened the message for viewing) within two weeks of transmission; acknowledged alerts were considered read. We reviewed medical records and contacted providers to determine timely follow-up actions (e.g. ordering a follow-up test or consultation) within 4 weeks of transmission. Multivariable logistic regression models accounting for clustering effect by providers analyzed predictors for two outcomes; lack of acknowledgment and lack of timely follow-up. Results Of 123,638 studies (including X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds, MRI and mammography), 1196 (0.97%) images generated alerts; 217 (18.1%) of these were unacknowledged. Alerts had a higher risk of being unacknowledged when ordering providers were trainees (OR, 5.58;95%CI, 2.86-10.89) and when dual (more than one provider alerted) as opposed to single communication was used (OR, 2.02;95%CI, 1.22-3.36). Timely follow-up was lacking in 92 (7.7% of all alerts) and was similar for acknowledged and unacknowledged alerts (7.3% vs. 9.7%;p=0.2). Risk for lack of timely follow-up was higher with dual communication (OR,1.99;95%CI, 1.06-3.48) but lower when additional verbal communication was used by the radiologist (OR, 0.12;95%CI: 0.04-0.38). Nearly all abnormal results lacking timely follow-up at 4 weeks were eventually found to have measurable clinical impact in terms of further diagnostic testing or treatment. Conclusions Critical imaging results may not

  9. Clinical significance of intercellular contact at the four-cell stage of human embryos, and the use of abnormal cleavage patterns to identify embryos with low implantation potential: a time-lapse study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhe; Chapple, Vincent; Feenan, Katie; Roberts, Peter; Matson, Phillip

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of intercellular contact point (ICCP) in four-cell stage human embryos and the effectiveness of morphology and abnormal cleavage patterns in identifying embryos with low implantation potential. Retrospective cohort study. Private IVF center. A total of 223 consecutive IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment cycles, with all resulting embryos cultured in the Embryoscope, and a subset of 207 cycles analyzed for ICCP number where good-quality four-cell embryos were available on day 2 (n = 373 IVF and n = 392 intracytoplasmic sperm injection embryos). None. Morphologic score on day 3, embryo morphokinetic parameters, incidence of abnormal biological events, and known implantation results. Of 765 good-quality four-cell embryos, 89 (11.6%) failed to achieve six ICCPs; 166 of 765 (21.7%) initially had fewer than six ICCPs but were able to establish six ICCPs before subsequent division. Embryos with fewer than six ICCPs at the end of four-cell stage had a lower implantation rate (5.0% vs. 38.5%), with lower embryology performance in both conventional and morphokinetic assessments, compared with embryos achieving six ICCPs by the end of four-cell stage. Deselecting embryos with poor morphology, direct cleavage, reverse cleavage, and fewer than six ICCPs at the four-cell stage led to a significantly improved implantation rate (33.6% vs. 22.4%). Embryos with fewer than six ICCPs at the end of the four-cell stage show compromised subsequent development and reduced implantation potential. Deselection of embryos with poor morphology and abnormal cleavage revealed via time-lapse imaging could provide the basis of a qualitative algorithm for embryo selection. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  11. Temporal Tuning Effects in the Visually Evoked Response,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    1 B . Characteristics off the EEG................................... 3 C. Characteristics off the VER...18’ B . Record~ing Apparatus .......... ... .. .... .............. .18 IV. PROCEDURE ..................... .. ........ ......... .. .... 19 V...RESULJTS ............. . .... ... .. . ... ................ t....... 21 A. Combined Presentation vs Single Presentations ............. 21 B

  12. Modulation of visually evoked movement responses in moving virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Reed-Jones, Rebecca J; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2009-01-01

    Virtual-reality technology is being increasingly used to understand how humans perceive and act in the moving world around them. What is currently not clear is how virtual reality technology is perceived by human participants and what virtual scenes are effective in evoking movement responses to visual stimuli. We investigated the effect of virtual-scene context on human responses to a virtual visual perturbation. We hypothesised that exposure to a natural scene that matched the visual expectancies of the natural world would create a perceptual set towards presence, and thus visual guidance of body movement in a subsequently presented virtual scene. Results supported this hypothesis; responses to a virtual visual perturbation presented in an ambiguous virtual scene were increased when participants first viewed a scene that consisted of natural landmarks which provided 'real-world' visual motion cues. Further research in this area will provide a basis of knowledge for the effective use of this technology in the study of human movement responses.

  13. Neural circuits underlying visually evoked escapes in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Timothy W.; Gebhardt, Christoph; Naumann, Eva A.; Riegler, Clemens; Ahrens, Misha B.; Engert, Florian; Del Bene, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Escape behaviors deliver organisms away from imminent catastrophe. Here, we characterize behavioral responses of freely swimming larval zebrafish to looming visual stimuli simulating predators. We report that the visual system alone can recruit lateralized, rapid escape motor programs, similar to those elicited by mechanosensory modalities. Two-photon calcium imaging of retino-recipient midbrain regions isolated the optic tectum as an important center processing looming stimuli, with ensemble activity encoding the critical image size determining escape latency. Furthermore, we describe activity in retinal ganglion cell terminals and superficial inhibitory interneurons in the tectum during looming and propose a model for how temporal dynamics in tectal periventricular neurons might arise from computations between these two fundamental constituents. Finally, laser ablations of hindbrain circuitry confirmed that visual and mechanosensory modalities share the same premotor output network. Together, we establish a circuit for the processing of aversive stimuli in the context of an innate visual behavior. PMID:26804997

  14. Investigating the mechanisms of visually-evoked tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Kirsten J; Lloyd, Donna M; Brown, Richard J; Plummer, Faye; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    When attempting to detect a near-threshold signal, participants often incorrectly report the presence of a signal, particularly when a stimulus in a different modality is presented. Here we investigated the effect of prior experience of bimodal visuotactile stimuli on the rate of falsely reported touches in the presence of a light. In Experiment 1, participants made more false alarms in light-present than light-absent trials, despite having no experience of the experimental visuotactile pairing. This suggests that light-evoked false alarms are a consequence of an existing association, rather than one learned during the experiment. In Experiment 2, we sought to manipulate the strength of the association through prior training, using supra-threshold tactile stimuli that were given a high or low association with the light. Both groups still exhibited an increased number of false alarms during light-present trials, however, the low association group made significantly fewer false alarms across conditions, and there was no corresponding group difference in the number of tactile stimuli correctly identified. Thus, while training did not affect the boosting of the tactile signal by the visual stimulus, the low association training affected perceptual decision-making more generally, leading to a lower number of illusory touch reports, independent of the light. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct visuomotor mapping for fast visually-evoked arm movements.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Raymond F; Day, Brian L

    2012-12-01

    In contrast to conventional reaction time (RT) tasks, saccadic RT's to visual targets are very fast and unaffected by the number of possible targets. This can be explained by the sub-cortical circuitry underlying eye movements, which involves direct mapping between retinal input and motor output in the superior colliculus. Here we asked if the choice-invariance established for the eyes also applies to a special class of fast visuomotor responses of the upper limb. Using a target-pointing paradigm we observed very fast reaction times (<150 ms) which were completely unaffected as the number of possible target choices was increased from 1 to 4. When we introduced a condition of altered stimulus-response mapping, RT went up and a cost of choice was observed. These results can be explained by direct mapping between visual input and motor output, compatible with a sub-cortical pathway for visual control of the upper limb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined evoked potentials in co-occuring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Major, Zoltán Zsigmond

    2011-07-30

    Evoked potentials, both stimulus related and event related, show disturbances in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and epilepsies, too. This study was designed to evaluate if these potentials are characteristically influenced by the presence of the two diseases, individually, and in the case of co-occurrence. Forty children were included, and four groups were formed, control group, ADHD group, epilepsy group and a group with the comorbidity of epilepsy and ADHD. Epilepsy patients were under proper antiepileptic treatment; ADHD patients were free of specific therapy. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials, visual evoked potentials and auditory P300 evaluation were performed. The latency of the P100 and N135 visual evoked potential components was significantly extended by the presence of epilepsy. If ADHD was concomitantly present, this effect was attenuated. Brainstem auditory evoked potential components were prolonged in the presence of the comorbidity, considering the waves elicited in the brainstem. P300 latencies were prolonged by the presence of co-occurring ADHD and epilepsy. Feedback parameters showed overall reduction of the tested cognitive performances in the ADHD group. Disturbances produced by the presence of ADHD-epilepsy comorbidity reveal hypothetically a linked physiopathological path for both diseases, and offers an approach with possible diagnostic importance, combined evoked potential recordings.

  17. Red blood cell aggregation, aggregate strength and oxygen transport potential of blood are abnormal in both homozygous sickle cell anemia and sickle-hemoglobin C disease.

    PubMed

    Tripette, Julien; Alexy, Tamas; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Mougenel, Daniele; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Chout, Roger; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Meiselman, Herbert J; Connes, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that red blood cell aggregation and the ratio of hematocrit to blood viscosity (HVR), an index of the oxygen transport potential of blood, might considerably modulate blood flow dynamics in the microcirculation. It thus seems likely that these factors could play a role in sickle cell disease. We compared red blood cell aggregation characteristics, blood viscosity and HVR at different shear rates between sickle cell anemia and sickle cell hemoglobin C disease (SCC) patients, sickle cell trait carriers (AS) and control individuals (AA). Blood viscosity determined at high shear rate was lower in sickle cell anemia (n=21) than in AA (n=52), AS (n=33) or SCC (n=21), and was markedly increased in both SCC and AS. Despite differences in blood viscosity, both sickle cell anemia and SCC had similar low HVR values compared to both AA and AS. Sickle cell anemia (n=21) and SCC (n=19) subjects had a lower red blood cell aggregation index and longer time for red blood cell aggregates formation than AA (n=16) and AS (n=15), and a 2 to 3 fold greater shear rate required to disperse red blood cell aggregates. The low HVR levels found in sickle cell anemia and SCC indicates a comparable low oxygen transport potential of blood in both genotypes. Red blood cell aggregation properties are likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease: the increased shear forces needed to disperse red blood cell aggregates may disturb blood flow, especially at the microcirculatory level, since red blood cell are only able to pass through narrow capillaries as single cells rather than as aggregates.

  18. Warp-averaging event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Begleiter, H; Porjesz, B

    2001-10-01

    To align the repeated single trials of the event-related potential (ERP) in order to get an improved estimate of the ERP. A new implementation of the dynamic time warping is applied to compute a warp-average of the single trials. The trilinear modeling method is applied to filter the single trials prior to alignment. Alignment is based on normalized signals and their estimated derivatives. These features reduce the misalignment due to aligning the random alpha waves, explaining amplitude differences in latency differences, or the seemingly small amplitudes of some components. Simulations and applications to visually evoked potentials show significant improvement over some commonly used methods. The new implementation of the dynamic time warping can be used to align the major components (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3) of the repeated single trials. The average of the aligned single trials is an improved estimate of the ERP. This could lead to more accurate results in subsequent analysis.

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Are evoked potentials in patients with adult-onset pompe disease indicative of clinically relevant central nervous system involvement?

    PubMed

    Wirsching, Andreas; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-08-01

    Pompe disease is a multisystem autosomal recessive glycogen storage disease. Autoptic findings in patients with classic infantile and late-onset Pompe disease have proven that accumulation of glycogen can also be found in the peripheral and central nervous system. To assess the functional role of these pathologic findings, multimodal sensory evoked potentials were analyzed. Serial recordings for brainstem auditory, visual, and somatosensory evoked potentials of 11 late-onset Pompe patients were reviewed. Data at the onset of the enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa were compared with follow-up recordings at 12 and 24 months. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials showed a delayed peak I in 1/10 patients and an increased I-III and I-V interpeak latency in 1/10 patients, respectively. The III-V interpeak latencies were in the normal range. Visual evoked potentials were completely normal. Median somatosensory evoked potentials showed an extended interpeak latency in 3/9 patients. Wilcoxon tests comparing age-matched subgroups found significant differences in brainstem auditory evoked potentials and visual evoked potentials. We found that the majority of recordings for evoked potentials were within the ranges for standard values, therefore reflecting the lack of clinically relevant central nervous system involvement. Regular surveillance by means of evoked potentials does not seem to be appropriate in late-onset Pompe patients.

  1. Visual and brainstem auditory evoked potentials in infants with severe vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Koç, Ahmet; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Calik, Mustafa; Işcan, Akin

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 plays an important role in the development of mental, motor, cognitive, and social functions via its role in DNA synthesis and nerve myelination. Its deficiency in infants might cause neuromotor retardation as well as megaloblastic anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of infantile vitamin B12 deficiency on evoked brain potentials and determine whether improvement could be obtained with vitamin B12 replacement at appropriate dosages. Thirty patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and 30 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Hematological parameters, visual evoked potentials, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials tests were performed prior to treatment, 1 week after treatment, and 3 months after treatment. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) were found to be prolonged in 16 (53.3%) and 15 (50%) patients, respectively. Statistically significant improvements in VEP and BAEP examinations were determined 3 months after treatment. Three months after treatment, VEP and BAEP examinations returned to normal in 81.3% and 53.3% of subjects with prolonged VEPs and BAEPs, respectively. These results demonstrate that vitamin B12 deficiency in infants causes significant impairment in the auditory and visual functioning tests of the brain, such as VEP and BAEP.

  2. Temporal recalibration of motor and visual potentials in lag adaptation in voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chang; Ogawa, Kenji; Kochiyama, Takanori; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2018-05-15

    Adaptively recalibrating motor-sensory asynchrony is critical for animals to perceive self-produced action consequences. It is controversial whether motor- or sensory-related neural circuits recalibrate this asynchrony. By combining magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional MRI (fMRI), we investigate the temporal changes in brain activities caused by repeated exposure to a 150-ms delay inserted between a button-press action and a subsequent flash. We found that readiness potentials significantly shift later in the motor system, especially in parietal regions (average: 219.9 ms), while visually evoked potentials significantly shift earlier in occipital regions (average: 49.7 ms) in the delay condition compared to the no-delay condition. Moreover, the shift in readiness potentials, but not in visually evoked potentials, was significantly correlated with the psychophysical measure of motor-sensory adaptation. These results suggest that although both motor and sensory processes contribute to the recalibration, the motor process plays the major role, given the magnitudes of shift and the correlation with the psychophysical measure. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  5. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  6. Lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials in analytic information processing style: evidence in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Toscano, M; Puledda, F; Avanzini, G; Di Clemente, L; Di Sabato, F; Di Piero, V

    2015-03-01

    Habituation is considered one of the most basic mechanisms of learning. Habituation deficit to several sensory stimulations has been defined as a trait of migraine brain and also observed in other disorders. On the other hand, analytic information processing style is characterized by the habit of continually evaluating stimuli and it has been associated with migraine. We investigated a possible correlation between lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials and analytic cognitive style in healthy subjects. According to Sternberg-Wagner self-assessment inventory, 15 healthy volunteers (HV) with high analytic score and 15 HV with high global score were recruited. Both groups underwent visual evoked potentials recordings after psychological evaluation. We observed significant lack of habituation in analytical individuals compared to global group. In conclusion, a reduced habituation of visual evoked potentials has been observed in analytic subjects. Our results suggest that further research should be undertaken regarding the relationship between analytic cognitive style and lack of habituation in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  7. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  9. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  10. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  11. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  12. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. Cardiac Abnormalities in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mookadam, Farouk; Smith, Travis; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Moustafa, Sherif E; Monico, Carla G.; Lieske, John C.; Milliner, Dawn S.

    2018-01-01

    Background In patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH), oxalate overproduction can result in recurrent urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, which in some cases results in a progressive decline in renal function, oxalate retention, and systemic oxalosis involving bone, retina, arterial media, peripheral nerves, skin, and heart. Oxalosis involving the myocardium or conduction system can potentially lead to heart failure and fatal arrhythmias. Methods and Results A retrospective review of our institution’s database was conducted for all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PH between 1/1948 and 1/2006 (n=103). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were used to identify cardiac abnormalities. Ninety-three patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 58% were male. Mean follow-up was 11.9 (median 8.8) years. In 38 patients who received an ECG or echocardiography, 31 were found to have any cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac findings correlated with decline in renal function. Conclusions Our data suggests that physicians caring for patients with PH should pay close attention to cardiac status, especially if renal function is impaired. PMID:20921818

  14. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  15. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  16. Oral sensitization to whey proteins induces age- and sex-dependent behavioral abnormality and neuroinflammatory responses in a mouse model of food allergy: a potential role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Germundson, Danielle L; Smith, Nicholas A; Vendsel, Lane P; Kelsch, Andrea V; Combs, Colin K; Nagamoto-Combs, Kumi

    2018-04-23

    in the WP-sensitized old male mice. Our results demonstrated that food allergy induced behavioral abnormality, increases in the number of mast cells, epigenetic DNA modification in the brain, microgliosis, and astrocyte hypertrophy in a sex- and age-dependent manner, providing a potential mechanism by which peripheral allergic responses evoke behavioral dysfunction.

  17. Spatiotemporal mapping of scalp potentials.

    PubMed

    Fender, D H; Santoro, T P

    1977-11-01

    Computerized analysis and display techniques are applied to the problem of identifying the origins of visually evoked scalped potentials (VESP's). A new stimulus for VESP work, white noise, is being incorporated in the solution of this problem. VESP's for white-noise stimulation exhibit time domain behavior similar to the classical response for flash stimuli but with certain significant differences. Contour mapping algorithms are used to display the time behavior of equipotential surfaces on the scalp during the VESP. The electrical and geometrical parameters of the head are modeled. Electrical fields closely matching those obtained experimentally are generated on the surface of the model head by optimally selecting the location and strength parameters of one or two dipole current sources contained within the model. Computer graphics are used to display as a movie the actual and model scalp potential field and the parameters of the dipole generators whithin the model head during the time course of the VESP. These techniques are currently used to study retinotopic mapping, fusion, and texture perception in the human.

  18. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  20. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  1. Steady-State Somatosensory Evoked Potential for Brain-Computer Interface—Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sangtae; Kim, Kiwoong; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) performance has achieved continued improvement over recent decades, and sensorimotor rhythm-based BCIs that use motor function have been popular subjects of investigation. However, it remains problematic to introduce them to the public market because of their low reliability. As an alternative resolution to this issue, visual-based BCIs that use P300 or steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs) seem promising; however, the inherent visual fatigue that occurs with these BCIs may be unavoidable. For these reasons, steady-state somatosensory evoked potential (SSSEP) BCIs, which are based on tactile selective attention, have gained increasing attention recently. These may reduce the fatigue induced by visual attention and overcome the low reliability of motor activity. In this literature survey, recent findings on SSSEP and its methodological uses in BCI are reviewed. Further, existing limitations of SSSEP BCI and potential future directions for the technique are discussed. PMID:26834611

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhapsmore » reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.« less

  3. Adaptive regularization network based neural modeling paradigm for nonlinear adaptive estimation of cerebral evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Böhme, Johann F

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we report an adaptive regularization network (ARN) approach to realizing fast blind separation of cerebral evoked potentials (EPs) from background electroencephalogram (EEG) activity with no need to make any explicit assumption on the statistical (or deterministic) signal model. The ARNs are proposed to construct nonlinear EEG and EP signal models. A novel adaptive regularization training (ART) algorithm is proposed to improve the generalization performance of the ARN. Two adaptive neural modeling methods based on the ARN are developed and their implementation and performance analysis are also presented. The computer experiments using simulated and measured visual evoked potential (VEP) data have shown that the proposed ARN modeling paradigm yields computationally efficient and more accurate VEP signal estimation owing to its intrinsic model-free and nonlinear processing characteristics.

  4. Varenicline and Abnormal Sleep Related Events

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Ruth L.; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess adverse drug reaction reports of “abnormal sleep related events” associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Design: Twenty-seven reports of “abnormal sleep related events” often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. Measurements and Results: These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. Conclusions: The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. Citation: Savage RL, Zekarias A, Caduff-Janosa P. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events. SLEEP 2015

  5. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003242.htm Abnormally dark or light skin To use the sharing features ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ...

  6. Biochemical abnormalities in neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Arvind; Grover, Neelam; Sharma, Roshan

    2003-03-01

    The presence of seizure does not constitute a diagnoses but it is a symptom of an underlying central nervous system disorder due to systemic or biochemical disturbances. Biochemical disturbances occur frequently in the neonatal seizures either as an underlying cause or as an associated abnormality. In their presence, it is difficult to control seizure and there is a risk of further brain damage. Early recognition and treatment of biochemical disturbances is essential for optimal management and satisfactory long term outcome. The present study was conducted in the department of pediatrics in IGMC Shimla on 59 neonates. Biochemical abnormalities were detected in 29 (49.15%) of cases. Primary metabolic abnormalities occurred in 10(16.94%) cases of neonatal seizures, most common being hypocalcaemia followed by hypoglycemia, other metabolic abnormalities include hypomagnesaemia and hyponateremia. Biochemical abnormalities were seen in 19(38.77%) cases of non metabolic seizure in neonates. Associated metabolic abnormalities were observed more often with Hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (11 out of 19) cases and hypoglycemia was most common in this group. No infant had hyponateremia, hyperkelemia or low zinc level.

  7. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P < 0.05), and in patients with positive than negative urine findings for cannabis (68 versus 57%, P < 0.05). Patients with ST abnormalities were more often males than females (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05), had a history of seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P < 0.05), had positive than negative urine findings for cannabis more often (26 versus 15%, P < 0.01) and had negative than positive urine findings for methadone more often (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05). QTc prolongation was more frequent in patients with high dosages of maintenance drugs than in patients with medium or low dosages (27 versus 12 versus 10%, P < 0.05) and in patients whose urine findings were positive than negative for methadone (23 versus 11%, P < 0.001) as well as for benzodiazepines (17 versus 9%, P < 0.05). Limitations of the data are that in most cases other risk factors for the cardiac abnormalities were not known. ECG abnormalities are frequent in opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation

  8. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  9. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-05-14

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs.

  10. The intra-individual reproducibility of flash-evoked potentials in a sample of children.

    PubMed

    Schellberg, D; Gasser, T; Köhler, W

    1987-07-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to flash stimuli were recorded twice from 26 children aged 10-13 years, with an intersession interval of about 10 months. Test-retest reliability was poor for recordings taken from scalp locations overlying non-specific cortex and somewhat better for specific cortex. The size of consistency coefficients (i.e. correlations within session) showed that noise and artefacts were not the decisive factors which lower reliability. A comparison with retest correlations of broad band parameters of the EEG at rest for the same sample showed, to our surprise, smaller retest reliability for VEP parameters. Variability of the VEP in children over time seems to be a substantial as its well-known inter-individual variability.

  11. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, these potential alternate causes should be considered. In this clinical review, we have presented a case of referred pain from the digastric muscle (Patient 1), of pulpectomized (Patient 2), and of pulpectomized pain (Patient 3) to illustrate referred, neuromodulatory, and neuropathic pain, respectively. The Patient 1 was advised muscle stretching and gentle massage of the trigger points, as well as pain relief using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. The pain in Patient 2 was relieved completely by the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. In Patient 3, the pain was controlled using either a continuous drip infusion of adenosine triphosphate or intravenous Mg2+ and lidocaine administered every 2 weeks. In each case of abnormal dental pain, the patient's diagnostic chart was used (Fig.2 and 3). Pain was satisfactorily relieved in all cases.

  13. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events.

    PubMed

    Savage, Ruth L; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-05-01

    To assess adverse drug reaction reports of "abnormal sleep related events" associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Twenty-seven reports of "abnormal sleep related events" often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Effects of touch on emotional face processing: A study of event-related potentials, facial EMG and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Spapé, M M; Harjunen, Ville; Ravaja, N

    2017-03-01

    Being touched is known to affect emotion, and even a casual touch can elicit positive feelings and affinity. Psychophysiological studies have recently shown that tactile primes affect visual evoked potentials to emotional stimuli, suggesting altered affective stimulus processing. As, however, these studies approached emotion from a purely unidimensional perspective, it remains unclear whether touch biases emotional evaluation or a more general feature such as salience. Here, we investigated how simple tactile primes modulate event related potentials (ERPs), facial EMG and cardiac response to pictures of facial expressions of emotion. All measures replicated known effects of emotional face processing: Disgust and fear modulated early ERPs, anger increased the cardiac orienting response, and expressions elicited emotion-congruent facial EMG activity. Tactile primes also affected these measures, but priming never interacted with the type of emotional expression. Thus, touch may additively affect general stimulus processing, but it does not bias or modulate immediate affective evaluation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Causes and Diagnosis of Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Elizabeth; Peddinti, Radhika

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal vaginal bleeding in a postmenarchal adolescent patient is most often related to dysfunctional uterine bleeding. However, there are other potential etiologies, including hematologic disorders, infections, and oncologic problems. We present a 12-year-old girl who presented with prolonged vaginal bleeding and was ultimately diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. In this article, we discuss the approach to a patient with vaginal bleeding along with a more in-depth review of risk stratification in rhabdomyosarcoma, including treatment options such as chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Radiographic abnormalities among construction workers exposed to quartz containing dust

    PubMed Central

    Tjoe, N; Burdorf, A; Parker, J; Attfield, M; van Duivenbooden, C; Heederik, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Construction workers are exposed to quartz containing respirable dust, at levels that may cause fibrosis in the lungs. Studies so far have not established a dose-response relation for radiographic abnormalities for this occupational group. Aims: To measure the extent of radiographic abnormalities among construction workers primarily exposed to quartz containing respirable dust. Methods: A cross sectional study on radiographic abnormalities indicative of pneumoconiosis was conducted among 1339 construction workers mainly involved in grinding, (jack)-hammering, drilling, cutting, sawing, and polishing. Radiological abnormalities were determined by median results of the 1980 International Labour Organisation system of three certified "B" readers. Questionnaires were used for assessment of occupational history, presence of respiratory diseases, and symptoms and smoking habits. Results: An abnormality of ILO profusion category 1/0 and greater was observed on 10.2% of the chest radiographs, and profusion category of 1/1 or greater on 2.9% of the radiographs. The average duration of exposure of this group was 19 years and the average age was 42. The predominant type of small opacities (irregularly shaped) is presumably indicative of mixed dust pneumoconiosis. The prevalence of early signs of nodular silicosis (small rounded opacities of category 1/0 or greater) was low (0.8%). Conclusions: The study suggests an elevated risk of radiographic abnormalities among these workers with expected high exposure. An association between radiographic abnormalities and cumulative exposure to quartz containing dust from construction sites was observed, after correction for potentially confounding variables. PMID:12771392

  18. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  19. [Congenital abnormalities of the aorta in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, J G; Ley, S

    2007-11-01

    Aortic abnormalities are common cardiovascular malformations accounting for 15-20% of all congenital heart disease. Ultrafast CT and MR imaging are noninvasive, accurate and robust techniques that can be used in the diagnosis of aortic malformations. While their sensitivity in detecting vascular abnormalities seems to be as good as that of conventional catheter angiocardiography, at over 90%, they are superior in the diagnosis of potentially life-threatening complications, such as tracheal, bronchial, or esophageal compression. It has been shown that more than 80% of small children with aortic abnormalities benefit directly from the use of noninvasive imaging: either cardiac catheterization is no longer necessary or radiation doses and periods of general anesthesia for interventional catheterization procedures can be much reduced. The most important congenital abnormalities of the aorta in children and adolescents are presented with reference to examples, and the value of CT and MR angiography is documented.

  20. Hemostatic abnormalities in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo; Passamonti, Serena M; Lecchi, Anna; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Cerutti, Marta; Cianci, Paola; Gianniello, Francesca; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-05-01

    A bleeding diathesis is a common feature of Noonan syndrome, and various coagulation abnormalities have been reported. Platelet function has never been carefully investigated. The degree of bleeding diathesis in a cohort of patients with Noonan syndrome was evaluated by a validated bleeding score and investigated with coagulation and platelet function tests. If ratios of prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, the activity of clotting factors was measured. Individuals with no history of bleeding formed the control group. The study population included 39 patients and 28 controls. Bleeding score was ≥2 (ie, suggestive of a moderate bleeding diathesis) in 15 patients (38.5%) and ≥4 (ie, suggestive of a severe bleeding diathesis) in 7 (17.9%). Abnormal coagulation and/or platelet function tests were found in 14 patients with bleeding score ≥2 (93.3%) but also in 21 (87.5%) of those with bleeding score <2. The prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in 18 patients (46%) and partial deficiency of factor VII, alone or in combination with the deficiency of other vitamin K-dependent factors, was the most frequent coagulation abnormality. Moreover, platelet aggregation and secretion were reduced in 29 of 35 patients (82.9%, P < .01 for all aggregating agents). Nearly 40% of patients with the Noonan syndrome had a bleeding diathesis and >90% of them had platelet function and/or coagulation abnormalities. Results of these tests should be taken into account in the management of bleeding or invasive procedures in these patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. [Normal and abnormal skin color].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2012-11-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma correspond to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  3. Abnormal grain growth in iron-silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Tricia A.

    Abnormal grain growth (AGG) was studied in an Fe-1%Si alloy using automated Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the driving force for this phenomenon. Experiments were performed with the knowledge that there are several possible driving forces and, the intent to determine the true driving force by elimination of the other potential candidates. These potential candidates include surface energy anisotropy, anisotropic grain boundary properties and the stored energy of deformation. In this work, surface energy and grain boundary anisotropies as well as the stored energy of deformation were investigated as the possible driving forces for AGG. Accordingly, industrially processed samples that were temper rolled to 1.5% and 8% were annealed in air for various times followed by quenching in water. The results obtained were compared to those from heat treatments performed in wet 15%H2-85%N2 at a US Steel facility. In addition, for a more complete study of the effect of surface energy anisotropies on AGG, the 1.5% temper-rolled material was heat-treated in other atmospheres such as 5%H2-95%Ar, 98%H2-2%He, 98%H2-2%H 2S, and 98%H2-2%N2 for 1 hour followed by quenching in water. The character of the grain boundaries in the materials was also examined for each set of experiments conducted, while the influence of stored energy was evaluated by examining intragranular orientation gradients. AGG occurred regardless of annealing atmosphere though the most rapid progression was observed in samples annealed in air. In general, grains of varying orientations grew abnormally. One consistently observed trend in all the detailed studies was that the matrix grains remained essentially static and either did not grow or only grew very slowly. On the other hand, the abnormally large grains (ALG), on average, were approximately 10 times the size of the matrix. Analysis of the grain boundary character of the interfaces between abnormal grains and the matrix showed no

  4. Exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone above USA standards are associated with auditory brainstem dysmorphology and abnormal auditory brainstem evoked potentials in healthy young dogs.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; González-González, Luis O; Kulesza, Randy J; Fech, Tatiana M; Pérez-Guillé, Gabriela; Luna, Miguel Angel Jiménez-Bravo; Soriano-Rosales, Rosa Eugenia; Solorio, Edelmira; Miramontes-Higuera, José de Jesús; Gómez-Maqueo Chew, Aline; Bernal-Morúa, Alexia F; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Mills, Paul C; Wilson, Wayne J; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2017-10-01

    Delayed central conduction times in the auditory brainstem have been observed in Mexico City (MC) healthy children exposed to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and ozone (O 3 ) above the current United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) standards. MC children have α synuclein brainstem accumulation and medial superior olivary complex (MSO) dysmorphology. The present study used a dog model to investigate the potential effects of air pollution on the function and morphology of the auditory brainstem. Twenty-four dogs living in clean air v MC, average age 37.1 ± 26.3 months, underwent brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) measurements. Eight dogs (4 MC, 4 Controls) were analysed for auditory brainstem morphology and histopathology. MC dogs showed ventral cochlear nuclei hypotrophy and MSO dysmorphology with a significant decrease in cell body size, decreased neuronal packing density with regions in the nucleus devoid of neurons and marked gliosis. MC dogs showed significant delayed BAEP absolute wave I, III and V latencies compared to controls. MC dogs show auditory nuclei dysmorphology and BAEPs consistent with an alteration of the generator sites of the auditory brainstem response waveform. This study puts forward the usefulness of BAEPs to study auditory brainstem neurodegenerative changes associated with air pollution in dogs. Recognition of the role of non-invasive BAEPs in urban dogs is warranted to elucidate novel neurodegenerative pathways link to air pollution and a promising early diagnostic strategy for Alzheimer's Disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of abnormal accident patterns at intersections

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-08-01

    This report presents the findings and recommendations based on the Identification of Abnormal Accident Patterns at Intersections. This project used a statistically valid sampling method to determine whether a specific intersection has an abnormally h...

  6. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • What is the difference between the terms cervical ...

  7. The psychosocial impact of an abnormal cervical smear result.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Mélanie; Brisson, Marc; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Franco, Eduardo L; Coutlée, François; Ferenczy, Alex; Fisher, William; Mansi, James A

    2012-10-01

    Data on the impact of abnormal cervical smear results on health-related quality of life (HrQoL) are scarce. We aimed to (i) prospectively assess the HrQoL of women who were informed of an abnormal smear result; (ii) identify predictors of greater negative psychosocial impact of an abnormal result; and (iii) prospectively estimate the quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost following an abnormal result. Between 08/2006 and 08/2008, 492 women with an abnormal result and 460 women with a normal result, frequency matched for age and clinic, were recruited across Canada. HrQoL was measured at recruitment and 4 and 12 weeks later with the EuroQol, Short Form-12, short Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and HPV Impact Profile. Three blocks of potential predictors of higher psychosocial impact were tested by hierarchical modeling: (i) socio-demographics; (ii) sexual activity; and (iii) smear result severity, communication, and understanding. Receiving an abnormal result significantly increased anxiety (STAI mean difference between both groups = 8.3). Initial anxiety decreased over time for the majority of women. However, 35% of women had clinically meaningful anxiety at 12 weeks (i.e. STAI scores ≥0.5 standard deviation of the controls). These women reported a lower socio-economic level, did not completely understand the information about their result and perceived themselves at higher risk of cancer. QALY lost following an abnormal result were between 0.007 and 0.009. Receiving an abnormal smear has a statistically significant and clinically meaningful negative impact on mental health. However, this negative impact subsides after 12 weeks for the majority of women. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  9. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Abnormal mTOR Activation in Autism.

    PubMed

    Winden, Kellen D; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Sahin, Mustafa

    2018-01-25

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important signaling hub that integrates environmental information regarding energy availability and stimulates anabolic molecular processes and cell growth. Abnormalities in this pathway have been identified in several syndromes in which autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is highly prevalent. Several studies have investigated mTOR signaling in developmental and neuronal processes that, when dysregulated, could contribute to the development of ASD. Although many potential mechanisms still remain to be fully understood, these associations are of great interest because of the clinical availability of mTOR inhibitors. Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of mTOR Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 41 is July 8, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Muscle abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, L-N.; Trejo, P.; Rauch, F.

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is mainly characterized by bone fragility but muscle abnormalities have been reported both in OI mouse models and in children with OI. Muscle mass is decreased in OI, even when short stature is taken into account. Dynamic muscle tests aiming at maximal eccentric force production reveal functional deficits that can not be explained by low muscle mass alone. However, it appears that diaphyseal bone mass is normally adapted to muscle force. At present the determinants of muscle mass and function in OI have not been clearly defined. Physiotherapy interventions and bisphosphonate treatment appear to have some effect on muscle function in OI. Interventions targeting muscle mass have shown encouraging results in OI animal models and are an interesting area for further research. PMID:28574406

  12. HIV Infection and Bone Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aamir N; Ahmad, Shahid N; Ahmad, Nafees

    2017-01-01

    More than 36 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection worldwide and 50% of them have access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). While recent advances in HIV therapy have reduced the viral load, restored CD4 T cell counts and decreased opportunistic infections, several bone-related abnormalities such as low bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis, osteopenia, osteomalacia and fractures have emerged in HIV-infected individuals. Of all classes of antiretroviral agents, HIV protease inhibitors used in ART combination showed a higher frequency of osteopenia, osteoporosis and low BMD in HIV-infected patients. Although the mechanisms of HIV and/or ART associated bone abnormalities are not known, it is believed that the damage is caused by a complex interaction of T lymphocytes with osteoclasts and osteoblasts, likely influenced by both HIV and ART. In addition, infection of osteoclasts and bone marrow stromal cells by HIV, including HIV Gp120 induced apoptosis of osteoblasts and release of proinflammatory cytokines have been implicated in impairment of bone development and maturation. Several of the newer antiretroviral agents currently used in ART combination, including the widely used tenofovir in different formulations show relative adverse effects on BMD. In this context, switching the HIV-regimen from tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) to tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) showed improvement in BMD of HIV-infected patients. In addition, inclusion of integrase inhibitor in ART combination is associated with improved BMD in patients. Furthermore, supplementation of vitamin D and calcium with the initiation of ART may mitigate bone loss. Therefore, levels of vitamin D and calcium should be part of the evaluation of HIV-infected patients.

  13. Visually evoked responses in extrastriate area MT after lesions of striate cortex in early life.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Hao; Chaplin, Tristan A; Egan, Gregory W; Reser, David H; Worthy, Katrina H; Rosa, Marcello G P

    2013-07-24

    Lesions of striate cortex [primary visual cortex (V1)] in adult primates result in blindness. In contrast, V1 lesions in neonates typically allow much greater preservation of vision, including, in many human patients, conscious perception. It is presently unknown how this marked functional difference is related to physiological changes in cortical areas that are spared by the lesions. Here we report a study of the middle temporal area (MT) of adult marmoset monkeys that received unilateral V1 lesions within 6 weeks of birth. In contrast with observations after similar lesions in adult monkeys, we found that virtually all neurons in the region of MT that was deprived of V1 inputs showed robust responses to visual stimulation. These responses were very similar to those recorded in neurons with receptive fields outside the lesion projection zones in terms of firing rate, signal-to-noise ratio, and latency. In addition, the normal retinotopic organization of MT was maintained. Nonetheless, we found evidence of a very specific functional deficit: direction selectivity, a key physiological characteristic of MT that is known to be preserved in many cells after adult V1 lesions, was absent. These results demonstrate that lesion-induced reorganization of afferent pathways is sufficient to develop robust visual function in primate extrastriate cortex, highlighting a likely mechanism for the sparing of vision after neonatal V1 lesions. However, they also suggest that interactions with V1 in early postnatal life are critical for establishing stimulus selectivity in MT.

  14. A new visually evoked cerebral blood flow response analysis using a low-frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Rey, Beatriz; Naranjo, Valery; Parkhutik, Vera; Tembl, José; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2010-03-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) has been widely used to monitor cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV) during the performance of cognitive tasks compared with repose periods. Although one of its main advantages is its high temporal resolution, only some of the previous functional TCD studies have focused on the analysis of the temporal evolution of the BFV signal and none of them has performed a spectral analysis of the signal. In this study, maximum BFV data in both posterior cerebral arteries was monitored during a visual perception task (10 cycles of alternating darkness and illumination) for 23 subjects. A peak was located in the low-frequency band of the spectrum of the maximum BFV of each subject both during visual stimulation and repose periods. The frequency of this peak was in the range between 0.037 and 0.098Hz, depending on the subject, the vessel and the experimental condition. The component of the signal at this frequency, which is associated with the slow variations caused by the visual stimuli, was estimated. That way, the variations in BFV caused by the experimental stimuli were isolated from the variations caused by other factors. This low-frequency estimation signal was used to obtain parameters about the temporal evolution and the magnitude variations of the BFV in a reliable way, thus, characterizing the neurovascular coupling of the participants. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trying to Move Your Unseen Static Arm Modulates Visually-Evoked Kinesthetic Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Metral, Morgane; Blettery, Baptiste; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Luyat, Marion; Guerraz, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Although kinesthesia is known to largely depend on afferent inflow, recent data suggest that central signals originating from volitional control (efferent outflow) could also be involved and interact with the former to build up a coherent percept. Evidence derives from both clinical and experimental observations where vision, which is of primary importance in kinesthesia, was systematically precluded. The purpose of the present experiment was to assess the role of volitional effort in kinesthesia when visual information is available. Participants (n=20) produced isometric contraction (10-20% of maximal voluntary force) of their right arm while their left arm, which image was reflected in a mirror, either was passively moved into flexion/extension by a motorized manipulandum, or remained static. The contraction of the right arm was either congruent with or opposite to the passive displacements of the left arm. Results revealed that in most trials, kinesthetic illusions were visually driven, and their occurrence and intensity were modulated by whether volitional effort was congruent or not with visual signals. These results confirm the impact of volitional effort in kinesthesia and demonstrate for the first time that these signals interact with visual afferents to offer a coherent and unified percept. PMID:24348909

  16. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal...

  17. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    among. Saccades and smooth pursuit are complex sensorimotor behaviors that involve several spatially distant brain regions and long- fiber tracts between...time, at a rate of 100 Hz. Visual stimuli were presented as a red laser -light, generated by NKI Pursuit Tracker® laser . The Pursuit Tracker® laser ...the testing equipment by projecting a laser stimulus onto the cylindrical screen and providing a fixed target at + 10º in both the horizontal and

  18. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    differentiates autistic from children with asperger syndrome , Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32 (2002), 231-238. Proposal AR093169...three male children with diagnoses of ASD as follows: Autism (8 years 6 months), PDD-NOS (7 years 3 months), and Asperger’s Syndrome (10 years 6...Asperger’s syndrome *15+. Such behavioral evidence further suggests that Proposal AR093169 Award W81XWH-10-1-0382 Annual Report for 15 May 2010 – 14 May

  19. Abnormal dark-adapted electroretinogram in Best's vitelliform macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, P; Quigley, M G; Polomeno, R C; Little, J M

    1988-10-01

    It is generally well accepted that in Best's vitelliform macular degeneration (BVMD) the electroretinogram (ERG) is normal whereas the electro-oculogram (EOG) is markedly abnormal. We describe a patient in whom BVMD was suspected on the basis of the clinical findings, EOG and family history (one of her daughters had the typical vitelliform lesion). However, her dark-adapted ERG was markedly abnormal. Similar anomalies were found in the dark-adapted ERG of the daughter. While the temporal features of the various ERG waves were well preserved, a substantial decrease in the amplitude of specific segments of the ERG signal was observed. A similar decrease in the amplitude of the oscillatory potentials was also found. We believe that this unusual combination of BVMD and abnormal dark-adapted ERG may be due to the reported reduced penetrance and variable expressivity of the BVMD gene(s).

  20. Developmental antecedents of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Le Grange, Daniel; O'Connor, Meredith; Hughes, Elizabeth K; Macdonald, Jacqui; Little, Keriann; Olsson, Craig A

    2014-11-01

    This study capitalizes on developmental data from an Australian population-based birth cohort to identify developmental markers of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescence. The aims were twofold: (1) to develop a comprehensive path model identifying infant and childhood developmental correlates of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in adolescence, and (2) to explore potential gender differences. Data were drawn from a 30-year longitudinal study that has followed the health and development of a population based cohort across 15 waves of data collection from infancy since 1983: The Australian Temperament Project. Participants in this analysis were the 1,300 youth who completed the 11th survey at 15-16 years (1998) and who completed the eating disorder inventory at this time point. Developmental correlates of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in mid-adolescence were temperamental persistence, early gestational age, persistent high weight, teen depression, stronger peer relationships, maternal dieting behavior, and pubertal timing. Overall, these factors accounted for 28% of the variance in Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors at 15-16 years of age. Depressive symptoms, maternal dieting behavior, and early puberty were more important factors for girls. Late puberty was a more important factor for boys. Findings address an important gap in our understanding of the etiology of Abnormal Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in adolescence and suggest multiple targets for preventive intervention. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Visual and brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with obesity.

    PubMed

    Akın, Onur; Arslan, Mutluay; Akgün, Hakan; Yavuz, Süleyman Tolga; Sarı, Erkan; Taşçılar, Mehmet Emre; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Ünay, Bülent

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate alterations in visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in children with obesity. A total of 96 children, with a mean age of 12.1±2.0 years (range 9-17 years, 63 obese and 33 age and sex-matched control subjects) were included in the study. Laboratory tests were performed to detect insulin resistance (IR) and dyslipidemia. The latencies and amplitudes of VEP and BAEP were measured in healthy and obese subjects. The VEP P100, BAEP interpeak latency (IPL) I-III and IPL I-V averages of obese children were significantly longer than the control subjects. When the obese group was divided into two subgroups, those with IR and without IR, BAEP wave I, wave III and P100 wave latencies were found to be longer in the group with IR. A statistically significant correlation was observed between BAEP wave I latency, IPL I-V, IPL I-III and the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA IR) index and fasting insulin level. Our findings suggest that VEP and BAEP can be used to determine early subclinical on auditory and visual functions of obese children with insulin resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormal electroretinogram associated with developmental brain anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Cibis, G W; Fitzgerald, K M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have encountered abnormal ERGs associated with optic nerve hypoplasia, macular, optic nerve and chorioretinal colobomata and developmental brain anomalies. Brain anomalies include cortical dysgenesis, lissencephaly, porencephaly, cerebellar and corpus callosum hypoplasia. We describe six exemplar cases. METHODS: Scotopic and photopic ERGs adherent to international standards were performed as well as photopic ERGs to long-duration stimuli. CT or MRI studies were also done. The ERGs were compared to age-matched normal control subjects. RESULTS: ERG changes include reduced amplitude b-waves to blue and red stimuli under scotopic testing conditions. Implicit times were often delayed. The photopic responses also showed reduced amplitude a- and b-waves with implicit time delays. The long-duration photopic ERG done in one case shows attenuation of both ON- and OFF-responses. CONCLUSIONS: Common underlying developmental genetic or environmental unifying casualties are speculated to be at fault in causing these cases of associated retinal and brain abnormalities. No single etiology is expected. Multiple potential causes acting early in embryogenesis effecting neuronal induction, migration and differentiation are theorized. These occur at a time when brain and retinal cells are sufficiently undifferentiated to be similarly effected. We call these cases examples of Brain Retina Neuroembryodysgenesis (BRNED). Homeobox and PAX genes with global neuronal developmental influences are gene candidates to unify the observed disruption of brain and retinal cell development. The ERG can provide a valuable clinical addition in understanding and ultimately classifying these disorders. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8719676

  3. [Cognitive abnormalities and cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Solowij, Nadia; Pesa, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Evidence that cannabis use impairs cognitive function in humans has been accumulating in recent decades. The purpose of this overview is to update knowledge in this area with new findings from the most recent literature. Literature searches were conducted using the Web of Science database up to February 2010. The terms searched were: "cannabi*" or "marijuana", and "cogniti*" or "memory" or "attention" or "executive function", and human studies were reviewed preferentially over the animal literature. Cannabis use impairs memory, attention, inhibitory control, executive functions and decision making, both during the period of acute intoxication and beyond, persisting for hours, days, weeks or more after the last use of cannabis. Pharmacological challenge studies in humans are elucidating the nature and neural substrates of cognitive changes associated with various cannabinoids. Long-term or heavy cannabis use appears to result in longer-lasting cognitive abnormalities and possibly structural brain alterations. Greater adverse cognitive effects are associated with cannabis use commencing in early adolescence. The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulatory neural mechanisms that modulate processes underlying a range of cognitive functions that are impaired by cannabis. Deficits in human users most likely therefore reflect neuroadaptations and altered functioning of the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  4. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dandy-Walker syndrome and chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Imataka, George; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Arisaka, Osamu

    2007-12-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a brain malformation of unknown etiology, but several reports have been published indicating that there is a causal relationship to various types of chromosomal abnormalities and malformation syndromes. In the present article, we present a bibliographical survey of several previously issued reports on chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS, including our case of DWS found in trisomy 18. There are various types of chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS; most of them are reported in chromosome 3, 9, 13 and 18. We also summarize some other chromosomal abnormalities and various congenital malformation syndromes.

  6. Managing abnormal eating behaviours in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with topiramate.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Tsuno, Norifumi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Abnormal eating behaviours are specific to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and increase caregiver burden. Topiramate, an anticonvulsant, suppresses cravings for alcohol and other substances and is a potential treatment for binge eating. However, there are few reports on topiramate efficacy for abnormal eating behaviours in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients. We present three Japanese frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with abnormal eating behaviours. Topiramate was effective, especially for compulsive eating, in cases with distinct lobar atrophy, but not for all abnormal eating behaviours. © 2013 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2013 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder.

  8. Spine abnormalities depicted by magnetic resonance imaging in adolescent rowers.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Marvin; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2011-02-01

    Most lesions of the spine of athletes, which often are detected incidentally, do not cause important symptoms or make the athletes discontinue their physical activities. To better understand the significance of these lesions, new imaging studies have been conducted with asymptomatic athletes in several sports, aiming to detect potentially deleterious and disabling abnormalities. To compare the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lumbar spine findings in a group of asymptomatic adolescent rowers and in a control group of adolescents matched according to age and sex who do not practice any regular physical activity. Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 3. Our study evaluated 44 asymptomatic adolescent boys distributed in 2 groups of 22 rowers and 22 control subjects. All the examinations were performed using a 0.35-T open-field MRI unit and evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists blinded to the study groups. Each MRI scan was analyzed for the presence of disc degeneration/desiccation, herniated or bulging disc, pars interarticularis stress reaction, and spondylolysis. The Student t test and the Fisher exact test were used for statistical analyses. Nine rowers (40.9%) had at least 1 abnormality detected by MRI in the lumbar spine, whereas only 2 participants (9.1%) in the control group had at least 1 MRI abnormality (P = .03). Seven disc changes (31.8%) and 6 pars abnormalities (27.3%) were found in the group of elite rowers. In the control group, 3 disc changes (13.6%) and no pars abnormalities were found in the MR scans. The comparison between groups showed statistically significant differences in stress reaction of the pars articularis. Disc disease and pars interarticularis stress reaction are prevalent abnormalities of the lumbar spine of high-performance rowers.

  9. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  10. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  11. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  12. Gamma-band abnormalities as markers of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Donald C.; Wilson, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autism is a behaviorally diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder with no current biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity. Gamma-band abnormalities have been reported in many studies of autism spectrum disorders. Gamma-band activity is associated with perceptual and cognitive functions that are compromised in autism. Some gamma-band deficits have also been seen in unaffected first-degree relatives, suggesting heritability of these findings. This review covers the published literature on gamma abnormalities in autism, the proposed mechanisms underlying the deficits, and the potential for translation into new treatments. Although the utility of gamma-band metrics as diagnostic biomarkers is currently limited, such changes in autism are also useful as endophenotypes, for evaluating potential neural mechanisms, and for use as surrogate markers of treatment response to interventions. PMID:24712425

  13. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; McDougall, I.R.; Constine, L.S.

    1995-03-30

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves` disease or euthyroid Graves` ophthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benignmore » adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity. 39 refs.« less

  14. Central nervous system abnormalities in vaginismus.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Emma; Graziottin, Alessandra; Priori, Alberto; Dall'ora, Elisa; Didonè, Giuseppe; Garbin, Emilio Luigi; Vicentini, Silvana; Bertolasi, Laura

    2009-01-01

    To investigate possible altered CNS excitability in vaginismus. In 10 patients with primary idiopathic lifelong vaginismus, 10 with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome accompanied by vaginismus and healthy controls we recorded EMG activity from the levator ani (LA) and external anal sphincter (EAS) muscles and tested bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR). Pudendal-nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were tested after a single stimulus. Pudendal-nerve SEP recovery functions were assessed using a paired conditioning-test paradigm at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 5, 20 and 40ms. EMG in patients showed muscular hyperactivity at rest and reduced inhibition during straining. The BCR polysynaptic R2 had larger amplitude (p<0.01) and longer duration (p<0.01) in patients from both groups than in controls. In controls, paired-pulse SEPs were suppressed at the 5ms ISI for N35-P40 (p<0.05) and P40-N50 ms (p<0.001) and facilitated at the 20ms ISI for N35-P40 (p<0.05) and P40-N50 (p<0.05). No significant differences were found in the paired-pulse N35-P40 in patients and controls but the cortical P40-N50 at 20 ISI was facilitated in patients (p<0.05). EMG activity is enhanced and the cortical SEP recovery cycle and BCR are hyperexcitable in vaginismus. The neurophysiological abnormalities in patients with vaginismus indicate concomitant CNS changes in this disorder.

  15. Progress in Mathematical Modeling of Gastrointestinal Slow Wave Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Calder, Stefan; Angeli, Timothy R.; Sathar, Shameer; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K.

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility is regulated in part by electrophysiological events called slow waves, which are generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Slow waves propagate by a process of “entrainment,” which occurs over a decreasing gradient of intrinsic frequencies in the antegrade direction across much of the GI tract. Abnormal initiation and conduction of slow waves have been demonstrated in, and linked to, a number of GI motility disorders. A range of mathematical models have been developed to study abnormal slow waves and applied to propose novel methods for non-invasive detection and therapy. This review provides a general outline of GI slow wave abnormalities and their recent classification using multi-electrode (high-resolution) mapping methods, with a particular emphasis on the spatial patterns of these abnormal activities. The recently-developed mathematical models are introduced in order of their biophysical scale from cellular to whole-organ levels. The modeling techniques, main findings from the simulations, and potential future directions arising from notable studies are discussed. PMID:29379448

  16. Quantifying the abnormal hemodynamics of sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-02-01

    Sickle red blood cells (SS-RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphologies and abnormal hemodynamics in deoxygenated states. A multi-scale model for SS-RBC is developed based on the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Different cell morphologies (sickle, granular, elongated shapes) typically observed in deoxygenated states are constructed and quantified by the Asphericity and Elliptical shape factors. The hemodynamics of SS-RBC suspensions is studied in both shear and pipe flow systems. The flow resistance obtained from both systems exhibits a larger value than the healthy blood flow due to the abnormal cell properties. Moreover, SS-RBCs exhibit abnormal adhesive interactions with both the vessel endothelium cells and the leukocytes. The effect of the abnormal adhesive interactions on the hemodynamics of sickle blood is investigated using the current model. It is found that both the SS-RBC - endothelium and the SS-RBC - leukocytes interactions, can potentially trigger the vicious ``sickling and entrapment'' cycles, resulting in vaso-occlusion phenomena widely observed in micro-circulation experiments.

  17. Glutamatergic abnormalities of the thalamus in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Watis, L; Chen, S H; Chua, H C; Chong, S A; Sim, K

    2008-01-01

    The thalamus, a key information processing centre in facilitating sensory discrimination and cognitive processes, has been implicated in schizophrenia due to the increasing evidence showing structural and functional thalamic abnormalities. Glutamatergic abnormalities, in particular, have been examined since glutamate is one of the main neurotransmitters found in the thalamus. We aimed to review the existing literature (1978 till 2007) on post-mortem and in vivo studies of the various components of glutamatergic neurotransmission as well as studies of the glutamate receptor genes within the thalamus in schizophrenia. The literature search was done using multiple databases including Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO host, Pubmed and ScienceDirect. Keywords used were "glutamate", "thalamus", "schizophrenia", "abnormalities", and "glutamatergic". Further searches were made using the bibliographies in the main journals and related papers were obtained. The extant data suggest that abnormalities of the glutamate receptors as well as other molecules involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission (including glutamate transporters and associated proteins, N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated intracellular signaling proteins, and glutamatergic enzymes) are found within the thalamus in schizophrenia. There is a pressing need for more rapid replication of findings from post mortem and genetic studies as well as the promotion of multi-component or multi-modality assessments of glutamatergic anomalies within the thalamus in order to allow a better appreciation of disruptions in these molecular networks in schizophrenia. These and future findings may represent potential novel targets for antipsychotic drugs to ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  18. Abnormal branching and regression of the notochord and its relationship to foregut abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vleesch Dubois, V N; Quan Qi, B; Beasley, S W; Williams, A

    2002-04-01

    An abnormally positioned notochord has been reported in embryos that develop foregut abnormalities, vertebral defects and other abnormalities of the VATER association. This study examines the patterns of regression of the abnormal notochord in the rat model of the VATER association and investigates the relationship between developmental abnormalities of the notochord and those of the vertebra and foregut. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of 1.75 mg/kg adriamycin on gestational days 6 - 9 inclusive. Rats were sacrificed between days 14 and 20 and their embryos harvested, histologically sectioned and stained and examined serially. The location and appearance of the degenerating notochord and its relationship to regional structural defects were analysed. All 26 embryos exposed to adriamycin developed foregut abnormalities and had an abnormal notochord. The notochord disappeared by a process of apoptotic degeneration that lagged behind that of the normal embryo: the notochord persisted in the abnormal embryo beyond day 17, whereas in the normal rat it had already disappeared. Similarly, formation of the nucleus pulposus was delayed. Vertebral abnormalities occurred when the notochord was ventrally-positioned. The notochord disappears during day 16 in the normal embryo whereas abnormal branches of the notochord persist until day 19 in the adriamycin-treated embryo. Degeneration of the notochord is dominated by apoptosis. An excessively ventrally-placed notochord is closely associated with abnormalities of the vertebral column, especially hemivertebrae.

  19. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Verdú, María Gabriela; Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Del Campo, Miguel; Campuzano, Victoria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83 Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ∼ 30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ∼ 75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well as in several mouse models, to establish potential candidate genes. We analysed several metabolic parameters in a cohort of 154 individuals with WBS (data available from 69 to 151 cases per parameter), as well as in several mouse models with complete and partial deletions of the orthologous WBS locus, and searched for causative genes and potential modifiers. Triglyceride plasma levels were significantly decreased in individuals with WBS while cholesterol levels were slightly decreased compared with controls. Hyperbilirubinemia, mostly unconjugated, was found in 18.3% of WBS cases and correlated with subclinical hypothyroidism and hypotriglyceridemia, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms. Haploinsufficiency at MLXIPL and increased penetrance for hypomorphic alleles at the UGT1A1 gene promoter might underlie the lipid and bilirubin alterations. Other disturbances included increased protein and iron levels, as well as the known subclinical hypothyroidism and glucose intolerance. Our results show that several unreported biochemical alterations, related to haploinsufficiency for specific genes at 7q11.23, are relatively common in WBS. The early diagnosis, follow-up and management of these metabolic disturbances could prevent long-term complications in this disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Prediction of heart abnormality using MLP network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Januar, Yulni; Mat, Muhammad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Awang, Mat Kamil

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality does not choose gender, age and races when it strikes. With no warning signs or symptoms, it can result to a sudden death of the patient. Generally, heart's irregular electrical activity is defined as heart abnormality. Via implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network, this paper tries to develop a program that allows the detection of heart abnormality activity. Utilizing several training algorithms with Purelin activation function, an amount of heartbeat signals received through the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be employed to condition the MLP network.

  1. Brain and bone abnormalities of thanatophoric dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elka; Blaser, Susan; Shannon, Patrick; Widjaja, Elysa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the imaging findings of skeletal and brain abnormalities in thanatophoric dwarfism, a lethal form of dysplastic dwarfism. The bony abnormalities associated with thanatophoric dwarfism include marked shortening of the tubular bones and ribs. Abnormal temporal lobe development is a common associated feature and can be visualized as early as the second trimester. It is important to assess the brains of fetuses with suspected thanatophoric dwarfism because the presence of associated brain malformations can assist in the antenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dwarfism.

  2. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  3. Sex chromosome abnormalities and psychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhu; Yang, Jian; Li, Yuhong; Ma, Xin; Li, Rena

    2017-01-01

    Excesses of sex chromosome abnormalities in patients with psychiatric diseases have recently been observed. It remains unclear whether sex chromosome abnormalities are related to sex differences in some psychiatric diseases. While studies showed evidence of susceptibility loci over many sex chromosomal regions related to various mental diseases, others demonstrated that the sex chromosome aneuploidies may be the key to exploring the pathogenesis of psychiatric disease. In this review, we will outline the current evidence on the interaction of sex chromosome abnormalities with schizophrenia, autism, ADHD and mood disorders. PMID:27992373

  4. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Performance of a fail-safe system to follow up abnormal mammograms in primary care.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ellie; Phillips, Russell S; Weingart, Saul N

    2010-09-01

    Missed and delayed breast cancer diagnoses are major sources of potential harm to patients and medical malpractice liability in the United States. Follow-up of abnormal mammogram results is an essential but challenging component of safe breast care. To explore the value of an inexpensive method to follow up abnormal test results, we examined a paper-based fail-safe system. We examined a fail-safe system used to follow up abnormal mammograms at a primary care practice at an urban teaching hospital. We analyzed all abnormal mammogram reports and clinicians' responses to follow-up reminders. We characterized potential lapses identified in this system and used regression models to identify patient, provider, and test result characteristics associated with such lapses. Clinicians responded to fail-safe reminders for 92% of 948 abnormal mammograms. Clinicians reported that they were unaware of the abnormal result in 8% of cases and that there was no follow-up plan in place for 3% of cases. Clinicians with more years of experience were more likely to be aware of the abnormal result (odds of being unaware per incremental year in practice, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and were more likely to have a follow-up plan. A paper-based fail-safe system for abnormal mammograms is feasible in a primary care practice. However, special care is warranted to ensure full clinician adherence and address staff transitions and trainee-related issues.

  6. Four families with immunodeficiency and chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, D C; Hayward, A R; Hughes, D T; Layward, L; Soothill, J F

    1979-01-01

    Six children, with severe deficiency of some or all of the immunoglobulins and minor somatic abnormalities, had chromosomal abnormalities: (1) 45,XY,t(13q/18q), (2) 46,XY,21ps +, (3) two brothers 46,XY (inv. 7) (4) 45,X,t(11p/10p)/46X,iXq,t(11p/10p) and, (5) in addendum, 45,XX,-18;46,XX, r18. The chromosome abnormalities were detected in B- as well as T-lymphocytes (as evidenced by using both PHA- and PWM-stimulated cultures) in all probands, but one was mosaic in PHA culture, although all his PWM-stimulated cells were abnormal. Chromosomal variants were also detected in relatives of three and immunodeficiency in relatives of two. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:314782

  7. Video Traffic Analysis for Abnormal Event Detection

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for new road guidelines; for rapid deploymen...

  8. Video traffic analysis for abnormal event detection.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to : be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for : new road guidelines; for rapid deplo...

  9. Abnormal findings in peers during skills learning.

    PubMed

    Wearn, Andy; Nakatsuji, Miriam; Bhoopatkar, Harsh

    2017-02-01

    Peer physical examination (PPE), where students examine each other, is common in contemporary clinical skills learning. A range of benefits and risks have been explored in the literature. One persistent concern has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings. Two previous studies have attempted to quantify the risk, one through the discussion of two exemplar cases and the other with a retrospective student survey. Here, we report the first prospective study of the number and type of abnormalities encountered as part of early clinical skills learning in a medical programme. We have a formal written consent process for PPE, which includes the management of abnormal findings through the completion of an event form. Our data come from cohorts undertaking years 2 and 3 of the programme between 2003 and 2014. One persistent concern (of PPE) has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings RESULTS: Nineteen event forms were completed over this period. The incidence rates per year ranged from 0.23 to 1.05 per cent. Abnormal findings included raised blood pressure, heart murmur, abnormal bedside test values, and eye and skin conditions. The low event rate, along with a feasible process for dealing with this issue, goes some way to reassuring those with concerns. We acknowledge that some abnormalities may have been missed, and that some data may have been lost as a result of incorrect process; however, even the highest annual rate is low in absolute terms. We recommend a formal process for managing abnormalities. Ideally this would be part of an overall PPE written policy, communicated to students, enacted by tutors and approved by the local ethics committee. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  11. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    PubMed

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  12. Blood coagulation abnormalities in multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Débora Santos da; Teixeira, Lisandra Antonia Castro; Beghini, Daniela Gois; Ferreira, André Teixeira da Silva; Pinho, Márcia de Berredo Moreira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Ribeiro, Marli Rambaldi; Freire, Monica Di Calafiori; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Tovar, Ana Maria Freire; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Perales, Jonas; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Esquenazi, Danuza; Monteiro, Robson Queiroz; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2018-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection. In 2016, more than 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world, representing the most frequent cause of infectious irreversible deformities and disabilities. In the present work, we demonstrate a consistent procoagulant profile on 40 reactional and non-reactional multibacillary leprosy patients. A retrospective analysis in search of signs of coagulation abnormalities among 638 leprosy patients identified 35 leprosy patients (5.48%) which displayed a characteristic lipid-like clot formed between blood clot and serum during serum harvesting, herein named 'leprosum clot'. Most of these patients (n = 16, 45.7%) belonged to the lepromatous leprosy pole of the disease. In addition, formation of the leprosum clot was directly correlated with increased plasma levels of soluble tissue factor and von Willebrand factor. High performance thin layer chromatography demonstrated a high content of neutral lipids in the leprosum clot, and proteomic analysis demonstrated that the leprosum clot presented in these patients is highly enriched in fibrin. Remarkably, differential 2D-proteomics analysis between leprosum clots and control clots identified two proteins present only in leprosy patients clots: complement component 3 and 4 and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family heavy chain-related protein (IHRP). In agreement with those observations we demonstrated that M. leprae induces hepatocytes release of IHRP in vitro. We demonstrated that leprosy MB patients develop a procoagulant status due to high levels of plasmatic fibrinogen, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, von Willebrand factor and soluble tissue factor. We propose that some of these components, fibrinogen for example, presents potential as predictive biomarkers of leprosy reactions, generating tools for earlier diagnosis and treatment of these events.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG) is a ...

  14. Neurosteroid allopregnanolone reduces ipsilateral visual cortex potentiation following unilateral optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Elena G; Espinosa-Garcia, Claudia; Atif, Fahim; Pardue, Machelle T; Stein, Donald G

    2018-05-02

    In adult mice with unilateral optic nerve crush injury (ONC), we studied visual response plasticity in the visual cortex following stimulation with sinusoidal grating. We examined visually evoked potentials (VEP) in the primary visual cortex ipsilateral and contralateral to the crushed nerve. We found that unilateral ONC induces enhancement of visual response on the side ipsilateral to the injury that is evoked by visual stimulation to the intact eye. This enhancement was associated with supranormal spatial frequency thresholds in the intact eye when tested using optomotor response. To probe whether injury-induced disinhibition caused the potentiation, we treated animals with the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, a potent agonist of the GABA A receptor, one hour after crush and on post-injury days 3, 8, 13, and 18. Allopregnanolone diminished enhancement of the VEP and this effect was associated with the upregulated synthesis of the δ-subunit of the GABA A receptor. Our study shows a new aspect of experience-dependent plasticity following unilateral ONC. This hyper-activity in the ipsilateral visual cortex is prevented by upregulation of GABA inhibition with allopregnanolone. Our findings suggest the therapeutic potential of allopregnanolone for modulation of plasticity in certain eye and brain disorders and a possible role for disinhibition in ipsilateral hyper-activity following unilateral ONC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Dysmorphometrics: the modelling of morphological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Daniels, Katleen; Walters, Mark; Clement, John; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Suetens, Paul

    2012-02-06

    The study of typical morphological variations using quantitative, morphometric descriptors has always interested biologists in general. However, unusual examples of form, such as abnormalities are often encountered in biomedical sciences. Despite the long history of morphometrics, the means to identify and quantify such unusual form differences remains limited. A theoretical concept, called dysmorphometrics, is introduced augmenting current geometric morphometrics with a focus on identifying and modelling form abnormalities. Dysmorphometrics applies the paradigm of detecting form differences as outliers compared to an appropriate norm. To achieve this, the likelihood formulation of landmark superimpositions is extended with outlier processes explicitly introducing a latent variable coding for abnormalities. A tractable solution to this augmented superimposition problem is obtained using Expectation-Maximization. The topography of detected abnormalities is encoded in a dysmorphogram. We demonstrate the use of dysmorphometrics to measure abrupt changes in time, asymmetry and discordancy in a set of human faces presenting with facial abnormalities. The results clearly illustrate the unique power to reveal unusual form differences given only normative data with clear applications in both biomedical practice & research.

  16. Abnormalities of High Density Lipoproteins in Abetalipoproteinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, John W.; Ways, Peter

    1967-01-01

    Detailed studies of the high density lipoproteins from three patients with abetalipoproteinemia have revealed the following principal abnormalities: 1) High density lipoprotein 3 (HDL3) is reduced in both absolute and relative concentration, although HDL2 is present in normal amounts. 2) The phospholipid distribution of both HDL fractions is abnormal, with low concentrations of lecithin and an increased percentage (though normal absolute quantity) of sphingomyelin. 3) In both HDL fractions, lecithin contains less linoleate and more oleate than normal. The cholesteryl esters are also low in linoleic acid, and the sphingomyelin is high in nervonic acid. Dietary intake influences the linoleic acid concentration within 2 weeks, and perhaps sooner, but the elevated sphingomyelin nervonic acid is little affected by up to 6 months of corn oil supplementation. Qualitatively similar changes in fatty acid composition, but not phospholipid distribution, are also found in other malabsorption states. The available evidence suggests that the abnormally low levels of HDL3 and the deranged phospholipid distribution are more specific for abetalipoproteinemia than the fatty acid abnormalities. However, the absence of these abnormalities in obligate heterozygous subjects makes their relationship to the primary defect of abetalipoproteinemia difficult to assess. Images PMID:6027078

  17. [Liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Silvany Neto, Annibal Muniz; Mendes, João Luiz Barberino; Cotrim, Helma Pinchemel; Nascimento, Ana Lísia Cunha; Lima Júnior, Alberto Soares; Cunha, Tatiana Oliveira Bernardo da

    2006-02-01

    Occupational exposure typical of an oil refinery may alter liver function among the workers. Thus, the objective of the study was to identify risk factors for liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. The workers at an oil refinery in Northeastern Brazil underwent routine annual medical examination from 1982 to 1998. This case-control study investigated all the 150 cases of individuals with simultaneous gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase abnormalities of at least 10% above reference levels. As controls, 150 workers without any liver enzyme or bilirubin abnormalities since starting to work there were selected. Odds ratios and the respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated from logistic regression models. In all the production sectors, the risk of liver enzyme abnormalities was significantly higher than in the administrative sector (OR=5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-18.4), even when the effects of alcohol, obesity and medical history of hepatitis were controlled for. During the period from 1992 to 1994, 88 out of the 89 cases occurred among workers from the various production sectors. Occupational exposure plays an important role in causing liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. This is in addition to the specifically biological and/or behavioral risk factors such as obesity and alcohol consumption.

  18. Chromosome and molecular abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre

    2001-06-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are seen in approximately 50% of cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 80% of cases of secondary MDS (following chemotherapy or radiotherapy). These abnormalities generally consist of partial or complete chromosome deletion or addition (del5q, -7, +8, -Y, del20q), whereas balanced or unbalanced translocations are rarely found in MDS. Fluorescence hybridization techniques (fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH], multiplex FISH, and spectral karyotyping) are useful in detecting chromosomal anomalies in cases in which few mitoses are obtained or rearrangements are complex. Ras mutations are the molecular abnormalities most frequently found in MDS, followed by p15 gene hypermethylation, FLT3 duplications, and p53 mutations, but none of these abnormalities are specific for MDS. The rare cases of balanced translocations in MDS have allowed the identification of genes whose rearrangements appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of MDS. These genes include MDS1-EVI1 in t(3;3) or t(3;21) translocations, TEL in t(5;12), HIP1 in t(5;7), MLF1 in t(3;5), and MEL1 in t(1;3). Genes more frequently implicated in the pathogenesis of MDS cases, such as those involving del5q, remain unknown, although some candidate genes are currently being studied. Cytogenetic and known molecular abnormalities generally carry a poor prognosis in MDS and can be incorporated into prognostic scoring systems such as the International Prognostic Scoring System.

  19. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  20. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than..., tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal findings, NIOSH will...

  1. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  3. Cardiac abnormality prediction using HMLP network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Ahmad, K. A.; Mat, Muhamad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Ahmad, Shahril

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races but depends on the lifestyle. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and usually detected once it already critical which lead to a sudden death to the patient. Basically, cardiac abnormality is the irregular electrical signal that generate by the pacemaker of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect cardiac abnormality activity through implementation of Hybrid Multilayer Perceptron (HMLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP and HMLP network by using Modified Recursive Prediction Error (MRPE) algorithm and to test the network performance.

  4. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  5. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate themore » types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.« less

  6. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  7. Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure.

    PubMed

    Hocking, B; Westerman, R

    2001-09-01

    Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.

  8. Early physiological abnormalities after simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Horn, T F; Huitron-Resendiz, S; Weed, M R; Henriksen, S J; Fox, H S

    1998-12-08

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage and dysfunction are devastating consequences of HIV infection. Although the CNS is one of the initial targets for HIV infection, little is known about early viral-induced abnormalities that can affect CNS function. Here we report the detection of early physiological abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. The acute infection caused a disruption of the circadian rhythm manifested by rises in body temperature, observed in all five individuals between 1 and 2 weeks postinoculation (p.i.), accompanied by a reduction in daily motor activity to 50% of control levels. Animals remained hyperthermic at 1 and 2 months p.i. and returned to preinoculation temperatures at 3 months after viral inoculation. Although motor activity recovered to baseline values at 1 month p.i., activity levels then decreased to approximately 50% of preinoculation values over the next 2 months. Analysis of sensory-evoked responses 1 month p.i. revealed distinct infection-induced changes in auditory-evoked potential peak latencies that persisted at 3 months after viral inoculation. These early physiological abnormalities may precede the development of observable cognitive or motor deficiencies and can provide an assay to evaluate agents to prevent or alleviate neuronal dysfunction.

  9. Early physiological abnormalities after simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Thomas F. W.; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Weed, Michael R.; Henriksen, Steven J.; Fox, Howard S.

    1998-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage and dysfunction are devastating consequences of HIV infection. Although the CNS is one of the initial targets for HIV infection, little is known about early viral-induced abnormalities that can affect CNS function. Here we report the detection of early physiological abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. The acute infection caused a disruption of the circadian rhythm manifested by rises in body temperature, observed in all five individuals between 1 and 2 weeks postinoculation (p.i.), accompanied by a reduction in daily motor activity to 50% of control levels. Animals remained hyperthermic at 1 and 2 months p.i. and returned to preinoculation temperatures at 3 months after viral inoculation. Although motor activity recovered to baseline values at 1 month p.i., activity levels then decreased to approximately 50% of preinoculation values over the next 2 months. Analysis of sensory-evoked responses 1 month p.i. revealed distinct infection-induced changes in auditory-evoked potential peak latencies that persisted at 3 months after viral inoculation. These early physiological abnormalities may precede the development of observable cognitive or motor deficiencies and can provide an assay to evaluate agents to prevent or alleviate neuronal dysfunction. PMID:9844017

  10. Induced abnormality in Mir- and Earth grown Super Dwarf wheat.

    PubMed

    Bubenheim, D L; Stieber, J; Campbell, W F; Salisbury, F B; Levinski, M; Sytchev, V; Podolsky, I; Chernova, L; Pdolsky, I

    2003-01-01

    Super-dwarf wheat grown on the Mir space station using the Svet "Greenhouse" exhibited morphological, metabolic and reproductive abnormalities compared with Earth-grown wheat. Of prominent importance were the abnormalities associated with reproductive ontogeny and the total absence of seed formation on Mir. Changes in the apical meristem associated with transition from the vegetative phase to floral initiation and development of the reproductive spike were all typical of 'Super-Dwarf' wheat up to the point of anthesis. Observation of ruptured anthers from the Mir-grown plants revealed what appeared to be normally developed pollen. These pollen gains, however, contained only one nuclei, while normal viable pollen is tri-nucleate. A potentially important difference in the flight experiment, compared with ground reference studies, was the presence of a high level of atmospheric ethylene (1,200 ppb). Ground studies conducted by exposing 'Super-Dwarf' wheat to ethylene just prior to anthesis resulted in manifestation of the same abnormalities observed in the space flight samples. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  11. Induced abnormality in Mir- and Earth grown Super Dwarf wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.; Stieber, J.; Campbell, W. F.; Salisbury, F. B.; Levinski, M.; Sytchev, V.; Podolsky, I.; Chernova, L.; Pdolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    Super-dwarf wheat grown on the Mir space station using the Svet "Greenhouse" exhibited morphological, metabolic and reproductive abnormalities compared with Earth-grown wheat. Of prominent importance were the abnormalities associated with reproductive ontogeny and the total absence of seed formation on Mir. Changes in the apical meristem associated with transition from the vegetative phase to floral initiation and development of the reproductive spike were all typical of 'Super-Dwarf' wheat up to the point of anthesis. Observation of ruptured anthers from the Mir-grown plants revealed what appeared to be normally developed pollen. These pollen gains, however, contained only one nuclei, while normal viable pollen is tri-nucleate. A potentially important difference in the flight experiment, compared with ground reference studies, was the presence of a high level of atmospheric ethylene (1,200 ppb). Ground studies conducted by exposing 'Super-Dwarf' wheat to ethylene just prior to anthesis resulted in manifestation of the same abnormalities observed in the space flight samples. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  12. Intestinal Rotation Abnormalities and Midgut Volvulus.

    PubMed

    Langer, Jacob C

    2017-02-01

    Rotation abnormalities may be asymptomatic or may be associated with obstruction caused by bands, midgut volvulus, or associated atresia or web. The most important goal of clinicians is to determine whether the patient has midgut volvulus with intestinal ischemia, in which case an emergency laparotomy should be done. If the patient is not acutely ill, the next goal is to determine whether the patient has a narrow-based small bowel mesentery. In general, the outcomes for children with a rotation abnormality are excellent, unless there has been midgut volvulus with significant intestinal ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  14. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  15. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  16. Abnormal carbene-silicon halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Robinson, Gregory H

    2016-04-14

    Reaction of the anionic N-heterocyclic dicarbene (NHDC), [:C{[N(2,6-Pr(i)2C6H3)]2CHCLi}]n (1), with SiCl4 gives the trichlorosilyl-substituted (at the C4 carbon) N-heterocyclic carbene complex (7). Abnormal carbene-SiCl4 complex (8) may be conveniently synthesized by combining 7 with HCl·NEt3. In addition, 7 may react with CH2Cl2 in warm hexane, giving the abnormal carbene-complexed SiCl3(+) cation (9). The nature of the bonding in 9 was probed with complementary DFT computations.

  17. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in amateur male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Anna M; Lewicka, Ewa; Dąbrowska-Kugacka, Alicja; Lewicka-Potocka, Zuzanna; Wabich, Elżbieta; Szerszyńska, Anna; Dyda, Julia; Sobolewski, Jakub; Koenner, Jakub; Raczak, Grzegorz

    2018-06-18

    Sports activity has become extremely popular among amateurs. Electrocardiography is a useful tool in screening for cardiac pathologies in athletes; however, there is little data on electrocardiographic abnormalities in the group of amateur athletes. The aim of this study was to analyze the abnormalities in resting and exercise electrocardiograms (ECGs) in a group of amateur athletes, and try to determine whether the criteria applied for the general population or for athletes' ECGs should be implemented in this group. In 40 amateur male marathon runners, 3 consecutive 12-lead ECGs were performed: 2-3 weeks before (stage 1), just after the run (stage 2) and 2-3 weeks after the marathon (stage 3). Resting (stage 1) and exercise (stage 2) ECGs were analyzed following the refined criteria for the assessment of athlete's ECG (changes classified as training-related, borderline or training-unrelated). In resting ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was found in 92.5% of the subjects and the most common was sinus bradycardia (62.5%). In post-exercise ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was present in 77.5% of the subjects and the most common was right atrium enlargement (RAE) (42.5%). Training-related ECG variants were more frequent at rest (82.5% vs 42.5%; p = 0.0008), while borderline variants - after the run (22.5% vs 57.5%; p = 0.0004). Training-unrelated abnormalities were found in 15% and 10% of the subjects, respectively (p-value - nonsignificant), and the most common was T-wave inversion. Even if the refined criteria rather than the criteria used for normal sedentary population were applied, the vast majority of amateur runners showed at least 1 abnormality in resting ECGs, which were mainly training-related variants. However, at rest, in 15% of the subjects, pathologic training-unrelated abnormalities were found. The most frequent post-exercise abnormality was right atrial enlargement. General electrocardiographic screening in amateur athletes should be taken into consideration.

  18. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  19. Abnormal fatty acids in Canadian children with autism.

    PubMed

    Jory, Joan

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acids are critical for pediatric neurodevelopment and are abnormal in autism, although prior studies have demonstrated conflicting results and methodological differences. To our knowledge, there are no published data on fatty acid in Canadian children with autism. The aim of this study was to investigate red blood cell and serum fatty acid status to identify whether abnormalities exist in Canadian children with autism, and to enhance future cross-study comparison. Eleven Canadian children with autism (3 girls, 8 boys; age 3.05 ± 0.79 y) and 15 controls (9 girls, 6 boys; age 3.87 ± 1.06 y) met inclusion criteria, which included prior Diagnostic and Statistical Manual diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, no recent medication or supplements, no specialty diets, and no recent illness. The children with autism demonstrated lower red blood cell docosahexaenoic acid (P < 0.0003), eicosapentaenoic acid (P < 0.03), arachidonic acid (P < 0.002), and ω-3/ω-6 ratios (P < 0.001). They also demonstrated lower serum docosahexaenoic acid (P < 0.02), arachidonic acid (P < 0.05), and linoleic acid (P < 0.02) levels. Fatty acids in both serum and red blood cells were abnormal in this small group of Canadian children with autism than in controls, underlining a need for larger age- and sex-matched investigations in this community. A potential role for fatty acid abnormalities within the complex epigenetic etiology of autism is proposed in relation to emerging understanding of relationships between cobalamin metabolism, gut microbiota, and propionic acid production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Bo, Qingyan; Orsenigo, Roberto; Wang, Junyi; Griffel, Louis; Brass, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D) and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries). This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025) as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%), and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08). Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had no impact on viral response to peginterferon plus ribavirin.

  1. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Qingyan; Orsenigo, Roberto; Wang, Junyi; Griffel, Louis; Brass, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D) and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries). This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025) as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%), and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08). Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had no impact on viral response to peginterferon plus ribavirin. PMID:26609222

  2. Face-Evoked Steady-State Visual Potentials: Effects of Presentation Rate and Face Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, L. Forest; Wieser, Matthias J.; Schweinberger, Stefan R.; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Face processing can be explored using electrophysiological methods. Research with event-related potentials has demonstrated the so-called face inversion effect, in which the N170 component is enhanced in amplitude and latency to inverted, compared to upright, faces. The present study explored the extent to which repetitive lower-level visual cortical engagement, reflected in flicker steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs), shows similar amplitude enhancement to face inversion. We also asked if inversion-related ssVEP modulation would be dependent on the stimulation rate at which upright and inverted faces were flickered. To this end, multiple tagging frequencies were used (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz) across two studies (n = 21, n = 18). Results showed that amplitude enhancement of the ssVEP for inverted faces was found solely at higher stimulation frequencies (15 and 20 Hz). By contrast, lower frequency ssVEPs did not show this inversion effect. These findings suggest that stimulation frequency affects the sensitivity of ssVEPs to face inversion. PMID:23205009

  3. EEG error potentials detection and classification using time-frequency features for robot reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Boubchir, Larbi; Touati, Youcef; Daachi, Boubaker; Chérif, Arab Ali

    2015-08-01

    In thought-based steering of robots, error potentials (ErrP) can appear when the action resulting from the brain-machine interface (BMI) classifier/controller does not correspond to the user's thought. Using the Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP) techniques, ErrP, which appear when a classification error occurs, are not easily recognizable by only examining the temporal or frequency characteristics of EEG signals. A supplementary classification process is therefore needed to identify them in order to stop the course of the action and back up to a recovery state. This paper presents a set of time-frequency (t-f) features for the detection and classification of EEG ErrP in extra-brain activities due to misclassification observed by a user exploiting non-invasive BMI and robot control in the task space. The proposed features are able to characterize and detect ErrP activities in the t-f domain. These features are derived from the information embedded in the t-f representation of EEG signals, and include the Instantaneous Frequency (IF), t-f information complexity, SVD information, energy concentration and sub-bands' energies. The experiment results on real EEG data show that the use of the proposed t-f features for detecting and classifying EEG ErrP achieved an overall classification accuracy up to 97% for 50 EEG segments using 2-class SVM classifier.

  4. Human lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex respond to screen flicker.

    PubMed

    Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Hénaff, Marie-Anne; Tallon-Baudry, Catherine; Yvert, Blaise; Guénot, Marc; Vighetto, Alain; Mauguière, François; Bertrand, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    The first electrophysiological study of the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), optic radiation, striate, and extrastriate visual areas is presented in the context of presurgical evaluation of three epileptic patients (Patients 1, 2, and 3). Visual-evoked potentials to pattern reversal and face presentation were recorded with depth intracranial electrodes implanted stereotactically. For Patient 1, electrode anatomical registration, structural magnetic resonance imaging, and electrophysiological responses confirmed the location of two contacts in the geniculate body and one in the optic radiation. The first responses peaked approximately 40 milliseconds in the LGN in Patient 1 and 60 milliseconds in the V1/V2 complex in Patients 2 and 3. Moreover, steady state visual-evoked potentials evoked by the unperceived but commonly experienced video-screen flicker were recorded in the LGN, optic radiation, and V1/V2 visual areas. This study provides topographic and temporal propagation characteristics of steady state visual-evoked potentials along human visual pathways. We discuss the possible relationship between the oscillating signal recorded in subcortical and cortical areas and the electroencephalogram abnormalities observed in patients suffering from photosensitive epilepsy, particularly video-game epilepsy. The consequences of high temporal frequency visual stimuli delivered by ubiquitous video screens on epilepsy, headaches, and eyestrain must be considered.

  5. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  6. The interpretation and management of abnormal liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Simpson, M A; Freshwater, D A

    2015-01-01

    Liver function tests (LFTs) are frequently requested as part of routine health assessments on serving members of the Royal Navy (RN). In common with many investigations there are a number of abnormal results in healthy individuals (0.5 - 9% depending on test and study population). There are established patterns of LFT derangement such as cholestatic derangement, hepatocellular derangement, and failure of synthetic function. There can be indicators to the cause of the derangement by assessing the ratios of elevated assays in relation to one another. This article aims to address the definition, potential causes and further investigation of common patterns of LFT derangement found in primary care in the RN.

  7. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  8. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  9. Neuroimaging evidence of brain abnormalities in mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boddaert, N; Salvador, A; Chandesris, M O; Lemaître, H; Grévent, D; Gauthier, C; Naggara, O; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Moura, D S; Munsch, F; Jaafari, N; Zilbovicius, M; Lortholary, O; Gaillard, R; Hermine, O

    2017-08-08

    Mastocytosis is a rare disease in which chronic symptoms are related to mast cell accumulation and activation. Patients can display depression-anxiety-like symptoms and cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of these symptoms may be associated with tissular mast cell infiltration, mast cell mediator release or both. The objective of this study is to perform morphological or functional brain analyses in mastocytosis to identify brain changes associated with this mast cell disorder. We performed a prospective and monocentric comparative study to evaluate the link between subjective psycho-cognitive complaints, psychiatric evaluation and objective medical data using magnetic resonance imaging with morphological and perfusion sequences (arterial spin-labeled perfusion) in 39 patients with mastocytosis compared with 33 healthy controls. In the test cohort of 39 mastocytosis patients with psycho-cognitive complaints, we found that 49% of them had morphological brain abnormalities, mainly abnormal punctuated white matter abnormalities (WMA). WMA were equally frequent in cutaneous mastocytosis patients and indolent forms of systemic mastocytosis patients (42% and 41% of patients with WMA, respectively). Patients with WMA showed increased perfusion in the putamen compared with patients without WMA and with healthy controls. Putamen perfusion was also negatively correlated with depression subscores. This study demonstrates, for we believe the first time, a high prevalence of morphological and functional abnormalities in the brains of mastocytosis patients with neuropsychiatric complaints. Further studies are required to determine the mechanism underpinning this association and to ascertain its specificity.

  10. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  11. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison ofmore » emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.« less

  12. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  13. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  14. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders.

    PubMed

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; De Jesus, Danilo R; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders.

  15. Sensory Abnormalities in Autism: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintwall Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents…

  16. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  17. Eye movement abnormalities in essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Plinta, Klaudia; Krzak-Kubica, Agnieszka; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Dylak, Jacek; Ober, Jan; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Rudzińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, characterized mainly by an action tremor of the arms. Only a few studies published as yet have assessed oculomotor abnormalities in ET and their results are unequivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients compared with the control group and to find the relationship between oculomotor abnormalities and clinical features of ET patients. We studied 50 ET patients and 42 matched by age and gender healthy controls. Saccadometer Advanced (Ober Consulting, Poland) was used to investigate reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades and conventional electrooculography for evaluation of smooth pursuit and fixation. The severity of the tremor was assessed by the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor. Significant differences between ET patients and controls were found for the incidence of reflexive saccades dysmetria and deficit of smooth pursuit. Reflexive saccades dysmetria was more frequent in patients in the second and third phase of ET compared to the first phase. The reflexive saccades latency increase was correlated with severity of the tremor. In conclusion, oculomotor abnormalities were significantly more common in ET patients than in healthy subjects. The most common oculomotor disturbances in ET were reflexive saccades dysmetria and slowing of smooth pursuit. The frequency of reflexive saccades dysmetria increased with progression of ET. The reflexive saccades latency increase was related to the severity of tremor. PMID:28149393

  18. Abnormal Web Usage Control by Proxy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Approaches to designing a proxy server with Web usage control and to making the proxy server effective on local area networks are proposed to prevent abnormal Web access and to prioritize Web usage. A system is implemented to demonstrate the approaches. The implementation reveals that the proposed approaches are effective, such that the abnormal…

  19. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  20. Obstetrical complications associated with abnormal maternal serum markers analytes.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Alain; Wilson, R Douglas

    2008-10-01

    To review the obstetrical outcomes associated with abnormally elevated or decreased level of one or more of the most frequently measured maternal serum marker analytes used in screening for aneuploidy. To provide guidance to facilitate the management of pregnancies that have abnormal levels of one of more markers and to assess the usefulness of these markers as a screening test. Perinatal outcomes associated with abnormal levels of maternal serum markers analytes are compared with the outcomes of pregnancies with normal levels of the same analytes or the general population. The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for English-language articles published from 1966 to February 2007, relating to maternal serum markers and perinatal outcomes. Search terms included PAPP-A (pregnancy associated plasma protein A), AFP (alphafetoprotein), hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), estriol, unconjugated estriol, inhibin, inhibin-A, maternal serum screen, triple marker screen, quadruple screen, integrated prenatal screen, first trimester screen, and combined prenatal screen. All study types were reviewed. Randomized controlled trials were considered evidence of the highest quality, followed by cohort studies. Key individual studies on which the recommendations are based are referenced. Supporting data for each recommendation are summarized with evaluative comments and references. The evidence was evaluated using the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Genetics Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The benefit expected from this guideline is to facilitate early detection of potential adverse pregnancy outcomes when risks are identified at the time of a maternal serum screen. It will help further stratification of risk and provide options for pregnancy management to minimize the impact of pregnancy complications. The potential harms resulting from such practice

  1. Syringomyelia and Craniocervical Junction Abnormalities in Chihuahuas.

    PubMed

    Kiviranta, A-M; Rusbridge, C; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O; Hielm-Björkman, A; Lappalainen, A K; Knowler, S P; Jokinen, T S

    2017-11-01

    Chiari-like malformation (CM) and syringomyelia (SM) are widely reported in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Griffon Bruxellois dogs. Increasing evidence indicates that CM and SM also occur in other small and toy breed dogs, such as Chihuahuas. To describe the presence of SM and craniocervical junction (CCJ) abnormalities in Chihuahuas and to evaluate the possible association of CCJ abnormalities with SM. To describe CM/SM-related clinical signs and neurologic deficits and to investigate the association of CM/SM-related clinical signs with signalment, SM, or CCJ abnormalities. Fifty-three client-owned Chihuahuas. Prospective study. Questionnaire analyses and physical and neurologic examinations were obtained before magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging. Images were evaluated for the presence of SM, CM, and atlantooccipital overlapping. Additionally, medullary kinking, dorsal spinal cord compression, and their sum indices were calculated. Scratching was the most common CM/SM-related clinical sign and decreased postural reaction the most common neurologic deficit in 73 and 87% of dogs, respectively. Chiari-like malformation and SM were present in 100 and 38% of dogs, respectively. Syringomyelia was associated with the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs (P = 0.034), and medullary kinking and sum indices were higher in dogs with clinical signs (P = 0.016 and P = 0.007, respectively). Syringomyelia and CCJ abnormalities are prevalent in Chihuahuas. Syringomyelia was an important factor for the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs, but many dogs suffered from similar clinical signs without being affected by SM, highlighting the clinical importance of CCJ abnormalities in Chihuahuas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Hemostatic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Aarti; Sikka, Meera; Sharma, Satender; Rusia, Usha

    2018-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Diverse hemostatic abnormalities have been reported in patients with myeloma which predispose to bleeding and also thrombosis. Methods: Complete blood count, biochemical parameters and parameters of hemostasis i.e. platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), factor VIII assay results, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer and lupus anticoagulant, were assessed in 29 MM patients and 30 age matched controls. Results: The most frequent abnormal screening parameter was APTT. Of the six indicative of a bleeding tendency i.e. thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, APTT, TT, reduced plasma fibrinogen and factor VIII, at least one was abnormal in 8 (27.6%) patients. Of the four prothrombotic markers, lupus anticoagulant, D-dimer, elevated factor VIII and plasma fibrinogen, one or more marker was present in 24 (82.7%). D-dimer was the most common prothrombotic marker, being elevated in 22 (75.9%) patients. One or more laboratory parameter of hemostasis was abnormal in all 29 (100%) patients. Though thrombotic complications are reported to be less frequent as compared to hemorrhagic manifestations, one or more marker of thrombosis was present in 24 (82.7%) patients. Conclusion: This study provided laboratory evidence of hemostatic dysfunction which may be associated with thrombotic or bleeding complications at diagnosis in all MM patients. Hence, screening for these abnormalities at the time of diagnosis should help improved prognosis in such cases. PMID:29373903

  3. [Electrocardiographic abnormalities in acute olanzapine poisonings].

    PubMed

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic used for many years in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Poisonings with this medicine can results with cardiotoxic effects in the form of ECG abnormalities. To evaluate the nature and incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with acute olanzapine poisoning. 23 adult (mean age 38.4 +/- 15.5 years) patients with acute olanzapine poisoning, including 10 men (30.4 +/- 8.1 years) and 11 women (45.7 +/- 17.2 years), where 1 man and 1 woman were poisoned twice. The toxic serum level of olanzapine (above 100 ng/mL) was confirmed in each patient. Evaluation of electrocardiograms performed in patients in the first day of hospitalization with automatic measurement of durations of PQ, QRS and QTc and the identification of arrhythmias and conduction disorders on the basis of visual analysis of the ECG waveforms. Statistical analysis of the results using the methods of descriptive statistics. The mean durations of PQ, QRS and QTc in the study group were as follows: 135 +/- 23 ms, 91 +/- 12 ms, and 453 +/- 48 ms, respectively. The most common ECG abnormalities were prolonged QTc and supraventricular tachycardia (including sinus tachycardia) - each 22%; less common were ST-T changes (17%) and supraventricular premature complexes (9%), and only in individual cases (4%) ventricular premature complexes, bundle branch block, sinus bradycardia and atrial fibrillation were present. In the course of acute olanzapine poisonings: (1) prolonged QTc interval is quite common, but rarely leads to torsade de pointes tachycardia; (2) fast supraventricular rhythms are also common, but rarely cause irregular tachyarrhythmias, eg. atrial fibrillation; (3) conduction disorders (atrioventricular blocks, bundle branch blocks) are not typical abnormalities; (4) the observed ECG abnormalities emphasize the need of continuous ECG monitoring in these patients.

  4. Influence of P300 latency jitter on event related potential-based brain-computer interface performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, P.; Aloise, F.; Schettini, F.; Salinari, S.; Mattia, D.; Cincotti, F.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Several ERP-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that can be controlled even without eye movements (covert attention) have been recently proposed. However, when compared to similar systems based on overt attention, they displayed significantly lower accuracy. In the current interpretation, this is ascribed to the absence of the contribution of short-latency visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in the tasks performed in the covert attention modality. This study aims to investigate if this decrement (i) is fully explained by the lack of VEP contribution to the classification accuracy; (ii) correlates with lower temporal stability of the single-trial P300 potentials elicited in the covert attention modality. Approach. We evaluated the latency jitter of P300 evoked potentials in three BCI interfaces exploiting either overt or covert attention modalities in 20 healthy subjects. The effect of attention modality on the P300 jitter, and the relative contribution of VEPs and P300 jitter to the classification accuracy have been analyzed. Main results. The P300 jitter is higher when the BCI is controlled in covert attention. Classification accuracy negatively correlates with jitter. Even disregarding short-latency VEPs, overt-attention BCI yields better accuracy than covert. When the latency jitter is compensated offline, the difference between accuracies is not significant. Significance. The lower temporal stability of the P300 evoked potential generated during the tasks performed in covert attention modality should be regarded as the main contributing explanation of lower accuracy of covert-attention ERP-based BCIs.

  5. Prevalence and consequences of chromosomal abnormalities in Canadian commercial swine herds.

    PubMed

    Quach, Anh T; Revay, Tamas; Villagomez, Daniel A F; Macedo, Mariana P; Sullivan, Alison; Maignel, Laurence; Wyss, Stefanie; Sullivan, Brian; King, W Allan

    2016-09-12

    Structural chromosome abnormalities are well known as factors that reduce fertility rate in domestic pigs. According to large-scale national cytogenetic screening programs that are implemented in France, it is estimated that new chromosome abnormalities occur at a rate of 0.5 % in fertility-unproven boars. This work aimed at estimating the prevalence and consequences of chromosome abnormalities in commercial swine operations in Canada. We found pig carriers at a frequency of 1.64 % (12 out of 732 boars). Carrier pigs consistently showed lower fertility values. The total number of piglets born for litters from carrier boars was between 4 and 46 % lower than the herd average. Similarly, carrier boars produced litters with a total number of piglets born alive that was between 6 and 28 % lower than the herd average. A total of 12 new structural chromosome abnormalities were identified. Reproductive performance is significantly reduced in sires with chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of such abnormal sires appears relatively high in populations without routine cytogenetic screening such as observed for Canada in this study. Systematic cytogenetic screening of potential breeding boars would minimise the risk of carriers of chromosome aberrations entering artificial insemination centres. This would avoid the large negative effects on productivity for the commercial sow herds and reduce the risk of transmitting abnormalities to future generations in nucleus farms.

  6. A robust real-time abnormal region detection framework from capsule endoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yanfen; Liu, Xu; Li, Huiping

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel method to detect abnormal regions from capsule endoscopy images. Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) is a recent technology where a capsule with an embedded camera is swallowed by the patient to visualize the gastrointestinal tract. One challenge is one procedure of diagnosis will send out over 50,000 images, making physicians' reviewing process expensive. Physicians' reviewing process involves in identifying images containing abnormal regions (tumor, bleeding, etc) from this large number of image sequence. In this paper we construct a novel framework for robust and real-time abnormal region detection from large amount of capsule endoscopy images. The detected potential abnormal regions can be labeled out automatically to let physicians review further, therefore, reduce the overall reviewing process. In this paper we construct an abnormal region detection framework with the following advantages: 1) Trainable. Users can define and label any type of abnormal region they want to find; The abnormal regions, such as tumor, bleeding, etc., can be pre-defined and labeled using the graphical user interface tool we provided. 2) Efficient. Due to the large number of image data, the detection speed is very important. Our system can detect very efficiently at different scales due to the integral image features we used; 3) Robust. After feature selection we use a cascade of classifiers to further enforce the detection accuracy.

  7. Pigmentary retinopathy associated with the mitochondrial DNA 3243 point mutation.

    PubMed

    Sue, C M; Mitchell, P; Crimmins, D S; Moshegov, C; Byrne, E; Morris, J G

    1997-10-01

    Fourteen patients from four unrelated families were studied to determine the prevalence of retinal pigmentary abnormalities associated with the MELAS A to G 3243 point mutation. Neurologic and ophthalmic examinations, retinal photography, pattern shift visual evoked potentials, and electroretinography were performed in all patients. Eight of the 14 patients had retinal pigmentary abnormalities characterized by symmetric areas of depigmentation involving predominantly the posterior pole and midperipheral retina. None of the patients had optic atrophy and only one patient with pigmentary retinal abnormalities had impaired visual acuity. None of the diabetic subjects (n = 6) had signs of diabetic retinopathy. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated mottled hyper- and hypofluorescent areas indicating multiple window defects in the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Visual evoked potentials showed delayed P100 responses in four of the eight patients with retinal pigmentary abnormalities. We conclude that there is a high prevalence of retinal pigmentary abnormalities in patients with MELAS A to G 3243 point mutation. These abnormalities are usually asymptomatic and best detected by retinal photography.

  8. Assessment and Development of Oculomotor Flying Skills by the Application of the Channel Theory of Vision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-04

    visual acuity in amblyopia , using steady-state visual evoked potentials. In J. E. Desmedt (Ed.), Visual evoked potentials in man: new developments... amblyopia by the evoked potential method. Ophthalmologica, 1977s 175, 159-164. 61. Regan, D. & Spekreijse, H. Auditory-visual interactions and the

  9. Evaluation of central nervous system in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Yusuf; Gürakan, Figen; Saltık Temizel, İnci Nur; Demir, Hülya; Oğuz, Kader Karlı; Yalnızoğlu, Dilek; Topçu, Meral; Özen, Hasan; Yüce, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate structure and functions of central nervous system (CNS) in children with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a. Neurological examination, psychometric tests, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) were performed. The results were compared between patients with good and poor metabolic control and healthy children. Twenty-three patients with GSD type 1a were studied. Twelve patients were in poor metabolic control group and 11 patients in good metabolic control group. Five patients had intellectual disability, 10 had EEG abnormalities, seven had abnormal VEP and two had abnormal BAEP results. MRI was abnormal in five patients. There was significant correlation between the number of hypoglycemic attacks and MRI abnormalities. Central nervous system may be affected in GSD type 1a even in patients with normal neurologic examination. Accumulation of abnormal results in patients with poor metabolic control supports the importance of metabolic control in GSD type 1a.

  10. Pregnancy outcomes among patients with recurrent pregnancy loss and uterine anatomic abnormalities.