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Sample records for abnormal wall motion

  1. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  2. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated with different manifestations of transient abnormal left ventricular wall motion: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Fumitaka; Tsuzuki, Takashi; Thoma, Yoshiki; Shiono, Shigeru; Tabuse, Hisayuki; Hoshida, Thoru; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-01

    Two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient abnormal left ventricular wall motion. Case 1 was a 56-year-old man. Electrocardiography showed ST segment elevation in leads I, II, II, aVL, aVF, V3-V6. Echocardiography showed localized left ventricular hypokinesis around the apical area (takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy). Ejection fraction was 20% (1st hospital day). Troponin T was positive. Case 2 was a 48-year-old woman. Electrocardiography showed ST segment elevation in leads I, aVL, V2-V6 and ST segment depression in leads II, III, aVF, V1. Echocardiography showed diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis. Ejection fraction was 21% (1st hospital day). Troponin T was positive. These two patients had no history of cardiac disease, and coronary angiography showed no stenosis or obstruction. Catecholamine was given for 1 day(Case 1) and for about 2 weeks (Case 2). Pimobendane was given to Case 2. Ejection fraction was 57% in Case 1 (2nd hospital day) and 33% (6th hospital day), 43% (7th hospital day)and 58% (16th hospital day)in Case 2. The recovery period of left ventricular abnormal wall motion and the medication period were longer in Case 2 showing diffuse hypokinesis than in Case 1 showing takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy. PMID:16764331

  3. Infarct-induced wall motion abnormalities in aortocoronary bypass patients: Correlation with electrocardiographic, enzymatic, and scintigraphic diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Depuey, E. Gordon; Mathur, Virendra; Hall, Robert J.; Burdine, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Gated isotope ventriculograms performed 7 to 12 days postoperatively in 50 aortocoronary bypass patients with perioperative myocardial infarction (POMI) were compared with preoperative contrast ventriculograms. The diagnosis of POMI was based on serial electrocardiograms (EKGs), cardiac enzyme studies, and 99mTc-pyrophosphate (PYP) scintigraphy. Seven patients exhibited no new regional wall motion abnormalities. Nine had new areas of localized hypokinesis. The remaining 34 demonstrated localized akinesis or dyskinesis; 12 of these also exhibited a greater than 20% decrease in ejection fraction. The severity of the postoperative wall motion abnormality was paralleled by the intensity of PYP accumulation but not necessarily by the degree of cardiac enzyme elevation. Because they occurred in only 62% of patients, new Q waves were considered an insensitive indicator of POMI. Our study revealed that POMI frequently produces significant changes in left ventricular kinetics. Of the standard techniques utilized, the PYP scan had the greatest predictive value. Images PMID:15216241

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Regional Wall Motion Abnormalities Using Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Intravenous Ventriculography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, Cynthia H.

    Healthy portions of the left ventricle (LV) can often compensate for regional dysfunction, thereby masking regional disease when global indices of LV function are employed. Thus, quantitation of regional function provides a more useful method of assessing LV function, especially in diseases that have regional effects such as coronary artery disease. This dissertation studied the ability of a phase -matched dual-energy digital subtraction angiography (DE -DSA) technique to quantitate changes in regional LV systolic volume. The potential benefits and a theoretical description of the DE imaging technique are detailed. A correlated noise reduction algorithm is also presented which raises the signal-to-noise ratio of DE images by a factor of 2 -4. Ten open-chest dogs were instrumented with transmural ultrasonic crystals to assess regional LV function in terms of systolic normalized-wall-thickening rate (NWTR) and percent-systolic-thickening (PST). A pneumatic occluder was placed on the left-anterior-descending (LAD) coronary artery to temporarily reduce myocardial blood flow, thereby changing regional LV function in the LAD bed. DE-DSA intravenous left ventriculograms were obtained at control and four levels of graded myocardial ischemia, as determined by reductions in PST. Phase-matched images displaying changes in systolic contractile function were created by subtracting an end-systolic (ES) control image from ES images acquired at each level of myocardial ischemia. The resulting wall-motion difference signal (WMD), which represents a change in regional systolic volume between the control and ischemic states, was quantitated by videodensitometry and compared with changes in NWTR and PST. Regression analysis of 56 data points from 10 animals shows a linear relationship between WMD and both NWTR and PST: WMD = -2.46 NWTR + 13.9, r = 0.64, p < 0.001; WMD = -2.11 PST + 18.4, r = 0.54, p < 0.001. Thus, changes in regional ES LV volume between rest and ischemic states, as

  5. Correlation between echocardiographic endocardial surface mapping of abnormal wall motion and pathologic infarct size in autopsied hearts.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, G T; Southern, J F; Choong, C Y; Thomas, J D; Fallon, J T; Guyer, D E; Weyman, A E

    1988-05-01

    We previously developed a cross-sectional echocardiographic technique for quantitatively mapping the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and on which regions of abnormal wall motion can be superimposed in their correct spatial distribution. This endocardial mapping technique (EMT) provides a measure of the left ventricular endocardial surface area (ESA in cm2), the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM in cm2), and the overall percent dysfunction (%AWM) as a measure of the functional "infarct size." To test this approach, we compared the EMT measurements with the actual endocardial surface area (in cm2) and pathologic infarct size (both percent infarct by volume and percent endocardial surface overlying infarct) measured at later autopsy in 20 adults (14 men, six women) ranging in age from 47 to 76 years (mean 64 +/- 9.6 years). The median interval from echocardiographic study to death was 19 days (range 1 to 269 days). Patients were divided into two groups based on the age of their infarcts at the time of death: (1) recent (infarct age less than 14 days; mean age 5.3 +/- 4.6 days) and (2) old (infarct age greater than 6 months; mean age 3.6 +/- 3 years). When the left ventricular endocardial surface area at autopsy was compared with the EMT-derived ESA, a close correlation was found (EMT area = 1.17 X autopsy area + 20.4; r = .94, p = .0001), with the systematic difference in the measurements accounted for by systolic arrest, loss of distending pressure, and specimen shrinkage. The echocardiographic measure of infarct size (%AWM) correlated well with the autopsy percent infarction by volume (%AWM = 1.1 X infarct volume + 5.5; r = .82, p = .0001). Similarly, a good correlation was found for the percent abnormal wall motion and the autopsy percent endocardial surface area overlying infarction (%AWM = 0.89 X infarct area - 0.9; r = .89, p = .0001). When the data were examined in relation to the age of the myocardial infarct, the echocardiographic %AWM appeared to

  6. Contrast echocardiography in acute myocardial ischemia. III. An in vivo comparison of the extent of abnormal wall motion with the area at risk for necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kaul, S; Pandian, N G; Gillam, L D; Newell, J B; Okada, R D; Weyman, A E

    1986-02-01

    To define the in vivo relation between abnormal wall motion and the area at risk for necrosis after acute coronary occlusion, 11 open chest dogs were studied. Five dogs underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and six underwent left circumflex artery occlusion. Area at risk was defined at five short-axis levels (mitral valve, chordal, high and low papillary muscle and apex) using myocardial contrast echocardiography. Wall motion was measured in the cycles preceding injection of contrast medium. Two observers used two different methods to measure wall motion. In method A, end-diastolic to end-systolic fractional radial change for each of 32 endocardial targets was determined. The extent of abnormal wall motion was then calculated using three definitions of wall motion abnormality: akinesia/dyskinesia, fractional inward endocardial excursion of less than 10%, and fractional inward endocardial excursion of less than 20%. In method B, the information from the entire systolic contraction sequence was analyzed and correlated with a normal contraction pattern. The best linear correlation between area at risk (AR) and abnormal wall motion (AWM) was achieved using method B and expressed by the following linear regression: AWM = 0.92 AR + 3.0 (r = 0.92, p less than 0.0001, SEE = 1.7%). Of the three definitions of abnormality used in method A, the best correlation was achieved between area at risk and less than 10% inward endocardial excursion and was expressed by the following polynomial regression: AWM = -0.01 AR2 + 1.5 AR -0.14 (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001, SEE = 1.7%). These data demonstrate that there is a definite relation between area at risk and abnormal wall motion but that this relation varies depending on the method used to analyze wall motion. However, wall motion during acute ischemia is also influenced by the loading conditions of the heart. Because these may vary in a manner that is independent of the ischemic process, measurement of both

  7. A simulation of three-dimensional systolic flow dynamics in a spherical ventricle: effects of abnormal wall motion.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Schoephoerster, R T

    1996-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricle (LV) wall motion induced by ischemia will affect flow dynamics, and these altered flow fields can be used to evaluate LV pumping efficiency. LV chamber flow fields were obtained in this study by solving the discretized three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for viscous, incompressible unsteady flow by using the finite analytic method. Several cases of abnormal wall motion (AWM) were simulated by a manipulation of the boundary conditions to produce regions of hypokinesis, akinesis, and dyskinesis. These solutions were used to determine the central ejection region (CER), defined as the region of flow domain in which the obtained velocity field vectors are aligned +/- 3 degrees from the LV long axis. A CER coefficient was computed from information on the location and orientation of the CER within the LV cavity. Contraction of the spherical ventricle produced a vector field that was symmetric with respect to the long axis. For the simulations of AWM, an asymmetrical flow pattern developed, became more pronounced with increasing severity of AWM, and resulted in a shorter CER that shifted toward the ischemic region. The CER coefficients decreased monotonically with increased severity in AWM from 0.948 in the normal case to a low of 0.164 for the most severe case of AWM. The CER coefficient quantitatively displayed the sensitivity of the flow patterns to even moderate degrees of hypokinesis. In addition, visualization of the three-dimensional flow field reinforced the necessity of three-dimensional simulations to capture aspects of the flow that existing methods of two-dimensional flow imaging that use ultrasound may miss. PMID:8669717

  8. [Wall motion abnormalities and hemodynamic parameters in patients with left bundle branch block during exercise echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Dupliakov, D V; Vozhdaeva, Z I; Sysuenkova, E V; Zemlianova, M E; Lotina, A S; Goleva, S V; Svetlakova, A P; Khokhlunov, S M

    2011-01-01

    Study aim was to investigate dynamics of local contractility and hemodynamic parameters during exercise stress echocardiography (EEcho) in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). We examined 23 patients (15 men, 8 women) aged 48-65 years (mean age 53.9+/-8.1 years). Bicycle EEcho was accomplished according to standard protocol. Patients without clinical signs of ischemic heart disease (n=11) comprised group 1, patients after myocardial infarction (n=12) - group 2 (subgroup 2A - with negative test result, subgroup 2B - with worsening of local left ventricular contractility during EEcho). At baseline group 1 patients had significantly better hemodynamic parameters (ejection fraction - EF, left ventricular end diastolic volume - LVEDV) and no abnormalities of local contractility. Exercise tolerance was also the highest in this group. Insignificant worsening of postexercise EF occurred in patients of subgroup 2B (from 46+/-10.5 to 44,2+/-9.4%). In group 1 EF significantly increased (from 56.8+/-10.5% to 64.7+/-15.4%, <0.05), in subgroup 2A tendency to EF increase up to 48.7+/-9.9% was registered. Lowering of local contractility abnormalities index was noted also only in patients of subgroup 2B (from 1.54+/-0.4 to 2.17+/-0.37 (p<0.01). LVEDV compared with initial values tended to decrease in both groups (however differences between groups were not significant). Positive echocardiographic response was associated with significant changes of transmitral blood flow. Angiographically clean coronary arteries were found in 8 of 10 patients in group 1. Six group 2 patients with history of typical clinical picture of angina and myocardial infarction) had multivessel lesions in coronary vascular bed. EEcho result was positive in 5 of 6 group 2 patients. Thus EEcho possesses high potential for diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with LBBB. This allows recommending it as a first line method in patients with this pathology. PMID:21623720

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting high risk coronary artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a high-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were categorized into three groups: (1) without CAD as normal (n=59), (2) 1- or 2-vessel disease as low-risk (n=29), and (3) left main and/or 3-vessel disease as high-risk (n=31). The peaks of systolic strain and strain rate from 18 curves of apical views were averaged as global longitudinal strain and strain rate (GLS and GLSR), respectively; the 6 systolic peaks of strain and strain rate at base- and mid-ventricular of short axis views were averaged as mean radial strain rate (MRSR). Results: GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of left ventricle were significantly lower in the high-risk group (P=0.047, P=0.004 and P=0.030, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics curve showed that the optimal values of GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR for detecting the severe CAD were -17%, -1 s-1, and 1.45 s-1 with the sensitivities of 77%, 71%, and 71% and the specificities of 63%, 67%, and 62%, respectively. Conclusion: Decrements in the GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of the left ventricle can detect the high-risk CAD cases among patients without RWMA at rest. PMID:26309603

  10. Abnormal behaviors detection using particle motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Feiyang; Yuan, Ding; You, Yuhu

    2015-03-01

    Human abnormal behaviors detection is one of the most challenging tasks in the video surveillance for the public security control. Interaction Energy Potential model is an effective and competitive method published recently to detect abnormal behaviors, but their model of abnormal behaviors is not accurate enough, so it has some limitations. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel Particle Motion model. Firstly, we extract the foreground to improve the accuracy of interest points detection since the complex background usually degrade the effectiveness of interest points detection largely. Secondly, we detect the interest points using the graphics features. Here, the movement of each human target can be represented by the movements of detected interest points of the target. Then, we track these interest points in videos to record their positions and velocities. In this way, the velocity angles, position angles and distance between each two points can be calculated. Finally, we proposed a Particle Motion model to calculate the eigenvalue of each frame. An adaptive threshold method is proposed to detect abnormal behaviors. Experimental results on the BEHAVE dataset and online videos show that our method could detect fight and robbery events effectively and has a promising performance.

  11. Intraventricular flow alterations due to dyssynchronous wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Audrey M.; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Roughly 30% of patients with systolic heart failure suffer from left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD), in which mechanical discoordination of the ventricle walls leads to poor hemodynamics and suboptimal cardiac function. There is currently no clear mechanistic understanding of how abnormalities in septal-lateral (SL) wall motion affects left ventricle (LV) function, which is needed to improve the treatment of LVD using cardiac resynchronization therapy. We use an experimental flow phantom with an LV physical model to study mechanistic effects of SL wall motion delay on LV function. To simulate mechanical LVD, two rigid shafts were coupled to two segments (apical and mid sections) along the septal wall of the LV model. Flow through the LV model was driven using a piston pump, and stepper motors coupled to the above shafts were used to locally perturb the septal wall segments relative to the pump motion. 2D PIV was used to examine the intraventricular flow through the LV physical model. Alterations to SL delay results in a reduction in the kinetic energy (KE) of the flow field compared to synchronous SL motion. The effect of varying SL motion delay from 0% (synchronous) to 100% (out-of-phase) on KE and viscous dissipation will be presented. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  12. An arterial wall motion test phantom for the evaluation of wall motion software.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Steven J; Dineley, Judith; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2007-09-01

    Increasing cardiovascular disease has led to new ultrasound methods of assessing artery disease such as arterial wall motion measurement. To validate arterial wall motion software, we developed a mechanically-controlled wall motion test phantom with straight upper and lower agar tissue mimicking material layers that resemble an artery cross section. The wall separation, displacements and wall velocities and accelerations can be controlled within physiologically realistic levels. A user-definable displacement or one of several pre-defined displacement waveforms can be created by the user with custom-written software. The test phantom is then controlled using the defined waveform with a stepper motor controller. Accuracy assessment of the test phantom with a laser vibrometer yielded a positional accuracy of 36+/-2 microm. A typical application of the test phantom is demonstrated by assessing a tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) method for estimating the distension waveform. The TDI-based method was found to have a minimum resolvable displacement of 22.5 microm, and a measurement accuracy of +/-8% using a physiological wall motion movement with a peak displacement of 689 microm. The accuracy of the TDI method was found to decrease with decreasing wall displacement and increasing wall velocity. PMID:17587485

  13. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Shannon P; Zahid, Maliha J; Durkin, John R; Francis, Richard J; Lo, Cecilia W; Chennubhotla, S Chakra

    2015-08-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a "black box" toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  14. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Shannon P.; Zahid, Maliha J.; Durkin, John R.; Francis, Richard J.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra

    2016-01-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a “black box” toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  15. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  16. Echocardiographic abnormalities of tricuspid valve motion in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, T; Tanimoto, M; Yamamoto, T; Makihata, S; Kawai, Y; Yorifuji, S

    1982-01-01

    Echocardiographic findings in five patients with pulmonary embolism were studied. Tricuspid echocardiograms showed abnormalities in valve motion, that is a monophasic triangular wave during diastole in all the patients as well as an increased dimension of the right ventricle. An "a' dip of the pulmonary valve echocardiogram was also recognised in all five. Later tricuspid echocardiograms regained the normal M-shaped configuration. The monophasic triangular pattern of the tricuspid valve during diastole may be related to the shorter duration of tricuspid valve opening compared with that of the mitral valve. Tachycardia cannot explain this difference between tricuspid and mitral valve motion, which seems to be caused by a prolonged isovolumic relaxation time of the right ventricle resulting in a delayed opening of the tricuspid valve. These results were obtained by comparing these data with those of control subjects and patients with chronic right ventricular overloading resulting from atrial septal defect. Images PMID:7073906

  17. Echocardiographic abnormalities of tricuspid valve motion in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Tanimoto, M; Yamamoto, T; Makihata, S; Kawai, Y; Yorifuji, S

    1982-05-01

    Echocardiographic findings in five patients with pulmonary embolism were studied. Tricuspid echocardiograms showed abnormalities in valve motion, that is a monophasic triangular wave during diastole in all the patients as well as an increased dimension of the right ventricle. An "a' dip of the pulmonary valve echocardiogram was also recognised in all five. Later tricuspid echocardiograms regained the normal M-shaped configuration. The monophasic triangular pattern of the tricuspid valve during diastole may be related to the shorter duration of tricuspid valve opening compared with that of the mitral valve. Tachycardia cannot explain this difference between tricuspid and mitral valve motion, which seems to be caused by a prolonged isovolumic relaxation time of the right ventricle resulting in a delayed opening of the tricuspid valve. These results were obtained by comparing these data with those of control subjects and patients with chronic right ventricular overloading resulting from atrial septal defect. PMID:7073906

  18. Three dimensional quantification of left ventricular wall motion by ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Laming, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Ell, P.J.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1985-05-01

    ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography is a relatively new technique, and this study establishes a simple method for displaying the three dimensional data obtained, determines a normal range for ejection fraction in all regions of the left ventricle, and compares wall motion in abnormal subjects with that determined by X-ray contrast ventriculography. The short axis sections dividing the ventricle in slices from apex to base, were used to calculate ejection fraction for all parts of the ventricle and the results were plotted on a single colour coded circular image. The apex was represented in the centre, the base around the circumference, and all other parts of the ventricle were represented in between. The image was divided into 15 segments, and normal segmental ejection fraction was defined as within two standard deviations of the mean in a group of 10 normal subjects. In 25 subjects with coronary artery disease, motion of the anterior, apical, and inferior walls agreed in every case with the right anterior oblique contrast ventriculogram, but in 12 of these, the three dimensional ejection fraction image showed abnormal septal motion, and in a further 3, abnormal lateral wall motion in addition. In the 12 subjects there was disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and in the further 3 there was left circumflex disease. ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography thus provides an accurate quantitative assessment of left ventricular wall motion in three dimensions, and has significant advantages over conventional planar techniques.

  19. New techniques for the assessment of regional left ventricular wall motion.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Bermejo, Javier; Perez-David, Esther; Lopez-Fernandez, Teresa; Ledesma, Maria Jesus; Caso, Pio; Malpica, Norberto; Santos, Andres; Moreno, Mar; Desco, Manuel

    2003-10-01

    The assessment of regional left ventricular (LV) function has been an important yet unresolved problem since the introduction of echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Abnormal regional LV wall motion is an early finding in multiple cardiac pathologies and its diagnosis is of critical importance. In the last few years diagnostic procedures based on combined use of existing echocardiographic technologies were geared toward improving the accuracy of detection of baseline and/or induced regional wall motion abnormalities. One of the assumptions is that the combination of reduced LV wall thickening and reduced myocardial velocities can be used to accurately diagnose regional myocardial dysfunction. In this article we will discuss several new techniques for the quantification of regional LV function using Doppler echocardiography. PMID:14536016

  20. A neural network learned information measures for heart motion abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambakhsh, M. S.; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Goela, Aashish; Islam, Ali; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we propose an information theoretic neural network for normal/abnormal left ventricular motion classification which outperforms significantly other recent methods in the literature. The proposed framework consists of a supervised 3-layer artificial neural network (ANN) which uses hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer functions for hidden and output layers, respectively. The ANN is fed by information theoretic measures of left ventricular wall motion such as Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), Rényi entropy and Fisher information, which measure global information of subjects distribution. Using 395×20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired from 48 subjects, the experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and thresholding based information theoretic classifiers. It yields a specificity equal to 90%, a sensitivity of 91%, and a remarkable Area Under Curve (AUC) for Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), equal to 93.2%.

  1. A diode for ferroelectric domain-wall motion

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, J.R.; Gregg, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    For over a decade, controlling domain-wall injection, motion and annihilation along nanowires has been the preserve of the nanomagnetics research community. Revolutionary technologies have resulted, like racetrack memory and domain-wall logic. Until recently, equivalent research in analogous ferroic materials did not seem important. However, with the discovery of sheet conduction, the control of domain walls in ferroelectrics has become vital for the future of what has been termed ‘domain-wall electronics'. Here we report the creation of a ferroelectric domain-wall diode, which allows a single direction of motion for all domain walls, irrespective of their polarity, under a series of alternating electric field pulses. The diode's sawtooth morphology is central to its function. Domain walls can move readily in the direction in which thickness increases gradually, but are prevented from moving in the other direction by the sudden thickness increase at the sawtooth edge. PMID:26059779

  2. Device transmits rotary motion through hermetically sealed wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. N.

    1964-01-01

    A wobble plate, metal bellows, and two shafts, assembled in a four-section housing, make it possible to transmit rotary motion through a hermetically sealed wall. In operation a rotational torque is developed by the wobble plate.

  3. Radionuclide ventriculography: evaluation of automated and visual methods for regional wall motion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steckley, R.A.; Kronenberg, M.W.; Born, M.L.; Rhea, T.C.; Bateman, J.E.; Rollo, F.D.; Friesinger, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Regional wall motion (RWM) abnormalities are sensitive indicators of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but quantitation of RWM with gated radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) has been limited, particularly in the left anterior oblique (LAO) projection. Regional LV performance was studied in 18 patients undergoing LAO RVG immediately prior to contrast ventriculography (CVG). Wall motion was analyzed by semiautomated and visual methods using several coordinate systems. For semiautomated methods, RVG and CVG wall motion were closely related in the two 90 degrees polar sectors at the apex and posterior wall (r . .85) and in the five 45 degrees polar sectors from midseptum through posterior wall (r . .82). The basal sectors on RVG had weak relationship to CVG, due to adjacent vascular structures. Semiautomated and visual grades for polar sectors on both CVG and RVG were closely related (r . .88- .94). Measured regional wall motion on LAO RVG compared favorably with near-simultaneous CVG in nonoverlapping portions of the LV and allowed objective quantitation of regional LV performance.

  4. Radionuclide ventriculography: evaluation of automated and visual methods for regional wall motion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steckley, R.A.; Kronenberg, M.W.; Born, M.L.; Rhea, T.C.; Bateman, J.E.; Rollo, F.D.; Friesinger, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Regional wall motion (RWM) abnormalities are sensitive indicators of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but quantitation of RWM with gated radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) has been limited, particularly in the left anterior oblique (LAO) projection. Regional LV performance was studied in 18 patients undergoing LAO RVG immediately prior to contrast ventriculography (CVG). Wall motion was analyzed by semiautomated and visual methods using several coordinate systems. For semiautomated methods, RVG and CVG wall motion were closely related in the two 90/sup 0/ polar sectors at the apex and posterior wall r = .850 and in the five 45/sup 0/ polar sectors from midseptum through posterior wall (r = .82). The basal sectors on RVG had weak relationships to CVG, due to adjacent vascular structures. Semiautomated and visual grades for polar sectors on both CVG and RVG were closely related (r = .88-.94). Measured regional wall motion on LAO RVG compared favorably with near-simultaneous CVG in nonoverlapping portions of the LV and allowed objective quantitation of regional LV performance.

  5. Acute Beta Blockade at Peak Stress: Will It Alter the Sensitivity of Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography in Patients with Normal Resting Wall Motion?

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Salam, Zainab; Ghazy, Mohamed; Khaled, Mohamed; Nammas, Wail

    2016-01-01

    Background We compared the accuracy of recovery phase images following administration of intravenous propranolol with peak stress images, for detection of coronary artery disease in patients with no resting wall motion abnormalities undergoing dobutamine stress echocardiography. Methods We enrolled 100 consecutive patients with no resting wall motion abnormalities who underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography. Propranolol was injected after termination of dobutamine infusion. Positive peak stress images were defined as the induction of wall motion abnormalities at any stage before propranolol injection. Positive recovery phase images were defined as maintenance or worsening of wall motion abnormalities induced at peak stress, or the appearance of new wall motion abnormalities during recovery phase. Significant coronary stenosis was defined as ≥ 50% obstruction of ≥ 1 sizable artery by coronary angiography. Results Seventy-two patients (72%) had significant coronary artery disease. Analysis of peak stress images revealed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 80.6%, 85.7%, 93.5%, and 63.2%; the overall accuracy was 82%. Analysis of the recovery phase images revealed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 91.7%, 75%, 90.4%, and 77.8%; here, the overall accuracy was 87%. Conclusions In patients with no resting wall motion abnormalities, acute beta blockade during dobutamine stress echocardiography improved the sensitivity of recovery phase images for detection of significant coronary artery disease versus peak stress images, but with reduced specificity. PMID:27122936

  6. Motion of a viscous fluid and a wall in the presence of a stationary wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennitskii, V. L.

    2016-03-01

    The problem of damping motion of a hydromechanical system consisting of a viscous fluid and its bounding rigid walls is solved. A condition under which there is an abrupt deceleration of the hydromechanical system is determined.

  7. Rising motion of a bubble layer near a vertical wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2015-11-01

    Bubbly flows in vertical pipes and channels form a wall-peak distribution of bubbles under certain conditions. The dynamics of the bubbles near the wall is different than in an unbounded liquid. Here we report the rising motion of bubbles in a liquid near a vertical wall. In a simulation of a bubbly flow in a periodic domain with a vertical wall on one side, an average pressure gradient is applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in a shear flow which is in turn generated by rising motion of bubbles. The rise velocity of the bubbles on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Eotvos number, and the average volume fraction of bubbles near the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented.

  8. Magnetic domain wall motion by spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Nguyen van Dau, F.; Fert, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The discovery that a spin polarized current can exert a large torque on a ferromagnet through a transfusion of spin angular momentum, offers a new way to control a magnetization by simple current injection, without the help of an applied external field. Spin transfer can be used to induce magnetization reversals and oscillations, or to control the position of a magnetic domain wall. In this review, we focus on this last mechanism, which is today the subject of an extensive research, both because the microscopic details for its origin are still debated, but also because promising applications are at stake for non-volatile magnetic memories.

  9. Current induced domain wall motion: Analysis and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei

    The subject of current induced magnetic reversal has received considerable interest recently due to its attractive property for magnetic nanodevice applications. In this thesis, 3D simulations are performed to study current induced magnetic domain motion in magnetic nanostrips and nanowires based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert model with a spin transfer torque. For sufficiently thin strips and wires, the LLG equation can be reduced to a one dimensional model. For the simplified models, the dynamic laws for the domain wall motion are derived from a matched asymptotic expansion. The results are consistent with the numerical results. We also study the current induced magnetic domain wall motion in magnetic nanostrips with defects. Our numerical results show that when a domain wall passes through a defect, it experiences a strong attracting force. There is a critical current density below which the domain wall will oscillate around the defect and eventually be pinned at the defect. From the asymptotic expansion analysis, we show that the amplitude of this domain wall oscillation can be resonantly amplified by an ac current with proper frequency for the first time. This suggests a way to reduce the critical current for depinning of the domain wall.

  10. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image.

  11. Spontaneous alterations in left ventricular regional wall motion after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Cui, L Q; Wang, M H; Gong, L S; Lesbre, J P

    1990-12-01

    For assessing the relationship between the left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities and the status of residual flow to the infarcted region, the extent of coronary artery disease and one-year outcome, 60 patients with a first transmural, Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI) underwent serial echocardiographic examinations. The abnormal wall motion (AWM) score was calculated, and the cardiac events (death, reinfarction, severe ventricular arrhythmia or congestive heart failure) after discharge were recorded. The AWM score of the infarcted area was higher in patients with total occlusion than in those with subtotal occlusion (anterior MI: 14.6 +/- 2.4 vs 7.2 +/- 2.1; inferior MI: 9.7 +/- 2.1 vs 5.1 +/-1.2, all P less than 0.01). Regional wall motion of the noninfarcted area was preserved in patients with single vessel disease but decreased in those with multivessel disease. In patients who developed cardiac events in follow-up period a higher AWM (16.4 +/- 3.7) was found than in those who did not (8.9 +/- 3.1, P less than 0.05). A score of greater than 13 had a strong prediction of cardiac events after acute MI, with a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 94% and positive predictive accuracy of 88%. PMID:2127245

  12. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  13. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  14. Left ventricle wall motion tracking using curvature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Kambhamettu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents the complete implementation of the new algorithm for tracking points on the left ventricle (LV) surface from volumetric cardiac images. We define the local surface stretching as an additional motion parameter of nonrigid transformation. Stretching is constant at all points on the surface for homothetic motion, or follows a polynomial function of certain order (linear in our implementation) in conformal motion. The wall deformation and correspondence information between successive frames of LV in a heart cycle are considered important in evaluating heart behavior and improved diagnosis. We utilize small motion assumption between consecutive frames, hypothesize all possible correspondences, and compute curvature changes for each hypothesis. The computed curvature change is then compared with the one predicted by conformal motion assumption for hypotheses evaluation. We demonstrate the improved performance of the new algorithm utilizing conformal motion with linear stretching assumption over constant stretching assumption on simulated data. Then, the algorithm is applied to real cardiac (CT) images and the stretching of the LV wall is determined. The data set used in our experiments was provided by Dr. Eric Hoffman at University of Pennsylvania Medical school and consists of 16 volumetric (128 by 128 by 118) images taken through the heart cycle.

  15. Detection of electromotive force induced by domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Geoffrey

    2010-03-01

    A magnetic domain wall can be displaced by current via the transfer of spin angular momentum from conduction electrons to the local magnetization. The capacity of spin-transfer torque to drive domain wall motion is now well established experimentally and theoretically [1], and is a central topic in the growing field of spintronics. This talk will describe the first experimental evidence [2] that the coupling between spin and charge also works in reverse; namely, that a domain wall driven by a field through a stationary electron gas generates an experimentally-detectible voltage. This new spintronic effect [3] was measured by precisely controlling the motion of a single domain wall in a Permalloy nanowire and isolated from other sources using a field modulation scheme to differentiate between the small domain wall-induced voltage and conventional inductive voltages. The domain wall-induced voltage was found to scale in proportion to the driving field magnitude, and its sign depends only on the direction of domain wall motion. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions [2, 4, 5], and will be discussed in terms of a generalized two-dimensional topological framework [2] capable of treating vortex DWs. [4pt] [1] G.S.D. Beach, M. Tsoi, and J.L. Erskine, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1272 (2008). [0pt] [2] S. Yang, G.S.D. Beach, C. Knutson, D. Xiao, Q. Niu, M. Tsoi, and J.L. Erskine, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 067201 (2009). [0pt] [3]. R. McMichael, and M. Stiles, Physics 2, 11 (2009). [0pt] [4] L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 33, 1572 (1986) [0pt] [5] S. E. Barnes and S. Maekawa, Appl. Phys. 89, 122507 (2006).

  16. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles{endash}Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D. C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles-Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present.

  18. Quantification of regional myocardial wall motion by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile tool that also allows comprehensive and accurate measurement of both global and regional myocardial contraction. Quantification of regional wall motion parameters, such as strain, strain rate, twist and torsion, has been shown to be more sensitive to early-stage functional alterations. Since the invention of CMR tagging by magnetization saturation in 1988, several CMR techniques have been developed to enable the measurement of regional myocardial wall motion, including myocardial tissue tagging, phase contrast mapping, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE), and strain encoded (SENC) imaging. These techniques have been developed with their own advantages and limitations. In this review, two widely used and closely related CMR techniques, i.e., tissue tagging and DENSE, will be discussed from the perspective of pulse sequence development and image-processing techniques. The clinical and preclinical applications of tissue tagging and DENSE in assessing wall motion mechanics in both normal and diseased hearts, including coronary artery diseases, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aortic stenosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophies, will be discussed. PMID:25392821

  19. Large-scale motions in a plane wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Jonathan, Latim; Shibani, Bhatt

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic significance of large-scale motions in turbulent boundary layers have been the focus of several recent studies, primarily focussing on canonical flows - zero pressure gradient boundary layers, flows within pipes and channels. This work presents an investigation into the large-scale motions in a boundary layer that is used as the prototypical flow field for flows with large-scale mixing and reactions, the plane wall jet. An experimental investigation is carried out in a plane wall jet facility designed to operate at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ > 1000 , which allows for the development of a significant logarithmic region. The streamwise turbulent intensity across the boundary layer is decomposed into small-scale (less than one integral length-scale δ) and large-scale components. The small-scale energy has a peak in the near-wall region associated with the near-wall turbulent cycle as in canonical boundary layers. However, eddies of large-scales are the dominating eddies having significantly higher energy, than the small-scales across almost the entire boundary layer even at the low to moderate Reynolds numbers under consideration. The large-scales also appear to amplitude and frequency modulate the smaller scales across the entire boundary layer.

  20. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  1. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  2. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  3. Chest wall motion in preterm infants using respiratory inductive plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Warren, R H; Horan, S M; Robertson, P K

    1997-10-01

    Preterm infant tidal breathing may be different from that of healthy full-term infants because of various features of the premature thorax. The purpose of this project was to describe chest wall motion in the preterm infant (gestational age <37 weeks) and compare it with chest wall motion data in a group of healthy, full-term infants. We wanted to use an objective bedside method for assessment with minimal disruption to the infant. The study population consisted of 61 preterm human infants whose mean(+/-sD) postconceptional age at time of study was 35.3+/-2.1 weeks. During the study, the infants were quietly awake in a prone position. Preterm infants had initially been admitted to a level III neonatal intensive care unit for acute management and had been transferred to a step-down area, where they were in stable condition for study. Data were collected with a semiquantitatively calibrated, noninvasive respiratory inductive plethysmograph. Mean(+/-SD) phase angle was significantly greater in preterm infants than in full-term infants (60.6+/-39.8 degrees versus 12.5+/-5.0 degrees, respectively, p < or = 0.0001). The laboured breathing index was significantly greater in preterm infants than in full-term infants (1.35+/-0.35 versus 1.01+/-0.01, respectively, p = 0.001). The ribcage contribution to breathing did not differ significantly between preterm and full-term infants (25.5+/-17.7% versus 36.3+/-14.4%, respectively, p = 0.11). These results indicate a significant increase in the degree of ribcage and abdomen asynchrony in the preterm subjects compared to the full-term infants. Plethysmography provided a time-efficient and objective method of assessing chest wall motion in this fragile population. PMID:9387956

  4. Sustained chiral magnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques under the tilted current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Bin; Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the steady magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques in the heavy-metal/magnet bilayers with perpendicular anisotropy. Based on collective coordinates method and stability analysis, we analyze the effects of tilted current and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the wall. We find that the wall acquires a sustained motion in the high-current regime by deviating the current from the wall track. Also, a persistent motion can be supported by the competition between spin-orbit torques and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in transforming wall type. In the low-current regime, there exist a switching of wall chirality and a reversal of wall motion.

  5. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  6. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  7. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  8. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  9. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  10. The influence of forward speed on ship motions in abnormal waves: Experimental measurements and numerical predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. S.; Hudson, D. A.; Temarel, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ship encounters with abnormal waves are increasingly well documented and it is therefore important to be able to model such encounters in order to assess the risks involved and whether there is a requirement for more stringent design rules.This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the influence of abnormal waves on a vessel travelling with forward speed in irregular seas. The vessel studied in this case is a naval frigate travelling at a range of speeds. To put the motions measured in abnormal waves into context comparisons are made to those in random seas with a variety of significant wave heights, both non-severe and severe. A further objective is to compare experimental measurements with motion predictions from both a two-dimensional linear strip theory and a three-dimensional partly nonlinear seakeeping model.Results demonstrate that abnormal waves may not necessarily be the worst conditions that a ship can encounter. However, accelerations derived from the rigid body motions appear to be in excess of rules values. This has implications for design due to the unexpected nature of abnormal wave occurrence and the consequent likelihood of encountering such a wave at a higher speed (hence in a more severe operating condition) than a random sea of an equivalent height.The three-dimensional partly nonlinear model demonstrates improved agreement with experimental measurements of rigid body motions, compared to the two-dimensional strip theory. It is therefore considered to have greater potential as a design tool for abnormal wave encounters. Further validation with a wide range of sea states and vessel types is required.

  11. Echocardiographic analysis of regional left ventricular wall motion in children after the arterial switch operation for complete transposition of the great arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, M.; Smallhorn, J.F.; Trusler, G.A.; Freedom, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Regional left ventricular wall motion was assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography in 21 patients with complete transposition of the great arteries at a mean of 2.2 years (range 0.3 to 7) after an arterial switch operation. Fourteen patients had undergone a two-stage and seven patients a primary repair. Twenty patients were found to have echocardiographic images adequate for wall motion analysis. The results of these studies were correlated with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scans. Left ventricular wall motion was assessed by measuring regional area change in parasternal and apical views. After planimetry of an end-systolic and an end-diastolic frame, the ventricle was divided into eight equal segments and the percent area change was calculated. Both a fixed reference and a floating system correcting for translation and rotation were applied. The measurements in the patient group were compared with normal age-matched values previously obtained in 55 normal infants and children. Wall motion abnormalities, found in seven patients, were located at the apex in three, at the inferior septum and anterolateral wall in one and the inferior, anterolateral and lateral walls in one patient each. All had a myocardial perfusion defect in a corresponding anatomic location. One patient with a small reversible perfusion defect at the basilar septum had normal regional wall motion. The sensitivity of detecting impairment of myocardial perfusion was 0.95. Wall motion abnormalities were found only in patients who had undergone a two-stage repair. Echocardiographic wall motion analysis can be used as a screening method to identify patients with suspected myocardial ischemia after the arterial switch operation.

  12. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  13. Wall motion in expiratory flow limitation: choke and flutter.

    PubMed

    Webster, P M; Sawatzky, R P; Hoffstein, V; Leblanc, R; Hinchey, M J; Sullivan, P A

    1985-10-01

    Limitation of expiratory airflow from mammalian airways is currently understood to be due to choking at wave speed (S. V. Dawson and E. A. Elliott. J. Appl. Physiol. 43: 498-515, 1977). A critical weakness of the theory is the lack of a mechanism for the dissipation of energy when effort exceeds that needed for maximal flow. We have observed substantial wall motion with flow limitation in a physical model of a trachea. Therefore we have examined a simple two-dimensional mathematical model, designed to approximate the behavior of the physical model of the trachea, to try to identify a relationship between flow limitation and wall oscillation. The model matches wave-speed predictions when only long waves are considered. The model predicts that aerodynamic flutter will occur in the zone of supercritical flow described in wave-speed theory. Aerodynamic flutter in the zone of supercritical flow provides a potential mechanism for the energy dissipation necessary for transition from supercritical to subcritical flow and explains the high-frequency pure tone heard with flow limitation. PMID:4055608

  14. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťibu, Mihai; Lostun, Mihaela; Allwood, Dan A.; Rotǎrescu, Cristian; Atiťoaie, Alexandru; Lupu, Nicoleta; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian; Chiriac, Horia

    2016-05-01

    Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe77.5Si7.5B15 amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB) system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  15. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  16. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  17. Optical Spin-Transfer-Torque-Driven Domain-Wall Motion in a Ferromagnetic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.; Roy, P. E.; Haigh, J. A.; Otxoa, R. M.; Irvine, A. C.; Janda, T.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Wunderlich, J.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation of the position of a domain wall in a dilute magnetic semiconductor, GaMnAsP. Two main contributions are identified. First, photocarrier spin exerts a spin-transfer torque on the magnetization via the exchange interaction. The direction of the domain-wall motion can be controlled using the helicity of the laser. Second, the domain wall is attracted to the hot spot generated by the focused laser. Unlike magnetic-field-driven domain-wall depinning, these mechanisms directly drive domain-wall motion, providing an optical tweezerlike ability to position and locally probe domain walls.

  18. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  19. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  20. Domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin transfer torque through excitation of nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dong, Yulan; Yan, Zhou; Wang, Xi-guang; He, Jun; Guo, Guang-hua

    2016-05-01

    Domain wall dynamics under the joint action of a linearly polarized microwave magnetic field and spin transfer torque was analysed in terms of the domain wall collective coordinates. It was found that a microwave-assisted steady domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin transfer torque can be adequately described by three domain wall collective coordinates. Analytical expression for the domain wall velocity showed that there are two contributions to the steady domain wall motion. One is derived from the nonlinear oscillation of domain wall width excited by the microwave field, and the other is from the heterodyne process between the width oscillation and the microwave field. The former always propels a domain wall to move in the positive direction, which is defined as the direction of the applied current. The latter contribution to the domain wall velocity can be positive or negative, depending on the polarization of the microwave field. The final domain wall velocity is determined by the competition between those two contributions, which indicates that by simply changing the polarization of the microwave field, the direction of the domain wall motion can be reversed. Our analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of domain wall motion can be tuned by selective excitation of nonlinear domain wall dynamics.

  1. Electric-field-controlled suppression of Walker breakdown and chirality switching in magnetic domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Li, You-Quan

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall controlled by an electric field in the presence of the spin flexoelectric interaction. We reveal that this interaction generates an effective spin torque and results in significant changes in the current-driven domain wall motion. In particular, the electric field can stabilize the domain wall motion, leading to strong suppression of the current-induced Walker breakdown and thus allowing a higher maximum wall velocity. We can furthermore use this electric-field control to efficiently switch the chirality of a moving domain wall in the steady regime.

  2. Micromagnetic analysis of current-induced domain wall motion in a bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komine, Takashi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate current-induced domain wall motion in bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) coupling by modeling two body problems for motion equations of domain wall. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling and magnetostatic interactions on current-induced domain wall motion in SAF nanowires was also investigated. By assuming the rigid wall model for translational motion, the interlayer exchange coupling and the magnetostatic interaction between walls and domains in SAF nanowires enhances domain wall speed without any spin-orbit-torque. The enhancement of domain wall speed was discussed by energy distribution as a function of wall angle configuration in bilayer nanowires.

  3. Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Motion Driven by Spin-Orbit Torques.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-08-19

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet-heavy-metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  4. Usefulness of heavy isometric exercise echocardiography for assessing left ventricular wall motion patterns late (> or = 6 months) after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fisman, E Z; Ben-Ari, E; Pines, A; Drory, Y; Motro, M; Kellermann, J J

    1992-11-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the effects of heavy isometric exercise on left ventricular (LV) wall motion patterns in patients who have had myocardial infarction, and to compare heavy isometric exercise with dynamic exercise for competence in eliciting LV wall motion abnormalities at equivalent rate-pressure products. Echocardiography was performed in 42 patients during supine bicycle ergometry and during heavy dynamometer stretching at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Systemic vascular resistance increased from 1,484 to 1,649 dynes s cm-5 (p < 0.05) during isometric exercise, and decreased significantly during dynamic exercise. Wall motion abnormalities or new asynergy were induced by isometric exercise in 120 segments, 107 of which (89%) showed significant stenosis of the perfusing coronary artery. Hypokinesia was the dominant pattern in the range of 76 to 90% narrowing; akinesia was dominant at 91 to 100% narrowing. Wall motion abnormalities were also documented in 13 segments (11%) assumed to be supplied by vessels with nonsignificant stenosis. Dyskinesia, seen in 7% of the segments, was equally distributed between both groups with significant stenosis. Sensitivity and positive predictive value in identifying specific coronary vessel disease was similar for both isometric and dynamic exercise. In conclusion, heavy isometric exercise in patients who have had myocardial infarction induces wall motion abnormalities of a severity proportional to the degree of coronary narrowing. This exercise method is similar to dynamic exercise for ability in identifying obstructions in a specific vessel. Furthermore, when compared at near-equal rate-pressure products, heavy isometric exercise is far superior in sensitivity to dynamic exercise. PMID:1414932

  5. Digital subtraction angiography in the evaluation of left ventricular function and wall motion in man.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Quigley, P J; Gearty, G F

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of digital subtraction angiography in the evaluation of left ventricular function (LVF). LVF was examined in 24 patients by three methods, (a) conventional ventriculography using an intraventricular injection (CLV) of 40 ml of contrast medium, (b) small volume (10-15 ml) left ventriculogram (SVLV) and (c) intravenous injection of 30 ml contrast medium (IVLV). Images were recorded via a conventional image intensifier--TV chain on to video tape and later analysed using a nuclear medicine computer with a digital interface. There was excellent correlation of ejection fraction and wall motion abnormalities between CLV and SVLV methods (r = 0.92 and r = 0.71, respectively) and good correlation between CLV and IVLV methods (r = 0.88 and r = 0.67, respectively). However, only minimal contrast induced premature ventricular contractions were observed in either the SVLV or IVLV methods compared with approximately 60% in the CLV method. Exclusion of studies containing ectopic cardiac cycles considerably improved the correlation between CLV and SVLV (r = 0.97) and between CLV and IVLV methods (r = 0.95). In conclusion, our results indicate that conventional left ventriculography may be replaced by either intravenous or small volume intraventricular methods with little loss of wall motion definition or error in ejection fraction estimation. The less invasive nature of the SVLV and IVLV methods should increase the usefulness of left ventriculography and extend its application to the assessment of left ventricular reserve under stress and during drug intervention. PMID:6207025

  6. Space and motion discomfort and abnormal balance control in patients with anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, R G; Redfern, M S; Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous research suggested that panic disorder with agoraphobia is associated with abnormalities on vestibular and balance function tests. The purpose of this study was to further examine psychiatric correlates of vestibular/balance dysfunction in patients with anxiety disorders and the specific nature of the correlated vestibular abnormalities. The psychiatric variables considered included anxiety disorder versus normal control status, panic disorder versus non-panic anxiety disorder diagnosis, presence or absence of comorbid fear of heights, and degree of space and motion discomfort (SMD). The role of anxiety responses to vestibular testing was also re-examined. Methods 104 subjects were recruited: 29 psychiatrically normal individuals and 75 psychiatric patients with anxiety disorders. Anxiety patients were assigned to four subgroups depending on whether or not they had panic disorder and comorbid fear of heights. SMD and anxiety responses were measured by questionnaires. Subjects were examined for abnormal unilateral vestibular hypofunction on caloric testing indicative of peripheral vestibular dysfunction, asymmetric responses on rotational testing as an indicator of an ongoing vestibular imbalance and balance function using Equitest dynamic posturography as an indicator of balance control. Logistic regression was used to establish the association between the psychiatric variables and vestibular or balance test abnormalities. Results Rotational test results were not significantly related to any of the psychiatric variables. The presence of either panic attacks or fear of heights increased the probability of having caloric hypofunction in a non-additive fashion. SMD and anxiety responses were independently associated with abnormal balance. Among specific posturography conditions, the association with SMD was significant for a condition that involved the balance platform tilting codirectionally with body sway, suggesting an abnormal dependence on

  7. Transient motion of a confined rarefied gas due to wall heating or cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadsworth, Dean C.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Muntz, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    The direct Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the transient motion of a confined rarefied gas as a container wall is rapidly heated or cooled. Results show that, for the rapid wall temperature changes, the gas response is better measured by an acoustic, rather than conduction, timescale, with steady state conditions being achieved after about ten wave crossing times.

  8. Spin-wave-driven high-speed domain-wall motions in soft magnetic nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaehak; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-10-28

    We report on a micromagnetic simulation study of interactions between propagating spin waves and a head-to-head domain wall in geometrically confined magnetic nanotubes. We found that incident spin waves of specific frequencies can lead to sufficiently high-speed (on the order of a few hundreds of m/s or higher) domain-wall motions in the same direction as that of the incident spin-waves. The domain-wall motions and their speed vary remarkably with the frequency and the amplitude of the incident spin-waves. High-speed domain-wall motions originate from the transfer torque of spin waves' linear momentum to the domain wall, through the partial or complete reflection of the incident spin waves from the domain wall. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the spin waves with a domain wall in the magnetic nanotubes as well as a route to all-magnetic control of domain-wall motions in the magnetic nanoelements.

  9. Blood flow and wall motion in an idealized left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Doyle, Matthew; Bourgault, Yves

    2006-11-01

    During diastole of the heart, the left ventricle (LV) expands as a result of both incoming blood flow and wall material relaxation. In this work, we simulate both of these effects, along with the fluid-structure interaction between the blood and the heart wall. As a first step leading to more realistic studies, we approximate the LV by a prolate ellipsoid and the valves by cylindrical tubes. The mitral valve is open, allowing blood to enter the LV, whereas the aortic valve is closed. To account for the effects of muscle fibers in the heart wall, we model the wall as a multi-layered orthotropic linear elastic material with different material properties in the fiber, sheet, and sheet-normal directions within each layer. Results will be presented for this idealized configuration, while simulations of blood flow in realistic canine left and right ventricles are currently underway.

  10. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  11. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  12. Starting solutions for oscillating motions of an Oldroyd-B fluid over a plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Asia; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Masood

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the starting solutions for oscillating motions of an Oldroyd-B fluid between two side walls perpendicular to a plane wall. The expressions for the velocity field and the associated tangential stress at the bottom wall are obtained, presented under integral and series form. These satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. The obtained solutions are graphically analyzed for the variations of interesting flow parameters. In the absence of side walls, all solutions that have been obtained reduce to those corresponding to the motion over an infinite plate. Moreover, the obtained solutions can be specialized to give similar solutions for Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian fluids performing the same motions.

  13. Synchronous precessional motion of multiple domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire by perpendicular field pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June-Seo; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Bisig, André; Krüger, Benjamin; Reeve, Robert M.; Schulz, Tomek; Büttner, Felix; Yoon, Jungbum; You, Chun-Yeol; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Swagten, Henk J. M.; Koopmans, Bert; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storage and logic devices based on magnetic domain wall motion rely on the precise and synchronous displacement of multiple domain walls. The conventional approach using magnetic fields does not allow for the synchronous motion of multiple domains. As an alternative method, synchronous current-induced domain wall motion was studied, but the required high-current densities prevent widespread use in devices. Here we demonstrate a radically different approach: we use out-of-plane magnetic field pulses to move in-plane domains, thus combining field-induced magnetization dynamics with the ability to move neighbouring domain walls in the same direction. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that synchronous permanent displacement of multiple magnetic walls can be achieved by using transverse domain walls with identical chirality combined with regular pinning sites and an asymmetric pulse. By performing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, we are able to experimentally demonstrate in-plane magnetized domain wall motion due to out-of-plane magnetic field pulses. PMID:24663150

  14. Direct Imaging of Thermally Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Minsheng; Chang, Li-Te; Lang, Murong; Wong, Kin L.; Lewis, Mark; Lin, Yen-Ting; Tang, Jianshi; Cherepov, Sergiy; Zhou, Xuezhi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally induced domain wall motion in a magnetic insulator was observed using spatiotemporally resolved polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The following results were found: (i) the domain wall moves towards hot regime; (ii) a threshold temperature gradient (5K/mm), i.e., a minimal temperature gradient required to induce domain wall motion; (iii) a finite domain wall velocity outside of the region with a temperature gradient, slowly decreasing as a function of distance, which is interpreted to result from the penetration of a magnonic current into the constant temperature region; and (iv) a linear dependence of the average domain wall velocity on temperature gradient, beyond a threshold thermal bias. Our observations can be qualitatively explained using a magnonic spin transfer torque mechanism, which suggests the utility of magnonic spin transfer torque for controlling magnetization dynamics.

  15. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  16. Comparison of Current and Field Driven Domain Wall Motion in Beaded Permalloy Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Enno; Dutta, Sumit; Ross, Caroline A.

    2015-03-01

    Domain wall based devices are promising candidates for non-volatile memory devices with no static power consumption. A common approach is the use of (field assisted) current driven domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires. In such systems local variations in linewidth act as obstacles for propagating domain walls. In this study we compare simulated field driven and current driven domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with anti-notches. The simulations were obtained using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetics Framework (OOMMF). The wires with a constant thickness of 8 nm exhibit linewidths ranging from 40 nm to 300 nm. Circular shaped anti-notches extend the linewidth locally by 10% to 30% and raise information about the domain wall propagation in such beaded nanowires. The results are interpreted in terms of the observed propagation behavior and summarized in maps indicating ranges of different ability to overcome the pinning caused by anti-notches of different sizes. Furthermore, regimes of favored domain wall type (transverse walls or vortex walls) and complex propagation effects like walker breakdown behavior or dynamic change between domain wall structures are identified The authors thank the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for funding.

  17. Fast Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in a Ring-Shaped Nanowire Driven by a Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Momeni, Kasra; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Chen, Lei; Lei, Shiming; Zhang, Shujun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Carman, Gregory P; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic domain-wall motion driven by a voltage dissipates much less heat than by a current, but none of the existing reports have achieved speeds exceeding 100 m/s. Here phase-field and finite-element simulations were combined to study the dynamics of strain-mediated voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion in curved nanowires. Using a ring-shaped, rough-edged magnetic nanowire on top of a piezoelectric disk, we demonstrate a fast voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion with average velocity up to 550 m/s, which is comparable to current-driven wall velocity. An analytical theory is derived to describe the strain dependence of average magnetic domain-wall velocity. Moreover, one 180° domain-wall cycle around the ring dissipates an ultrasmall amount of heat, as small as 0.2 fJ, approximately 3 orders of magnitude smaller than those in current-driven cases. These findings suggest a new route toward developing high-speed, low-power-dissipation domain-wall spintronics. PMID:27002341

  18. Role of resting thallium201 perfusion in predicting coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome in unstable angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.R.; Williams, A.E.; Chisholm, R.J.; Patt, N.L.; Greyson, N.D.; Armstrong, P.W.

    1989-02-01

    We performed quantitative thallium scintigraphy in 66 unstable angina patients, 5.6 +/- 5.1 hours after rest pain, to predict coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome. Thallium defects and/or washout abnormalities were present in 5 of 10 (50%) patients with coronary stenoses less than 50%, 27 of 33 (82%) patients with coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 50% and no history of previous myocardial infarction, and in 23 of 23 patients (100%) with histories of previous infarction. Defects were uncommon in the territory of vessels with less than 50% (13 of 61, 21%), but significantly more common in the territory of vessels with greater than or equal to 50% stenosis (57 of 137, 42%), p less than 0.005. With the addition of washout abnormalities to defect analysis, sensitivity for detection of coronary stenoses improved to 67% (92 of 137), p less than or equal to 0.005, but specificity fell to 59% (36 of 61), p less than 0.01. Segmental wall motion abnormalities were less common in segments with normal perfusion (21%) or in those with washout abnormalities alone (19%), than in segments with thallium defects (45%, p less than 0.005). Defects in patients with previous infarction were common in both segments, with normal (26 of 66, 40%) or abnormal (24 of 45, 53%) wall motion. Eleven of 18 patients with in-hospital cardiac events, but no history of myocardial infarction, had resting thallium defects, whereas only 8 of 25 patients without cardiac event had thallium defect (p = 0.056).

  19. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Purnama, I.; Kerk, I. S.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire. PMID:25736593

  20. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  1. Current-induced 360° domain wall motion with Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chendong; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Chen, Shujun; Song, Chengkun; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-05-01

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) on the static and dynamic characteristics of a 360° domain wall. Simulation results show that both the energy and the size of a 360° domain wall decrease with the increase of DMI intensity. In the presence of DMI, the stable motion of a 360° domain wall can be either along the  +x direction or  ‑x direction depending on the sign of the DMI. For stable motion, the maximum velocity of a 360° domain wall is 19.87% larger than that without the DMI. Increasing the current density beyond the Walker threshold, conversion between the 360° domain wall state and the vortex state was observed. Further increasing the current density, the proliferation of 360° domain walls becomes possible. Moreover, the 360° domain wall becomes more flexible and easier to pass a notch by considering the DMI. These findings may offer guidance for the development of 360° domain wall-based racetrack memories.

  2. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  3. Internal friction due to domain-wall motion in martensitically transformed A15 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Welch, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice instability in A15 materials in some cases leads to a cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformation at low temperatures. The transformed material orients in lamellae with c axes alternately aligned along the <100> directions producing domain walls between the lamellae. An internal-friction (delta) feature below T/sub m/ is attributed to stress-induced domain-wall motion. The magnitude of the friction increases as temperature is lowered below T/sub m/ as (1-c/a) increases, and behaves as (1-c/a)/sup 2/ from T/sub m/ down to the superconducting critical temperature where the increasing tetragonality is inhibited. The effect of strain in the lattice is to decrease the domain-wall internal friction, but not affect T/sub m/. Neutron-induced disorder and the addition of some third-elements in alloying decrease both delta and T/sub m/, with some elements reducing only the former. Less than 1 at. % H is seen to completely suppress both delta and T/sub m. Martensitically transformed V/sub 2/Zr demonstrates low-temperature internal-friction and modulus behavior consists with easy ..beta../m wall motion relative to the easy m/m motion of the A15's. For the V/sub 2/Zr, a peak in delta is observed, qualitatively in agreement with expected ..beta../m wall motion.

  4. Pitching-motion-activated flapping foil near solid walls for power extraction: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Qiu, Y. L.; Shu, C.; Zhao, N.

    2014-08-01

    A numerical investigation on the power extraction of a pitching-motion-activated flapping foil near solid walls is performed by using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method in this study. The flapping motions of the foil include a forced pitching component and an induced plunging component. The foil is placed either near a solid wall or between two parallel plane walls. Compared to previous work on the flapping foil for power extraction, the effect of the walls is first considered in this work. At a Reynolds number of 1100 and with the position of the foil pitching axis at third chord, the influences of the mechanical parameters (such as damping coefficient and spring constant) of the foil, the amplitude and frequency of the pitching motion and the clearance between the foil pitching axis and the wall on the power extraction performance of the flapping foil are systematically evaluated. Compared to the situation of free stream, the power extraction performance of the foil near the wall is improved. For given amplitude and frequency, as the clearance decreases the net power extraction efficiency improves. Moreover, as the foil is placed near one wall, there is a transverse shift to the plunging motion that consequently weakens the improvement of net power extraction efficiency. In contrast, the shift can be significantly eliminated as the foil is placed between two walls, which can further improve the net power extraction efficiency. In addition, it is found that the efficiency improvement is essentially from the increased power extraction, which is due to the generation of high lift force.

  5. Nucleation, imaging, and motion of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, S., Col; Jamet, S.; StaÅo, M.; Trapp, B.; Le Denmat, S.; Cagnon, L.; Toussaint, J. C.; Fruchart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report several procedures for the robust nucleation of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical permalloy nanowires. Specific features of the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) contrast of such wires are discussed, to avoid the misinterpretation of the magnetization states. The domain walls moved under quasistatic magnetic fields in the range 0.1-10 mT, as evidenced by MFM at remanence at different stages of their motion.

  6. Compliant wall surface motion and its effect on the structure of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Balasubramanian, R.; Bushnell, D. M.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The status of the continuing compliant wall drag reduction research at NASA-Langley Research Center is discussed. Preliminary surface motion calculations are reported along with compliant surface design concepts and their numerical models. A compliant drag reduction theory based on stabilizing the turbulent substructure is proposed and previous experiments have been examined relative to that theory. Results of recent low speed compliant surface experiments have been reported which include initial attempts to measure local compliant surface motion.

  7. Vortex motion in wall-bounded viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    A factor of general interest in a broad class of wall-bounded flows is the dynamic evolution of vortical structures through the flow. The structures are three-dimensional, and an overall mathematical description of such entities has not yet been formulated. One of the objectives of the present investigation is concerned with the establishment of a framework, based on first principles, which may form a basis for more detailed analytical studies. Another aim is related to the establishment of boundary and initial conditions in numerical experiments. The mathematical framework employed involves the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and an inner solution field is constructed which consists of a two-dimensional vortical structure. The outer solution field is taken to be an otherwise undisturbed laminar two-dimensional parallel or self-similar viscous flowfield.

  8. Curvature and torsion effects in spin-current driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    The domain wall motion along a helix-shaped nanowire is studied for the case of spin-current driving via the Zhang-Li mechanism. The analysis is based on the collective variable approach. Two effects are ascertained: (i) the curvature results in the appearance of the Walker limit for a uniaxial wire, and (ii) the torsion results in effective shift of the nonadiabatic spin torque parameter β . The latter effect changes considerably the domain wall velocity and can result in negative domain wall mobility. This effect can be also used for an experimental determination of the nonadiabatic parameter β and damping coefficient α .

  9. Experimentally tunable chiral spin transfer torque in domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Domain walls (DWs) can be moved very efficiently with nanosecond long current pulses in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co nanowires formed with platinum under- and over-layers due to a chiral spin torque mechanism. In these structures the DWs exhibit a chiral Néel structure that has been proposed is set by a Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya exchange interaction (DMI) arising from the Pt/Co and Co/Pt interfaces. The strength of this interaction can be measured from the longitudinal field dependence of the current induced DW velocity. We show, thereby, that the magnitude and sign of the DMI is strongly dependent and monotonically changes as small changes in the thicknesses of the Co layers are made. However, due to the chiral nature of the DMI we show that the magnitude and sign of the DMI is determined by the difference between the respective DMI at the upper and lower interfaces, which compensate each other. Thus, we find that the DMI increases as the lower Co thickness is increased but decreases as the upper Co thickness is increased, changing sign in both cases.

  10. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  11. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z Z

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  12. Field-driven domain wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengjun, Zhuo; Zhouzhou, Sun

    Field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We proposed a new trial function and found the exact solution for the DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up the DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of the hard-axis anisotropy, we found that the breakdown field and velocity of the DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. The work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on the DW motion.

  13. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-04-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  14. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  15. Effects of impurity transport and melt layer motion to the tungsten wall erosion during anomaly events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibano, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Lang, T. L.; Togo, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Developing designs of future fusion devices, safety and soundness of the rector at anomaly events must be ensured. A computational approach is being taken by developing a homegrown integrated reactor simulation code and analyzing a loss-of-cooling-gas-puff accident (LCGA). This code currently includes simple plasma, edge, and wall models. In this study, models for the tungsten transport and melt layer motion was added and used for the analysis. It was found that this accident results significant erosion of the wall while impurities from the wall would contribute the radiation cooling for the intense heat flux. However, these effects strongly depend on an uncertain parameter of the tungsten transport as well as the tungsten melt layer motion. Thus, parametric survey for these uncertain quantities were taken and discussed.

  16. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  17. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  18. Near and far-wall effects on the three-dimensional motion of bacteria-driven microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Bio-hybrid microrobots have been heavily studied due to their potential applications as minimally invasive medical microdevices. Though most researchers have focused on two-dimensional and near-wall motion, this letter uses a defocused optical tracking method to quantify the three-dimensional motion of 5 μm diameter polystyrene beads driven by attached Serratia marcescens bacteria. Away from walls the beads trace out helical trajectories, demonstrating kinematics produced by near-constant forces and torques. Near-wall motion is observed to be more stochastic. The motion of beads driven by single bacteria is analyzed in detail, providing an understanding of the forces and torques on the beads.

  19. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  20. Emergence of electromotive force in precession-less rigid motion of deformed domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahpour, Tohid; Darmiani, Narges; Phirouznia, Arash

    2016-08-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the electromotive force (emf) can be induced just by the spin precession where the generation of the electromotive force has been considered as a real-space topological pumping effect. It has been shown that the amount of the electromotive force is independent of the functionality of the localized moments. It was also demonstrated that the rigid domain wall (DW) motion cannot generate electromotive force in the system. Based on real-space topological pumping approach in the current study we show that the electromotive force can be induced by rigid motion of a deformed DW. We also demonstrate that the generated electromotive force strongly depends on the DW bulging. Meanwhile results show that the DW bulging leads to generation of the electromotive force both along the axis of the DW motion and normal to the direction of motion.

  1. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  2. Fluids in micropores. V. Effects of thermal motion in the walls of a slit-micropore

    SciTech Connect

    Diestler, D.J.; Schoen, M.

    1996-05-01

    Previous articles in this series have concerned the prototypal slit-pore with {ital rigid} walls, in which a Lennard-Jones (12,6) monatomic film is constrained between two plane-parallel walls comprising like atoms fixed in the face-centered-cubic (fcc) (100) configuration. The behavior of molecularly thin films in the rigid-wall prototype is governed by the template effect, whereby solid films can form epitaxially when the walls are properly aligned in the lateral directions. In this article the influence of thermal motion of the wall atoms on the template effect is investigated. The walls are treated as Einstein solids, the atoms moving independently in harmonic potentials centered on rigidly fixed equilibrium positions in the fcc (100) configuration. The force constant {ital f}{sub {ital c}} is a measure of the stiffness of the walls, the rigid-wall limit being {ital f}{sub {ital c}}={infinity}. Formal thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses of the system are carried out. The results of grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations indicate that for values of {ital f}{sub {ital c}} characteristic of a soft (e.g., noble-gas) crystal dynamic coupling between wall and film has a substantial influence on such equilibrium properties as normal stress (load) and interfacial tensions. In general, the softer the walls (i.e., the smaller the value of {ital f}{sub {ital c}}), the weaker the template effect and hence the softer and more disordered the confined film. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Dynamic Interplay of Coherent Rotations and Domain Wall Motion in Faraday Rotators based on Ferromagnetic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong; Shinn, Mannix

    Under small, externally-applied magnetic fields, the Faraday rotation in magneto-optic material containing ferromagnetic domains is driven primarily by two principal mechanisms: domain wall motion and coherent domain rotations. Domain wall motion yields a larger Faraday responsivity but is limited by magnetically induced optical incoherence and by damping effects. Coherent domain rotation yields smaller Faraday rotations, but exhibits a flatter and broader frequency response. The two mechanisms occur along orthogonal principal axes and may be probed independently. However, when probed along an oblique angle to the principal axes, the relationship between the Faraday rotation and the external field changes from linear to tensorial. Although this may lead to more complicated phenomena (e.g. a sensitivity axis that depends on RF frequency), the interplay of domain rotation and domain wall motion can be exploited to improve responsivity or bandwidth. The detailed experimental data can be understood in terms of a quantitative model for the magnitude and direction of the responsivity vector. Applications to magnetic field sensors based on arrayed bismuth doped iron garnet films will be emphasized in this presentation.

  4. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  5. Assessment of tissue Doppler imaging measurements of arterial wall motion using a tissue mimicking test rig.

    PubMed

    Thrush, Abigail J; Brewin, Mark P; Birch, Malcolm J

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study is to assess the accuracy of the tissue Doppler imaging arterial wall motion (TDI AWM) technique in measuring dilation over a range of distances and velocities. A test rig, consisting of two parallel blocks of tissue mimicking material (TMM), has been developed to generate known wall motion. One block remains stationary while the other moves in a cyclical motion. A calibrated laser range finder was used to measure the TMM motion. The TDI AWM measurements were found to underestimate the dilation by 21% +/- 4.7% when using the recommended scanner parameters. The size of the error was found to increase with a decrease in ultrasound output power. Results suggested that errors in the TDI AWM dilation measurements relate to underestimates in the velocity measured by the TDI technique. The error demonstrated in this study indicates a limitation in the value of TDI AWM result obtained in vivo. (E-mail: abigail.thrush@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk). PMID:17964065

  6. 90-degree polarization switching in BaTiO3 crystals without domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Scott, J. F.; Fang, D. N.; Li, F. X.

    2013-12-01

    We report 90° polarization switching in a BaTiO3 crystal without domain wall (DW) motion by prefabricating samples with interlocking domains via compression. During electric re-poling of the depoled and aged crystals, 90° domain nucleation still exists, but 90° DW motion is inhibited by the strong constraints from surrounding domains, leading to DW-free 90° polarization switching. The measured coercive field of 500 V/mm for the DW-free 90° switching is close to the intrinsic values and much larger than that of 80 V/mm via 90° DW motion. Compared to the rather difficult domain-free 180° polarization switching in ultrathin films, 90° DW-free switching is easier.

  7. Real-time measurements of local myocardium motion and arterial wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Kanai, H; Koiwa, Y; Zhang, J

    1999-01-01

    We have already developed a new method, namely, the phased tracking method, to track the movement of the heart wall and arterial wall accurately based on both the phase and magnitude of the demodulated signals to determine the instantaneous position of an object. This method has been realized by an off-line measurement system, which cannot be applied to transient evaluation of rapid response of the cardiovascular system to physiological stress. In this paper, therefore, a real-time system to measure change in the thickness of the myocardium and the arterial wall is presented. In this system, an analytic signal from standard ultrasonic diagnostic equipment is analogue-to-digital (A/D) converted at a sampling frequency of 1 MHz. By pipelining and parallel processing using four high-speed digital signal processing (DSP) chips, the method described is realized in real time. The tracking results for both sides of the heart and/or arterial wall are superimposed on the M (motion)-mode image in the work station (WS), and the thickness changes of the heart and/or arterial wall are also displayed and digital-to-analogue (D/A) converted in real time. From the regional change in thickness of the heart wall, spatial distribution of myocardial motility and contractility can be evaluated. For the arterial wall, its local elasticity can be evaluated by referring to the blood pressure. In in vivo experiments, the rapid response of the change in wall thickness of the carotid artery to the dose of the nitroglycerine (NTG) is evaluated. This new real-time system offers potential for quantitative diagnosis of myocardial motility, early stage atherosclerosis, and the transient evaluation of the rapid response of the cardiovascular system to physiological stress. PMID:18244316

  8. Current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with a rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, J. H.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Hu, An; Ding, H. F.

    2011-11-01

    We performed micromagnetic simulations of the current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with rectangular cross-section. In the absence of the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, a threshold current, J{sub c} is required to drive the domain wall moving continuously. We find that J{sub c} is proportional to the maximum cross product of the demagnetization field and magnetization orientation of the domain wall and the domain wall width. With varying both the wire thickness and width, a minimum threshold current in the order of 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} is obtained when the thickness is equivalent to the wire width. With the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, the calculated domain wall velocity {nu} equals to the adiabatic spin transfer velocity u when the current is far above the Walker limit J{sub w}. Below J{sub w}, {nu}=({beta}/{alpha})u, where {beta} is the nonadiabatic parameter and {alpha} is the damping factor. For different {beta}, we find the Walker limit can be scaled as J{sub w}=({alpha}/{beta}-{alpha})J{sub c}. Our simulations agree well with the one dimensional analytical calculation, suggesting the findings are the general behaviors of the systems in this particular geometry.

  9. Relaxation of H/sub 2/ vibrational motion by wall collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.; DeBoni, T.M.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The method of computer molecular dynamics was applied to an important technological problem where experimental data may be extremely difficult to obtain: collisional de-excitation at surfaces of vibrationally highly excited hydrogen molecules. The calculations have been carried out primarily for vibrational states about the v = 6 level. The technique is illustrated by means of a specific example and the detail that can be obtained from such calculations concerning the dynamics of the interaction is shown. Molecular states excited to the v = 4, v = 6, and v = 11 vibrational levels and the J = 1 rotational level have been examined. The translational temperature of the molecules is chosen to be 500/sup 0/K, and the wall is given thermal motion characteristic of a temperature of 500/sup 0/K. Different angles of approach have been studied, and different impact points on the surface have been selected. After the first collision, the impact point becomes random because of the stochastic nature of subsequent molecular trajectories. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrational, rotational, and translational energy. Careful sampling and averaging of the results of many trajectory runs is needed in order to arrive at meaningful conclusions about the probability of de-excitation as a function of such parameters as the number of wall collisions, the residence time, the wall temperature, and the microscopic nature of the wall itself.

  10. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  11. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghui; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  12. A memristor based on current-induced domain-wall motion in a nanostructured giant magnetoresistance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchenberger, Jana; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy

    2012-04-01

    The possibility of controlling the resistance of a memristive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) system via current-induced domain-wall motion was investigated. For a narrow spin-valve structure, current-induced domain-wall motion in the free layer can be detected once the current density exceeds a critical threshold. Then, the resistance of the device depends on the position of the domain wall. The GMR system shows a MR ratio of 10% in the as-prepared state. Narrow stripes were fabricated by e-beam lithography and ion-beam etching with a width of 200 nm. The stripes exhibit GMR ratios up to 8% at room temperature. Micromagnetic simulations of the domain-wall motion in the free layer allow an estimation of the time scale of the domain-wall migration in the stripe. Furthermore, the simulations were compared with measured critical current densities in the free layer with and without an applied external field.

  13. Electric-Field Control over Spin-Wave and Current Induced Domain Wall Motion and Magnonic Torques in Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagina, Iryna; Linder, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    We discover that the way spin-waves exert magnetic torques in multiferroic materials can cause not only domain wall motion, but also magnetization dynamics for homogeneous magnetization textures. Interestingly, the domain wall motion can be controlled via purely electrical means with the spin-waves being generated by an ac electric field E while the direction of the wall motion also is sensitive to an applied dc E field. Moreover, we determine the interaction between spin-transfer torque from an electric current and a magnetic domain wall in multiferroics and show that the Walker breakdown threshold scales with the magnitude of a perpendicular electric field, offering a way to control the properties of domain wall propagation via electric gating.

  14. Magnetic domain-wall motion twisted by nanoscale probe-induced spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, L. S.; Wang, C. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Shu, L.; Bai, J.; Chai, Y. S.; Zhao, X.; Nie, J. C.; Cao, C. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Xiong, C. M.; Sun, Y.; Shi, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Xia, K.; Nan, C. W.; Zhang, J. X.

    2014-12-01

    A method for deterministic control of magnetism using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 1011˜1012A /m2 inhibits the integration with low-energy-cost technology. Here, we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin-transfer torque (STT) occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where a lower bound of the estimated threshold spin-polarized current density is ˜108A /m2 at the tip/manganite interface. The dynamic of DW motions are analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert method. This probe-voltage-controlled DW motion, at an ambient condition, demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nanomagnet systems with low-energy consumption.

  15. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  16. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s-1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  17. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  18. Nucleation of reversed domain and pinning effect on domain wall motion in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Shen, B. G.; Niu, E.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetization behaviors show a strong pinning effect on domain wall motion in optimally melt-spun Pr8Fe87B5 ribbons at room temperature. According to analysis, the coercivity is determined by the nucleation field of reversed domain, and the pinning effect, which results from the weak exchange coupling at interface, makes domain nucleation processes independent and leads to non-uniform magnetization reversals. At a temperature of 60 K, owing to the weak exchange coupling between soft-hard grains, magnetization reversal undergoes processes of spring domain nucleation in soft grains and irreversible domain nucleation in hard grains, and the pinning effect remains strong among hard grains.

  19. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  20. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting with abnormal abdominal wall movement. Case report.

    PubMed

    Aslanabadi, Saeid; Azhough, Ramin; Motlagh, Parviz Samad; Hadidchi, Shahram; Tabrizi, Ali Dastranj; Zonouzy, Keivan Kashy

    2004-10-15

    The authors present a case of intramedullary ganglioglioma in a 6-year-old girl. Since the age of 4 months the patient had experienced a spontaneous wavy undulating movement of her anterior abdominal wall resembling a severe peristalsis. The movement was continuous even during sleep, and this symptom was named "belly dance." Magnetic resonance images revealed an intramedullary tumor with ill-defined borders, and the lesion was partially resected. The patient made a good recovery, although 4 years postsurgery her scoliosis had progressed. PMID:15633994

  1. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  2. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  3. Role of domain walls in the abnormal photovoltaic effect in BiFeO3

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Akash; Roy Chaudhuri, Ayan; Heon Kim, Young; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the anomalous photovoltaic (PV) effect in BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films, which resulted in open circuit voltages (Voc) considerably larger than the band gap of the material, has generated a revival of the entire field of photoferroelectrics. Here, via temperature-dependent PV studies, we prove that the bulk photovoltaic (BPV) effect, which has been studied in the past for many non-centrosymmetric materials, is at the origin of the anomalous PV effect in BFO films. Moreover, we show that irrespective of the measurement geometry, Voc as high as 50 V can be achieved by controlling the conductivity of domain walls (DW). We also show that photoconductivity of the DW is markedly higher than in the bulk of BFO.

  4. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K.; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Schwemmer, Chris; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕi, max) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice.

  5. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (P<0.001) for all setups]. The isovolume tests present small variations of the obtained volume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviation<0.085 L for all setups). After validation by the isovolume test, an investigation of a patient with pleural effusion using the proposed method shows pulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  6. Cases of limb-body wall complex: Early amnion rupture, vascular disruption, or abnormal splitting of the embryo?

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Frank; Pinar, Halit; Kostadinov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of limb-body wall complex (LBWC), also known as body stalk anomaly, a rare form of body wall defect incompatible with life. The first case was identified during a level II ultrasound examination performed at 7 wk gestational age. The delivery was by breech extraction at 39 wk and 4 days. The second case was delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 35 wk and 5 days. Karyotype analysis was normal in both fetuses. The phenotype of LBWC is variable, but commonly identified features include: exencephaly, limb defects, and either facial clefts or thoraco-abdominoschisis. The exact etiology remains uncertain, as the disorder has been regarded as sporadic with low recurrence. Vascular disruption during early embryogenesis, early amnion rupture, abnormal splitting of the embryo, and failure of amnion fusion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of LBWC. A role for possible gene mutation and maternal use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs has also been suggested. Detailed ultrasonography along with biochemical screening may allow for early detection.

  7. Domain wall motion effect on the anelastic behavior in lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourim, El Mostafa; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Gabbay, Maurice; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Cheng, Bo Lin

    2002-05-01

    Three undoped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were prepared with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary: Pb(Zr0.50Ti0.50)O3, Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3, and Pb(Zr0.54Ti0.46)O3. Internal friction Q-1 and shear modulus G were measured versus temperature from 20 °C to 500 °C. Experiments were performed on an inverted torsional pendulum at low frequencies (0.1, 0.3, and 1 Hz). The ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition results in a peak (P1) of Q-1 correlated with a sharp minimum M1 of G. Moreover the Q-1(T) curves show two relaxation peaks called R1 and R2 respectively, correlated with two shear modulus anomalies called A1 and A2 on the G(T) curves. The main features of the transition P1 peak are studied, they suggest that its behavior is similar to the internal friction peaks associated with martensitic transformation. The relaxation peak, R1 and R2 are both attributed to motion of domain walls (DWs), and can be analyzed by thermal activated process described by Arrhenius law. The R2 peak is demonstrated to be due to the interaction of domain walls and oxygen vacancies because it depends on oxygen vacancy concentration and electrical polarization. However, the R1 peak is more complex; its height is found to be increased as stress amplitude and heating rate increase. It seems that the R1 peak is influenced by three mechanisms: (i) relaxation due to DW-point defects interaction, (ii) variation of domain wall density, and (iii) domain wall depinning from point defect clusters.

  8. Magnetic configuration of submicron-sized magnetic patterns in domain wall motion memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Norikazu; Numata, Hideaki; Fukami, Shunsuke; Nagahara, Kiyokazu; Suzuki, Tetsuhiro; Ishiwata, Nobuyuki; Fukumoto, Keiki; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Ono, Teruo

    2010-05-01

    We observed magnetic configuration and its change by external magnetic fields in submicron-sized U- and H-shaped NiFe patterns with an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope. The microscope images showed the formation of a single domain wall (DW) with transverse structure at one corner of the U- and H-shaped patterns by applying the magnetic field from the oblique direction. By applying the magnetic field from the direction parallel to a horizontal bar in the patterns, the magnetic configuration in the U-shaped pattern was changed and four patterns were formed: (1) the DW moved from one trap site to another, (2) the DW moved beyond the trap site and formed a single domain, (3) the DW moved and stopped between the trap sites, and (4) the DW remained at the initial position. Only pattern (1) showed reversible DW motion, although pattern (2) was predominantly formed. In contrast, the magnetization configurations showed pattern (1), and reversible DW motion was observed for more than 80% of the H-shaped patterns. Micromagnetic simulation revealed that the DW in the U-shaped pattern was not sufficiently fixed at the corner and easily moved and vanished at the edge of the patterns because the magnetization in the two parallel bars rotated with a magnetic field. The DW was trapped with sufficient strength at the corner, and DW motion occurred only between the trap sites for the H-shaped patterns. The DW motion process was observed with an in situ magnetic field using the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope and the process could be optimized by controlling the pattern shape.

  9. The stability of steady motion of magnetic domain wall: Role of higher-order spin-orbit torques

    SciTech Connect

    He, Peng-Bin Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2015-12-14

    The steady motion of magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques is investigated analytically in the heavy/ferromagnetic metal nanowires for three cases with a current transverse to the in-plane and perpendicular easy axis, and along the in-plane easy axis. By the stability analysis of Walker wall profile, we find that if including the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the Walker breakdown can be avoided in some parameter regions of spin-orbit torques with a current transverse to or along the in-plane easy axis. However, in the case of perpendicular anisotropy, even considering the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the velocity of domain wall cannot be efficiently enhanced by the current. Furthermore, the direction of wall motion is dependent on the configuration and chirality of domain wall with a current along the in-plane easy axis or transverse to the perpendicular one. Especially, the direction of motion can be controlled by the initial chirality of domain wall. So, if only involving the spin-orbit mechanism, it is preferable to adopt the scheme of a current along the in-plane easy axis for enhancing the velocity and controlling the direction of domain wall.

  10. The stability of steady motion of magnetic domain wall: Role of higher-order spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Bin; Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2015-12-01

    The steady motion of magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques is investigated analytically in the heavy/ferromagnetic metal nanowires for three cases with a current transverse to the in-plane and perpendicular easy axis, and along the in-plane easy axis. By the stability analysis of Walker wall profile, we find that if including the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the Walker breakdown can be avoided in some parameter regions of spin-orbit torques with a current transverse to or along the in-plane easy axis. However, in the case of perpendicular anisotropy, even considering the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the velocity of domain wall cannot be efficiently enhanced by the current. Furthermore, the direction of wall motion is dependent on the configuration and chirality of domain wall with a current along the in-plane easy axis or transverse to the perpendicular one. Especially, the direction of motion can be controlled by the initial chirality of domain wall. So, if only involving the spin-orbit mechanism, it is preferable to adopt the scheme of a current along the in-plane easy axis for enhancing the velocity and controlling the direction of domain wall.

  11. Induction of Embryogenesis in Brassica Napus Microspores Produces a Callosic Subintinal Layer and Abnormal Cell Walls with Altered Levels of Callose and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of microspore embryogenesis produces dramatic changes in different aspects of the cell physiology and structure. Changes at the cell wall level are among the most intriguing and poorly understood. In this work, we used high pressure freezing and freeze substitution, immunolocalization, confocal, and electron microscopy to analyze the structure and composition of the first cell walls formed during conventional Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis, and in cultures treated to alter the intracellular Ca2+ levels. Our results revealed that one of the first signs of embryogenic commitment is the formation of a callose-rich, cellulose-deficient layer beneath the intine (the subintinal layer), and of irregular, incomplete cell walls. In these events, Ca2+ may have a role. We propose that abnormal cell walls are due to a massive callose synthesis and deposition of excreted cytoplasmic material, and the parallel inhibition of cellulose synthesis. These features were absent in pollen-like structures and in microspore-derived embryos, few days after the end of the heat shock, where abnormal cell walls were no longer produced. Together, our results provide an explanation to a series of relevant aspects of microspore embryogenesis including the role of Ca2+ and the occurrence of abnormal cell walls. In addition, our discovery may be the explanation to why nuclear fusions take place during microspore embryogenesis. PMID:26635844

  12. Effects of nitroglycerin, postextrasystolic potentiation, and pacing-induced ischaemia on wall motion in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, F; Ensslen, R; Thormann, J; Sesto, M

    1977-01-01

    The influence of nitroglycerin, postextrasystolic potentiation, and rapid ventricular pacing on total and regional ventricular function was studied in 32 patients with normal ventricular function and in 44 patients with left ventricular asynergy caused by obstructive coronary artery disease. Total ventricular function was assessed by ventriculography and regional ventricular function was analysed by use of 7 hemiaxes. Nitroglycerin increased ejection fraction and decreased left ventricular systolic and end-diastolic pressures in the normally functioning ventricles; apical wall motion increased, while basal wall motion remained unchanged after nitroglycerin in these ventricles. Pressures fell significantly in ventricles with asynergy after nitroglycerin; ejection fraction decreased while wall motion in asynergic areas was inconsistently influenced. Postextrasystolic potentiation augmented ejection fraction by a powerful and homogeneous increase of wall motion in normally functioning ventricles. Asynergic areas and normal areas in diseased ventricles showed identical augmentation of wall motion after a premature beat. Rapid venticular pacing produced a significant increase in end-diastolic pressure and a fall in ejection fraction in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease. Wall motion in normal areas perfused by arteries with critical stenoses was dramatically depressed after pacing, while asynergic areas and normal areas perfused by normal arteries remained unchanged. The results show that normal contractile behaviour can be detected by postextrasystolic potentiation in asynergic areas, suggesting that some normally perfused muscle exists in these areas. Pacing stress does not further deteriorate function in asynergic areas, which suggests the presence of viable and well perfused muscle (within scar tissue) whose function may not profit from revascularization. Pacing-induced asynergy identifies the functional significance of coronary stenoses and suggests

  13. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn2Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthem, Vitoria M. T. S.; Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier; Givord, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn2Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn2Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is <110>. For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn2Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  14. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  15. Creep and Flow Regimes of Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt Films with Perpendicular Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J. P.; Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.; Stamps, R. L.

    2007-11-01

    We report on magnetic domain-wall velocity measurements in ultrathin Pt/Co(0.5 0.8nm)/Pt films with perpendicular anisotropy over a large range of applied magnetic fields. The complete velocity-field characteristics are obtained, enabling an examination of the transition between thermally activated creep and viscous flow: motion regimes predicted from general theories for driven elastic interfaces in weakly disordered media. The dissipation limited flow regime is found to be consistent with precessional domain-wall motion, analysis of which yields values for the damping parameter, α.

  16. Thermal-induced domain wall motion of tip-inverted micro/nanodomains in near-stoichiometric LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Kitamura, K.; Liu, Y. M.; Ohuchi, F. S.; Li, J. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Thermal-induced domain wall motion of tip-inverted micro/nanodomains in near-stoichiometric LiNbO3 single crystals was investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). The domain wall motion was observed in PFM phase and amplitude images at room temperature after the sample was subjected to a thermal process at a heating temperature higher than 100 °C. In hexagonal domains with only y walls, predetermined nucleation with layer-by-layer growth is the main mechanism for the domain wall motion. In the domains composed of both x walls and y walls, the x walls are more mobile than the y walls, and the domain wall motion starts from the random nucleation of steps along the x walls that finally grow into y walls. The domain wall motion in the near-stoichiometric LiNbO3 crystal is attributed to the energy-preferable domain wall orientation, the pyroelectric effect, and the screening charge variation caused by the thermal process.

  17. Theory of domain wall motion mediated magnetoelectric effects in a multiferroic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-10-01

    A model is discussed for magnetoelectric (ME) interactions originating from the motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a multiferroic composite of orthoferrites RFeO3 (RFO) with magnetic stripe domains and a piezoelectric such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). The DWs in RFO can be set in motion with an ac magnetic field up to a critical speed of 20 km/s, the highest for any magnetic system, leading to the excitation of bulk and shear magnetoacoustic waves. Thus, the ME coupling will arise from flexural deformation associated with DW motion (rather than the Joule magnetostriction mediated coupling under a static or quasistatic condition). A c plane orthoferrite with a single Néel-type DW in the bc plane and an ac magnetic field H along the c axis is assumed. The deflection in the bilayer due to DW motion is obtained when the DW velocity is a linear function H and the resulting induced voltage across PMN-PT is estimated. It is shown that a combination of spatial and time harmonics of the bending deformation leads to (i) a linear ME coefficient defined by αE=E/H and (ii) a quadratic ME coefficient αEQ=E/H2. The model is applied to yttrium orthoferrites (YFO) and a PMN-PT bilayer since YFO has one of the highest DW mobility amongst the orthoferrites. The coefficient αE is dependent on the DW position, and it is maximum when the DW equilibrium position is at the center of the sample. In YFO/PMN-PT the estimated low-frequency αE ˜ 30 mV/cm Oe and resonance value is 1.5 V/(cm Oe). Since orthoferrites (and PMN-PT) are transparent in the visible region and have a large Faraday rotation, the DW dynamics and the ME coupling could be studied simultaneously. The theory discussed here is of interest for studies on ME coupling and for applications such as magnetically controlled electro-optic devices.

  18. High speed domain wall motion in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions driven by perpendicular current injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Cros, V.; Anane, A.; Grollier, J.; Fert, A.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Fukushima, A.; Yuasa, S.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to efficiently drive fast domain wall (DW) motion will pave the way for revolutionary new electronic devices ranging from DW-MRAMs to spintronic memristors. The majority of domain wall devices use a lateral, current-in-plane configuration in which critical current densities for domain wall motion remain quite high, typically being on the order of 100 MA/cm^2 with velocities generally limited to about 100 m/s. In this contribution we show that critical current densities can be decreased by up to two orders of magnitude using the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry. Indeed, we demonstrate that a DW can be propagated back and forth along the free layer of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) in the absence of an external magnetic field using current densities that are on the order of 5 MA/cm^2. More notably however, we obtain high domain wall velocities for these low current densities: the MTJ's large resistance variations allow us to carry out time-resolved measurements of the wall motion from which we evidence DW velocities exceeding 500m/s.

  19. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Do; Yu, Jiawei; Qiu, Xuepeng; Wang, Yi; Awano, Hiroyuki; Manchon, Aurelien; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ˜15 MA /c m2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ˜26 MA /c m2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n ). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  20. Thermodynamic theory for thermally driven domain wall motion in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang Rong

    2015-03-01

    It is well-established now that a thermal gradient can be used to manipulate spins in a magnetic texture like skyrmions and domain walls (DWs). A thermal gradient can interact with spins through different channels. For example, a thermal gradient can affect spins through the thermoelectric effects by which spin polarized electric current is generated in a ferromagnetic metal. In turn, the thermally generated electric current can interact with magnetic texture via spin-transfer torque (STT). A thermal gradient can also generate magnons or spin waves that interact with magnetic textures. This effect should be important in a ferromagnetic insulator. Spin waves (or magnons) interact with magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a complicated way that a DW can propagate either along or against magnon flow, similar to its electron counterpart. Probably differ from its electron counterpart where one may attribute the ``wrong'' DW propagation direction to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and various types of torques due to spin-orbit interactions, it will be very difficult to understand why a DW can move along the magnon flow if the angular momentum transfer is the only mechanism behind the magnon driven DW motion. It will also be difficulty to explain why ``wrong'' DW propagation direction has not been observed in thermally driven DW motion in both simulations and experiments. Thus, there must be other interaction(s) between spin waves and magnetic textures. In terms of thermal gradient driven DW propagation along a nanowire, a DW always propagates to the hot region of a magnetic insulator wire. We theoretically illustrate why it is surely so from thermodynamic viewpoint. It is shown that DW entropy is always larger than that of a domain. Equivalently, the free energy difference of a DW and a domain decreases as the temperature increases. The larger DW entropy is related to the increase of magnon density of states at low energy originated from the gapless bound spin waves in

  1. Soliton-like magnetic domain wall motion induced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Teruo

    Topological defects such as magnetic solitons, vortices, Bloch lines, and skyrmions start to play an important role in modern magnetism due to their extraordinary stability which can be hailed as future memory devices. Recently, novel type of antisymmetric exchange interaction, namely the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), has been uncovered and found to influence on the formation of topological defects. Exploring how the DMI affects the dynamics of topological defects is therefore an important task. Here we investigate the dynamics of the magnetic domain wall (DW) under a DMI by developing a time-of-flight measurement scheme which allows us to measure the DW velocity for magnetic fields up to 0.3T. For a weak DMI, the trend of DW velocity follows the Walker's model which predicts that the velocity of DW increases with field up to a threshold (Walker field) and decreases abruptly. On the other hand, for a strong DMI, velocity breakdown is completely suppressed and the DW keeps its maximum velocity even far above the Walker field. Such a distinct trend of the DW velocity, which has never been predicted, can be explained in terms of magnetic soliton, of which topology can be protected by the DMI. Importantly, such a soliton-like DW motion is only observed in two dimensional systems, implying that the vertical Bloch lines (VBLs) creating inside of the magnetic domain-wall play a crucial role. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 15H05702, 26870300, 26870304, 26103002, 25.4251, Collaborative Research Program of the Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, and R & D Project for ICT Key Technology of MEXT from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  2. Use of /sup 1/H NMR to study molecular motion in cellulose, pectin, and bean cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, I.E.P.; Tepfer, M.; Callaghan, P.T.; MacKay, A.L.; Bloom, M.

    1983-01-01

    Growing plant cells are enclosed in a framework, the cell wall, whose rigidity must be overcome for cell enlargement to occur. It has been shown that one of the primary modes of action of plant growth substances is to induce cell wall loosening. The mechansim of cell wall loosening is very poorly understood and may involve large-scale changes in the molecular mobility of the cell wall polysaccharides. Proton magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) was used to study molecular motion in bean stem cell walls as well as in cellulose, sodium pectate solutions, and calcium pectate gels. All samples were prepared in K/sub 2/O to minimize the contribution of water to the observed signals. The different NMR properties that have been measured are sensitive to molecular motions over a wide range of frequencies (10 kHz-90 MHz). For each sample, a free induction decay was obtained and the second moment as well as spin-lattice (longitudinal), spin-spin (transverse), and dipolar relaxations were measured. As expected, the different samples studied had strikingly different NMR properties. These results have been extended to look for pH-sensitive changes in the NMR properties of calcium pectate gels and bean cell walls, since both show marked pH-sensitive changes in their rheological behavior. Pulsed field gradient NMR studies of very mobile components of polysaccharide systems are discussed.

  3. Predicting the response of small-scale near-wall turbulence to large-scale outer motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Lionel; Leschziner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A phenomenological model is provided, based on post-processing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data at Reτ = 1020, which permits the near-wall-turbulence statistics to be predicted from a "universal signal," free from the effects of large-scale motions, in combination with information on the large-scale motions in the outer log-law region. The separation of large-scale and small-scale motions is effected, unusually, by means of the "Empirical Mode Decomposition" method, without explicit wavelength cutoffs. The model first yields the universal field by removing, from a full-volume turbulence field at an arbitrary time level, the effects of large-scale convective displacements (footprints), the modulation of the small-scale motions, caused by the large-scale motions, and distortions arising from sweep-induced splatting. In contrast to other modelling efforts, the present framework extends to all three velocity components, as is demonstrated by reference to joint (u - v) and (u - w) probability-density functions (PDFs). The model is then successfully used to reconstitute the full near-wall statistics by combining the universal field with the outer large-scale motions at any time level other than that for which the universal field was determined.

  4. Soliton-like magnetic domain wall motion induced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoko; Kim, Kab-Jin; Taniguchi, Takuya; Tono, Takayuki; Ueda, Kohei; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Moriyama, Takahiro; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Ono, Teruo

    2016-02-01

    Topological defects such as magnetic solitons, vortices and skyrmions have started to play an important role in modern magnetism because of their extraordinary stability, which can be exploited in the production of memory devices. Recently, a type of antisymmetric exchange interaction, namely the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI; refs ,), has been uncovered and found to influence the formation of topological defects. Exploring how the DMI affects the dynamics of topological defects is therefore an important task. Here we investigate the dynamics of the magnetic domain wall (DW) under a DMI by developing a real time DW detection scheme. For a weak DMI, the DW velocity increases with the external field and reaches a peak velocity at a threshold field, beyond which it abruptly decreases. For a strong DMI, on the other hand, the velocity reduction is completely suppressed and the peak velocity is maintained constant even far above the threshold field. Such a distinct trend of the velocity can be explained in terms of a magnetic soliton, the topology of which is protected during its motion. Our results therefore shed light on the physics of dynamic topological defects, which paves the way for future work in topology-based memory applications.

  5. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  6. A cellular scale numerical study of the effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Qiao; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2014-04-01

    The effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets was numerically studied with the immersed boundary method. Cells were modeled as viscous-fluid-filled capsules surrounded by hyper-elastic membranes with negligible thickness. The numerical results show that with the increase of hematocrit, the near-wall approaching of platelets is enhanced, with which platelets exhibit larger deformation and orientation angle of its near-wall tank-treading motion, and the lateral force pushing platelets to the wall is increased with larger fluctuation amplitude. Meanwhile the near-wall approaching is reduced by increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Anomalous switching in Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological junctions by chiral domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Nakamura, Taketomo; Yonezawa, S.; Yakabe, M.; Ishiguro, R.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2013-08-01

    A spontaneous symmetry breaking in a system often results in domain wall formation. The motion of such domain walls is utilized to realize novel devices like racetrack-memories, in which moving ferromagnetic domain walls store and carry information. Superconductors breaking time reversal symmetry can also form domains with degenerate chirality of their superconducting order parameter. Sr2RuO4 is the leading candidate of a chiral p-wave superconductor, expected to be accompanied by chiral domain structure. Here, we present that Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological superconducting-junctions, with which the phase winding of order parameter can be effectively probed by making use of real-space topology, exhibit unusual switching between higher and lower critical current states. This switching is well explained by chiral-domain-wall dynamics. The switching can be partly controlled by external parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and current. These results open up a possibility to utilize the superconducting chiral domain wall motion for future novel superconducting devices.

  8. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B.

    2014-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  9. Evaluating MRI based vascular wall motion as a biomarker of Fontan hemodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Hong, Haifa

    2015-03-01

    The Fontan procedure for single-ventricle heart disease involves creation of pathways to divert venous blood from the superior & inferior venacavae (SVC, IVC) directly into the pulmonary arteries (PA), bypassing the right ventricle. For optimal surgical outcomes, venous flow energy loss in the resulting vascular construction must be minimized and ensuring close to equal flow distribution from the Fontan conduit connecting IVC to the left & right PA is paramount. This requires patient-specific hemodynamic evaluation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations which are often time and resource intensive, limiting applicability for real-time patient management in the clinic. In this study, we report preliminary efforts at identifying a new non-invasive imaging based surrogate for CFD simulated hemodynamics. We establish correlations between computed hemodynamic criteria from CFD modeling and cumulative wall displacement characteristics of the Fontan conduit quantified from cine cardiovascular MRI segmentations over time (i.e. 20 cardiac phases gated from the start of ventricular systole), in 5 unique Fontan surgical connections. To focus our attention on diameter variations while discounting side-to-side swaying motion of the Fontan conduit, the difference between its instantaneous regional expansion and inward contraction (averaged across the conduit) was computed and analyzed. Maximum Fontan conduit-average expansion over the cardiac cycle correlated with the anatomy-specific diametric offset between the axis of the IVC and SVC (r2=0.13, p=0.55) - a known factor correlated with Fontan energy loss and IVC-to-PA flow distribution. Investigation in a larger study cohort is needed to establish stronger statistical correlations.

  10. Pre-ejectional left ventricular wall motions studied on conscious dogs using Doppler myocardial imaging: relationships with indices of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, D; Berdeaux, A; Cohen, L; Giudicelli, J F; Witchitz, S; Veyrat, C

    1998-11-01

    Duration of the pre-ejection period is a sensitive index of myocardial function. Our purpose was to document normal pre-ejectional left ventricular (LV) wall motions at rest and under dobutamine using Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI), and to correlate posterior wall velocities with indices of LV systolic function. M-mode recordings of both walls were imaged on eight conscious dogs chronically instrumented. Subendocardial pre-ejectional velocities were digitized and measured every 3.8 ms. DMI analysis consisted of sign recognition, velocity measurement, duration and timing from the Q wave of the electrocardiogram. Isovolumic contraction time (Ict) was represented by the time interval from onset to peak of the first derivative of LV pressure. Conventional Doppler labelling of velocity signs, positive toward and negative away from the transducer, was applied to the direction of encoded wall motions. For physiological understanding, wall motions of both walls were also labelled inward and outward with respect to the left ventricular cavity center. In each wall, PEP was shown as several colored strips, each strip representing the period of time that the wall was moving in one direction. Changes in velocity sign corresponding to changes in direction of motion were opposed in each wall (p < 0.001), featuring successive inward and outward wall motions. There was a markedly sustained inward motion during Ict. Its velocity amplitude increased with dobutamine. There was a positive correlation between velocities of the inward motion contemporaneous of Ict and ejection fraction (r = 0.72, p < 0.003). Values of Ict respectively drawn from DMI and from hemodynamics were also significantly correlated (r = 0.85, p < 0.007). Thus, the inward motion evidenced by DMI during Ict appears promising to assess myocardial function and effect of drugs. PMID:10385949

  11. Physical Sensing of Surface Properties by Microswimmers – Directing Bacterial Motion via Wall Slip

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinglei; Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli swim along circular trajectories adjacent to surfaces. Thereby, the orientation (clockwise, counterclockwise) and the curvature depend on the surface properties. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations of a mechano-elastic model of E. coli, with a spherocylindrical body propelled by a bundle of rotating helical flagella, to study quantitatively the curvature of the appearing circular trajectories. We demonstrate that the cell is sensitive to nanoscale changes in the surface slip length. The results are employed to propose a novel approach to directing bacterial motion on striped surfaces with different slip lengths, which implies a transformation of the circular motion into a snaking motion along the stripe boundaries. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by a simulation of active Brownian rods, which also reveals a dependence of directional motion on the stripe width. PMID:25993019

  12. Physical Sensing of Surface Properties by Microswimmers--Directing Bacterial Motion via Wall Slip.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli swim along circular trajectories adjacent to surfaces. Thereby, the orientation (clockwise, counterclockwise) and the curvature depend on the surface properties. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations of a mechano-elastic model of E. coli, with a spherocylindrical body propelled by a bundle of rotating helical flagella, to study quantitatively the curvature of the appearing circular trajectories. We demonstrate that the cell is sensitive to nanoscale changes in the surface slip length. The results are employed to propose a novel approach to directing bacterial motion on striped surfaces with different slip lengths, which implies a transformation of the circular motion into a snaking motion along the stripe boundaries. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by a simulation of active Brownian rods, which also reveals a dependence of directional motion on the stripe width. PMID:25993019

  13. Oscillatory limited compressible fluid flow induced by the radial motion of a thick-walled piezoelectric tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Grassia, Paul; Derby, Brian

    2003-09-01

    A simple oscillatory, slightly compressible, fluid flow model in a thick-walled piezoelectric tube used in a drop-on-demand inkjet print head is developed from the point of view of fluid-structure interaction to take account of pressure wave propagation and pressure loading opposing wall motion. A frequency sweep is performed computationally using the model revealing the first acoustic fluid-structure resonance frequency and the influence of fluid viscosity. The validity of the model, with given information on the speed of sound in a fluid, is evaluated by comparing the theoretically predicted resonance frequency to the experimentally measured resonance frequency. In addition, the intrinsic speed of sound can be easily computed using the measured acoustic resonance frequency and this computed speed of sound agrees closely with speeds of sound reported in the literature.

  14. Investigation of domain wall motion in RE-TM magnetic wire towards a current driven memory and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Current driven magnetic domain wall (DW) motions of ferri-magnetic TbFeCo wires have been investigated. In the case of a Si substrate, the critical current density (Jc) of DW motion was successfully reduced to 3×106 A/cm2. Moreover, by using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate with a molding groove of 600 nm width, the Jc was decreased to 6×105 A/cm2. In order to fabricate a logic in memory, a current driven spin logics (AND, OR, NOT) have been proposed and successfully demonstrated under the condition of low Jc. These results indicate that TbFeCo nanowire is an excellent candidate for next generation power saving memory and logic.

  15. Asymmetric Response of Ferroelastic Domain-Wall Motion under Applied Bias.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Michael L; Liu, Shi; Winkler, Christopher R; Damodaran, Anoop R; Grinberg, Ilya; Martin, Lane W; Rappe, Andrew M; Taheri, Mitra L

    2016-02-10

    The switching of domains in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials plays a central role in their application to next-generation computer systems, sensing applications, and memory storage. A detailed understanding of the response to electric fields and the switching behavior in the presence of complex domain structures and extrinsic effects (e.g., defects and dislocations) is crucial for the design of improved ferroelectrics. In this work, in situ transmission electron microscopy is coupled with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore the response of 71° ferroelastic domain walls in BiFeO3 with various orientations under applied electric-field excitation. We observe that 71° domain walls can have intrinsically asymmetric responses to opposing biases. In particular, when the electric field has a component normal to the domain wall, forward and backward domain-wall velocities can be dramatically different for equal and opposite fields. Additionally, the presence of defects and dislocations can strongly affect the local switching behaviors through pinning or nucleation of the domain walls. These results offer insight for controlled ferroelastic domain manipulation via electric-field engineering. PMID:26695346

  16. An all-metallic logic gate based on current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Xia, Ke; Gu, Changzhi; Tang, Ling; Yang, Haifang; Li, Junjie

    2008-02-01

    The walls of magnetic domains can become trapped in a ferromagnetic metallic point contact when the thickness of the film and the width of the contact are less than their critical values. The discovery that domain walls can be moved from such constrictions by a sufficiently large current has attracted considerable attention from researchers working on both fundamental research and potential applications. Here we show that Invar nanocontacts fabricated on silica substrates exhibit a sharp drop in resistance with increasing bias voltage at room temperature in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Moreover, when two nanocontacts are combined in an all-metallic comparison circuit, it is possible to perform logical NOT operations. The use of electrical currents rather than applied magnetic fields to control the domain walls also reduces energy consumption and the risk of crosstalk in devices. PMID:18654469

  17. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  18. Planar positron imaging of rubidium-82 for myocardial infarction: A comparison with thallium-201 and regional wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Ryan, J.W.; Resnekov, L.; Stark, V.; Peterson, E.L.; Gustafson, G.C.; Martin, W.B.; Freier, P.A.; Harper, P.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Rubidium-82 (Rb-82) is a generator-produced, short half-life (76 seconds) positron emitting potassium analog. Using a mobile gamma camera equipped with a rotating tungsten collimator and high-energy shielding, we examined the use of Rb-82 in the coronary care unit and clinical laboratory for detection of perfusion defects due to myocardial infarction. We studied 31 subjects, 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 12 with remote myocardial infarction, and nine controls. Rb-82 images were compared with Tl-201 and regional wall motion for detection of infarct-related arteries. Of the 22 patients with myocardial infarction, 16 were identified with Rb-82 and Tl-201. In nine control subjects, eight were normal with each method. Correlation between Rb-82 and Tl-201 defect scores was excellent. Sensitivity and specificity for infarct-related arteries were similar for Rb-82, Tl-201, and wall motion imaging. Thus planar Rb-82 imaging can detect MI reliably in the coronary care unit and in the clinical laboratory.

  19. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  20. Wall-Motion Based Analysis of Global and Regional Left Atrial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Christian B.; Helm, Patrick A.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Budge, Loren P.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Ferguson, John D.; Norton, Patrick T.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is an increasingly prevalent cardiovascular disease; changes in atrial structure and function induced by atrial fibrillation and its treatments are often spatially heterogeneous. However, spatial heterogeneity of function is difficult to assess with standard imaging techniques. This paper describes a method to assess global and regional mechanical function by combining cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element surface fitting. We used this fitted surface to derive measures of left atrial volume, regional motion, and spatial heterogeneity of motion in 23 subjects, including healthy volunteers and atrial fibrillation patients. We fit the surfaces using a Newton optimization scheme in under 1 min on a standard laptop, with a root mean square error of 2.3±0.5 mm, less than 9% of the mean fitted radius, and an inter-operator variability of less than 10%. Fitted surfaces showed clear definition of the phases of left atrial motion (filling, passive emptying, active contraction) in both volume-time and regional radius-time curves. Averaged surfaces of healthy volunteers and atrial fibrillation patients provided evidence of substantial regional variation in both amount and timing of regional motion, indicating spatial heterogeneity of function, even in healthy adults. PMID:23708788

  1. The spectrum of echocardiographic abnormalities in hypothyroidism and the effect of hormonal treatment.

    PubMed

    Nouh, M S; Famuyiwa, O O; Sulimani, R A; Al-Nuaim, A

    1991-11-01

    Cross-sectional echocardiography was used to identify and quantify different cardiac abnormalities in 85 patients with hypothyroidism. Pericardial effusion was the most common and was found in 32 patients (37.6%), while abnormal increase in left ventricular dimensions with impairment of function followed next in frequency (16.4%). Asymmetrical septal hypertrophy as well as segmental wall motion abnormality were each detected in 11.76%. Holosystolic prolapse of the mitral valve was present in only 4.7% of the cases. Different combinations of abnormalities were observed in a total of 22 patients (25.76%), and pericardial effusion was a constant finding. Some of the abnormalities were reversed with physiological thyroxin replacement, but abnormal wall motion remained unimproved. PMID:17590809

  2. On the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices: Vortex motions induced by wall roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip; Seddougui, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The receptivity problem for Goertler vortices induced by wall roughness is investigated. The roughness is modelled by small amplitude perturbations to the curved wall over which the flow takes place. The amplitude of these perturbations is taken to be sufficiently small for the induced Goertler vortices to be described by linear theory. The roughness is assumed to vary in the spanwise direction on the boundary layer lengthscale, while in the flow direction the corresponding variation is on the lengthscale over which the wall curvature varies. In fact the latter condition can be relaxed to allow for a faster streamwise roughness variation so long as the variation does not become as fast as that in the spanwise direction. The function which describes the roughness is assumed to be such that its spanwise and streamwise dependences can be separated; this enables progress by taking Fourier or Laplace transforms where appropriate. The cases of isolated and distributed roughness elements are investigated and the coupling coefficient which relates the amplitude of the forcing and the induced vortex amplitude is found asymptotically in the small wavelength limit. It is shown that this coefficient is exponentially small in the latter limit so that it is unlikely that this mode can be stimulated directly by wall roughness. The situation at 0(1) wavelengths is quite different and this is investigated numerically for different forcing functions. It is found that an isolated roughness element induces a vortex field which grows within a wedge at a finite distance downstream of the element. However, immediately downstream of the obstacle the disturbed flow produced by the element decays in amplitude. The receptivity problem at larger Goertler numbers appropriate to relatively large wall curvature is discussed in detail.

  3. Speed limit in internal space of domain walls via all-order effective action of moduli motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Hashimoto, Koji

    2016-03-01

    We find that motion in internal moduli spaces of generic domain walls has an upper bound for its velocity. Our finding is based on our generic formula for all-order effective actions of internal moduli parameter of domain wall solitons. It is known that the Nambu-Goldstone mode Z associated with spontaneous breaking of translation symmetry obeys a Nambu-Goto effective Lagrangian √{1 -(∂0Z )2 } detecting the speed of light (|∂0Z |=1 ) in the target spacetime. Solitons can have internal moduli parameters as well, associated with a breaking of internal symmetries such as a phase rotation acting on a field. We obtain, for generic domain walls, an effective Lagrangian of the internal moduli ɛ to all orders in (∂ɛ ). The Lagrangian is given by a function of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian: L =g (√{1 +(∂μɛ )2 }). This shows generically the existence of an upper bound on ∂0ɛ , i.e., a speed limit in the internal space. The speed limit exists even for solitons in some nonrelativistic field theories, where we find that ɛ is a type I Nambu-Goldstone mode that also obeys a nonlinear dispersion to reach the speed limit. This offers a possibility of detecting the speed limit in condensed matter experiments.

  4. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  5. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  6. Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeon, Beverley J.; Guala, Michele; LeHew, Jeff; Jacobi, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Structural skeleton of high Reynolds number flow gives insight into smooth and rough walls. (modeling implications not yet clear) Dynamic roughness as a model of "designer" roughness: a) Impose length scale(s) and dominant frequency. b) Irregular roughness well-represented by first "few" POD modes (Christensen, 2009). Experiments and simple model demonstrate: a) Harmonics associated with forcing (and w) important. b) Change to the mean profile (skin friction).

  7. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  8. Simultaneous optical mapping of transmembrane potential and wall motion in isolated, perfused whole hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Elliot B.; Bachtel, Andrew D.; Huang, Jian; Walcott, Gregory P.; Rogers, Jack M.

    2011-09-01

    Optical mapping of cardiac propagation has traditionally been hampered by motion artifact, chiefly due to changes in photodetector-to-tissue registration as the heart moves. We have developed an optical mapping technique to simultaneously record electrical waves and mechanical contraction in isolated hearts. This allows removal of motion artifact from transmembrane potential (Vm) recordings without the use of electromechanical uncoupling agents and allows the interplay of electrical and mechanical events to be studied at the whole organ level. Hearts are stained with the voltage-sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS and ring-shaped markers are attached to the epicardium. Fluorescence, elicited on alternate frames by 450 and 505 nm light-emitting diodes, is recorded at 700 frames/ per second by a camera fitted with a 605+/-25 nm emission filter. Marker positions are tracked in software. A signal, consisting of the temporally interlaced 450 and 505 nm fluorescence, is collected from the pixels enclosed by each moving ring. After deinterlacing, the 505 nm signal consists of Vm with motion artifact, while the 450 nm signal is minimally voltage-sensitive and contains primarily artifacts. The ratio of the two signals estimates Vm. Deformation of the tissue enclosed by each set of 3 rings is quantified using homogeneous finite strain.

  9. Aortic regurgitation caused by rupture of the abnormal fibrous band between the aortic valve and aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the sudden onset of aortic regurgitation (AR) by an exceptional cause. A 68-year-old woman suddenly experienced general fatigue, and AR was diagnosed. One year later, we performed aortic valve replacement. At surgery, three aortic cusps with a larger noncoronary cusp had prolapsed along with a free-floating fibrous band that had previously anchored the cusp to the aortic wall. Its rupture had induced the sudden onset of AR. There was no sign of infectious endocarditis. We performed successful aortic valve replacement. PMID:21751110

  10. Details of left ventricular radial wall motion supporting the ventricular theory of the third heart sound obtained by cardiac MR

    PubMed Central

    Robson, M D; Rider, O J; Pegg, T J; Dasanu, C A; Jung, B A; Rotaru, N; Clarke, K; Holloway, C J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obtaining new details of radial motion of left ventricular (LV) segments using velocity-encoding cardiac MRI. Methods: Cardiac MR examinations were performed on 14 healthy volunteers aged between 19 and 26 years. Cine images for navigator-gated phase contrast velocity mapping were acquired using a black blood segmented κ-space spoiled gradient echo sequence with a temporal resolution of 13.8 ms. Peak systolic and diastolic radial velocities as well as radial velocity curves were obtained for 16 ventricular segments. Results: Significant differences among peak radial velocities of basal and mid-ventricular segments have been recorded. Particular patterns of segmental radial velocity curves were also noted. An additional wave of outward radial movement during the phase of rapid ventricular filling, corresponding to the expected timing of the third heart sound, appeared of particular interest. Conclusion: The technique has allowed visualization of new details of LV radial wall motion. In particular, higher peak systolic radial velocities of anterior and inferior segments are suggestive of a relatively higher dynamics of anteroposterior vs lateral radial motion in systole. Specific patterns of radial motion of other LV segments may provide additional insights into LV mechanics. Advances in knowledge: The outward radial movement of LV segments impacted by the blood flow during rapid ventricular filling provides a potential substrate for the third heart sound. A biphasic radial expansion of the basal anteroseptal segment in early diastole is likely to be related to the simultaneous longitudinal LV displacement by the stretched great vessels following repolarization and their close apposition to this segment. PMID:24641347

  11. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Vascular corrosion casting: analyzing wall shear stress in the portal vein and vascular abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Casteleyn, Christophe; van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Segers, Patrick; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Vascular corrosion casting is an established method of anatomical preparation that has recently been revived and has proven to be an excellent tool for detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological examination of normal and pathological microcirculation. In addition, the geometry provided by vascular casts can be further used to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) in a vascular bed using computational techniques. In the first part of this study, the microvascular morphological changes associated with portal hypertension (PHT) and cirrhosis in vascular casts are described. The second part of this study consists of a quantitative analysis of the WSS in the portal vein in casts of different animal models of PHT and cirrhosis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Microvascular changes in the splanchnic, hepatic and pulmonary territory of portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice are described in detail with stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, our results are the first to report the vascular changes in the common bile duct ligation cirrhotic model. Calculating WSS using CFD methods is a feasible technique in PHT and cirrhosis, enabling the differentiation between different animal models. First, a dimensional analysis was performed, followed by a CFD calculation describing the spatial and temporal WSS distributions in the portal vein. WSS was significantly different between sham/cirrhotic/pure PHT animals with the highest values in the latter. Up till now, no techniques have been developed to quantify WSS in the portal vein in laboratory animals. This study showed for the first time that vascular casting has an important role not only in the morphological evaluation of animal models of PHT and cirrhosis, but also in defining the biological response of the portal vein wall to hemodynamic changes. CFD in 3D geometries can be used to describe the spatial and temporal variations in WSS in the portal vein and to better understand

  14. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Pierce, Timothy H

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  15. A prospective comparison of echocardiographic wall motion score index and radionuclide ejection fraction in predicting outcome following acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, G; Basu, S; Lahiri, A; Senior, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To characterise echocardiographic wall motion score index (WMSI) as a surrogate measure of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to compare its prognostic value with that of EF measured by radionuclide ventriculography (RNV).
DESIGN—A prospective study to compare baseline echocardiographic WMSI with RNV EF in consecutive patients thrombolysed for AMI, both performed on the same day before discharge, and their relative prognostic values in predicting cardiac events.
SETTING—District general hospital coronary care unit and cardiology department.
PATIENTS—120 consecutive patients free of exclusion criteria thrombolysed for AMI and followed up for a mean (SD) of 13 (10) months.
INTERVENTIONS—None.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses plus cardiac event rates at follow up between RNV EF and echocardiographic WMSI.
RESULTS—WMSI correlated well with RNV EF. The best corresponding WMSIs for EFs 45%, 40%, and 35% were 0.6, 0.8, and 1.1, respectively. There were 42 cardiac events during follow up. Although both RNV EF and WMSI were strong univariate predictors of cardiac events, only WMSI independently predicted outcome in a multivariate model. All three WMSI cut offs significantly predicted events, while an RNV EF cut off of ⩽ 45% v > 45% failed to reach significance.
CONCLUSIONS—Although both RNV and echocardiographic WMSI strongly predicted cardiac outcome, WMSI, a cheaper and more readily available technique, is more discriminatory, especially in cases of mild left ventricular dysfunction following AMI.


Keywords: echocardiographic wall motion score index; radionuclide ventriculography; prognosis; acute myocardial infarction PMID:11514477

  16. Field-induced domain wall motion of amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y. H.; Lee, K. J.; Jung, M. H.; Yoon, J. B.; Cho, J. H.; You, C.-Y.; Kim, T. W.

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous CoSiB/Pt multilayer is a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material to achieve high squareness, low coercivity, strong anisotropy, and smooth domain wall (DW) motion, because of the smoother interface compared with crystalline multilayers. For [CoSiB(6 Å)/Pt (14 Å)]{sub N} multilayers with N = 3, 6, and 9, we studied the field-induced DW dynamics. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub 1}{sup eff} is 1.5 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} for all the N values, and the linear increment of coercive field H{sub c} with N gives constant exchange coupling J. By analyzing the field dependence of DW images at room temperature, a clear creep motion with the exponent μ = 1/4 could be observed. Even though the pinning field H{sub dep} slightly increases with N, the pinning potential energy U{sub c} is constant (=35 k{sub B}T) for all the N values. These results imply that the amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers are inherently homogeneous compared to crystalline multilayers. For N ≤ 6, the pinning site density ρ{sub pin} is less than 1000/μm{sup 2}, which is about 1 pinning site per the typical device junction size of 30 × 30 nm{sup 2}. Also, the exchange stiffness constant A{sub ex} is obtained to be 0.48 × 10{sup −6} erg/cm, and the domain wall width is expected to be smaller than 5.5 nm. These results may be applicable for spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory and DW logic device applications.

  17. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  18. Strain-mediated deterministic control of 360° domain wall motion in magnetoelastic nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cheng-Yen; Sepulveda, Abdon E.; Hoff, Daniel; Keller, Scott M.; Carman, Gregory. P.

    2015-11-01

    This study provides numerical simulations for deterministic 360° magnetization rotation of the transverse domain walls in a nickel nano-ring (outer diameter: 500 nm, inner diameter: 300 nm, and thickness: 10 nm) on a lead zirconate titanate (Pb[ZrxTi1-x]O3 0 < x < 1) (PZT) thin film (500 nm) deposited onto a Si substrate with surface patterned electrodes. Two alternative electrode architectures are studied, namely, a 4-electrode and a 6-electrode configuration. The 4-electrode configuration relies on magnetization dynamics to produce an overshoot coupled with proper timing control of the voltage applied to achieve 360° magnetization rotation. In contrast, the 6-electrode configuration only requires sequential voltage application to successive pairs of electrodes and thus can be operated at quasi-static speeds and does not rely on magnetization dynamics to achieve 360° magnetization rotation. These analytical models provide support for developing new devices such as nanoscale multiferroic driven electromagnetic motors.

  19. Influence of nonlocal damping on the field-driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. Y.; Yuan, Zhe; Xia, Ke; Wang, X. R.

    2016-08-01

    We derive a general expression of nonlocal damping in noncollinear magnetization due to the nonuniform spin current pumped by precessional magnetization and incorporate it into a generalized Thiele equation to study its effects on the dynamics of the transverse and vortex domain walls (DWs) in ferromagnetic nanowires. We demonstrate that the transverse component of nonlocal damping slows down the field-driven DW propagation and increases the Walker breakdown field, whereas it is neglected in many previous works in literature. The experimentally measured DW mobility variation with the damping tuned by doping with heavy rare-earth elements that had discrepancy from micromagnetic simulation is now well understood with the nonlocal damping. Our results suggest that the nonlocal damping should be properly included as a prerequisite for quantitative studies of current-induced torques in noncollinear magnetization.

  20. 3D analysis of the chest wall motion for monitoring late-onset Pompe disease patients.

    PubMed

    Meric, Henri; Falaize, Line; Pradon, Didier; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Late-onset Pompe disease, for which enzyme replacement therapy is available, induces progressive diaphragmatic weakness. Monitoring diaphragmatic function is therefore crucial but is hindered by the need to insert esophageal and gastric probes. Vital capacity (VC), inspiratory capacity, maximal inspiratory pressure, and sniff nasal pressure are noninvasive measurements but reflect only global inspiratory-muscle function. Diaphragmatic function may be assessable noninvasively based on abdominal contribution to breathing and abdominal volume change during the VC maneuver (AVC-VC), obtained by 3-dimensional chest-wall analysis. In 11 patients, we assessed the relationships between the above-listed noninvasive variables and the invasively measured Gilbert index reflecting the diaphragmatic contribution to breathing (ratio of gastric pressure over transdiaphragmatic pressure swings during spontaneous breathing). Only abdominal contribution to breathing and AVC-VC correlated significantly with the Gilbert index (R = 0.977, P = 0.0001; and R = 0.944, P = 0.001 respectively). AVC-VC correlated significantly with transdiaphragmatic pressure swing during the sniff maneuver (R = 0.743, P = 0.0009) and with phrenic magnetic stimulation (R = 0.610, P = 0.046). Repeat testing 1 year later in the first 6 patients showed concordant changes in abdominal contribution to breathing, Gilbert index, and VC. Abdominal contribution to breathing and AVC-VC are reliable and noninvasive indices of diaphragmatic function in Pompe disease, and therefore hold promise as clinical monitoring tools. PMID:26711305

  1. An in situ diffraction study of domain wall motion contributions to the frequency dispersion of the piezoelectric coefficient in lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, Shruti B.; Prewitt, Anderson D.; Jones, Jacob L.; Studer, Andrew J.; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2013-01-28

    The contribution of non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall displacement to the frequency dependence of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient has been determined experimentally in lead zirconate titanate using time-resolved, in situ neutron diffraction. Under subcoercive electric fields of low frequencies, approximately 3% to 4% of the volume fraction of non-180 Degree-Sign domains parallel to the field experienced polarization reorientation. This subtle non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion directly contributes to 64% to 75% of the magnitude of the piezoelectric coefficient. Moreover, part of the 33 pm/V decrease in piezoelectric coefficient across 2 orders of magnitude in frequency is quantitatively attributed to non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion effects.

  2. A new attenuation model of near-fault ground motions with consideration of the hanging wall effect in the Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lei; Xie, Lili; Hu, Jinjun; Wang, Dong

    2011-09-01

    The hanging wall effect is an important factor that impacts the characteristics of strong ground motions in near-fault areas. Based on a residual analysis of ground motion parameters characterizing the hanging wall effect and in recognition of the nature of the effect, many models have been developed. In this study, after a comprehensive analysis of two existing models, a new model is proposed and used to model the hanging wall effect in horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGAH) and spectral acceleration (SAH) at a period of 0.1 s in the Wenchuan earthquake. Finally, comparisons between the modeling results of the hanging wall effect in the Wenchuan earthquake and the results predicted by using Abrahamson and Silva's NGA model (AS NGA) indicate that the AS NGA model predicts a much higher hanging wall effect than the model developed in this paper. Furthermore, the AS NGA model predicts a large hanging wall effect even at great distances, while the proposed model more accurately captures the trend of the effect.

  3. A formula for the wall-amplified added mass coefficient for a solid sphere in normal approach to a wall and its application for such motion at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.-L.

    2010-12-01

    This work re-examines the potential flow theory for a sphere in normal approach to a wall, based on the classical results derived by Lamb [Hydrodynamics (Dover, New York, 1932)] and Milne-Thomson [Theoretical Hydrodynamics, 5th ed. (Dover, New York, 1968)]. These authors generated an expression in which the kinetic energy for a sphere in an unbounded fluid is augmented by a wall correction function in terms of an infinite series that depends on the scaled center-to-wall distance, h∗=h/a, with a denoting the sphere radius. By truncating the series at the order of h∗-3, the resulting one-term correction function, 3/8h∗-3, is widely employed to approximate the wall-amplified added mass coefficient, CAM(h ∗), in multiphase flow research. Nonetheless, this work shows that this one-term correction deviates greatly from corrections including higher order terms when the interstitial gap drops below the half sphere radius. Thus, an explicit formula is developed, for all h∗, using a near-wall Padé approximation, an intermediate bridging function, and a far-field approximation. This proposed formula provides an efficient and reasonable approximation to the infinite series and thus may serve as an improved wall correction function as compared to the one-term formula. The developed formula is applied to compute the unsteady approach of a nonrotating sphere toward a wall in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number condition. In addition to Brenner's wall correction on the quasisteady viscous force [H. Brenner, "The slow motion of a sphere through a viscous fluid towards a plane surface," Chem. Eng. Sci. 16, 242 (1961)], the current formula is employed to modify both the added mass coefficient, from 1/2, and the history force. This latter force is modified by integrating the wall-modified potential flow theory with the boundary layer theory. If the one-term correction is used in the equation of motion, underestimation of the sphere motion and the force magnitudes are

  4. Early Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy for assessment of regional wall motion asynergy on discharge after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    van Vlies, B.; Baas, J.; Visser, C.A.; van Royen, E.; Delemarre, B.J.; Bot, H.; Dunning, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    To assess the relation between early Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin antibody scintigraphy and degree of regional asynergy on discharge, 38 patients with a first acute myocardial infarct were studied (18 anterior, 20 inferoposterior infarctions). In 21 patients thrombolytic therapy was administered. On the first day of myocardial infarction, 80 MBq Indium-111 Antimyosin was injected. Planar images, anterior, lateral and left anterior oblique, were made 24 hours later. Localized myocardial uptake was present in 37/38 patients, and was evaluated for Count Density Index (count density of infarct zone/left lung count density) in the left anterior oblique images, which displayed the infarct zone well. Regional asynergy on discharge was evaluated by cross-sectional echocardiography and defined mild (hypokinesia) or severe (akinesia or dyskinesia). Count density index was significantly lower in 15 patients with mild asynergy, compared with 22 patients with severe asynergy (1.61 +/- 0.25 vs. 2.42 +/- 0.40, p less than 0.001). This difference was present in both patient groups treated with or without thrombolysis. We conclude that early count density index, reflecting the amount of local necrosis, is highly correlated to the ultimate degree of wall motion impairment.

  5. Short and long term predictive value of admission wall motion score in acute myocardial infarction. A cross sectional echocardiographic study of 345 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kan, G; Visser, C A; Koolen, J J; Dunning, A J

    1986-01-01

    A score of left ventricular segmental wall motion was used as a convenient rapid way to assess overall left ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction. Its success in risk stratification at admission was assessed by a blind review of cross sectional echocardiographic tape recordings from multiple acoustic windows. Sixty nine (20%) of the 345 patients died during hospital stay or within a one year follow up. The mean (SD) wall motion score in those who died was significantly higher than in those who survived (16.2 (5.9) vs 5.7 (3.9)). There were no differences between the group that died in hospital within three months of discharge and the group that died between three months and one year after discharge. Among the 31 patients who died in hospital, however, wall motion score was highest in 15 patients dying of cardiogenic shock (19.2 (4.2)). In 16 patients with lethal ruptures it was 13.5 (6.1). The nine patients with free wall ruptures had higher wall motion scores than those with ventricular septal rupture or papillary muscle rupture (15.7 (6.9) vs 8.5 (5.3)). Eight (3.3%) of 245 patients with a score less than 10 died, compared with 61 (61%) of 100 scoring greater than or equal to 10. The sensitivity of a score of greater than or equal to 10 in predicting death within one year was 88%, the specificity was 86%, the positive predictive value was 61%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. PMID:3790378

  6. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He{sup +}-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Diez, L. García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D.; Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R.; Ocker, B.

    2015-07-20

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He{sup +} ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H{sup −1∕4} behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H{sub dep}. In turn, H* ≈ H{sub dep} is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  7. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He+-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Diez, L.; García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R.; Ocker, B.; Ravelosona, D.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He+ ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H-1/4 behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field Hdep. In turn, H* ≈ Hdep is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  8. Wall motion in the stenotic carotid artery: association with greyscale plaque characteristics, the degree of stenosis and cerebrovascular symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systolic dilation of the atherosclerotic carotid artery depends on several factors including arterial compliance and the haemodynamic environment. The purpose of this study was to quantify wall motion in stenotic carotid arteries and investigate any associations with the ultrasound greyscale plaque characteristics, the degree of stenosis, and the presence of cerebrovascular symptoms. Methods Variations in the lumen diameters of 61 stenotic carotid arteries (stenosis range 10%-95%) from 47 patients were measured before the proximal shoulder of the atherosclerotic plaque using ultrasound image sequences over several cardiac cycles. Absolute and percentage diameter changes from diastole to systole were calculated and their relationship to the degree of stenosis, greyscale plaque characteristics, and the presence of ipsilateral hemispheric symptoms were studied. Results The mean absolute diameter change from diastole to systole was 0.45 mm (s.d. 0.17), and the mean percentage diameter change was 6.9% (s.d. 3.1%). Absolute and percentage diameter changes did not have a statistically significant relationship to the degree of stenosis, greyscale plaque characteristics, or the presence of ipsilateral hemispheric symptoms (p > 0.05). Parameters significantly correlated with the presence of symptoms were the degree of stenosis (p = 0.01), plaque greyscale median (p = 0.02) and the plaque surface irregularity index (p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study confirmed the degree of stenosis, plaque greyscale median and our surface irregularity index were significant predictors of symptoms, but found no significant correlation between diameter changes of stenosed carotid arteries and the presence of ipsilateral hemispheric symptoms. PMID:24139162

  9. High-risk subgroup of inferior myocardial infarction: importance of anterior wall motion and right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Yasuda, T; Gold, H K; Leinbach, R C; Boucher, C A; McKusick, K A; Strauss, H W

    1986-01-01

    To identify high-risk subgroups of inferior myocardial infarction, 75 patients presenting with their first inferior infarction were investigated by sequential gated blood pool scans. The patients were divided into four groups based on the right ventricular function (RVF) and anterior wall motion (AWM) of the left ventricle by scan at the time of admission. A second blood pool scan was performed at ten days to evaluate RV and LV function. Thirty-eight patients had cardiac catheterization before discharge and all patients were followed up for one year to determine their clinical outcome. Depressed RVF and reduced AWM were observed in 26 (35%) (Group A); depressed RVF and normal AWM were found in 20 (27%) (Group B); reduced AWM and normal RVF in 10 (13%) (Group C); and normal RVF and AWM in 19 (25%) (Group D). The mean values of biventricular function (LVEF, RVEF) in groups A, B, C, and D were (44.9 +/- 8.4%, 32.5 +/- 9.9%), (59.9 +/- 8.6%, 34.5 +/- 8.0%), (44.9 +/- 15.7%, 48.2 +/- 3.3%), and (60.4 +/- 9.1%, 51.6 +/- 10.6%), respectively, at admission. In serial measurements, LVEF did not change significantly in any group, however, RVEF improved nearly 10 points in groups A and B at 10 days. Group A also had the highest incidence (82%) of left anterior descending coronary artery involvement, and the highest mean creatine phosphokinase levels (762 +/- 318 U/l): Furthermore, group A had a high incidence of major complications during their hospital course and high mortality during the one-year follow-up. These data clearly identified group A as a high-risk subgroup of patients with inferior infarction. PMID:3602422

  10. The dynamics of the asymmetric motion of domain walls of sandwich domain structure in a Fe-based amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmetko, D. N.; Zhmetko, S. D.; Troschenkov, Y. N.; Matsura, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The frequency dependence of asymmetry of the domain walls velocity relative to the middle plane of amorphous ribbon is investigated. An additional pressure of the same direction acting on each domain wall caused by dependence of eddy current damping on the coordinate of the domain wall is revealed. The microscopic mechanisms of this additional pressure are considered.

  11. New method for detecting domain wall trapping and motion at a constriction in narrow ferromagnetic wires using perpendicular-current giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambano, Antonio Javier

    We present a versatile, new method for detecting the presence and small motions of a trapped domain wall in a narrow ferromagnetic wire using current-perpendicular-to-plane, CPP, giant magnetoresistance, GMR. We have adapted the Ono et al.1-2 method for trapping domain walls to CPP GMR measurements. We shaped a spin valve multilayer Cu(10nm)/Py(20nm)/Cu(10nm)/Py(5nm)/Cu(5nm)/Au(15nm), where Py = Ni84 Fe16, into a long ˜500-nm-wide wire with a U-shaped or V-shaped constriction (notch) near its middle that acts as a trapping site for a head-to-head (or tail-to-tail) domain wall. A sweeping external magnetic field, H, is applied along the wire axis. The magnetization is restricted to be parallel to the wire axis due to the shape anisotropy. Magnetization reversal in the wire takes place by propagation of a magnetic domain wall, which initially nucleates in a diamond-shaped reservoir and is injected from there into the nanowire at a particular value of H. As a wall in either Py layer moves past the measuring contact, the CPP GMR detects the change of the relative magnetizations of the two Py layers, from parallel to antiparallel. The CPP GMR response to small motions of the trapped domain wall is enhanced because the CPP current is restricted to the region of wall trapping; but in addition, the CPP current can be also localized to a measuring region outside the constriction. Superconducting 150-nm-thick (top) and 100-nm-thick (bottom) Nb contacts are used to obtain a uniform CPP current density in the wall trapping region at 4.2 K; but measurements at 295K, including 200-nm-Au top contacts, have also been successful with non-uniform CPP currents. Data for the two different types of constrictions show that for U-shape notches, several pinning sites were seen as the wall in the thinner Py layer remained trapped in the constriction, while in V-shaped notches one trapping site occurred. Successful pinning of a wall at the constriction in the thicker Py layer was more

  12. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-01

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta. PMID:27255604

  13. Current-driven domain wall motion due to volume spin transfer torque in Co/Ni multilayer systems on Au underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Thomas, Luc; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the current-induced domain wall (CIDW) dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayers deposited on Au underlayer, where the conventional spin transfer torque governs the domain wall dynamics, by the Kerr microscope. It is found that the DW angle tilting following Oersted field profile plays an important role in domain wall (DW) motion at high current density J by decreasing DW velocity with the increasing J, while distorting its DW morphology. Also we find that the DW pinning becomes pronounced as the anisotropy decreases by increasing number of Co/Ni repeats. Most remarkably, the DW tilting angle changes its sign by inserting ultrathin Pt layer between Au and Co layer, which suggests that the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction and spin Hall effect induces opposite effect in DW tilting. Our findings can be of use for application of CIDW to spintronics with perpendicularly magnetized systems.

  14. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  15. Domain-wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires driven by arbitrary time-dependent fields: an exact result.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2010-04-01

    We address the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires under the influence of external time-dependent magnetic fields. We report a new exact spatiotemporal solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the case of soft ferromagnetic wires and nanostructures with uniaxial anisotropy. The solution holds for applied fields with arbitrary strength and time dependence. We further extend this solution to applied fields slowly varying in space and to multiple domain walls. PMID:20481956

  16. Current-induced domain wall motion attributed to spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction in Pt/GdFeCo (100 nm) magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Yuichiro; Kawamoto, Masaya; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the current-induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) in Pt/GdFeCo bilayer wires where the thicknesses of the GdFeCo layer are 110 and 150 nm. We found that the direction of CIDWM in the Pt/GdFeCo wires is the same as the current flow direction. The velocity of the domain wall depends on the in-plane magnetic field. These results indicate that the CIDWM along the current direction in the Pt/GdFeCo wires is probably attributed to the spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction. Generally, these effects do not appear in thick magnetic wires because they effectively occur at the interfaces of a heavy metal and magnetic layers. Therefore, these results are interesting phenomena because they probably suggest that the spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction in the Pt/GdFeCo wire have an anomalously long-range influence.

  17. Regional Mapping of Aortic Wall Stress by Using Deformable, Motion-coherent Modeling based on Electrocardiography-gated Multidetector CT Angiography: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Heye, Tobias J; Makar, Ryan A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Marin, Daniele; Boll, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of deformable, motion-coherent modeling based on electrocardiography-gated multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography of the thoracic aorta and to evaluate whether quantifiable information on aortic wall stress as a function of patient-specific cardiovascular parameters can be gained. Materials and Methods For this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, thoracic electrocardiography-gated dual-source multidetector CT angiographic images were used from 250 prospectively enrolled patients (150 men, 100 women; mean age, 79 years). On reconstructed 50-phase CT angiographic images, aortic strain and deformation were determined at seven cardiac and aortic locations. One-way analysis of variance was used by assessing the magnitude for longitudinal and axial strain and axial deformation, as well as time-resolved peak and maxima count for longitudinal strain and axial deformation. Interdependencies between aortic strain and deformation with extracted hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results With increasing heart rates, there was a significant decrease in longitudinal strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.95) and a decrease in the number of longitudinal strain peaks (P < .001, R(2) = 0.79); however, a significant increase in axial deformation (P < .001, R(2) = 0.31) and axial strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.61) was observed. Increasing aortic blood velocity led to increased longitudinal strain (P = .018, R(2) = 0.42) and longitudinal strain peak counts (P = .011, R(2) = 0.48). Pronounced motion in the longitudinal direction limited motion in the axial plane (P < .019, R(2) = 0.29-0.31). Conclusion The results of this study render a clinical basis and provide proof of principle for the use of deformable, motion-coherent modeling to provide quantitative information on physiological motion of the aorta under various hemodynamic circumstances. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article

  18. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  19. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  20. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M. J.; Kezirian, M. T.; Brenner, H.

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, while allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces arises from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere 'rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane--at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case. This suggests a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  1. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  2. Inversion symmetry of Josephson current as test of chiral domain wall motion in Sr2RuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kohta; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Mawatari, Yasunori; Asano, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2015-09-01

    Clarifying the chiral domain structure of superconducting Sr2RuO4 has been a long-standing issue in identifying its peculiar topological superconducting state. We evaluated the critical current Ic versus the magnetic field H of Nb/Sr2RuO4 Josephson junctions, changing the junction dimension in expectation of that the number of domains in the junction is controlled. Ic(H ) exhibits a recovery from inversion symmetry breaking to invariance when the dimension is reduced to several microns. This inversion invariant behavior indicates the disappearance of domain walls; thus, the size of a single domain is estimated at approximately several microns.

  3. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Design and evaluation of a 67% area-less 64-bit parallel reconfigurable 6-input nonvolatile logic element using domain-wall motion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Natsui, Masanori; Mochizuki, Akira; Hanyu, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    A 6-input nonvolatile logic element (NV-LE) using domain-wall motion (DWM) devices is presented for low-power and real-time reconfigurable logic LSI applications. Because the write current path of a DWM device is separated from its read current path and the resistance value of the write current path is quite small, multiple DWM devices can be reprogrammed in parallel, thus affording real-time logic-function reconfiguration within a few nanoseconds. Moreover, by merging a circuit component between combinational and sequential logic functions, transistor counts can be minimized. As a result, 2-ns 64-bit-parallel circuit reconfiguration is realized by the proposed 6-input NV-LE with 67% lesser area than a conventional CMOS-based alternative, with a simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE) simulation under a 90 nm CMOS/MTJ technologies.

  5. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software. PMID:22461994

  6. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  7. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  8. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  9. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  10. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  11. Asymmetric grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and anisotropic domain wall motion in obliquely grown nanocrystalline Co films.

    PubMed

    Quirós, C; Peverini, L; Díaz, J; Alija, A; Blanco, C; Vélez, M; Robach, O; Ziegler, E; Alameda, J M

    2014-08-22

    Strong asymmetries have been observed in grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ patterns obtained from 30 nm-thick nanocrystalline Co films prepared by oblique sputtering (15°-75° off-sample normal). These asymmetries have been qualitatively simulated by a simple model consisting of an ensemble of 8 nm-wide inclined Co nanocolumns. It is found that narrow inclined features appear in the diffuse background resembling those characteristic of faceted systems, which can be used to obtain straightforward non-destructive estimations of buried nanocolumnar grains inclination, even for oblique angles below 45°, when the stronger and broader asymmetric features of the pattern are not yet fully formed. Furthermore, using magneto-optical microscopy, a marked change in the magnetic domain's nucleation and growth process has been observed in the sample prepared at 75°, with the stronger GISAXS asymmetries. Easy axis magnetization reversal starts by a random and homogeneous nucleation of small (∼μm) elongated domains aligned with the nanocolumn's long axis and proceeds through the preferred propagation of head-to-head domain walls (DWs) along the applied field direction. This peculiar magnetic behavior indicates that the strongly anisotropic nanostructuring created by the oblique growth process is equivalent, from a magnetic point of view, to an array of self-assembled buried nanowires. These results show how GISAXS and magneto-optical microscopy can be combined as a powerful tool for correlating the morphology and magnetism of thin nanostructured systems. PMID:25074483

  12. Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–0.38PbTiO3 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Enwei; Cao, Wenwu

    2010-01-01

    The loss behavior of 0.62Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–0.38PbTiO3 (PMN-38%PT) ferroelectric single crystal poled along [001]c was investigated. It was found that the complex electromechanical coefficients and loss factors change dramatically at the coercive field Ec around 250 V∕mm, representing the intrinsic switching barrier. Since the energy loss is related to the domain wall motion, the imaginary parts of the electromechanical coefficients can be used to study the degree of domain wall motions in relaxor-based ferroelectric single crystals. Experimental results indicate that for this system, domain wall motion contributes significantly to the imaginary parts of electromechanical coefficients. In addition, [001]c poled PMN-38%PT single crystals have much larger mechanical loss factor compared to that of conventional single crystal like LiNbO3. This phenomenon is proved to be closely related to 90° domain wall motion in this crystal system. PMID:20145700

  13. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  14. Extensive domain wall motion and deaging resistance in morphotropic 0.55Bi(Ni{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}–0.45PbTiO{sub 3} polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tutuncu, Goknur; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Xing, Xianran; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-03-31

    Domain wall motion is known as a major source of extrinsic contributions to the dielectric and piezoelectric properties of ferroelectric materials. In the present work, we report the extent of non-180° domain wall motion during strong and weak electric field amplitudes in situ using time-resolved, high-energy X-ray diffraction in the ferroelectric morphotropic phase boundary composition 0.55Bi(Ni{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}–0.45PbTiO{sub 3} (BNT-45PT). After application of strong electric fields, two phases are shown to coexist. In the tetragonal phase of this material, the extent of 90° domain wall motion is significant and the domain alignment is nearly saturated. Weak (subswitching) cyclic electric fields are then also shown to induce domain wall motion. Deaging, or the progressive loss of preferred domain orientation during sequentially increasing field amplitudes, is notably low in these materials, showing that the initial domain alignment is strongly stabilized. Overall, the in situ measurements reveal that domain wall motion significantly impacts the structure and properties of BNT-45PT and reinforces the importance of understanding domain wall motion contributions to the physical properties of ferroelectrics.

  15. Application of real-time, stroboscopic x-ray diffraction with dynamical mechanical analysis to characterize the motion of ferroelastic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard J.; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Buckley, Andrew; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2004-02-01

    The dynamic response of ferroelastic twins to an alternating stress has been studied in situ at high temperature using a stroboscopic x-ray diffractometer and combined dynamical mechanical analyzer (XRD-DMA). The XRD-DMA is designed to allow x-ray rocking curves to be collected while the sample is undergoing simultaneous dynamical mechanical analysis in three-point-bend geometry. The detection of diffracted x-rays is synchronized with the applied load, so that rocking curves corresponding to different parts of the dynamic load cycle can be obtained separately. The technique is applied to single-crystal LaAlO3, which undergoes a cubic to rhombohedral phase transition at 550 °C, leading to the generation of characteristic "chevron" twins. The rocking-curve topology is calculated as a function of crystal orientation for each chevron type. Systematic changes in the rocking curves during heating and cooling under dynamic load demonstrate a clear preference for chevrons containing {100}pc walls perpendicular to the sample surface and {110}pc walls oriented at 45° to the sample surface. These domain walls are oriented favorably with respect to the applied stress (i.e., they separate domains with contrasting components of spontaneous strain parallel to the sample length). Below 200 °C, the superelastic strain is accommodated by rapid advancement/retraction of vertical {100}pc needle domains, with little effect on the dynamic rocking curves. Above 200 °C, a dynamic shift in peak position between rocking curves measured at the maximum and minimum applied loads is detected. The onset of a dynamic response correlates with the loss of the {100}pc needle domains and the transformation of the microstructure to 45° {110}pc walls. Superelastic strain is then accommodated by domain wall displacement/rotation, causing the wall to sweep back and forth across the x-ray beam and diffraction to occur from alternate domains at the maximum and minimum points of the stress cycle. A

  16. Performance loss due to wall ablation in plasma armature railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. V.; Parsons, W. M.; Cummings, C. E.; Fox, W. E.

    1985-07-01

    Parametric measurements have been performed on a plasma armature railgun at Los Alamos. The railgun is extensively instrumented for studies of the projectile motion and its interaction with the plasma armature. The most important parameter, driving current, was varied from 100 kA to 400 kA. Additional parameters investigated include current waveform, injection velocity, injection gas, wall insulation material, and initial pressure. For all combinations of parameters investigated, the measured performance was substantially below theoretical predictions. A strong correlation was found between performance loss and abnormal plasma armature features such as multiple arc formation, or separation of the armature from the projectile. In extreme cases, the plasma armature was observed to come to rest inside the railgun. A plasma armature model has been developed which successfully accounts for the measured performance loss and for many of the abnormal plasma armature features. By incorporating the ablation of wall material into the armature plasma this model predicts two parasitic forces that dominate the motion of the armature at high velocity. One force is the inertial drag term m dot sub a v. The other is frictional drag between the hot, turbulent plasma and the walls, which increases M sub a v squared. Simple scaling relations, which incorporate the plasma armature model, show that velocities less than 10 km/s will be extremely difficult to achieve with plasma armature railguns unless the effects of ablation are eliminated or carefully controlled.

  17. Evaluation of a Kalman-based block matching method to assess the bi-dimensional motion of the carotid artery wall in B-mode ultrasound sequences.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Orkisz, Maciej; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe; Vray, Didier

    2013-07-01

    We aim at investigating arterial diseases at early stage, by assessing the longitudinal (i.e. in the same direction as the blood flow) motion of the intima-media complex. This recently evidenced phenomenon has been shown to provide relevant and complementary information about vascular health. Our method assesses the longitudinal and radial motion from clinical in vivo B-mode ultrasound sequences. To estimate the trajectory of a selected point during the cardiac cycle, we introduce a block matching method that involves a temporal update of the reference block using a pixel-wise Kalman filter. The filter uses the initial gray-level of the pixel as control signal to avoid divergence due to cumulating errors. The block and search-window sizes are adapted to the tissue of interest. The method was evaluated on image sequences of the common carotid artery, acquired in 57 healthy volunteers and in 25 patients at high cardiovascular risk. Reference trajectories were generated for each sequence by averaging the tracings performed by three observers. Six different computerized techniques were also compared to our method. With a pixel size of 30 μm, the average absolute motion estimation errors were 84 ± 107 μm and 20 ± 19 μm for the longitudinal and radial directions, respectively. This accuracy was of the same order of magnitude as the inter- and intra-observers variability, and smaller than for the other methods. The estimated longitudinal motion amplitude was significantly reduced in at-risk patients compared with healthy volunteers (408 ± 281 μm vs. 643 ± 274 μm, p<0.0001). Our method can constitute a reliable and time-saving technique to investigate the arterial stiffness in clinical studies, in the objective to detect early-stage atherosclerosis. PMID:23612497

  18. Abnormal subendocardial function in restrictive left ventricular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henein, M Y; Gibson, D G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study possible disturbances in left ventricular long axis function in patients with a restrictive filling pattern. DESIGN--Prospective examination of the left ventricular transverse and longitudinal axes, transmitral flow, and the apexcardiogram. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre for cardiac diseases. SUBJECTS--21 normal subjects, age (SD) 51(11); 30 patients of similar age with a restrictive left ventricular filling pattern, defined as short early diastolic deceleration time less than the lower 95% confidence limit of the normal value (120 ms). 20 patients had a normal and 10 had an increased left ventricular end diastolic cavity size. RESULTS--Mitral Doppler echocardiography: E wave velocity was high only in patients with a normal cavity size. A wave velocity was greatly reduced in the two groups (P < 0.001) so that the E/A ratio was abnormally high. The relative A wave amplitude on the apexcardiogram was greatly increased in the two groups: 46(15)% (mean (SD)) and 54(4)% v 15(5)%. Minor axis: Fractional shortening was reduced from 30(10)% to 17(7)% in patients with normal cavity size and to 13(4.2)% in those with a dilated cavity (P < 0.001), as was the posterior wall thickening fraction from 100(30)% to 42(20)% and 50(25)% respectively (P < 0.001). Total systolic epicardial motion was normal and isovolumic relaxation time was short in the two groups. Long axis: Left ventricular abnormalities included reduced total amplitude of motion and its component during atrial systole (P < 0.001 for the two groups at both sites). Peak long axis shortening and lengthening were decreased at both left ventricular sites (P < 0.001). The time intervals from q wave of the electrocardiogram and A2 (aortic valve closure) to the onset of shortening and lengthening respectively were increased (both P < 0.001). Right ventricular long axis function was similarly affected but to a lesser extent. CONCLUSION--Left ventricular long axis function is consistently abnormal in

  19. Indication of Probe-Axis Angle by Extracting Wall Motion of Heart to Assist in Obtaining Long- and Short-Axis Views on Echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Matsuura, H.; Takahashi, R.

    We have developed an algorithm to find standard cross sections of the heart from successive echograms. We first divided an echogram into small spatial regions to detect the typical motion of the mitral valve by analyzing the brightness variation and correlation coefficient among the regions. Furthermore, combining this technique with the optical flow method, we elucidated the region velocity of the left ventricle after centering the valve on echogram. By analyzing symmetry among specified regions, we distinguished the short-axis view of heart from the others.

  20. The dynamics of domain walls and strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Haws, David; Garfinkle, David

    1989-01-01

    The leading order finite-width corrections to the equation of motion describing the motion of a domain wall are derived. The regime in which this equation of motion is invalid is discussed. Spherically and cylindrically symmetric solutions to this equation of motion are found. A misconception that has arisen in recent years regarding the rigidity (or otherwise) of cosmic strings is also clarified.

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  2. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  3. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kim, K.-J.; Lee, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ono, T.; You, C.-Y.; Jung, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices. PMID:27030379

  4. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Yoshimura, Y; Kim, K-J; Lee, K; Kim, T W; Ono, T; You, C-Y; Jung, M H

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices. PMID:27030379

  5. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kim, K.-J.; Lee, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ono, T.; You, C.-Y.; Jung, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices.

  6. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:26961572

  7. Ultrasonography of gallbladder abnormalities due to schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joachim; Azoulay, Daniel; Dong, Yi; Holtfreter, Martha C; Akpata, Robert; Calderaro, Julien; El-Scheich, Tarik; Breuer, Matthias; Neumayr, Andreas; Hatz, Christoph; Kircheis, Gerald; Botelho, Monica C; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2016-08-01

    After malaria, schistosomiasis remains the most important tropical parasitic disease in large parts of the world. Schistosomiasis has recently re-emerged in Southern Europe. Intestinal schistosomiasis is caused by most Schistosoma (S.) spp. pathogenic to humans and leads to chronic inflammation and fibrosis of the colon as well as to liver fibrosis. Gallbladder abnormalities usually occur in patients with advanced hepatic portal fibrosis due to Schistosoma mansoni infection. Occasionally, gallbladder abnormalities have been seen also in children and occurring without associated overt liver abnormalities.The specific S. mansoni-induced gallbladder abnormalities detectable by ultrasound include typical hyperechogenic wall thickening with external gallbladder wall protuberances. The luminal wall surface is smooth. The condition is usually clinically silent although some cases of symptomatic cholecystitis have been described. The ultrasonographic Murphy response is negative. Gallbladder contractility is impaired but sludge and calculi occur rarely. Contrary to other trematodes such as liver flukes, S. mansoni does not obstruct the biliary tract. Advanced gallbladder fibrosis is unlikely to reverse after therapy. PMID:27169865

  8. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  9. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  10. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  12. Analysis of regional left ventricular wall movement by phased array echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, D G; Brown, D J; Logan-Sinclair, R B

    1978-01-01

    Images from standard two-dimensional echocardiographs do not lend themselves to the study of regional left ventricular wall movement because of poor definition of endocardium. An alternative method, based on a wide-angle phased array sector scanner has, therefore, been devised. Once the appropriate region of the heart has been identified, the scan rate is increased, and an array of 41 M-mode scans is produced, resulting in improved frequency response and endocardial definition. Each scan is digitised separately, and since their spatial orientation is known, the left ventricular image can be reconstituted by computer, and isometric or contour displays produced. Preliminary results, based on 40 patients, are presented showing examples of left ventricular wall movement. Regional abnormalities of amplitude or timing can be displayed with results similar to those of angiography, while disturbances of septal motion or wall thickness can be observed in greater detail than with other methods. Images PMID:737090

  13. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  14. [TMJ morphological changes in abnormal occlusion].

    PubMed

    Volkov, S I; Bazhenov, D V; Semkin, V A; Bogdanov, A O

    2013-01-01

    TMJ dysfunction is one of the most common diseases among all disorders of the maxillofacial region. Any abnormality in synchrony or amplitude of motion of the TMJ results in the malposition of the articular disc. Researchers and clinicians were always interested in topographic anatomy of the TMJ. There is currently no consensus on matters relating to changes in anatomical features of the TMJ by occlusal disturbances. PMID:23715443

  15. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  18. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  19. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  20. Abnormal magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Zhao, H.; Chen, G. F.; Zhang, Y.; Du, H. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Wang, C. S.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yang, J. B.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that the hysteresis loops show wasp-waisted character at low temperatures, which has been proved to be related to the existence of multi-phases, the Fe/Ni soft magnetic phases and the CaCu5-type hard magnetic phase. A smooth-jump behavior of the magnetization is observed at T>5 K, whereas a step-like magnetization process appears at T<5 K. The CaCu5-type phase is responsible for such abnormal magnetization behavior. The magnetic moment reversal model with thermal activation is used to explain the relation of the critical magnetic field (Hcm) to the temperature (T>5 K). The reversal of the moment direction has to cross over an energy barrier of about 6.6×10-15 erg. The step-like jumps of the magnetization below 5 K is proposed to be resulted from a sharp increase of the sample temperature under the heat released by the irreversible domain wall motion.

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, Brown’s syndrome, orbital wall fractures, and restricted eye movement associated with thyroid eye disease. 2) Nystagmus: Some patients with nystagmus (jerky eye movements) will acquire a head turn or tilt if ...

  2. Organized motion in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of organized motion in turbulent flow indicates that the transport properties of most shear flows are dominated by large-scale vortex nonrandom motions. The mean velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer consists of a viscous sublayer, buffer layer, and a logarithmic outer layer; an empirical formula of Coles (1956) applies to various pressure gradients. The boundary layer coherent structure was isolated by the correlation methods of Townsend (1956) and flow visualization by direct observations of complex unsteady turbulent motions. The near-wall studies of Willmart and Wooldridge (1962) used the space-time correlation for pressure fluctuations at the wall under a thick turbulent boundary layer; finally, organized motion in free shear flows and transition-control of mixing demonstrated that the Reynolds number invariance of turbulence shows wide scatter.

  3. Comparison of myocardial contrast echocardiography with NC100100 and 99mTc sestamibi SPECT for detection of resting myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with previous myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jucquois, I; Nihoyannopoulos, P; D'Hondt, A; Roelants, V; Robert, A; Melin, J; Glass, D; Vanoverschelde, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) following intravenous injection of perfluorocarbon microbubbles permits identification of resting myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients who have had a previous myocardial infarction.
PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS—22 patients (mean (SD) age 66 (11) years) underwent MCE after intravenous injection of NC100100, a novel perfluorocarbon containing contrast agent, and resting 99mTc sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). With both methods, myocardial perfusion was graded semiquantitatively as 1 = normal, 0.5 = mild defect, and 0 = severe defect.
RESULTS—Among the 203 normally contracting segments, 151 (74%) were normally perfused by SPECT and 145 (71%) by MCE. With SPECT, abnormal tracer uptake was mainly found among normally contracting segments from the inferior wall. By contrast, with MCE poor myocardial opacification was noted essentially among the normally contracting segments from the anterior and lateral walls. Of the 142 dysfunctional segments, 87 (61%) showed perfusion defects by SPECT, and 94 (66%) by MCE. With both methods, perfusion abnormalities were seen more frequently among akinetic than hypokinetic segments. MCE correctly identified 81/139 segments that exhibited a perfusion defect by SPECT (58%), and 135/206 segments that were normally perfused by SPECT (66%). Exclusion of segments with attenuation artefacts (defined as abnormal myocardial opacification or sestamibi uptake but normal contraction) by either MCE or SPECT improved both the sensitivity (76%) and the specificity (83%) of the detection of SPECT perfusion defects by MCE.
CONCLUSIONS—The data suggest that MCE allows identification of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients who have had a previous myocardial infarction, provided that regional wall motion is simultaneously taken into account.


Keywords: myocardial contrast echocardiography; NC100100

  4. Personalized fall detection and classification through walls and in heavy indoor clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Jokanovic, Branka

    2015-05-01

    Recent research and developments for in home radar monitoring have shown real promise of the technology in detecting normal and abnormal gross-motor activities of humans inside their residences and at private homes. Attention is now paid to challenges in system integration, operations, and installations. One important question touches on the required number of radar units for a given residence and whether eventually one radar unit per room would become the nominal approach. Towards addressing this question and assessing the effectiveness of radar unit to sense adjacent rooms and hallways of the same residence, this paper examines through-wall radar monitoring where the radar signal faces both wall attenuation and dispersion. We show that typical interior walls do not significantly alter the radar time-frequency (TF) signature of a fall, and the radar signal return is slightly weakened by wall penetration. Additionally, we show that there is a wide variation of the TF feature values associated with fall motions which confuse a classifier, trained with generic subjects, and cause it to falsely declare a different motion.

  5. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  6. A nonlinear structural concept for compliant walls. [drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two mechanisms of drag reduction for flow over flat plates were investigated. The first mechanism employs Bushnell's hypothesis that compliant walls produce drag reduction by interfering with the formation of the turbulent spots in a turbulent boundary layer. It is shown that the amplitudes and frequencies of compliant wall motions for drag reduction might be achieved by using slightly curved walls and the resulting large amplitude motions of snap buckling. A simple structural model of an arch is used in the analysis, and an asymptotic method is developed. The required wall motions can be obtained by using materials like mylar. In addition, the delay of transition from laminar to turbulent flow by driven walls was studied for Poiseuille channel flow. The walls are driven by a periodic traveling wave. A significant increase in the transitional Reynolds number is obtained by appropriately prescibing the wavelength and phase velocity of the wall motion. Previously developed asymptotic methods are used in the analysis.

  7. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  8. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  9. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  10. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  11. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel

    2016-04-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  14. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  16. Circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Isaac; Henry, Richard Conn

    2000-07-01

    An extraordinarily simple and transparent derivation of the formula for the acceleration that occurs in uniform circular motion is presented, and is advocated for use in high school and college freshman physics textbooks.

  17. Polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tracking of the Beacon Explorer-C satellite by a precision laser system was used to measure the polar motion and solid earth tide. The tidal perturbation of satellite latitude is plotted as variation in maximum latitude in seconds of arc on earth's surface as a function of the date, and polar motion is shown by plotting the variation in latitude of the laser in seconds of arc along the earth's surface as a function of date

  18. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  19. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  20. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  1. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  2. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  3. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  4. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  5. Asteroid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mary V.; Moynihan, P. Daniel

    1996-12-01

    Equations are derived which describe the apparent motion of an asteroid traveling on an elliptical orbit in geocentric ecliptic coordinates. At opposition, the equations are identical to those derived by Bowellet al. (Bowell, E., B. Skiff, and L. Wasserman 1990. InAsteroids, Comets, Meteors III(C.-I. Lagerkvist, M. Rickman, B. A. Lindblad, and M. Lindgren, Eds.), pp. 19-24. Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden). These equations can be an important component in the optimization of search strategies for specific asteroid populations based on their apparent motions relative to other populations when observed away from opposition.

  6. Development and pathologies of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Seidelmann, Sara B; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-06-01

    Arteries consist of an inner single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by layers of smooth muscle and an outer adventitia. The majority of vascular developmental studies focus on the construction of endothelial networks through the process of angiogenesis. Although many devastating vascular diseases involve abnormalities in components of the smooth muscle and adventitia (i.e., the vascular wall), the morphogenesis of these layers has received relatively less attention. Here, we briefly review key elements underlying endothelial layer formation and then focus on vascular wall development, specifically on smooth muscle cell origins and differentiation, patterning of the vascular wall, and the role of extracellular matrix and adventitial progenitor cells. Finally, we discuss select human diseases characterized by marked vascular wall abnormalities. We propose that continuing to apply approaches from developmental biology to the study of vascular disease will stimulate important advancements in elucidating disease mechanism and devising novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24071897

  7. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  8. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  9. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  11. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  12. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  13. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  14. Domain wall motion and electromechanical strain in lead-free piezoelectrics: Insight from the model system (1 - x)Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3-x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tutuncu, Goknur; Li, Binzhi; Bowman, Keith; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-07-17

    The piezoelectric compositions (1 - x)Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3–x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BZT-xBCT) span a model lead-free morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between room temperature rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at approximately x = 0.5. In the present work, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements during electric field application are used to elucidate the origin of electromechanical strain in several compositions spanning the tetragonal compositional range 0.6 ≤ x ≤ 0.9. As BCT concentration decreases towards the MPB, the tetragonal distortion (given by c/a-1) decreases concomitantly with an increase in 90° domain wall motion. The increase in observed macroscopic strain is predominantly attributed to the increased contribution from 90° domain wall motion. The results demonstrate that domain wall motion is a significant factor in achieving high strain and piezoelectric coefficients in lead-free polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  15. Domain walls inside localised orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blåbäck, J.; van der Woerd, E.; Van Riet, T.; Williams, M.

    2015-12-01

    The equations of motion of toroidal orientifold compactifications with fluxes are in one-to-one correspondence with gauged supergravity if the orientifold (and D-brane) sources are smeared over the compact space. This smeared limit is identical to the approximation that ignores warping. It is therefore relevant to compare quantities obtained from the gauged supergravity with the true 10d solution with localised sources. In this paper we find the correspondence between BPS domain walls in gauged SUGRA and 10D SUGRA with localised sources. Our model is the simplest orientifold with fluxes we are aware of: an O6/D6 compactification on {T}^3/{Z}_2 in massive IIA with H 3-flux. The BPS domain walls correspond to a O6/D6/NS5/D8 bound state. Our analysis reveals that the domain wall energy computed in gauged SUGRA is unaffected by the localisation of the O6/D6 sources.

  16. Random vibration of compliant wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.; Heller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the realistic case of two-dimensional random motion of a membrane with bending stiffness supported on a viscoelastic spring substrate and on an elastic base plate under both subsonic and supersonic boundary layer turbulence. The cross-power spectral density of surface displacements is solved in terms of design variables of the compliant wall - such as the dimensions and material properties of the membrane (Mylar), substrate (PVC foam), and panel (aluminum) - so that a sensitivity analysis can be made to examine the influence of each design variable on the surface response statistics. Three numerical examples typical of compliant wall design are worked out and their response statistics in relation to wave drag and roughness drag are assessed. The results can serve as a guideline for experimental investigation of the drag reduction concept through the use of a compliant wall.

  17. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  18. A programmable motion phantom for quality assurance of motion management in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, L; Kron, T; Johnston, P N; McDermott, L N; Taylor, M L; Callahan, J; Franich, R D

    2012-03-01

    A commercially available motion phantom (QUASAR, Modus Medical) was modified for programmable motion control with the aim of reproducing patient respiratory motion in one dimension in both the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, as well as, providing controllable breath-hold and sinusoidal patterns for the testing of radiotherapy gating systems. In order to simulate realistic patient motion, the DC motor was replaced by a stepper motor. A separate 'chest-wall' motion platform was also designed to accommodate a variety of surrogate marker systems. The platform employs a second stepper motor that allows for the decoupling of the chest-wall and insert motion. The platform's accuracy was tested by replicating patient traces recorded with the Varian real-time position management (RPM) system and comparing the motion platform's recorded motion trace with the original patient data. Six lung cancer patient traces recorded with the RPM system were uploaded to the motion platform's in-house control software and subsequently replicated through the phantom motion platform. The phantom's motion profile was recorded with the RPM system and compared to the original patient data. Sinusoidal and breath-hold patterns were simulated with the motion platform and recorded with the RPM system to verify the systems potential for routine quality assurance of commercial radiotherapy gating systems. There was good correlation between replicated and actual patient data (P 0.003). Mean differences between the location of maxima in replicated and patient data-sets for six patients amounted to 0.034 cm with the corresponding minima mean equal to 0.010 cm. The upgraded motion phantom was found to replicate patient motion accurately as well as provide useful test patterns to aid in the quality assurance of motion management methods and technologies. PMID:22119931

  19. Detection of Aortic Wall Inclusion Using Regional Pulse Wave Propagation and Velocity In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of the regional stiffening of the arterial wall may prove important in the diagnosis of various vascular pathologies. The pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the aortic wall has been shown to be dependent on the wall stiffness and has played a fundamental role in a range of diagnostic methods. Conventional clinical methods involve a global examination of the pulse traveling between two remote sites, e.g. femoral and carotid arteries, to provide an average PWV estimate. However, the majority of vascular diseases entail regional vascular changes and therefore may not be detected by a global PWV estimate. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction study of straight-geometry aortas was carried out to examine the effects of regional stiffness changes on PWV. Five homogeneous aortas with increasing wall stiffness as well as two aortas with soft and hard inclusions were considered. In each case, spatio-temporal maps of the wall motion were used to analyze the regional pulse wave propagation. On the homogeneous aortas, increasing PWVs were found to increase with the wall moduli (R2 = 0.9988), indicating the reliability of the model to accurately represent the wave propagation. On the inhomogeneous aortas, formation of reflected and standing waves was observed at the site of the hard and soft inclusions, respectively. Neither the hard nor the soft inclusion had a significant effect on the velocity of the traveling pulse beyond the inclusion site, which supported the hypothesis that a global measurement of the average PWV could fail to detect regional abnormalities. PMID:24235978

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  1. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  2. Development of Motion Processing in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annaz, Dagmara; Remington, Anna; Milne, Elizabeth; Coleman, Mike; Campbell, Ruth; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Swettenham, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that children with autism may be impaired in the perception of biological motion from moving point-light displays. Some children with autism also have abnormally high motion coherence thresholds. In the current study we tested a group of children with autism and a group of typically developing children aged 5 to 12 years of…

  3. Fetal MR Imaging of Gastrointestinal Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Furey, Elizabeth A; Bailey, April A; Twickler, Diane M

    2016-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an increasing and valuable role in antenatal diagnosis and perinatal management of fetal gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. Advances in MR imaging data acquisition and use of motion-insensitive techniques have established MR imaging as an important adjunct to obstetric ultrasonography (US) for fetal diagnosis. In this regard, MR imaging provides high diagnostic accuracy for antenatal diagnosis of common and uncommon GI pathologic conditions. In the setting of fetal GI disease, T1-weighted images demonstrate the amount and distribution of meconium, which is crucial to the diagnostic capability of fetal MR imaging. Specifically, knowledge of the T1 signal intensity characteristics of fetal meconium, the normal pattern of meconium with advancing gestational age, and the expected caliber of small and large bowel in the fetus is key to diagnosis of abnormalities of the GI tract. Use of ultrafast T2-weighted sequences for evaluation of the expected location and morphology of fluid-containing structures, including the stomach and small bowel, in the fetal abdomen further aids in diagnostic confidence. Uncommonly encountered fetal GI pathologic conditions, especially cloacal dysmorphology, may demonstrate characteristic MR imaging patterns, which may add additional information to that from fetal US, allowing improved fetal and neonatal management. This article discusses common indications for fetal MR imaging of the GI tract, imaging protocols for fetal GI MR imaging, the normal appearance of the fetal GI tract with advancing gestational age, and the imaging appearances of common fetal GI abnormalities, as well as uncommon fetal GI conditions with characteristic appearances. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163598

  4. Dynamics of domain wall driven by spin-transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Chureemart, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2011-05-01

    Spin-torque switching of magnetic devices offers new technological possibilities for data storage and integrated circuits. We have investigated domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic thin film driven by a spin-polarized current using an atomistic spin model with a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the effect of the spin-transfer torque. The presence of the spin-transfer torque is shown to create an out-of-plane domain wall, in contrast to the external-field-driven case where an in-plane wall is found. We have investigated the effect of the spin torque on domain-wall displacement, domain-wall velocity, and domain-wall width, as well as the equilibration time in the presence of the spin-transfer torque. We have shown that the minimum spin-current density, regarded as the critical value for domain-wall motion, decreases with increasing temperature.

  5. In-situ observation of domain wall motion in Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Dabin; Cai, Changlong; Li, Zhenrong Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Shujun; Cheng, Yaojin

    2014-07-21

    Various domain structures, including wave-like domains, mixed needle-like and laminar domains, typical embedded 90° and 180° domains, have been observed in unpoled rhombohedral, monoclinic, and tetragonal Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals by polarizing light microscope; while in poled tetragonal crystals, the parallel 180° domains were reversed and only vertical 90° domain walls were observed. For 0.24PIN-0.42PMN-0.34PT crystals with morphotropic phase boundary composition, the domain wall motion was in-situ observed as a function of applied electric field along crystallographic [100] direction. With increasing the electric field from 0 to 12 kV/cm, the rhombohedral (R) domains were found to change to monoclinic (M) domains and then to tetragonal (T) domains. The electric field-induced phase transition was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent dielectric behavior.

  6. Local Domain-Wall Velocity Engineering via Tailored Potential Landscapes in Ferromagnetic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    We report the local control of the domain-wall velocity by tailoring the domain-wall potential landscape via local variations of a curved ring geometry. Employing time-resolved scanning-transmission x-ray microscopy, we dynamically image the motion of domain walls in rotating magnetic fields and quantify the contribution of the spatially varying potential to the domain-wall dynamics. We explain our experimentally obtained angular dependences of domain-wall velocities by the interplay between long-range forces arising from the Zeeman interaction of domain walls with the external magnetic field with local forces arising from variations of domain-wall energy due to a varying ring width. The interplay of these forces leads to distortion-free wall motion, and we use the engineered domain-wall potential landscape for spatial synchronization of domain-wall velocities in ferromagnetic rings, which are both a key prerequisite for the implementation of domain-wall-based devices.

  7. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  8. Dynamic response of cantilever retaining walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1996-10-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible cantilever retaining walls that are elastically constrained against rotation at their base. The retained medium is idealized as a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semi-infinite extent in the horizontal direction. The parameters varied include the flexibilities of the wall and its base, the properties of the retained medium, and the characteristics of the ground motion. In addition to long-period, effectively static excitations, both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are considered. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the wall pressures, and the associated shears and bending moments. The method of analysis employed is described only briefly, emphasis being placed on the presentation and interpretation of the comprehensive numerical solutions. It is shown that, for realistic wall flexibilities, the maximum wall forces are significantly lower than those obtained for fixed-based rigid walls and potentially of the same order of magnitude as those computed by the Mononobe-Okabe method.

  9. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  10. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate "automotion," the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  11. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  12. Electrocardiographic changes of acute lateral wall myocardial infarction: a reappraisal based on scintigraphic localization of the infarct

    SciTech Connect

    Movahed, A.; Becker, L.C.

    1984-10-01

    To determine how often acute lateral myocardial infarcts may be electrocardiographically silent, a new approach was utilized in which subjects were selected by admission thallium scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients with their first infarction were identified with moderate to severe perfusion defects of the lateral and posterolateral walls, persistent over 7 days and associated with severe wall motion abnormalities. Patients with involvement of the anterior, septal or inferior regions were not included. In nine patients, the perfusion defect extended to the anterolateral wall: all developed ST elevation and Q waves in at least one of the lateral leads (I, aVL or V6) but none showed changes in the inferior leads (II, III or aVF). In the other 22 patients, the perfusion defect was limited to the lateral and posterolateral walls: only 12 showed ST elevations (inferior leads only in 7, lateral leads only in 2, both leads in 3) and only 9 developed Q waves (inferior in all). In 8 of these 22 patients, the infarct was silent in the sense that no ST segment elevation or Q waves were seen, although ST depressions or T wave inversions, or both, in all but one patient were compatible with subendocardial infarction. The results indicate that the standard electrocardiogram is insensitive to changes in the lateral and posterolateral regions. Additional diagnostic studies are needed for proper localization and sizing of acute myocardial infarcts.

  13. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  14. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  15. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  16. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  17. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  18. Ultrastructural correlates of left ventricular contraction abnormalities in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease: determinants of reversible segmental asynergy postrevascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Flameng, W; Suy, R; Schwarz, F; Borgers, M; Piessens, J; Thone, F; Van Ermen, H; De Geest, H

    1981-11-01

    The relationships between structural alterations and left ventricular (LV) contraction abnormalities were studied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Transmural biopsies of the LV anterior free wall were taken during aortocoronary bypass surgery (CABG) in 62 patients. When preoperative anterior wall motion (AWM) was reduced, significant myocardial cell degeneration was found in patients with as well as without previous anterior infarction (MI). The amount of myocardial fibrosis was increased only in patients with ECG evidence of previous anterior MI (p less than 0.001). In a second series of 139 CAD patients, cineventriculograms performed before and 8 months after CABG were examined. In patients with patent grafts to the LV anterior wall not previously infarcted, reduced AWM became normal. In patients with previous anterior MI the outcome of AWM was unpredictable (usually unimproved). Thus the histologic correlate of reduced AWM in segments not previously infarcted was progressive loss of contractile material in otherwise viable myocardial cells. Some reversibility was suggested by restoration of resting function after CABG. Unpredictable results in segments associated with pathologic Q waves appear related to the fibrous component of these previously infarcted areas. PMID:6975559

  19. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    Limited range of motion is a term meaning that a joint or body part cannot move through its normal range of motion. ... Motion may be limited because of a problem within the joint, swelling of tissue around the joint, ...

  20. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  2. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    SciTech Connect

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  3. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Domain Walls in Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2015-03-01

    We study domain walls in thin ferromagnetic nanotubes with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Dramatic effects arise from the interplay of space curvature and spin-orbit induced DMI on the domain wall structure in these systems. The domain walls become narrower in systems with DMI and curvature. Moreover, the domain walls created in such nanotubes can propagate without Walker breakdown for arbitrary applied currents, thus allowing for a robust and controlled domain-wall motion. The domain-wall velocity is directly proportional to the non-adiabatic spin transfer torque current term and is insensitive to the adiabatic current term. Application of an external magnetic field along the nanotube axis triggers rich dynamical response of the curved domain wall. In particular, we show that the propagation velocity is a non-linear function of both the applied field and DMI, and strongly depends on the orientation and chirality of the wall. We acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 25800184 and No. 25247056) from the MEXT, Japan and SpinNet.

  4. Reduced order modeling of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Modeling turbulent flow near a wall is a pacing item in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace applications and geophysical flows. Gradual progress has been made in statistical modeling of near wall turbulence using the Reynolds averaged equations of motion, an area of research where John Lumley has made numerous seminal contributions. More recently, Lumley and co-workers pioneered dynamical systems modeling of near wall turbulence, and demonstrated that the experimentally observed turbulence dynamics can be predicted using low dimensional dynamical systems. The discovery of minimal flow unit provides further evidence that the near wall turbulence is amenable to reduced order modeling. The underlying rationale for potential success in using low dimensional dynamical systems theory is based on the fact that the Reynolds number is low in close proximity to the wall. Presumably for the same reason, low dimensional models are expected to be successful in modeling of the laminar/turbulence transition region. This has been shown recently using dynamic mode decomposition. Furthermore, it is shown that the near wall flow structure and statistics in the late and non-linear transition region is strikingly similar to that in higher Reynolds number fully developed turbulence. In this presentation, I will argue that the accumulated evidence suggests that wall modeling for LES using low dimensional dynamical systems is a profitable avenue to pursue. The main challenge would be the numerical integration of such wall models in LES methodology.

  5. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  6. A coupled level-set framework for bladder wall segmentation with application to MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chaijie; Bao, Shanglian; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a coupled level-set framework for segmentation of bladder wall using T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The segmentation results will be used for non-invasive MR-based virtual cystoscopy (VCys). The framework uses two level-set functions to segment inner and outer borders of the bladder wall respectively. Based on Chan-Vese (C-V) model, a local adaptive fitting (LAF) image energy is introduced to capture local intensity contrast. Comparing with previous work, our method has the following advantages. First of all, unlike most other work which only segments the boundary of the bladder but not inner border and outer border respectively, our method extracts the inner border as well as the outer border of bladder wall automatically. Secondly, we focus on T1-weighted MR images which decrease the image intensity of the urine and therefore minimize the partial volume effect (PVE) on the bladder wall for detection of abnormalities on the mucosa layer in contrast to others' work on CT images and T2-weighted MR images which enhance the intensity of the urine and encounter the PVE. In addition, T1-weighted MR images provide the best tissue contrast for detection of the outer border of the bladder wall. Since MR images tend to be inhomogeneous and have ghost artifacts due to motion and other causes as compared to computer tomography (CT)-based VCys, our framework is easy to control the geometric property of level-set functions to mitigate the influences of inhomogeneity and ghosts. Finally, a variety of geometric parameters, such as the thickness of bladder wall, etc, can be measured easily under the level-set framework. These parameters are clinically important for VCys. The segmentation results were evaluated by experienced radiologists, whose feedback strongly demonstrated the usefulness of such coupled level-set framework for VCys.

  7. Experimental Study of Short-Time Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Riegler, David; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report our progress on the study of short-time Brownian motion of optically-trapped microspheres. In earlier work, we observed the instantaneous velocity of microspheres in gas and in liquid, verifying a prediction by Albert Einstein from 1907. We now report a more accurate test of the energy equipartition theorem for a particle in liquid. We also observe boundary effects on Brownian motion in liquid by setting a wall near the trapped particle, which changes the dynamics of the motion. We find that the velocity autocorrelation of the particle decreases faster as the particle gets closer to the wall.

  8. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  10. Wind tunnel wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Kemp, William B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    About a decade ago, interest in alleviating wind tunnel wall interference was renewed by advances in computational aerodynamics, concepts of adaptive test section walls, and plans for high Reynolds number transonic test facilities. Selection of NASA Langley cryogenic concept for the National Transonic Facility (NTF) tended to focus the renewed wall interference efforts. A brief overview and current status of some Langley sponsored transonic wind tunnel wall interference research are presented. Included are continuing efforts in basic wall flow studies, wall interference assessment/correction procedures, and adaptive wall technology.

  11. A nonlinear structural concept for drag-reducing compliant walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two mechanisms of drag reduction for flow over flat plates were investigated. The first mechanism employs Bushnell's hypothesis that compliant walls produce drag reduction by interfering with the formation of the turbulent spots in a turbulent boundary layer. It is shown that the amplitudes and frequencies of compliant wall motions for drag reduction might be achieved by using slightly curved walls and the resulting large amplitude motions of snap buckling. A simple structural model of an arch is used in the analysis, and an asymptotic method is developed. The required wall motions can be obtained by using materials like mylar. In addition, the delay of transition from laminar to turbulent flow by driven walls was studied for Poiseuille channel flow. The walls are driven by a periodic traveling wave. A significant increase in the transitional Reynolds number is obtained by appropriately prescribing the wavelength and phase velocity of the wall motion. Previously developed asymptotic methods are used in the analysis. Previously announced in STAR as N83-11061

  12. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  13. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders. We will discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. This is not carry out a comprehensive review; rather we selectively discuss existing evidence in building an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

  14. Low-cost respiratory motion tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Del Valle, Misael; Wang, Jiali; Byrne, James; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the cause of more than 150,000 deaths annually in the United States. Early and accurate detection of lung tumors with Positron Emission Tomography has enhanced lung tumor diagnosis. However, respiratory motion during the imaging period of PET results in the reduction of accuracy of detection due to blurring of the images. Chest motion can serve as a surrogate for tracking the motion of the tumor. For tracking chest motion, an optical laser system was designed which tracks the motion of a patterned card placed on the chest by illuminating the pattern with two structured light sources, generating 8 positional markers. The position of markers is used to determine the vertical, translational, and rotational motion of the card. Information from the markers is used to decide whether the patient's breath is abnormal compared to their normal breathing pattern. The system is developed with an inexpensive web-camera and two low-cost laser pointers. The experiments were carried out using a dynamic phantom developed in-house, to simulate chest movement with different amplitudes and breathing periods. Motion of the phantom was tracked by the system developed and also by a pressure transducer for comparison. The studies showed a correlation of 96.6% between the respiratory tracking waveforms by the two systems, demonstrating the capability of the system. Unlike the pressure transducer method, the new system tracks motion in 3 dimensions. The developed system also demonstrates the ability to track a sliding motion of the patient in the direction parallel to the bed and provides the potential to stop the PET scan in case of such motion.

  15. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  16. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-17

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. Produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithiumceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  17. Is the great attractor really a great wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences are discussed of a late time phase transition which produces light domain walls. The observed peculiar velocity field of the Universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave background radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such a scenario. The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion reported by the Seven Samurai could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall with the Hubble volume (the Great Wall).

  18. Role of orientation reference selection in motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal were developed to further explore and quantify the orientation reference selection abilities of subjects and the relation, if any, between motion sickness and orientation reference selection. The overall objectives of this proposal are to determine (1) if motion sickness susceptibility is related to sensory orientation reference selection abilities of subjects, (2) if abnormal vertical canal-otolith function is the source of these abnormal posture control strategies and if it can be quantified by vestibular and oculomotor reflex measurements, and (3) if quantifiable measures of perception of vestibular and visual motion cues can be related to motion sickness susceptibility and to orientation reference selection ability demonstrated by tests which systematically control the sensory imformation available for orientation.

  19. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  20. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  1. Moving Towards Domain Wall Devices in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    Domain walls in ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic oxides are distinct functional materials in their own right. They can be conducting, or even superconducting, when surrounding domains are insulating; they can demonstrate magnetism when the surrounding bulk is non-magnetic and they can contain ordered electrical dipoles when the matrix containing them is non-polar. Since domain walls can also be created, destroyed, and controllably moved from place to place, there is an amazing opportunity for us to design new forms of devices in which functionality is actively and dynamically deployed (now you see it; now you don't). This is the essence of the emerging field known as ``domain wall nanoelectronics''. In time, this arena of research could change the way we think of nanoscale functional devices, moving increasingly towards agile circuitry and neuromorphic device architectures. While the control of domain wall injection, movement and annihilation has been developed rather well in the nanomagnetics community (in race-track and domain wall logic research), similar research has not been widely performed in nanoscale ferroelectrics, ferroelastics and multiferroics. This talk will discuss progress that has been made to date and the way in which nanomagnetics research can be used as a source of inspiration. Site-specific domain wall injection and motion control in both proper and improper ferroelectrics using inhomogeneous electric and elastic fields, as well as dielectric patterning in uniaxial ferroelectrics, will be specifically considered. As will be shown, sufficient control has been developed to allow the creation of a diode for domain wall motion in ferroelectrics, for example. The author acknowledges support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  2. Abnormality on Liver Function Test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Children with abnormal liver function can often be seen in outpatient clinics or inpatients wards. Most of them have respiratory disease, or gastroenteritis by virus infection, accompanying fever. Occasionally, hepatitis by the viruses causing systemic infection may occur, and screening tests are required. In patients with jaundice, the tests for differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In the case of a child with hepatitis B virus infection vertically from a hepatitis B surface antigen positive mother, the importance of the recognition of immune clearance can't be overstressed, for the decision of time to begin treatment. Early diagnosis changes the fate of a child with Wilson disease. So, screening test for the disease should not be omitted. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is mainly discovered in obese children, is a new strong candidate triggering abnormal liver function. Muscular dystrophy is a representative disease mimicking liver dysfunction. Although muscular dystrophy is a progressive disorder, and early diagnosis can't change the fate of patients, it will be better to avoid parent's blame for delayed diagnosis. PMID:24511518

  3. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  4. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  5. Static imaging of motion: motion texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Koichi

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes how motion segmentation can be achieved by analyzing of a single static image that is created from a series of picture frames. The key idea is motion imaging; in other words, motion is expressed in static images by integrating, frame after frame, the spatiotemporal fluctuations of the gradient gray level at each local area. This tends to create blurred or attached line images (images with lines that show the path of movement of an object through space) on moving objects. We call this 'motion texture'. We computed motion texture images based on the animation of a natural scene and on a number of computer synthesized animations containing groups of moving objects (random dots). Moreover, we applied two different texture analyses to the motion textured images for segmentation: a texture analysis based on the local homogeneity of gray level gradation in similarly textured regions and another based on the structural feature of gray level gradation in motion texture. Experiments showed that subjective visual impressions of segmentation were quite different for these animations. The texture segmentation described here successfully grouped moving objects coincident to subjective impressions. In our random dot animations, the density of the basic motion vectors extracted from each pair of successive frames was set at a constant to compensate for the dot grouping effect based on the vector density. The dot appearance period (lifetime) is varied across the animations. In a long lifetime random dot animation, region boundaries can be more clearly perceived than in a short one. The different impressions may be explained by analyzing the motion texture elements, but can not always be represented successfully using the motion vectors between two successive frames whose density is set at a constant between the animations with the different lifetime.

  6. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  7. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  8. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  9. Climbing Rates of Microtubules Propelled by Dynein after Collision with Microfabricated Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashikari, Norihiko; Shitaka, Yuji; Fujita, Kosuke; Kojima, Hiroaki; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2012-02-01

    We proposed a method to characterize the effect of micrometer-scale walls on the motion of microtubules propelled by dynein, a motor protein. The walls were made of resist polymers, such as OEBR1000, SAL601, and PMGI, using e-beam lithography. The pattern of the walls was designed to make microtubules collide with the wall perpendicularly and the number of microtubules crossing over the wall was counted from sequential images obtained with a fluorescence microscope. It was found that the wall, which was higher than approximately 800 nm, stops microtubules from crossing over the wall. The wall made of OEBR1000 prevents microtubules from crossing it more effectively than that made of SAL601 and the overhang is also useful for guiding the microtubule motion.

  10. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p < 0.050). One participant showed an increase in motion of 8.2 mm (p < 0.001) with vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (<1 mm) in kidney motion. No relationship was observed for abdominal wall motion and motion changes in the left kidney (r = 0.345, p = 0.402) or right kidney (r = 0.527, p = 0.145). Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion. PMID:24502551

  11. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  12. Characterization of the Test Section Walls at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Charles B.; Graves, Sharon S.

    2003-01-01

    The test section walls of the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are known to move under thermal and pressure loads. Videogrammetry was used to measure wall motion during the summer of 2002. In addition, a laser distancemeter was used to measure the relative distance between the test section walls at a single point. Distancemeter and videogrammetry results were consistent. Data were analyzed as a function of temperature and pressure to determine their effects on wall motion. Data were collected between 50 and 100 F, 0 and 0.315 Mach, and dynamic pressures of 0 and 120 psf. The overall motion of each wall was found to be less than 0.25 in. and less than facility personnel anticipated. The results show how motion depends on the temperature and pressure inside the test section as well is the position of the boundary layer vane. The repeatability of the measurements was +/-0.06 in. This report describes the methods used to record the motion of the test section walls and the results of the data analysis. Future facility plans include the development of a suitable wall restraint system and the determination of the effects of the wall motion on tunnel calibration.

  13. Guiding Center Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, H.J. de

    2004-03-15

    The motion of charged particles in slowly varying electromagnetic fields is analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field is such that the gyro-period and the gyro-radius of the particle motion around field lines are the shortest time and length scales of the system. The particle motion is described as the sum of a fast gyro-motion and a slow drift velocity.

  14. Cigarette smoke potentiates asbestos-induced airflow abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L.; Tron, V.; Wiggs, B.; Churg, A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to both asbestos and cigarette smoke can produce worse parenchymal lung disease than exposure to asbestos alone. Using a guinea pig model of asbestos administration that produces primarily airway disease and associated airflow abnormalities, we showed previously that the combination of asbestos and smoke acts synergistically to produce more marked increases in tissue collagen, fibrosis of airway walls, and early interstitial fibrosis than are seen with asbestos alone. To investigate the functional effects of these morphological and biochemical abnormalities, pulmonary function tests for volumes and flows, including lung volumes, pressure-volume curves, and flow-volume curves, were performed. By themselves, both smoke and asbestos produced increases in total lung capacity (TLC), residual volume (RV), and functional residual capacity (FRC); the two agents together made all these changes worse than either one alone. Both smoking and asbestos moved the pressure-volume curve upward, and the effects of the two agents together were again greater than either alone. Similarly, both smoke and asbestos decreased flows, and the two agents produced more severe impairment than either one by itself. The changes in volumes, pressure-volume curve, and flows correlated with both increased thickness of small airway walls and increases in airspace size. These observations indicate that, at least in this guinea pig model, cigarette smoke can potentiate the functional consequences of asbestos exposure.

  15. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  16. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  17. Abnormalities of the Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane, including the hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes, are an important group of inherited hemolytic anemias. Classified by distinctive morphology on peripheral blood smear, these disorders are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Once considered routine, growing recognition of the longterm risks of splenectomy, including cardiovascular disease, thrombotic disorders, and pulmonary hypertension, as well as the emergence of penicillin-resistant pneumococci, a concern for infection in overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, have led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Current management guidelines acknowledge these important considerations when entertaining splenectomy and recommend detailed discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. PMID:24237975

  18. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  19. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  20. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  1. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  2. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  3. Fractional Whirl Motion in Wave Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Unloaded gas, plain journal bearings experience sub-synchronous whirl motion due to fluid film instabilities and wall contact usually occurs immediately after the onset of the whirl motion. An alternative is the wave journal bearing which significantly improves bearing stability. The predicted threshold where the sub-synchronous whirl motion starts was well confirmed by the experimental observation. In addition, both a two-wave and a three-wave journal bearing can operate free of sub-synchronous whirl motion over a large range in speeds. When the sub-synchronous whirl motion occurs, both the two-wave and three-wave bearing can run in a whirl orbit well within the bearing clearance. At large clearances and wave amplitudes a two-wave bearing, unliKe other bearings, can exhibit a sub-synchronous whirl movement at both low and high speeds, but can run extremely stable and without whirl at intermediate speeds. Moreover, in these cases, the whirl frequencies are close to a quarter of the synchronous speed. The three-wave bearing can exhibit sub-synchronous whirl motion only after a specific threshold when the speed increases and the whirl frequencies are close to half of the synchronous speed.

  4. Breathing abnormalities in sleep in achondroplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, K A; Everett, F; Sillence, D; Fagan, E; Sullivan, C E

    1993-01-01

    Overnight sleep studies were performed in 20 subjects with achondroplasia to document further the respiratory abnormalities present in this group. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded in 19 of the subjects to screen for the presence of brainstem abnormalities, which are one of the potential aetiological mechanisms. Fifteen children aged 1 to 14 years, and five young adults, aged 20 to 31 years were included. All had upper airway obstruction and 15 (75%) had a pathological apnoea index (greater than five per hour). Other sleep associated respiratory abnormalities, including partial obstruction, central apnoea, and abnormal electromyographic activity of accessory muscles of respiration, also showed a high prevalence. SEPs were abnormal in eight (42%), but there was no correlation between abnormal SEPs and apnoea during sleep, either qualitatively or quantitatively. A high prevalence of both sleep related respiratory abnormalities and abnormal SEPs in young subjects with achondroplasia was demonstrated. However, the sleep related respiratory abnormalities do not always result in significant blood gas disturbances or correlate with abnormal SEPs in this group. PMID:8215519

  5. Discovering hierarchical motion structure.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Samuel J; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Jäkel, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Scenes filled with moving objects are often hierarchically organized: the motion of a migrating goose is nested within the flight pattern of its flock, the motion of a car is nested within the traffic pattern of other cars on the road, the motion of body parts are nested in the motion of the body. Humans perceive hierarchical structure even in stimuli with two or three moving dots. An influential theory of hierarchical motion perception holds that the visual system performs a "vector analysis" of moving objects, decomposing them into common and relative motions. However, this theory does not specify how to resolve ambiguity when a scene admits more than one vector analysis. We describe a Bayesian theory of vector analysis and show that it can account for classic results from dot motion experiments, as well as new experimental data. Our theory takes a step towards understanding how moving scenes are parsed into objects. PMID:25818905

  6. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  7. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Background— Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Methods and Results— Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Conclusions— Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. PMID

  8. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  9. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  10. Cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall, a dynamic network of polysaccharides and glycoproteins of significant compositional and structural complexity, functions in plant growth, development and stress responses. In recent years, the existence of plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanisms has been demonstrated, but little is known about the signaling pathways involved, or their components. Examination of key mutants has shed light on the relationships between cell wall remodeling and plant cell responses, indicating a central role for the regulatory network that monitors and controls cell wall performance and integrity. In this review, we present a short overview of cell wall composition and discuss post-synthetic cell wall modification as a valuable approach for studying CWI perception and signaling pathways. PMID:23857352

  11. Occurrence of maxillary sinus abnormalities detected by cone beam CT in asymptomatic patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the maxillofacial region allow the inspection of the entire volume of the maxillary sinus (MS), identifying anatomic variations and abnormalities in the image volume, this is frequently neglected by oral radiologists when interpreting images of areas at a distance from the dentoalveolar region, such as the full anatomical aspect of the MS. The aim of this study was to investigate maxillary sinus abnormalities in asymptomatic patients by using CBCT. Methods 1113 CBCT were evaluated by two examiners and identification of abnormalities, the presence of periapical lesions and proximity to the lower sinus wall were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and Kappa statistics. Results Abnormalities were diagnosed in 68.2% of cases (kappa = 0.83). There was a significant difference between genders (p < 0.001) and there was no difference in age groups. Mucosal thickening was the most prevalent abnormality (66%), followed by retention cysts (10.1%) and opacification (7.8%). No association was observed between the proximity of periapical lesions and the presence and type of inflammatory abnormalities (p = 0.124). Conclusions Abnormalities in maxillary sinus emphasizes how important it is for the dentomaxillofacial radiologist to undertake an interpretation of the whole volume of CBCT images. PMID:22883529

  12. Possible Genetic Origin of Limb-Body Wall Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gajzer, David C.; Hirzel, Alicia Cristina; Saigal, Gaurav; Rojas, Claudia Patricia; Rodriguez, Maria Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) is characterized by multiple severe congenital malformations including an abdominal and/or thoracic wall defect covered by amnion, a short or absent umbilical cord with the placenta almost attached to the anterior fetal wall, intestinal malrotation, scoliosis, and lower extremity anomalies. There is no consensus about the etiology of LBWC and many cases with abnormal facial cleft do not meet the requirements for the true complex. We describe a series of four patients with LBWC and other malformations in an attempt to explain their etiology. There are several reports of fetuses with LBWC and absent gallbladder and one of our patients also had polysplenia. Absent gallbladder and polysplenia are associated with laterality genes including HOX, bFGF, transforming growth factor beta/activins/BMP4, WNT 1–8, and SHH. We postulate that this severe malformation may be due to abnormal genes involved in laterality and caudal development. PMID:26111189

  13. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  14. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25691415

  15. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems. PMID:25729824

  16. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  17. Abnormal Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bo; Wang, Xinglong; Zheng, Ling; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases. A deeper understanding of the remarkably dynamic nature of mitochondria, characterized by a delicate balance of fission and fusion, has helped to fertilize a recent wave of new studies demonstrating abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease and discusses how these abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. We propose that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics represents a key common pathway that mediates or amplifies mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal dysfunction during the course of neurodegeneration. PMID:19799998

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, K E; Kim, J H; Moon, S Y; Oh, S K

    1999-08-01

    To determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in a child psychiatric population, and to evaluate possible associations between types of abnormalities and patient's clinical characteristics, cytogenetic examination was performed on 604 patients. Demographic data, reasons for karyotyping, clinical signs, and other patient characteristics were assessed and correlated with the results from karyotyping. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 69 patients (11.3%); these were structural in 49 cases and numerical in 20. Inversion of chromosome nine was found in 15 subjects, trisomy of chromosome 21 in 11, and fragile X in five patients. When karyotyping was performed because of intellectual impairment or multiple developmental delay, significantly more abnormalities were found than average; when performed because autistic disorder was suspected, the number of abnormalities was significantly fewer. There were no differences in clinical variables between structural and numerical abnormalities, nor among nine types of chromosomal abnormalities, except that numerical abnormalities and polymorphism were found at a later age, and that walking was more delayed and IQ was lower in patients with Down syndrome. Clinicians should be aware of the possible presence of chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric populations; the close collaboration with geneticists and the use of more defined guidelines for cytogenetic investigation are important. PMID:10485616

  19. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  20. Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo; Fortin, J.-Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier E{sub B} to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find E{sub B}=0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

  1. Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo; Fortin, J.-Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier EB to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find EB =0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

  2. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  3. Hebes Chasma Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a canyon wall located in Hebes Chasma, was collected during the Southern Fall season. Hebes Chasma is located north of Valles Marineris.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -1.5, Longitude 284.5 East (75.5 West). 35 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for

  4. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  5. Interactions between domain walls and spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaui, M.; Laufenberg, M.; Backes, D.; Buhrer, W.; Rudiger, U.; Vila, L.; Vouille, C.; Faini, G.

    2006-03-01

    A promising novel approach for switching magnetic nanostructures is current-induced domain wall propagation (CIDP), where due to a spin torque effect, electrons transfer angular momentum to a head-to-head domain wall and thereby push it in the direction of the electron flow without any externally applied fields. This effect has been observed with a variety of techniques including MFM [1] and spin polarized scanning electron microscopy [2] to directly observe current-induced domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanostructures and magnetoresistance measurements to systematically probe the critical current densities as a function of the geometry [3]. The observed wall velocities and critical current densities, where wall motion sets in at room temperature, do not agree well with theoretical 0K calculations [4]. We have therefore measured the critical current densities as a function of the sample temperature. We find that the spin torque effect becomes more efficient at low temperatures, which could account for some of the observed discrepancies between the 300K experiment and the 0K simulation. [1] A. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 77205 (2004); [2] M. Klaui et al., PRL 95, 26601 (2005); [3] M. Klaui et al., PRL 94, 106601 (2005); [4] A. Thiaville et al., EPL 69, 990 (2005); G. Tatara et al., APL 86, 252509 (2005);

  6. Spin torque and domain wall velocity in ferromagnetic semiconductor π and 2π N'eel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, E. A.; Flatté, M. E.

    2010-03-01

    The motion of a domain wall under an applied spin-polarized current[1] has interesting device applications for the development of spintronic devices. We model 2π N'eel walls (energetically favorable in thin films) in ferromagnetic semiconductors, and compare the results to those for the more-frequently studied π walls. Under coherent transport conditions, analytic solutions for spin-dependent reflection and transmission coefficients are possible[2,3]. We calculate charge resistance, spin torque, and domain wall velocity. We find the peak spin torque is more than twice as large for a 2π wall than for a π wall. We also find that the peak velocity of a 2π wall is larger than that of a π wall, but the peak velocities of 3π and 4π walls are smaller than those of both π and 2π walls. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.[4pt] [1] M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Nature 428, 539 (2004).[0pt] [2] G. Vignale and M. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002).[0pt] [3] D. Ralph and M. Stiles, Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 320, 1190 (2008).

  7. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  8. Site-specific volumetric analysis of lung tumour motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George A.; Langer, Mark; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-06-01

    The treatment of lung cancer with radiation therapy is hindered by respiratory motion. Real-time adjustments to compensate for this motion are hampered by mechanical system latencies and imaging-rate restrictions. To better understand tumour motion behaviour for adaptive image-guided radiation therapy of lung cancer, the volume of a tumour's motion space was investigated. Motion data were collected by tracking an implanted fiducial using fluoroscopy at 30 Hz during treatment sessions. A total of 637 treatment fractions from 31 tumours were used in this study. For each fraction, data points collected from three consecutive breathing cycles were used to identify instantaneous tumour location. A convex hull was created over these data points, defining the tumour motion envelope. The study sought a correlation between the tumour location in the lung and the convex hull's volume and shape. It was found that tumours located in the upper apex had smaller motion envelopes (<50 mm3), whereas tumours located near the chest wall or diaphragm had larger envelopes (>70 mm3). Tumours attached to fixed anatomical structures had small motion spaces. Three general shapes described the tumour motion envelopes: 50% of motion envelopes enclosed largely 1D oscillation, 38% enclosed an ellipsoid path, 6% enclosed an arced path and 6% were of hybrid shape. This location-space correlation suggests it may be useful in developing a predictive model, but more work needs to be done to verify it.

  9. FIBER DEPOSITION ALONG AIRWAY WALLS: EFFECTS OF FIBER CROSS-SECTION ON ROTATIONAL INTERCEPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne fibers present a threat to human health. athematical model of fiber motion is presented which suggests that significant rotational deposition occurs along airway walls downstream of human lung bifurcations. he predictions are validated by cited experimental data. oth pro...

  10. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  11. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  12. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  13. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  14. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  15. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  16. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  17. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  18. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  19. Experimental Manipulation of Wall-Bounded Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, Beverley

    2011-11-01

    The potential gains in efficiency across a range of applications associated with successful control of wall- bounded turbulence are well-known, as are the many challenges this interdisciplinary problem encompasses. Further, while there have been recent developments in fundamental wall turbulence research, including description of the characteristics of coherent structures (e.g. Adrian, 2007) and the very large scale motions (e.g. Mathis et al, 2009), many fundamental questions remain, in particular with respect to scaling behavior as the Reynolds number is increased to practically important values. Progress can be made in both understanding the response of canonical flows to forcing at the wall and isolating mechanisms important to the unperturbed flows using open-loop forcing. To this end, recent work has shown how small amplitude perturbations to surface roughness designed to isolate individual spatial and temporal scales (a ``dynamic roughness'') can be used to manipulate the characteristics of wall turbulence. This talk will describe the experimental manipulation of a turbulent boundary layer using dynamic roughness and the connection to the spatio-temporal (spectral) information traditionally reported in turbulence studies. The development of tools from earlier work on directional amplification of the Navier-Stokes operator into simple models by which to interpret the coupling between the wall motion and the flow will be described, and some examples of the understanding of structure and Reynolds number trends in the canonical (unperturbed) flow that emerge from the perturbed case will be given. The contribution of students and collaborators, in particular Dr. Ati Sharma (University of Sheffield, U.K.) and Ian Jacobi (Caltech), to this work and the support of AFOSR (grant FA #9550-09-1-0701, program manager John Schmisseur) are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  1. [Abnormality in bone metabolism after burn].

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Xie, W G

    2016-08-20

    Burn causes bone metabolic abnormality in most cases, including the changes in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone mass loss, and bone absorption, which results in decreased bone mineral density. These changes are sustainable for many years after burn and even cause growth retardation in burned children. The mechanisms of bone metabolic abnormality after burn include the increasing glucocorticoids due to stress response, a variety of cytokines and inflammatory medium due to inflammatory response, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and bone loss due to long-term lying in bed. This article reviews the pathogenesis and regularity of bone metabolic abnormality after burn, the relationship between bone metabolic abnormality and burn area/depth, and the treatment of bone metabolic abnormality, etc. and discusses the research directions in the future. PMID:27562160

  2. Identification of defect distribution at ferroelectric domain walls from evolution of nonlinear dielectric response during the aging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrý, Pavel; Sluka, Tomáš

    2016-02-01

    The motion of ferroelectric domain walls greatly contributes to the macroscopic dielectric and piezoelectric response of ferroelectric materials. The domain-wall motion through the ferroelectric material is, however, hindered by pinning on crystal defects, which substantially reduces these contributions. Here, using thermodynamic models based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory, we find a relation between the microscopic reversible motion of nonferroelastic 180∘ domain walls interacting with a periodic array of pinning centers and the nonlinear macroscopic permittivity. We show that the reversible motion of domain walls can be split into two basic modes: first, the bending of a domain wall between pinning centers, and, second, the uniform movement of the domain-wall plane. We show that their respective contributions may change when the distribution of pinning centers is rearranged during the material aging. We demonstrate that it is possible to indicate which mechanism of the domain-wall motion is affected during material aging. This allows one to judge whether the defects only homogeneously accumulate at domain walls or prefer to align in certain directions inside the domain-wall plane. We suggest that this information can be obtained using simple macroscopic dielectric measurements and a proper analysis of the nonlinear response. Our results may therefore serve as a simple and useful tool to obtain details on domain-wall pinning in an aging process.

  3. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  4. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  5. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  6. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  7. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  8. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  9. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  10. Motion through Syntactic Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Michele I.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (Talmy, 1985), (Talmy, 1985) and (Talmy, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the…

  11. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature,…

  12. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  13. Naive Theories of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Everyday life provides individuals with countless opportunities for observing and interacting with objects in motion. Although everyone presumably has some sort of knowledge about motion, it is by no means clear what form(s) this knowledge may take. The research described in this paper determined what sorts of knowledge are in fact acquired…

  14. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  15. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  16. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  17. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  18. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  19. 5. Detail of bin wall, showing the thinner exterior wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail of bin wall, showing the thinner exterior wall next to the inner wall with its alternating courses of channel tile and hollow tile. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  20. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. Brownian motion goes ballistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2012-02-01

    It is the randomness that is considered the hallmark of Brownian motion, but already in Einstein's seminal 1905 paper on Brownian motion it is implied that this randomness must break down at short time scales when the inertia of the particle kicks in. As a result, the particle's trajectories should lose its randomness and become smooth. The characteristic time scale for this transition is given by the ratio of the particle's mass to its viscous drag coefficient. For a 1 μm glass particle in water and at room temperature, this timescale is on the order of 100 ns. Early calculations, however, neglected the inertia of the liquid surrounding the particle which induces a transition from random diffusive to non-diffusive Brownian motion already at much larger timescales. In this first non-diffusive regime, particles of the same size but with different densities still move at almost the same rate as a result of hydrodynamic correlations. To observe Brownian motion that is dominated by the inertia of the particle, i.e. ballistic motion, one has to observe the particle at significantly shorter time scales on the order of nanoseconds. Due to the lack of sufficiently fast and precise detectors, such experiments were so far not possible on individual particles. I will describe how we were able to observe the transition from hydrodynamically dominated Brownian motion to ballistic Brownian motion in a liquid. I will compare our data with current theories for Brownian motion on fast timescales that take into account the inertia of both the liquid and the particle. The newly gained ability to measure the fast Brownian motion of an individual particle paves the way for detailed studies of confined Brownian motion and Brownian motion in heterogeneous media. [4pt] [1] Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der W"arme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Fl"ussigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Ann. Phys. 322, 549--560 (1905). [0pt] [2] Lukic, B., S. Jeney, C

  2. Cortical motion deafness.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Christine Y; Michel, Christoph M; Clarke, Stephanie; Adriani, Michela; Seeck, Margitta; Landis, Theodor; Blanke, Olaf

    2004-09-16

    The extent to which the auditory system, like the visual system, processes spatial stimulus characteristics such as location and motion in separate specialized neuronal modules or in one homogeneously distributed network is unresolved. Here we present a patient with a selective deficit for the perception and discrimination of auditory motion following resection of the right anterior temporal lobe and the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). Analysis of stimulus identity and location within the auditory scene remained intact. In addition, intracranial auditory evoked potentials, recorded preoperatively, revealed motion-specific responses selectively over the resected right posterior STG, and electrical cortical stimulation of this region was experienced by the patient as incoming moving sounds. Collectively, these data present a patient with cortical motion deafness, providing evidence that cortical processing of auditory motion is performed in a specialized module within the posterior STG. PMID:15363389

  3. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  4. Detection of abnormal living patterns for elderly living alone using support vector data description.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Boreom; Park, Kwang Suk

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we developed an automated behavior analysis system using infrared (IR) motion sensors to assist the independent living of the elderly who live alone and to improve the efficiency of their healthcare. An IR motion-sensor-based activity-monitoring system was installed in the houses of the elderly subjects to collect motion signals and three different feature values, activity level, mobility level, and nonresponse interval (NRI). These factors were calculated from the measured motion signals. The support vector data description (SVDD) method was used to classify normal behavior patterns and to detect abnormal behavioral patterns based on the aforementioned three feature values. The simulation data and real data were used to verify the proposed method in the individual analysis. A robust scheme is presented in this paper for optimally selecting the values of different parameters especially that of the scale parameter of the Gaussian kernel function involving in the training of the SVDD window length, T of the circadian rhythmic approach with the aim of applying the SVDD to the daily behavior patterns calculated over 24 h. Accuracies by positive predictive value (PPV) were 95.8% and 90.5% for the simulation and real data, respectively. The results suggest that the monitoring system utilizing the IR motion sensors and abnormal-behavior-pattern detection with SVDD are effective methods for home healthcare of elderly people living alone. PMID:21317086

  5. Motion of the Shoulder Complex During Multiplanar Humeral Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Paula M.; Phadke, Vandana; Braman, Jonathan P.; Hassett, Daniel R.; Cieminski, Cort J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many prior studies have evaluated shoulder motion, yet no three-dimensional analysis comparing the combined clavicular, scapular, and humeral motion during arm elevation has been done. We aimed to describe and compare dynamic three-dimensional motion of the shoulder complex during raising and lowering the arm across three distinct elevation planes (flexion, scapular plane abduction, and coronal plane abduction). Methods: Twelve subjects without a shoulder abnormality were enrolled. Transcortical pin placement into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus allowed electromagnetic motion sensors to be rigidly fixed. The subjects completed two repetitions of raising and lowering the arm in flexion, scapular, and abduction planes. Three-dimensional angles were calculated for sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic, and glenohumeral joint motions. Joint angles between humeral elevation planes and between raising and lowering of the arm were compared. Results: General patterns of shoulder motion observed during humeral elevation were clavicular elevation, retraction, and posterior axial rotation; scapular internal rotation, upward rotation, and posterior tilting relative to the clavicle; and glenohumeral elevation and external rotation. Clavicular posterior rotation predominated at the sternoclavicular joint (average, 31°). Scapular posterior tilting predominated at the acromioclavicular joint (average, 19°). Differences between flexion and abduction planes of humerothoracic elevation were largest for the glenohumeral joint plane of elevation (average, 46°). Conclusions: Overall shoulder motion consists of substantial angular rotations at each of the four shoulder joints, enabling the multiple-joint interaction required to elevate the arm overhead. Clinical Relevance: Improved knowledge of the normal motion of the shoulder during humeral elevation will improve the assessment of patients with shoulder motion abnormalities, planning for rehabilitation

  6. Dynamics of a Sliding Ladder Leaning against a Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, J. B.; Simeão Carvalho, P.; Mota, M. F.; Quintas, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study is about the dynamics of a sliding ladder leaning against a vertical wall. The results are understood by considering the motion divided in two parts: (i) for 0 = t = t[subscript s] with one degree of freedom, and (ii) for t > t[subscript s] with two degrees of freedom, where the separation is determined by the instance t[subscript…

  7. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion.

    PubMed

    Hill, A M; Bull, A M J; Wallace, A L; Johnson, G R

    2008-02-01

    Joint modelling plays an important role in qualitative and quantitative descriptions of both normal and abnormal joints, as well as predicting outcomes of alterations to joints in orthopaedic practice and research. Contemporary efforts in modelling have focussed upon the major articulations of the lower limb. Well-constrained arthrokinematics can form the basis of manageable kinetic and dynamic mathematical predictions. In order to contain computation of shoulder complex modelling, glenohumeral joint representations in both limited and complete shoulder girdle models have undergone a generic simplification. As such, glenohumeral joint models are often based upon kinematic descriptions of inadequate degrees of freedom (DOF) for clinical purposes and applications. Qualitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion range from the parody of a hinge joint to the complex realism of a spatial joint. In developing a model, a clear idea of intention is required in order to achieve a required application. Clinical applicability of a model requires both descriptive and predictive output potentials, and as such, a high level of validation is required. Without sufficient appreciation of the clinical intention of the arthrokinematic foundation to a model, error is all too easily introduced. Mathematical description of joint motion serves to quantify all relevant clinical parameters. Commonly, both the Euler angle and helical (screw) axis methods have been applied to the glenohumeral joint, although concordance between these methods and classical anatomical appreciation of joint motion is limited, resulting in miscommunication between clinician and engineer. Compounding these inconsistencies in motion quantification is gimbal lock and sequence dependency. PMID:17509885

  8. Systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve in tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy: Still a matter of debate?

    PubMed

    Meimoun, P; Clerc, J; Botoro, T; Elmkies, F; Martis, S; Zemir, H; Luycx-Bore, A

    2015-11-01

    We present a case which developed a typical tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy (TTC) during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Its originality is related to several findings, which have never been described simultaneously in the same patient. This 63-year-old woman with normal coronary angiography and no evidence of coronary vasospasm had a biphasic response to DSE, a finding which usually occurs in coronary artery disease. Moreover, the symmetric extensive wall motion abnormalities (WMA) occurred simultaneously with the development of a systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) and left ventricular obstruction, and was clinically asymptomatic. Although in TTC the stunning usually occurs for several days, WMA and SAM resolved within few minutes after cessation of dobutamine and administration of a beta-blocker. And finally, exercise echo performed at the same target heart rate few days later did not induce neither a SAM nor WMA, which suggests that left ventricular obstruction could have played a role in the pathogenesis of this case by supply-demand mismatch. Concomitant coronary microvascular dysfunction was also demonstrated by a reduction of the non-invasive coronary flow reserve in the distal part of the left anterior descending artery. PMID:26482629

  9. Swimming Near the Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Daniel; Moored, Keith; Dewey, Peter; Lauder, George; Smits, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The aerodynamic loads on rectangular panels undergoing heave and pitch oscillations near a solid wall were measured using a 6-axis ATI sensor. Over a range of Strouhal numbers, reduced frequencies and flexibilities, swimming near the wall was found to increase thrust and therefore the self-propelled swimming speed. Experimental particle image velocimetry revealed an asymmetric wake structure with a momentum jet angled away from the wall. Both the thrust amplification and the asymmetric wake structure were verified and investigated further using an in-house inviscid panel method code. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-08-1-0642.

  10. Sleep physiology, abnormal States, and therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Wickboldt, Alvah T; Bowen, Alex F; Kaye, Aaron J; Kaye, Adam M; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  11. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  12. Right Liver Lobe Hypoplasia and Related Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Alicioglu, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hypoplasia and agenesis of the liver lobe is a rare abnormality. It is associated with biliary system abnormalities, high location of the right kidney, and right colon interposition. These patients are prone to gallstones, portal hypertension and possible surgical complications because of anatomical disturbance. Case Report Magnetic resonance imaging features of a rare case of hypoplasia of the right lobe of the liver in a sigmoid cancer patient are presented. Conclusions Hypoplasia of the right liver should not be confused with liver atrophy; indeed, associations with other coexistent abnormalities are also possible. Awareness and familiarity with these anomalies are necessary to avoid fatal surgical and interventional complications. PMID:26634012

  13. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Detection of fetal structural abnormalities with US during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fong, Katherine W; Toi, Ants; Salem, Shia; Hornberger, Lisa K; Chitayat, David; Keating, Sarah J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Johnson, Jo-Ann

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is performed during early pregnancy for dating, determination of the number of fetuses, assessment of early complications, and increasingly for evaluation of the fetus, including measurement of the thickness of the nuchal translucency (NT). Measurement of NT thickness between 11 and 14 weeks gestation, combined with maternal age and maternal serum biochemistry, can be an effective method of screening for trisomy 21 and other chromosomal abnormalities. Furthermore, an increased NT thickness in the presence of a normal karyotype is associated with an increased frequency of structural defects and genetic syndromes. Therefore, this finding is an indication for a more detailed anatomic survey of the fetus. Besides nuchal abnormalities, a wide range of other congenital anomalies can be diagnosed with US at 11-14 weeks gestation, including defects of the central nervous system, heart, anterior abdominal wall, urinary tract, and skeleton. The anatomic survey can be performed with a standardized protocol by using transabdominal US and, when necessary, transvaginal US. A thorough knowledge of the US features of normal fetal development is necessary to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:14730044

  15. [An Autopsy Case of Abnormal Behaviour Induced by Zolpidem].

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Kudo, Keiko; Sameshima, Naomi; Sato, Kazuo; Tsuji, Akiko; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    Zolpidem is a widely used ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine in clinical practice; compared with benzodiazepines, it does not have side effects such as daytime hangover, rebound insomnia, and development of tolerance. We report an autopsy case of abnormal behaviour induced by zolpidem. A man in his 60's had suffered from postherpetic neuralgia about 2 months ago and had been prescribed zolpidem for insomnia. According to his family, he had no memory of his actions such as striking a wall, taking his futon outside, and eating 5 times a day after he took zolpidem. Because his postherpetic neuralgia did not improve, he was hospitalized and treated with an epidural block. During hospitalization, he took off his clothes, removed the epidural block catheter by himself, and slept on others' beds. He disappeared from the hospital one day; the next day, he was found dead in a narrow water storage tank 10 km away from the hospital. He was thought to have driven a car by himself to reach the place. Forensic autopsy revealed that the cause of death was drowning. Zolpidem and several other drugs were detected by toxicological analysis of his blood; the concentrations of these drugs were within therapeutic range. There are several reports about somnambulism induced by zolpidem such as sleepwalking, sleep driving, and eating. Considering the strange episodes following zolpidem administration, his behaviour on the day of his death was considered abnormal behaviour induced by zolpidem. PMID:26306385

  16. CT observation of rib abnormalities: spectrum of findings.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, G; Levitt, R G; Slaker, D P; Murphy, W A

    1985-01-01

    The CT studies in 63 patients in which rib abnormality was identified or excluded were retrospectively analyzed. The CT features were detailed and correlated with other available radiographic findings as well as clinical data. Contiguous spread of tumor to rib or metastasis to rib characteristically showed subtle or complete segmental lytic rib destruction. An accompanying extrapleural soft tissue mass was frequently seen with metastatic disease and myeloma. In nine patients CT showed rib destruction that had been obscured on chest radiography by heart, diaphragm, mass, or pleural effusion. Other imaging studies prompted consideration of neoplasm in seven patients in whom CT clearly showed benign post-traumatic or developmental lesions. Six patients had a clinically suspected chest wall mass excluded, leading to the diagnosis of Tietze syndrome. The ribs should be carefully inspected on all CT studies of the thorax and upper abdomen. Computed tomography is helpful when other imaging techniques, such as rib films or isotopic bone scans, have not resolved the question of clinically or radiographically suspected rib abnormality. PMID:3968282

  17. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by Aspergillus arteritis without angiographic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yasuo; Tomiyama, Masahiko; Haga, Rie; Nishijima, Haruo; Suzuki, Chieko; Nishijima, Michiharu; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Baba, Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    No source of bleeding is detected by angiogram in 15-20% of patients with nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This negative angiographic finding might suggest a benign prognosis. We describe a case of fatal SAH caused by Aspergillus arteritis without formation of fusiform dilatation or aneurysms. A 76-year-old man with a 2-month history of progressive visual loss due to pachymeningitis around the optic nerves suffered from SAH in the bilateral sylvian fissures. Repetitive serum galactomannan assay and angiography showed no abnormality. Post mortem examination revealed marked proliferation of Aspergillus in the granulomas of the frontal base dura mater. In addition, major trunks and several branches of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were invaded by Aspergillus hyphae, which destroyed the walls in the absence of dilatation and aneurysms. Invasive aspergillosis of the CNS often forms a mycotic aneurysm. However, four autopsy cases of nonaneurysmal SAH due to invasive aspergillosis have been reported. The present case is the second autopsy case of Aspergillus arteritis without angiographic abnormality, resulting in fatal SAH. Aggressive and continuous antifungal therapy is absolutely necessary in suspected cases of invasive aspergillosis of the CNS, even if angiography is negative and therapeutic markers of aspergillosis are normal. PMID:22239342

  18. OCT Motion Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Martin F.; Hornegger, Joachim

    From the introduction of time domain OCT [1] up to recent swept source systems, motion continues to be an issue in OCT imaging. In contrast to normal photography, an OCT image does not represent a single point in time. Instead, conventional OCT devices sequentially acquire one-dimensional data over a period of several seconds, capturing one beam of light at a time and recording both the intensity and delay of reflections along its path through an object. In combination with unavoidable object motion which occurs in many imaging contexts, the problem of motion artifacts lies in the very nature of OCT imaging. Motion artifacts degrade image quality and make quantitative measurements less reliable. Therefore, it is desirable to come up with techniques to measure and/or correct object motion during OCT acquisition. In this chapter, we describe the effect of motion on OCT data sets and give an overview on the state of the art in the field of retinal OCT motion correction.

  19. Robotic palpation and mechanical property characterization for abnormal tissue localization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bummo; Kim, Yeongjin; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Kim, Jung

    2012-09-01

    Palpation is an intuitive examination procedure in which the kinesthetic and tactile sensations of the physician are used. Although it has been widely used to detect and localize diseased tissues in many clinical fields, the procedure is subjective and dependent on the experience of the individual physician. Palpation results and biomechanics-based mechanical property characterization are possible solutions that can enable the acquisition of objective and quantitative information on abnormal tissue localization during diagnosis and surgery. This paper presents an integrated approach for robotic palpation combined with biomechanical soft tissue characterization. In particular, we propose a new palpation method that is inspired by the actual finger motions that occur during palpation procedures. To validate the proposed method, robotic palpation experiments on silicone soft tissue phantoms with embedded hard inclusions were performed and the force responses of the phantoms were measured using a robotic palpation system. Furthermore, we carried out a numerical analysis, simulating the experiments and estimating the objective and quantitative properties of the tissues. The results indicate that the proposed approach can differentiate diseased tissue from normal tissue and can characterize the mechanical information of diseased tissue, which means that this method can be applied as a means of abnormality localization to diagnose prostate cancers. PMID:22772733

  20. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown. PMID:24505742

  1. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: abdominal and inguinal hernias, cystocele, urethrocele, ... uterine and vaginal prolapse: diagnosis and management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  2. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystocele Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series References Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the ... 72. Read More Anterior Inflatable artificial sphincter Stress urinary incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - ...

  3. Oscillons and domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Salmi, Petja

    2008-05-15

    Oscillons, extremely long-lived localized oscillations of a scalar field, are shown to be produced by evolving domain wall networks in {phi}{sup 4} theory in two spatial dimensions. We study the oscillons in frequency space using the classical spectral function at zero momentum, and obtain that the velocity distribution is suppressed as {gamma}{sup -2} at large Lorentz factor {gamma}, with oscillons produced up to at least {gamma}{approx}10. This leads us to speculate that oscillons are produced at cusps, regions of the domain wall travelling near the speed of light. In order to gain some insight onto the dilute oscillon 'gas' produced by the domain walls, we prepare a denser gas by filling the simulation volume with oscillons boosted in random directions. We finish the study by revisiting collisions between oscillons and between an oscillon and a domain wall, showing that in the latter case they can pass straight through with minimal distortion.

  4. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  5. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion. PMID:24919162

  6. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, J. H.; Herps, M.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  7. Opportunity at the Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of 'Burns Cliff,' a portion of the inner wall of 'Endurance Crater.' This view shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right.

  8. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  9. Motion Recognition and Modifying Motion Generation for Imitation Robot Based on Motion Knowledge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzawa, Yuki; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    A knowledge-based approach to imitation learning of motion generation for humanoid robots and an imitative motion generation system based on motion knowledge learning and modification are described. The system has three parts: recognizing, learning, and modifying parts. The first part recognizes an instructed motion distinguishing it from the motion knowledge database by the continuous hidden markov model. When the motion is recognized as being unfamiliar, the second part learns it using locally weighted regression and acquires a knowledge of the motion. When a robot recognizes the instructed motion as familiar or judges that its acquired knowledge is applicable to the motion generation, the third part imitates the instructed motion by modifying a learned motion. This paper reports some performance results: the motion imitation of several radio gymnastics motions.

  10. From Boltzmann equations to steady wall velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, Thomas; Nardini, Germano; Rues, Ingo E-mail: germano.nardini@desy.de

    2014-09-01

    By means of a relativistic microscopic approach we calculate the expansion velocity of bubbles generated during a first-order electroweak phase transition. In particular, we use the gradient expansion of the Kadanoff-Baym equations to set up the fluid system. This turns out to be equivalent to the one found in the semi-classical approach in the non-relativistic limit. Finally, by including hydrodynamic deflagration effects and solving the Higgs equations of motion in the fluid, we determine velocity and thickness of the bubble walls. Our findings are compared with phenomenological models of wall velocities. As illustrative examples, we apply these results to three theories providing first-order phase transitions with a particle content in the thermal plasma that resembles the Standard Model.

  11. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saugey, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Weaire, D.

    2006-05-01

    We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stresses and dissipation in the system. In particular, we investigate the relationship between the drag force and the slip velocity of the bubble, which for small slip velocities obeys power laws, as predicted by previous semianalytical treatments.

  12. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  13. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... because they do not affect hearing. However, sometimes cosmetic surgery is recommended. Skin tags may be tied off, ... 5 years old. More severe abnormalities may require surgery for cosmetic reasons as well as for function. Surgery to ...

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  15. Spontaneous occurrence of chromosome abnormality in cats.

    PubMed

    THULINE, H C; NORBY, D W

    1961-08-25

    A syndrome in male cats analogous to chromatin-positive Klinefelter's syndrome in human males has been demonstrated. The physical characteristics which suggested an abnormality of chromosome number in cats were "calico" or "tortoise-shell" coat colors in a male. Buccal mucosal smears were found to have "female-type" patterns in two out of 12 such male cats screened, and these two were found to have a diploid chromosome number of 39 rather than the normal 38. Testicular biopsy performed on one revealed an abnormal pattern; no gonadal tissue was found in the other cat with an abnormal chromosome number. These findings indicate that the cat, in addition to the mouse, is available for experimental study of chromosome number abnormalities. PMID:13776765

  16. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  17. Laplacian eigenmap with temporal constraints for local abnormality detection in crowded scenes.

    PubMed

    Thida, Myo; Eng, How-Lung; Remagnino, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and localizing abnormal activities in crowded scenes. A spatiotemporal Laplacian eigenmap method is proposed to extract different crowd activities from videos. This is achieved by learning the spatial and temporal variations of local motions in an embedded space. We employ representatives of different activities to construct the model which characterizes the regular behavior of a crowd. This model of regular crowd behavior allows the detection of abnormal crowd activities both in local and global contexts and the localization of regions which show abnormal behavior. Experiments on the recently published data sets show that the proposed method achieves comparable results with the state-of-the-art methods without sacrificing computational simplicity. PMID:23757524

  18. Abnormal brain scan with subacute extradural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J. Barrie; Langford, Keith H.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients are described with proven subacute extradural haematomas, each with an abnormal cerebral scan of diagnostic assistance. A possible mechanism of production of the subacute extradural haematoma is discussed, and appears to be similar to the mechanism involved in the subacute subdural haematoma. The means by which the abnormal scan results in such cases is also examined, from which it appears that non-specific meningeal membrane inflammatory reaction surrounding the haematoma is significant. Images PMID:5478950

  19. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Mohamed; Boraie, Maher

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1%) individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8%) at the second screening, (P <0.001). Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8%) adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1%) individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6%) individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3%) individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5%) individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6%) of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6%) individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1%) of them. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9%) of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6%) of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8%) individuals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8%) individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01) and (P <0.001), respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population. PMID:27215241

  20. Abnormal ferrite in hyper-eutectoid steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chairuangsri, T.; Edmonds, D.V.

    2000-04-19

    The microstructural characteristics of ultra-high carbon hyper-eutectoid Fe-C and Fe-C-Cu experimental steels have been examined after isothermal transformation in a range just beneath the eutectoid temperature. Particular attention was paid to the formation of so-called abnormal ferrite, which refers to coarse ferrite grains which can form, in hyper-eutectoid compositions, on the pro-eutectoid cementite before the pearlite reaction occurs. Thus it is confirmed that the abnormal ferrite is not a result of pearlite coarsening, but of austenite decomposition before the conditions for coupled growth of pearlite are established. The abnormal ferrite formed on both allotriomorphic and Widmanstaetten forms of pro-eutectoid cementite, and significantly, it was observed that the pro-eutectoid cementite continued to grow, despite being enclosed by the abnormal ferrite. Under certain conditions this could lead to the eventual formation of substantially reduced amounts of pearlite. Thus, a model for carbon redistribution that allows the proeutectoid cementite to thicken concurrently with the abnormal ferrite is presented. The orientation relationships between the abnormal ferrite and pro-eutectoid cementite were also determined and found to be close to those which have been reported between pearlitic ferrite and pearlitic cementite.

  1. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  2. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  3. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  4. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... special tests of eye motion after warm or cold water or air is used to stimulate the ... Get enough fluids Treat infections, including ear infections, colds, flu, sinus congestion, and other respiratory infections If ...

  5. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  6. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of motion. Some of these disorders include: Cerebral palsy Congenital torticollis Muscular dystrophy Stroke or brain injury ... Rheumatology and musculoskeletal problems. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 8th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  7. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma originating from the chest wall with rib metastases.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Junichi; Kiyoshima, Moriyuki; Suzuki, Hisashi; Kitahara, Miyuki; Asato, Yuji; Iijima, Tatsuo; Amemiya, Ryuta

    2015-11-01

    An asymptomatic 39-year-old woman was referred to us for an abnormal nodular opacity detected on the chest X-ray. Histopathological and further examinations revealed findings consistent with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) originating from the chest wall with metastases to the ribs. Complete excision was performed; however, adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered because of the patient's mental disorder. There are very few reports of EHE arising from the chest wall; therefore, we present this case report with the clinicopathological features of EHE and discuss the therapeutic aspects. PMID:24399489

  8. Coupled transverse motion

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  10. HVDC wall bushing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.M.; Lux, A.E.; Howes, D.R. )

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted to determine the performance of HVDC wall bushings in different wetting conditions. The in-service behavior of these wall bushing on HVDC systems at voltages of {plus minus}450 kV and above is first described to establish the conditions under which flashovers have occurred. Laboratory tests made at the EPRI High Voltage Transmission Research Center confirm that wall bushings may flash over at rated operation voltage under conditions which are intended to be representative of those experienced on operating transmission systems. Methods for improving performance are discussed, and results of tests with several types of mitigation techniques are described. The major emphasis is placed on the application of room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber. Clean fog is used to evaluate the characteristics of this material on post insulators. The encouraging performance of the post insulators coated with RTV is the basis for further evaluation on full scale wall bushings tested in nonuniform rain. In addition to tests on RTV coated wall bushings without pre-doposited contamination, attempts at achieving reasonable contamination layers on RV are described. By means of resistance measurements on horizontal insulators, the critical conditions which may lead to flashover on surfaces with different materials and coatings are investigated 15 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin; Nielsen, Mads; Edula, Goutham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-03-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 manually segmented images extracted from 15 different subjects and shown to give accurate results, with 37% less errors than the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) algorithm and 62% less than a similar graph cut method without coupled surfaces. Common measures of airway wall thickness such as the Interior Area (IA) and Wall Area percentage (WA%) was measured by the proposed method on a total of 723 CT scans from a lung cancer screening study. These measures were significantly different for participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) compared to asymptomatic participants. Furthermore, reproducibility was good as confirmed by repeat scans and the measures correlated well with the outcomes of pulmonary function tests, demonstrating the use of the algorithm as a COPD diagnostic tool. Additionally, a new measure of airway wall thickness is proposed, Normalized Wall Intensity Sum (NWIS). NWIS is shown to correlate better with lung function test values and to be more reproducible than previous measures IA, WA% and airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (PI10).

  12. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  13. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  14. Aircraft Abnormal Conditions Detection, Identification, and Evaluation Using Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawi, Dia

    Abnormal flight conditions play a major role in aircraft accidents frequently causing loss of control. To ensure aircraft operation safety in all situations, intelligent system monitoring and adaptation must rely on accurately detecting the presence of abnormal conditions as soon as they take place, identifying their root cause(s), estimating their nature and severity, and predicting their impact on the flight envelope. Due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the aircraft system under abnormal conditions, these requirements are extremely difficult to satisfy using existing analytical and/or statistical approaches. Moreover, current methodologies have addressed only isolated classes of abnormal conditions and a reduced number of aircraft dynamic parameters within a limited region of the flight envelope. This research effort aims at developing an integrated and comprehensive framework for the aircraft abnormal conditions detection, identification, and evaluation based on the artificial immune systems paradigm, which has the capability to address the complexity and multidimensionality issues related to aircraft systems. Within the proposed framework, a novel algorithm was developed for the abnormal conditions detection problem and extended to the abnormal conditions identification and evaluation. The algorithm and its extensions were inspired from the functionality of the biological dendritic cells (an important part of the innate immune system) and their interaction with the different components of the adaptive immune system. Immunity-based methodologies for re-assessing the flight envelope at post-failure and predicting the impact of the abnormal conditions on the performance and handling qualities are also proposed and investigated in this study. The generality of the approach makes it applicable to any system. Data for artificial immune system development were collected from flight tests of a supersonic research aircraft within a motion-based flight

  15. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  16. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  17. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  18. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  19. Abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet → singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  20. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet → singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  1. Domain wall assisted GMR head with spin-Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, R.; Sabareesan, P.; Daniel, M.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a field induced domain wall in the Py/Pt bi-layer structure in the presence of spin-Hall effect (SHE) by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation along with the adiabatic, nonadiabatic and SHE spin-transfer torques (STTs). It is observed that a weak magnetic field moves the domain wall with high velocity in the presence of SHE and the direction of the velocity is changed by changing the direction of the weak field. The numerical results show that the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer can be reversed quickly through domain wall motion by changing the direction of a weak external field in the presence of SHE while the direction of current is fixed. The SHE reduces the magnetization reversal time of 1000 nm length strip by 14.7 ns. This study is extended to model a domain wall based GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance) read head with SHE.

  2. Study of imploding liner-electrode wall interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshev, V.K.; Zharinov, Y.I.; Kudolkin, I.D.; Ruzin, V.N.; Ionov, A.I.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives the results of the experiments on aluminum liner acceleration and their interaction with electrode walls. The liners having the radius of 30 mm, wall thickness of 1mm and 0.7 mm and a length of 30 mm are accelerated by a magnetic field, created by explosive magnetic generator (EMC). A helical generator 100 mm in diameter and 700 mm in length was used to create a magnetic field. During the process of compression a liner shape was recorded using X-ray facility. The report gives experimental set-up, electrical and design data of experimental units and diagnostic equipment data, also raw experimental data, analysis data and description of an analysis method. Based on the experiments the authors chose the method to bring a liner into a contact with electrode walls, which permits continuous contact of a liner with electrode wall is in the process of motion.

  3. Instantaneous Helical Axis Methodology to Identify Aberrant Neck Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Yelisetti, Vishal; Schulz, Craig A.; Bronfort, Gert; Downing, Joseph; Keefe, Daniel F.; Nuckley, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain afflicts 30-50% of the U.S. population annually; however we currently have poor diagnostic differentiation techniques to inform individualized treatment. Planar neck kinematics has been shown to be correlated with neck pain, but neck motion is much more complex than pure planar activities. Our objective was to define a methodology for determining aberrant neck kinematics and assess it. Methods We examined a complex neck kinematic activity of neck circumduction, computed the pathway of motion using the instantaneous helical axis approach in 81 patients with non-specific neck pain and in 20 non-matched symptom free subjects. Neck circumduction, or rolling of the head, represents a complex neck kinematic activity, investigating the innate coupled motion of the cervical spine at the end ranges of motion in all directions. Instance of discontinuities in the helical axis patterns, or folds, were identified and labeled as occurrences of aberrant motion. Findings The instances of aberrant motion, or folds, which are nearly non-existent in the healthy sample group, are present in both the pre and post treatment neck pain patients. Following a treatment intervention of the symptomatic patients, pain and neck disability index decreased significantly (p<0.001) concomitant with a decrease in the number of folds (p=0.021). Interpretation The present study highlights a new technique using an instantaneous helical axis approach to detect subtle abnormalities in the pathway of motion of the head about the trunk, during a neck circumduction exercise. PMID:23911108

  4. Mutation of rnf213a by TALEN causes abnormal angiogenesis and circulation defects in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Sun, Xunsha; Chen, Huimin; Liu, Huijiao; Lai, Rong; Li, Jiaoxing; Wang, Yufang; Zhang, Jingjing; Sheng, Wenli

    2016-08-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is characterized by a stenosis at the terminal of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. RNF213 is a susceptibility gene for MMD in East Asians. The role of RNF213 in the etiology of MMD remains unknown. Here we generated rnf213a mutant zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technique and described the characteristics of a zebrafish embryonic model of MMD. rnf213a mutant zebrafish developed abnormal angiogenesis in intersegmental vessels and cranial secondary vessels. Endothelial cells exhibited the defects in morphogenesis and formation of vascular tubes despite normal cell to cell contacts under electron microscope. Circulatory disorder was induced by abnormal sprouts in the trunk and head. Reduced circulation in the abnormal vessels was revealed by microangiography. No blood flow permeated across the vessels wall despite the extremely abnormal structure. rnf213a mutant showed lower erythrocyte velocity in dorsal aorta than that in wild-type siblings. In this study, we provided a promising in vivo model for MMD, and this model would aid to understand the function of rnf213a in angiogenesis. PMID:27125596

  5. Chest CT abnormalities and quality of life: relationship in adult cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Lavelle, Lisa P.; McCarthy, Colin J.; McEvoy, Sinead H.; Fleming, Hannah; Gallagher, Annika; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm; McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relationship between lung parenchymal abnormalities on chest CT and health-related quality of life in adult cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods The chest CT scans of 101 consecutive CF adults (mean age 27.8±7.9, 64 males) were prospectively scored by two blinded radiologists in consensus using a modified Bhalla score. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the revised Quittner Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ-R). Multiple regressions were performed with each of the CFQ-R domains and all clinical and imaging findings to assess independent correlations. Results There were 18 inpatients and 83 outpatients. For the cohort of inpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Air Trapping), and also with Social Functioning (Consolidation) and Role Functioning (Consolidation). For outpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Consolidation) and also with Physical Functioning (Consolidation), Vitality (Consolidation, Severity of Bronchiectasis), Eating Problems (airway wall thickening), Treatment Burden (Total CT Score), Body Image (Severity of Bronchiectasis) and Role Functioning (Tree-in-bud nodules). Consolidation was the commonest independent CT predictor for both inpatients (predictor for 2 domains) and outpatients (predictor in 3 domains). Several chest CT abnormalities excluded traditional measures such as FEV1 and BMI from the majority of CFQ-R domains. Conclusions Chest CT abnormalities are significantly associated with quality of life measures in adult CF, independent of clinical or spirometric measurements. PMID:27047946

  6. Experimental Harmonic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, G. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    1. Elementary theory of harmonic motion; 2. Experimental work in harmonic motion; Experiment 1. Determination of g by a simple pendulum; Experiment 2. Harmonic motion of a body suspended by a spring; Experiment 3. Harmonic motion of a rigid body suspended by a torsion wire; Experiment 4. Study of a system with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 5. Dynamical determination of ratio of couple to twist for a torsion wire; Experiment 6. Comparison of the moments of inertia of two bodies; Experiment 7. Experiment with a pair of inertia bars; Experiment 8. Determination of the moment of inertia of a rigid pendulum; Experiment 9. Experiment on a pendulum with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 10. Determination of g by a rigid pendulum; Experiment 11. Pendulum on a yielding support; Experiment 12. Determination of the radius of curvature of a concave mirror by the oscillations of a sphere rolling in it; Experiment 13. Determination of g by the oscillations of a rod rolling on a cylinder; Experiment 14. Study of a vibrating system with two degrees of freedom; Note 1. On the vibration of a body suspended from a light spring; Note 2. Periodic time of a pendulum vibrating through a finite arc; Note 3. Periodic time for finite motion; Note 4. Periodic times of a pendulum with two degrees of freedom.

  7. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  8. Ultraslow scaled Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, Anna S.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    We define and study in detail utraslow scaled Brownian motion (USBM) characterized by a time dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D(t)≃ 1/t. For unconfined motion the mean squared displacement (MSD) of USBM exhibits an ultraslow, logarithmic growth as function of time, in contrast to the conventional scaled Brownian motion. In a harmonic potential the MSD of USBM does not saturate but asymptotically decays inverse-proportionally to time, reflecting the highly non-stationary character of the process. We show that the process is weakly non-ergodic in the sense that the time averaged MSD does not converge to the regular MSD even at long times, and for unconfined motion combines a linear lag time dependence with a logarithmic term. The weakly non-ergodic behaviour is quantified in terms of the ergodicity breaking parameter. The USBM process is also shown to be ageing: observables of the system depend on the time gap between initiation of the test particle and start of the measurement of its motion. Our analytical results are shown to agree excellently with extensive computer simulations.

  9. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  10. Abnormal head position in infantile nystagmus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  11. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  12. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  13. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  14. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  15. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gross, D M; Williams, J C; Caprioli, C; Dominguez, B; Howell, R R

    1988-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharide storage diseases express themselves clinically with a wide variety of abnormalities, including growth and mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities, clouded corneas, nerve compression syndromes, upper airway obstruction and cardiovascular involvement, to name the most common. In most cases the cause of early death is cardiorespiratory failure secondary to cardiovascular involvement and upper airway obstruction. The findings of cardiac ultrasound examination in 29 children, adolescents and young adults are presented. In addition to the previously well-described abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves in several types of mucopolysaccharide storage disease, we report patchy involvement in some cases, 3 instances of asymmetric septal hypertrophy not previously reported in mucopolysaccharide storage diseases, cardiac involvement in half of our patients with Sanfilippo syndrome and a lack of age-related severity of cardiac involvement even within the specific syndromes. PMID:3122547

  16. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  17. Cone photopigment bleaching abnormalities in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Lobes, L A; Doft, B H

    1987-04-01

    We have used a color-matching technique to obtain estimates of the optical density of cone photopigments as a function of retinal illuminance in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We found that the half-bleach illuminance of some patients is abnormally high. That is, it takes more light to bleach an equivalent amount of photopigment in these patients. Since low illuminance color matches for these patients are normal, this implies that these patients have normal amounts of photopigment, but the photopigment is not bleaching normally. This result clearly points to abnormalities in the outer retina of these diabetic patients. The most likely causes of this abnormality are either decreases in the ability of the cones to absorb light, or an increased rate of regeneration of the cone photopigments. PMID:3557875

  18. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs

    PubMed Central

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia. PMID:24174905

  19. Pebble bed pebble motion: Simulation and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This dissertation presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  20. Orbital motions of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Ko; Inamura, Takao

    2012-09-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion on the wall of a spherical levitator was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging technique. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along an elliptic orbit around the center of mass of the bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force.

  1. Abnormal Pap Smear and Diagnosis of High-Grade Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sopracordevole, Francesco; Mancioli, Francesca; Clemente, Nicolò; De Piero, Giovanni; Buttignol, Monica; Giorda, Giorgio; Ciavattini, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between the first diagnosis of high-grade Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (HG-VaIN: VaIN 2-VaIN 3) and the cytological abnormalities on the referral pap smear.All the women with histological diagnosis of HG-VaIN consecutively referred to the Gynecological Oncology Unit of the Aviano National Cancer Institute (Aviano, Italy) from January 1991 to April 2014 and with a pap smear performed in the 3 months before the diagnosis were considered, and an observational cohort study was performed.A total of 87 women with diagnosis of HG-VaIN were identified. Major cytological abnormalities (HSIL and ASC-H) on the referral pap smear were significantly more frequent than lesser abnormalities (ASC-US and LSIL) in postmenopausal women (64.9% vs 36.7%, P = 0.02) and in women with a previous diagnosis of HPV-related cervical preinvasive or invasive lesions (70.5% vs 39.5%, P = 0.01). Diagnosis of VaIN 3 was preceded by major cytological abnormalities in most of the cases (72.7% vs 27.3%, P < 0.001).The diagnosis of HG-VaIN can be preceded by different abnormalities on referral pap smear. Major abnormalities are usually reported in postmenopausal women and in women with previous cervical HPV-related disease. However, ASC-US or LSIL do not exclude HG-VaIN, especially VaIN2. An accurate examination of the whole vaginal walls (or vaginal vault) must be performed in all the women who underwent colposcopy for an abnormal pap smear, and a biopsy of all suspicious areas is mandatory. PMID:26496321

  2. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  3. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  4. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  5. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  6. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  7. Abnormal carbene-silicon halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Robinson, Gregory H

    2016-04-14

    Reaction of the anionic N-heterocyclic dicarbene (NHDC), [:C{[N(2,6-Pr(i)2C6H3)]2CHCLi}]n (1), with SiCl4 gives the trichlorosilyl-substituted (at the C4 carbon) N-heterocyclic carbene complex (7). Abnormal carbene-SiCl4 complex (8) may be conveniently synthesized by combining 7 with HCl·NEt3. In addition, 7 may react with CH2Cl2 in warm hexane, giving the abnormal carbene-complexed SiCl3(+) cation (9). The nature of the bonding in 9 was probed with complementary DFT computations. PMID:26605692

  8. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  9. Ocular motor abnormalities in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, C A; Kennard, C

    2015-01-01

    Eye movements are a source of valuable information to both clinicians and scientists as abnormalities of them frequently act as clues to the localization of a disease process. Classically, they are divided into two main types: those that hold the gaze, keeping images steady on the retina (vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes) and those that shift gaze and redirect the line of sight to a new object of interest (saccades, vergence, and smooth pursuit). Here we will review some of the major ocular motor abnormalities present in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25412716

  10. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research. PMID:26460794

  11. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  12. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  13. A School without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Len Tai

    1994-01-01

    During the summer, selected students of Hawaiian ancestry who have completed seventh or eighth grade participate in a boarding program with outdoor activities such as pulling taro, star gazing, and camping. The activities eliminate walls of doubt and fear and nurture self-confidence, creativity, personal growth, leadership, and cultural awareness.…

  14. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  15. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  16. Mechanics of amoeboid motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.

    1986-01-01

    The reactive flow model is a putative description of amoeboid cytoplasm based on the formalism of multifield fluid mechanics. We show by direct numerical computations that the reactive flow model is able to account for various phenomena observed in dissociated cytoplasm and/or in vitro contractile networks. These phenomena include states of relaxation or mechanical equilibrium, as well as transitions between such states, by processes of expansion or contraction. Simulations also indicate the existence of states of chaotic or turbulent cytoplasmic streaming. Finally, simulations yield steady states of coherent motion similar to motions observed in cytoplasm dissociated from the giant amoeba, Chaos carolinensis.

  17. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  18. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  19. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  20. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L

    2011-01-01

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6-2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes. PMID:22127058