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Sample records for abnormal wall motion

  1. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  2. A brief training module improves recognition of echocardiographic wall-motion abnormalities by emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Chris; Tommaso, Laura; Kulstad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Wall-motion abnormality on echocardiogram is more sensitive in detecting cardiac ischemia than the electrocardiogram, but the use of bedside echocardiography by emergency physicians (EPs) for this purpose does not appear to be widespread, apparently due to limited data on proficiency of EPs for this task. We sought to determine the effect of a brief training module on the ability of EPs to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms. Methods. We developed a brief training and testing module and presented it to EPs. After baseline testing of 15 echocardiograms, we presented the 30-minute training module, and administered a new test of 15 different echocardiograms. Physicians were asked to interpret the wall motion as normal or abnormal. Results. 35 EPs over two separate sessions showed significant improvement recognition of wall-motion abnormalities after the brief training module. Median score on the baseline test was 67%, interquartile range (IQR) 53% to 80%, while the median score on the posttraining test was 87%, IQR 80% to 87%, P < .001, independent of time in practice or prior training. Conclusion. With only brief training on how to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms, EPs showed significant improvement in ability to identify wall motion abnormalities.

  3. Segmental wall motion abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy: hemodynamic characteristics and comparison with thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuiki, K.; Hayasaka, M.; Yasui, S.

    1987-05-01

    This study assessed the hemodynamic characteristics of segmental wall motion abnormality of the left ventricle in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and its relation to the thallium-201 (TI-201) myocardial scintigraphy (MPI). Left ventriculograms and MPI in 23 patients were analyzed by the use of quantitative indexes of regional wall motion and TI-201 uptake based on a mean and a standard deviation of 13 normal subjects. Relative normokinesis in our definition was more frequently seen in the inferior wall than in the anterior wall (p less than 0.01). In contrast, severe asynergy was more often seen in the anterior wall than in the inferior wall (p less than 0.01). There were 11 patients who had relative normokinesis and asynergy together. By means of the index of wall motion, the DCM patients were divided into two groups, one with segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) and another with diffuse wall motion abnormality (DWMA). The DWMA group had higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (p less than 0.05) and the tendency of large left ventricular end-diastolic volumes than the SWMA group. There was a rough correlation (r = 0.58) between the quantitative indexes of TI-201 uptake and wall motion at the same region of the left ventricle. Thus, the nonuniformity of the left ventricular wall motion was recognized in the patients with DCM and more increased preload was shown in the patients with DWMA than in the group with SWMA. Further, the regional asynergy may be related to the localized fibrosis within the left ventricle in DCM, considering the result that the worse TI-201 uptake was roughly accompanied by the more severe asynergy.

  4. Mitral Annular Systolic Velocities Predict Left Ventricular Wall Motion Abnormality During Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Dawod; Sharif-Rasslan, Amal; Shahla, Camilia

    2011-01-01

    Background Longitudinal systolic left ventricular contraction is complementary to the radial performance and can be assessed using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). This study was performed to evaluate the contribution of mitral annular systolic velocities using TDI after dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Methods and Results Fifty subjects with suspected coronary artery disease and chest pain were examined, using DSE as usual, as well as TDI imaging of the mitral annulus at the septal, lateral, inferior, anterior, posterior regions and the proximal anteroseptal region from the apical views, before and immediately after DSE. In 24 subjects the study was normal, while wall motion abnormality was seen in 26, 9 of them only after DSE. Mitral annular systolic velocity at the 6 locations increased significantly after DSE both in normal subjects and in those with wall motion abnormality (WMA). After DSE mitral annular septal systolic velocity in normals, 19.2 ± 3.8 cm/sec, was higher than in those with WMA, 14.6 ± 2.5 cm/sec, P < 0.0003. Post-DSE mitral systolic velocity was senstive and accurate in predicting WMA. Conclusions Systolic mitral TDI velocities increase after DSE, however to a lesser extent in those with wall motion abnormality, and can differentiate them from normal subjects.

  5. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  6. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  7. Apical regional wall motion abnormalities reminiscent to Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy following consumption of psychoactive fungi.

    PubMed

    Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hilpert, Pirmin; Krause, Nicola; Troidl, Christian; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Dill, Thorsten; Hamm, Christian; Elsässer, A

    2009-05-01

    Consumption of natural hallucinogenic substances continues to be a problem. In this case we report from a young male patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome with significant ST-elevation after the abuse of psychoactive fungi, commonly referred to as "magic mushrooms". Coronary angiography excludes relevant coronary artery disease. In ventriculography contractile dysfunction with hypokinesia in the apical segments could be documented reminiscent to wall motion abnormalities in Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed no pathological signal activity in the late-enhancement sequences ruling out myocardial infarction or inflammatory processes. Ventricular function normalized within several days. The active metabolite of psychoactive fungi psilocybin is known to interact with several different dopaminergic, adrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Thus, the pathomechanisms leading to contractile dysfunction after consumption of psychoactive fungi are reminiscent to those documented in TTC.

  8. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities with the use of color kinesis: a valuable visual and training aid.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y S; Puryear, J V; Gan, S C; Fowler, M B; Vagelos, R H; Popp, R L; Schnittger, I

    1997-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of left ventricular segmental wall motion by echocardiography is an important yet difficult skill to learn. Color-coded left ventricular wall motion (color kinesis) is a tool that potentially could aid in the interpretation and provide semiquantification. We studied the usefulness of color kinesis in 42 patients with a history of congestive cardiomyopathy who underwent two-dimensional echocardiograms and a color kinesis study. The expert's reading of the two-dimensional wall motion served as a reference for comparison of color kinesis studies interpreted by the expert and a cardiovascular trainee. Correlation between two-dimensional echocardiography and the expert's and trainee's color coded wall motion scores were r = 0.83 and r = 0.67, respectively. Reproducibility between reviewers and between operators was also assessed. Interobserver variability for color-coded wall motion showed a correlation of r = 0.78. Correlation between operators was also good; r = 0.84. Color kinesis is reliable and appears promising as an adjunct in the assessment of wall motion abnormalities by echocardiography. It is both a valuable visual aid, as well as a training aid for the cardiovascular trainee.

  9. Validity of acoustic quantification colour kinesis for detection of left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities: a transoesophageal echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, T; Kolev, N; Blaicher, A; Spiss, C; Zimpfer, M

    1997-10-01

    Transoesophageal echocardiography is a sensitive monitor for intraoperative myocardial ischaemia. Colour kinesis is a new technology for echocardiographic assessment of regional wall motion based on acoustic quantification. We have examined the feasibility and accuracy of quantitative segmental analysis of colour kinesis images to provide objective evaluation of systolic regional wall motion during the perioperative period using transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE). Two-dimensional echocardiograms were obtained in the transgastric short-axis and long-axis views in 60 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. End-systolic colour overlays superimposed on the grey scale images were obtained with colour kinesis to colour encode left ventricular endocardial motion throughout systole. These colour-encoded images were divided into segments and compared with corresponding conventional two-dimensional images. Six hundred of a potential 720 left ventricular wall segments were of sufficient resolution for grading by experts; they diagnosed wall motion abnormalities in 61 of these segments by a conventional method. In comparing the conventional TOE method with colour kinesis, there were 60 true positives, 482 true negatives, 57 false positives and 1 false negative result. This yielded a sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 51% and negative predictive value of 100%. Translational and rotational movement of the heart and papillary muscle interference were common problems accounting for false positive diagnoses. We conclude that colour kinesis provides a basis for objective and on-line evaluation of left ventricular regional wall motion which is a sensitive but non-specific method. It may be a useful aid for the less experienced because it can potentially direct the anaesthetist's attention towards specific segments.

  10. Clinical utility of a multigated modified anterior projection in the detection of left ventricular inferior and apical wall motion abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Bianco, J.A.; Kemper, A.J.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the left anterior oblique projection (LAO) multigated radionuclide ventriculogram (RVG) underestimates presence and extent of apical and inferior left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. We investigated, prospectively, the sensitivity and specificity of a modified anterior projection (MAP), which incorporates cephalad tilting. Thirty-three consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization suspected to have coronary artery disease were studied with RVG, using both the MAP and LAO views. LAO views were analyzed using the ejection fraction image (REFI), and the regional ejection fraction (REF) of the inferoapical region. The MAP studies were analyzed using stroke volume image (SVI) to evaluate apical and inferior LV regions. Results were as follows: (Formula: see text), Both intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were comparable to those of conventional angiographic studies used in detection of apical and inferior asynergy. It is concluded that the multigated MAP offers additional information about abnormalities of the LV inferior and apical regions.

  11. [Wall motion abnormalities and hemodynamic parameters in patients with left bundle branch block during exercise echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Dupliakov, D V; Vozhdaeva, Z I; Sysuenkova, E V; Zemlianova, M E; Lotina, A S; Goleva, S V; Svetlakova, A P; Khokhlunov, S M

    2011-01-01

    Study aim was to investigate dynamics of local contractility and hemodynamic parameters during exercise stress echocardiography (EEcho) in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). We examined 23 patients (15 men, 8 women) aged 48-65 years (mean age 53.9+/-8.1 years). Bicycle EEcho was accomplished according to standard protocol. Patients without clinical signs of ischemic heart disease (n=11) comprised group 1, patients after myocardial infarction (n=12) - group 2 (subgroup 2A - with negative test result, subgroup 2B - with worsening of local left ventricular contractility during EEcho). At baseline group 1 patients had significantly better hemodynamic parameters (ejection fraction - EF, left ventricular end diastolic volume - LVEDV) and no abnormalities of local contractility. Exercise tolerance was also the highest in this group. Insignificant worsening of postexercise EF occurred in patients of subgroup 2B (from 46+/-10.5 to 44,2+/-9.4%). In group 1 EF significantly increased (from 56.8+/-10.5% to 64.7+/-15.4%, <0.05), in subgroup 2A tendency to EF increase up to 48.7+/-9.9% was registered. Lowering of local contractility abnormalities index was noted also only in patients of subgroup 2B (from 1.54+/-0.4 to 2.17+/-0.37 (p<0.01). LVEDV compared with initial values tended to decrease in both groups (however differences between groups were not significant). Positive echocardiographic response was associated with significant changes of transmitral blood flow. Angiographically clean coronary arteries were found in 8 of 10 patients in group 1. Six group 2 patients with history of typical clinical picture of angina and myocardial infarction) had multivessel lesions in coronary vascular bed. EEcho result was positive in 5 of 6 group 2 patients. Thus EEcho possesses high potential for diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with LBBB. This allows recommending it as a first line method in patients with this pathology.

  12. Evaluation by quantitative 99m-technetium MIBI SPECT and echocardiography of myocardial perfusion and wall motion abnormalities in patients with dobutamine-induced ST-segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Elhendy, A; Geleijnse, M L; Roelandt, J R; van Domburg, R T; Cornel, J H; TenCate, F J; Postma-Tjoa, J; Reijs, A E; el-Said, G M; Fioretti, P M

    1995-09-01

    ST-segment elevation during exercise testing has been attributed to myocardial ischemia and wall motion abnormalities (WMA). However, the functional significance of ST-segment elevation during dobutamine stress testing (DST) has not been evaluated in patients referred for diagnostic evaluation of myocardial ischemia. DST (up to 40 micrograms/kg/min) with simultaneous echocardiography and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 229 consecutive patients with suspected myocardial ischemia who were unable to perform an adequate exercise test; 127 (55%) had a previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI). ST elevation was defined as > or = 1 mm new or additional J point elevations with a horizontal or upsloping ST segment lasting 80 ms. Reversible perfusion defects on SPECT and new or worsening WMA during stress on echocardiography were considered diagnostic of ischemia. ST elevation occurred in 40 patients (17%) during the test; 34 of them (85%) had previous AMI. All patients with ST-segment elevation had abnormal scintigrams (fixed or reversible defects, or both) and abnormal wall motion (fixed or transient defect, or both) at peak stress. In patients who had ST elevation and no previous AMI (n = 6), ischemia was detected in all by echocardiography and in 5 (83%) by SPECT. In patients with previous AMI, the prevalence of ischemia was not different with or without ST elevation (53% vs 43% by echocardiography and 53% vs 48% by SPECT, respectively). Baseline regional wall motion score in the infarct zone was higher in patients with ST elevation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Effects of Left Ventricular Wall Motion Abnormality on Global and Regional Diastolic Function of the Left and Right Ventricles at Rest and After Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Dawod; Sharif-Rasslan, Amal; Odeh, Majed; Shahla, Camilia; Khalil, Amin; Rosenschien, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Background Diastolic dysfunction precedes systolic dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormality (WMA) on diastolic LV and right ventricular (RV) function at rest and after stress. Methods Fifty-nine subjects, 15 with LV-WMA (abnormal group) and 44 without (normal group), underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) studies, in addition to evaluation of LV and RV diastolic function before and after DSE. Results Resting mitral flow parameters were similar. DSE increased peak A-wave velocities in both groups, and mitral color slope only in normal subjects. After DSE, E-wave peak velocities and mitral color slope were higher in normal subjects, P < 0.05. At rest and after DSE systolic and diastolic pulmonary vein velocities were similar in both groups; however, DSE increased these velocities only in normal subjects, P < 0.05. Regional E-wave peak velocities of LV were higher at rest in normal subjects, P < 0.05. Both LV and RV, regional peak E-wave velocities were not affected by DSE. After DSE, regional A-wave peak velocities increased in all (P < 0.01), except at the lateral region (P = 0.07). DSE increased trans-tricuspid velocities in both groups, P < 0.05. Resting A-wave velocities were higher in normal subjects, P < 0.01. Conclusions Global LV early diastolic filling parameters were not affected by LV-WMA at rest. LV-WMA blunted the response after stress. RV E-wave velocities increased after DSE, and were not affected by LV-WMA. LV-WMA reduced regional LV-E’ velocities at rest but not the reserve. A-wave velocities were not affected by WMA and increased after DSE.

  14. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  15. Intraventricular flow alterations due to dyssynchronous wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Audrey M.; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Roughly 30% of patients with systolic heart failure suffer from left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD), in which mechanical discoordination of the ventricle walls leads to poor hemodynamics and suboptimal cardiac function. There is currently no clear mechanistic understanding of how abnormalities in septal-lateral (SL) wall motion affects left ventricle (LV) function, which is needed to improve the treatment of LVD using cardiac resynchronization therapy. We use an experimental flow phantom with an LV physical model to study mechanistic effects of SL wall motion delay on LV function. To simulate mechanical LVD, two rigid shafts were coupled to two segments (apical and mid sections) along the septal wall of the LV model. Flow through the LV model was driven using a piston pump, and stepper motors coupled to the above shafts were used to locally perturb the septal wall segments relative to the pump motion. 2D PIV was used to examine the intraventricular flow through the LV physical model. Alterations to SL delay results in a reduction in the kinetic energy (KE) of the flow field compared to synchronous SL motion. The effect of varying SL motion delay from 0% (synchronous) to 100% (out-of-phase) on KE and viscous dissipation will be presented. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  16. Domain wall motion by localized temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Simone; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by a localized Gaussian temperature profile is studied in a Permalloy nanostrip within the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The different contributions to thermally induced DW motion, entropic torque and magnonic spin transfer torque, are isolated and compared. The analysis of magnonic spin transfer torque includes a description of thermally excited magnons in the sample. A third driving force due to a thermally induced dipolar field is found and described. Finally, thermally induced DW motion is studied under realistic conditions by taking into account the edge roughness. The results give quantitative insights into the different mechanisms responsible for domain wall motion in temperature gradients and allow for comparison with experimental results.

  17. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  18. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Shannon P.; Zahid, Maliha J.; Durkin, John R.; Francis, Richard J.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra

    2016-01-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a “black box” toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  19. Wall motion estimation in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Oubel, E; Cebral, J R; De Craene, M; Blanc, R; Blasco, J; Macho, J; Putman, C M; Frangi, A F

    2010-09-01

    The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is becoming important owing to its potential connection to rupture, and as a way to incorporate the effects of vascular compliance in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Most of papers report values obtained with experimental phantoms, simulated images or animal models, but the information for real patients is limited. In this paper, we have combined non-rigid registration with signal processing techniques to measure pulsation in real patients from high frame rate digital subtraction angiography. We have obtained physiological meaningful waveforms with amplitudes in the range 0 mm-0.3 mm for a population of 18 patients including ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Statistically significant differences in pulsation were found according to the rupture status, in agreement with differences in biomechanical properties reported in the literature.

  20. Acute myocarditis with normal wall motion detected with 2D speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Niel, Johannes; Aichinger, Josef; Ebner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present the case of a 26-year-old male with acute tonsillitis who was referred for coronary angiography because of chest pain, elevated cardiac biomarkers, and biphasic T waves. The patient had no cardiovascular risk factors. Echocardiography showed no wall motion abnormalities and no pericardial effusion. 2D speckle tracking revealed distinct decreased regional peak longitudinal systolic strain in the lateral and posterior walls. Ischemic disease was extremely unlikely in view of his young age, negative family history regarding coronary artery disease, and lack of regional wall motion abnormalities on the conventional 2D echocardiogram. Coronary angiography was deferred as myocarditis was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) was performed, showing subepicardial delayed hyperenhancement in the lateral and posterior walls correlating closely with the strain pattern obtained by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. With a working diagnosis of acute myocarditis associated with acute tonsillitis, we prescribed antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The patient’s clinical signs resolved along with normalization of serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, and the patient was discharged on the third day after admission. Learning points Acute myocarditis can mimic acute coronary syndromes.Conventional 2D echocardiography lacks specific features for detection of subtle regional wall motion abnormalities.2D speckle tracking expands the scope of echocardiography in identifying myocardial dysfunction derived from edema in acute myocarditis. PMID:27249814

  1. Power optimization for domain wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Liu, Y.; Abanov, Ar.

    2011-04-01

    The current mediated domain-wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic wire is investigated. We derive the effective equations of motion of the domain wall. They are used to study the possibility to optimize the power supplied by electric current for the motion of domain walls in a nanowire. We show that a certain resonant time-dependent current moving a domain wall can significantly reduce the Joule heating in the wire, and thus it can lead to a novel proposal for the most energy efficient memory devices. We discuss how Gilbert damping, nonadiabatic spin transfer torque, and the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can effect this power optimization.

  2. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  3. Regional heart motion abnormality detection via information measures and unscented Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Islam, Ali; Ross, Ian G; Li, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates regional heart motion abnormality detection using various classifier features with Shannon's Differential Entropy (SDE). Rather than relying on elementary measurements or a fixed set of moments, the SDE measures global distribution information and, as such, has more discriminative power in classifying distributions. Based on functional images, which are subject to noise and segmentation inaccuracies, heart wall motion analysis is acknowledged as a difficult problem and, therefore, incorporation of prior knowledge is desirable to enhance the accuracy. Given noisy data and nonlinear dynamic model to describe the myocardial motion, unscented Kalman filter, a recursive nonlinear Bayesian filter, is devised in this study so as to estimate LV cavity points. Subsequently, a naive Bayes classifier algorithm is constructed from the SDEs of different features in order to automatically detect abnormal functional regions of the myocardium. Using 90 x 20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images obtained from 30 subjects, the experimental analysis carried over 480 myocardial segments demonstrates that the proposed method perform significantly better than other recent methods, and can lead to a promising diagnostic support tool to assist clinicians.

  4. a Numerical Investigation of Magnetic Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation has given new insight into magnetization dynamics in thin films. This thesis reports on a numerical investigation of magnetic domain wall motion in thin iron garnet films. The magnetization is modeled as a continuum field with constant magnitude, subject to exchange, anisotropy, magnetic interactions, and an external drive field. The features of these systems are domains, walls, and lines. A co-moving formulation of the Landau -Lifshitz-Gilbert equation was developed and implemented on the Connection Machine 2. This approach allowed the investigation of large systems for useful length and time scales. This investigation confirms several mechanisms of domain wall motion and reports on one which is new. At low drive fields, the domain wall moves with a constant velocity and time-invariant profile. Beyond a critical field, a single horizontal Bloch line (HBL) is formed and moves through the wall. The HBL reduces the wall mobility and the average wall velocity varies quadratically with the applied field. At larger fields, HBLs are formed in the center of the wall by a local breakdown mechanism, nucleating a pair of HBLs. The HBLs propagate to the surface of the material where they unwind, and the process repeats. The domain wall velocity is a weak function of the external field in this region. The motion of a domain wall in a stripe array is also described and compared with experiment. Simulation results corroborate the features of overshoot and wall oscillation observed in experimental data, and indicate that they are due to the presence of an HBL in the wall. Comparison of the overall time scale indicates that the gyromagnetic ratio is incorrect for this material. This investigation also reports on the statics and dynamics of vertical Bloch line (VBL) pairs. The structure of a domain wall containing two pi VBLs, and a single 2pi VBL has been determined. The VBLs inhibit the formation of HBLs and significantly reduce wall mobility. The 2pi VBL

  5. Mechanical Actuation of Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Hill, Daniel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the motion of a magnetic domain wall induced by transverse elastic waves in a one-dimensional magnetic wire, which respects both rotational and translational symmetries. By invoking the conservation of the associated total angular and linear momenta, we are able to derive the torque and the force on the domain wall exerted by the waves. We then show how ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domain walls can be driven by circularly and linearly polarized waves, respectively. We envision that elastic waves may provide effective means to drive the dynamics of magnetic solitons in insulators.

  6. Domain wall motion in synthetic Co2Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Liu, Lixin; Chen, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Weiss, Nathan O; Zhou, Hailong; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-04-11

    We report the synthesis of single crystalline Co(2)Si nanowires and the electrical transport studies of single Co(2)Si nanowire devices at low temperature. The butterfly shaped magnetoresistance shows interesting ferromagnetic features, including negative magnetoresistance, hysteretic switch fields, and stepwise drops in magnetoresistance. The nonsmooth stepwise magnetoresistance response is attributed to magnetic domain wall pinning and depinning motion in the Co(2)Si nanowires probably at crystal or morphology defects. The temperature dependence of the domain wall depinning field is observed and described by a model based on thermally assisted domain wall depinning over a single energy barrier.

  7. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  8. Domain wall motion driven by an oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Dae-Yun; Choe, Sug-Bong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2017-03-01

    The coherent unidirectional motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) is a key technology used in memory and logic device applications, as demonstrated in magnetic strips by electric current flow as well as in films by oscillation of a tilted magnetic field. Here we introduce a coherent unidirectional motion of DWs in the strip, utilizing an oscillating field, which is described within a previous 1D model. The essential criterion for DW motion in this approach is the oscillating-field-induced modulation of the DW width, which has not been previously considered. This DW motion driven by width modulation sheds light on high frequency domain manipulation in spin devices. A comprehensive inspection of field angle dependence reveals that unidirectional DW motion in this model requires chiral DWs, followed by asymmetric deformation of the domain shape.

  9. Feature extraction and wall motion classification of 2D stress echocardiography with support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chykeyuk, Kiryl; Clifton, David A.; Noble, J. Alison

    2011-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is a common clinical procedure for diagnosing heart disease. Clinically, diagnosis of the heart wall motion depends mostly on visual assessment, which is highly subjective and operator-dependent. Introduction of automated methods for heart function assessment have the potential to minimise the variance in operator assessment. Automated wall motion analysis consists of two main steps: (i) segmentation of heart wall borders, and (ii) classification of heart function as either "normal" or "abnormal" based on the segmentation. This paper considers automated classification of rest and stress echocardiography. Most previous approaches to the classification of heart function have considered rest or stress data separately, and have only considered using features extracted from the two main frames (corresponding to the end-of-diastole and end-of-systole). One previous attempt [1] has been made to combine information from rest and stress sequences utilising a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which has proven to be the best performing approach to date. Here, we propose a novel alternative feature selection approach using combined information from rest and stress sequences for motion classification of stress echocardiography, utilising a Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifier. We describe how the proposed SVM-based method overcomes difficulties that occur with HMM classification. Overall accuracy with the new method for global wall motion classification using datasets from 173 patients is 92.47%, and the accuracy of local wall motion classification is 87.20%, showing that the proposed method outperforms the current state-of-the-art HMM-based approach (for which global and local classification accuracy is 82.15% and 78.33%, respectively).

  10. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles{endash}Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Experimental Study on Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Yano, K.; Kasai, S.

    2006-06-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion for a well-defined single DW in a micro-fabricated magnetic wire with submicron width was investigated by real-space observation with magnetic force microscopy. Magnetic force microscopy visualizes that a single DW introduced in a wire is displaced back and forth by positive and negative pulsed-current, respectively. Effect of the Joule heating, reduction of the threshold current density by shape control, and magnetic ratchet effect are also presented.

  12. Asymmetric angular dependence of domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2013-03-01

    An angular dependence of domain wall (DW) motion is studied in a magnetic wire consisting of a giant-magnetoresistance spin-valve. A DW pinning site is formed by a single notch, where a conventional linear one and a specially designed tilted one are compared. The asymmetric angular dependence was found in the DW depinning behavior with the tilted notch. The geometry control of the pinning site can be useful for DW diode devices using a rotating magnetic field.

  13. Domain Wall Motion in Synthetic Co2Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Liu, Lixin; Chen, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Weiss, Nathan O.; Zhou, Hailong; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis of single crystalline Co2Si nanowires, and electrical transport studies of single Co2Si nanowire devices at low temperature. The butterfly-shaped magnetoresistance shows interesting ferromagnetic features including negative magnetoresistance, hysteretic switch fields and step-wise drops in magnetoresistance. The non-smooth step-wise magnetoresistance response is attributed to magnetic domain wall pinning and de-pinning motion in the Co2Si nanowires probably at crystal defects or morphology defects. The temperature dependence of the domain wall de-pinning field is observed and is described by a model based on thermally assisted domain wall de-pinning over a single energy barrier. PMID:22469009

  14. Dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion after nucleation: dependence on the wall energy.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, K; Kuch, W; Vogel, J; Romanens, F; Pizzini, S; Camarero, J; Bonfim, M; Kirschner, J

    2006-03-10

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion in the FeNi layer of a FeNi/Al2O3/Co trilayer has been investigated by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, photoelectron emission microscopy, and a stroboscopic pump-probe technique. The nucleation of domains and subsequent expansion by domain wall motion in the FeNi layer during nanosecond-long magnetic field pulses was observed in the viscous regime up to the Walker limit field. We attribute an observed delay of domain expansion to the influence of the domain wall energy that acts against the domain expansion and that plays an important role when domains are small.

  15. Near-wall aerodynamics of idealized model foot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yoshi; Hall, Joseph; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sheth, Ritesh; Glauser, Mark; Khalifa, Ezzat

    2006-11-01

    The air quality is affected by amounts and types of contaminant particles suspended in the air. The particulate matter reaches the respiratory system in an indoor environment by fist becoming detached, resupended and then entrained in the human micro-environment. The resuspension phenomena from the floor occur through either a ballistic mechanism, where kinetic energy is transferred to dust particles through direct contact, or an aerodynamic mechanism, where dust particles are resuspended by the flow generated by the body. In this study we focus on the aerodynamic resuspension of particles caused by walking. The foot motion is idealized and is either towards or away from a floor. A circular disk and an elongated plate having the equivalent area to that of a human foot are used. The foot motion is driven vertically by a linear servo motor that controls the velocity, acceleration, stroke and deceleration. The model velocity is based on the real foot motion. In addition to flow visualization, flowfield measurements were conducted with PIV. In the downstroke, results show a vortex impacting the wall creating the strong wall jet. In upstroke, the vortex generated behind the idealized foot exhibits the large magnitude of velocity. Experiment is continuing with a model more closely to simulating shoe geometry as well as incorporating the real foot kinetics. The results will be compared with the numerical simulation and analytical results.

  16. Volume-based features for detection of bladder wall abnormal regions via MR cystography.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chaijie; Yuan, Kehong; Liu, Fanghua; Xiao, Ping; Lv, Guoqing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes a framework for detecting the suspected abnormal region of the bladder wall via magnetic resonance (MR) cystography. Volume-based features are used. First, the bladder wall is divided into several layers, based on which a path from each voxel on the inner border to the outer border is found. By using the path length to measure the wall thickness and a bent rate (BR) term to measure the geometry property of the voxels on the inner border, the seed voxels representing the abnormalities on the inner border are determined. Then, by tracing the path from each seed, a weighted BR term is constructed to determine the suspected voxels, which are on the path and inside the bladder wall. All the suspected voxels are grouped together for the abnormal region. This work is significantly different from most of the previous computer-aided bladder tumor detection reports on two aspects. First of all, the T (1)-weighted MR images are used which give better image contrast and texture information for the bladder wall, comparing with the computed tomography images. Second, while most previous reports detected the abnormalities and indicated them on the reconstructed 3-D bladder model by surface rendering, we further determine the possible region of the abnormality inside the bladder wall. This study aims at a noninvasive procedure for bladder tumor detection and abnormal region delineation, which has the potential for further clinical analysis such as the invasion depth of the tumor and virtual cystoscopy diagnosis. Five datasets including two patients and three volunteers were used to test the presented method, all the tumors were detected by the method, and the overlap rates of the regions delineated by the computer against the experts were measured. The results demonstrated the potential of the method for detecting bladder wall abnormal regions via MR cystography.

  17. Role of entropy in domain wall motion in thermal gradients.

    PubMed

    Schlickeiser, F; Ritzmann, U; Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2014-08-29

    Thermally driven domain wall (DW) motion caused solely by magnonic spin currents was forecast theoretically and has been measured recently in a magnetic insulator using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. We present an analytical calculation of the DW velocity as well as the Walker breakdown within the framework of the Landau Lifshitz Bloch equation of motion. The temperature gradient leads to a torque term acting on the magnetization where the DW is mainly driven by the temperature dependence of the exchange stiffness, or--in a more general picture--by the maximization of entropy. The existence of this entropic torque term does not rest on the angular momentum transfer from the magnonic spin current. Hence, even DWs in antiferromagnets or compensated ferrimagnets should move accordingly. We further argue that the entropic torque exceeds that of the magnonic spin current.

  18. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-24

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  19. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  20. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  1. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  2. Assessment of left ventricular regional wall motion by color kinesis technique: comparison with angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Vermes, E; Guyon, P; Weingrod, M; Otmani, A; Soussana, C; Halphen, C; Leroy, G; Haïat, R

    2000-08-01

    The analysis of segmental wall motion using two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography is subjective with high interobserver variability. Color kinesis is a new technique providing a color-encoded map of endocardial motion. We evaluated the accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D for assessment of regional asynergy compared with left ventricular angiography as a reference method. Fifteen patients admitted for myocardial infarction were studied by echocardiography the day before left ventricular angiography. The left ventricle was divided into seven segments. Each segment was classified by two independent observers as normal or abnormal in 2-D and color kinesis. Accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D was evaluated and compared to left ventricular angiography. Color kinesis is significantly superior to 2-D for all seven segments (mean 0.80/0.68, P = 0.05), except for the septum (0.67/0.60, P = NS). Interobserver variability studied by chi-square statistic is lower with color kinesis (0.70) than with 2-D (0.57). We conclude that these data suggest that color kinesis is a useful method for assessing systolic wall motion in all segments, except the septum and for improving the accuracy of segmental ventricular function and interobserver variability.

  3. Usefulness of coronary flow reserve over regional wall motion when added to dual-imaging dipyridamole echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Fausto; Richieri, Margherita; Pasanisi, Emilio; Cutaia, Valeria; Zanella, Carlo; Della Valentina, Patrizia; Di Pede, Francesco; Raviele, Antonio; Picano, Eugenio

    2003-02-01

    Vasodilator stress echocardiography allows semi-simultaneous imaging of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary flow and regional wall function. To assess the relative (and additive?) value of regional flow and function for noninvasive identification of angiographically assessed LAD disease in patients with chest pain syndrome, we studied 230 consecutive in-hospital patients (134 men, aged 63.5 +/- 11 years) with chest pain syndrome and normal regional and global left ventricular function. All patients underwent stress echocardiography with dipyridamole (up to 0.84 mg/kg over 10 minutes), including wall motion analysis by 2-dimensional echocardiography and coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of the LAD artery by Doppler, with or without contrast injection. A new regional wall motion abnormality in >or=2 contiguous segments was required for 2-dimensional echocardiographic positivity. CFR was evaluated as the ratio of dipyridamole to peak diastolic coronary blood flow velocity at rest. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 60 days; a quantitatively assessed diameter reduction >50% of the LAD artery was considered significant. Of the 230 patients, 70 had LAD disease. A regional wall motion abnormality in LAD territory was present in 52 patients, and reduced CFR (<1.9) in 62 patients. Sensitivity for detecting LAD disease was 74% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% confidence interval [CI] 64% to 84%) and 81% for CFR <1.9 (95% CI 72% to 90%); specificity was 91% (95% CI 87% to 96%) for 2-dimensional echocardiography and 84% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 90%). Accuracy was 86% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% CI 82% to 91%) and 83.5% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 88%). When 2-dimensional echocardiography and CFR criteria were considered, sensitivity increased to 93% (95% CI 87% to 99%), with 80.6% specificity (95% CI 74.5% to 86.7%). CFR was assessed during vasodilator stress echocardiography. Its diagnostic accuracy for detecting LAD disease was comparable

  4. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  5. Effect of curvature on domain wall motion in elliptical nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Fikriye Idil; Bickel, Jessica; Aidala, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    Understanding domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanostructures is important to realize proposed magnetic data storage and logic devices. We investigate the effect of curvature on DW pinning and motion by studying elliptical rings using micromagnetic simulations. Elliptical rings with constant width have varying curvature, with the lowest curvature at the minor axis, and the greatest curvature at the major axis. DWs can be created at any angular position within the ellipse by the application of an appropriate uniform magnetic field. However, only some of these positions are stable when the field is removed. We study the stability and depinning of the DWs by applying a slowly increasing elliptical magnetic field to determine the magnitude of the field at which the DWs begin to move. By varying the major to minor axis ratio, we examine the effect of curvature on DW pinning. A larger field is required to move DWs in regions of higher curvature (near the major axis) than lower curvature (near the minor axis). Overall, we see that increasing the major to minor axis ratio of elliptical nanorings requires increasing field strength to depin the DWs along the major axis. Work supported in part by NSF DMR-1207924 and NSF CMMI-1025020. Simulations performed at the CNS computational facilities at Harvard University, a member of the NNIN supported by NSF Award No. ECS-0335765.

  6. Aortic root and left atrial wall motion. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, G; Layton, C

    1977-01-01

    The echocardiographically recorded movement of the aortic root was studied by analysing the relation between posterior aortic wall motion and other intracardiac events. The systolic anterior movement of the aortic root continued beyond aortic valve closure and in cases with mitral regurgitation began significantly earlier than in normal subjects. The diastolic rapid posterior movement began after mitral valve opening but did not occur in patients with mitral stenosis. The total amplitude of aortic root motion was increased in patients with mitral regurgitation, diminished in cases of mitral stenosis, and was normal with aortic regurgitation. In patients with atrioventricular block an abrupt posterior movement followed the P wave of the electrocardiogram irrespective of its timing in diastole. These observations correlate with the expected changes in left atrial volume during the cardiac cycle both in the normal subjects and patients with heart disease. The results support the hypothesis that phasic changes in left atrial dimension are largely responsible for the echocardiographically observed movement of the aortic root and indicate a potential role for echocardiography in the analysis of left atrial events. Images PMID:911559

  7. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  8. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  9. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  10. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  11. Segmentation of arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution using M-mode ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Craig; Azer, Karim; Ramcharan, Sharmilee L; Bunzel, Michelle; Cambell, Barry R; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Walker, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for segmenting arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution, using the returns from M-mode ultrasound. The technique involves measuring the spatial offset between all pairs of scans from their cross-correlation, converting the spatial offsets to relative wall motion through a global optimization, and finally translating from relative to absolute wall motion by interpolation over the M-mode image. The resulting detailed wall distension waveform has the potential to enhance existing vascular biomarkers, such as strain and compliance, as well as enable new ones.

  12. Changes in dynamic embryonic heart wall motion in response to outflow tract banding measured using video densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, Stephanie; Midgett, Madeline; Thornburg, Kent; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal blood flow during early cardiovascular development has been identified as a key factor in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease; however, the mechanisms by which altered hemodynamics induce cardiac malformations are poorly understood. This study used outflow tract (OFT) banding to model increased afterload, pressure, and blood flow velocities at tubular stages of heart development and characterized the immediate changes in cardiac wall motion due to banding in chicken embryo models with light microscopy-based video densitometry. Optical videos were used to acquire two-dimensional heart image sequences over the cardiac cycle, from which intensity data were extracted along the heart centerline at several locations in the heart ventricle and OFT. While no changes were observed in the synchronous contraction of the ventricle with banding, the peristaltic-like wall motion in the OFT was significantly affected. Our data provide valuable insight into early cardiac biomechanics and its characterization using a simple light microscopy-based imaging modality.

  13. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  14. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  15. Vagal control of cardiac electrical activity and wall motion during ventricular fibrillation in large animals.

    PubMed

    Naggar, Isaac; Nakase, Ko; Lazar, Jason; Salciccioli, Louis; Selesnick, Ivan; Stewart, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Vagal inputs control pacemaking and conduction systems in the heart. Anatomical evidence suggests a direct ventricular action, but functional evidence that separates direct and indirect (via the conduction system) vagal actions is less well established. We studied vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during sinus rhythm and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs and sheep to determine: 1) the range of unilateral and bilateral actions (inotropic and chronotropic) and 2) whether VNS alters left ventricular motion and/or electrical activity during VF, a model of abnormal electrical conduction of the left ventricle that excludes sinus and atrioventricular nodal function. Adult pigs (N=8) and sheep (N=10) were anesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. VNS was performed in animals at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100Hz for 20s. VF was induced with direct current to the ventricles or occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In 4 pigs and 3 sheep, left ventricular wall motion was assessed from endocardial excursion in epicardial echocardiography. In sheep and pigs, the best frequency among those tested for VNS during sinus rhythm to produce sustained electrical and mechanical ventricular standstill was 50Hz for unilateral or bilateral stimulation. When applied during VF, bilateral VNS increased the variability of the dominant VF frequency, indicating a direct impact on the excitability of ventricular myocytes, and decreased endocardial excursion by more than 50% during VF. We conclude that the vagus nerve directly modulates left ventricular function independently from its effects on the conduction system.

  16. Echocardiographic quantification of regional left ventricular wall motion with color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Krahwinkel, W; Haltern, G; Gülker, H

    2000-01-15

    Echocardiographic assessment of regional systolic left ventricular function is usually performed qualitatively and depends on investigator experience. In this study, we investigated a new method for quantifying regional systolic wall motion based on color kinesis. In this study, regional systolic wall motion velocity (Vsys) was determined by dividing end-systolic color width by systolic time. High regional wall motion velocity (Vhigh) was determined by dividing the width of the widest color by its duration of 40 ms. First, in vitro measurements with an acrylic glass model were obtained; these demonstrated a high correlation between echocardiographically determined and real "wall motion velocities" (R = 0.99, p<0.001, R2 = 0.99). Then, 17 healthy, young persons were examined, and normal values for each left ventricular wall segment (16-segment model) were determined. The mean Vsys and Vhigh of all 272 wall segments were 2.3+/-0.6 and 7.4+/-1.8 cm/s, respectively. Finally, in 12 patients with coronary artery disease and prior myocardial infarction, Vsys and Vhigh of each left ventricular wall segment were determined and compared with conventional echocardiographic wall motion analysis using the usual 4-grade score system. Analysis of data showed that quantitative color kinesis measurements demonstrated significantly lower velocity values in pathologic than in normal wall segments (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.05). Measurements discriminated between pathologic and normal wall motion, with an accuracy of 89% for Vsys and 83% for Vhigh (chi-square test, p<0.05). To summarize, in this first study, measurements of regional wall motion velocities with color kinesis demonstrated reliable results for the quantification of regional left ventricular systolic function.

  17. Current-induced domain wall motion in Rashba spin-orbit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Katsunori; Tatara, Gen

    2008-06-01

    Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion, induced by transfer of spin transfer effect due to exchange interaction, is expected to be useful for next generation high-density storages. Here we showed that efficient domain wall manipulation can be achieved by the introduction of Rashba spin-orbit interaction, which induces spin precession of conduction electron and acts as an effective magnetic field. Its effect on domain wall motion depends on the wall configuration. We found that the effect is significant for Bloch wall with the hard axis along the current, since the effective field works as β or fieldlike term and removes the threshold current if in extrinsic pinning is absent. For Néel wall and Bloch wall with easy axis perpendicular to Rashba plane, the effective field induces a step motion of wall corresponding to a rotation of wall plane by the angle of approximately π at current lower than intrinsic threshold. Rashba interaction would therefore be useful to assist efficient motion of domain walls at low current.

  18. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. Methods We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. Results In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p < 0.01; peak systolic radial strain -31.74 ± 9.15% fornormal, -24.33 ± 6.28% for hypokinesia, -20.30 ± 7.78% for akinesia, p < 0.01). However, the velocity vectors at the time of mitral valve opening (MVO) were directed outward in the visually normal myocardium, inward velocity vectors were revealed in the visually akinetic area (VMVO, -0.85 ± 1.65 cm/s for normal vs. 0.10 ± 1.46 cm/s for akinesia, p < 0.001). At coronary angiography, VMVO clearly increased in the ischemic area (VMVO, -0.88+1.56 cm/s for normal vs. 0.70 + 2.04 cm/s for ischemic area, p < 0.01). Conclusion Regional wall motion assessment using VVI showed could be used to detect significant ischemia in the patient with acute chest pain at ED.

  19. Analysis of intracranial aneurysm wall motion and its effects on hemodynamic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; De Craene, Mathieu; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamics, and in particular Wall Shear Stress (WSS), is thought to play a critical role in the progression and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Wall motion is related to local biomechanical properties of the aneurysm, which in turn are associated with the amount of damage undergone by the tissue. The underlying hypothesis in this work is that injured regions show differential motion with respect to normal ones, allowing a connection between local wall biomechanics and a potential mechanism of wall injury such as elevated WSS. In a previous work, a novel method was presented combining wall motion estimation using image registration techniques with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations in order to provide realistic intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. It was shown that, when compared to compliant vessels, rigid models tend to overestimate WSS and produce smaller areas of elevated WSS and force concentration, being the observed differences related to the magnitude of the displacements. This work aims to further study the relationships between wall motion, flow patterns and risk of rupture in aneurysms. To this end, four studies containing both 3DRA and DSA studies were analyzed, and an improved version of the method developed previously was applied to cases showing wall motion. A quantification and analysis of the displacement fields and their relationships to flow patterns are presented. This relationship may play an important role in understanding interaction mechanisms between hemodynamics, wall biomechanics, and the effect on aneurysm evolution mechanisms.

  20. Effects of posture on chest-wall configuration and motion during tidal breathing in normal men

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Sachie; Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Kouyama, Yusuke; Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Ando, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of postural changes during tidal breathing on the configuration and motion of chest-wall in order to further breathing motion evaluation. [Subjects and Methods] Chest-wall configuration and motion in the supine, right lateral, and sitting positions were measured using optoelectronic plethysmography in 15 healthy adult men. [Results] The anteroposterior diameters of the chest wall were significantly lower in the supine position for the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages, whereas the mediolateral diameters in the lateral position were lowest for the abdominal rib cage. Regarding chest-wall motion, both craniocaudal and anteroposterior motions of the anterior surface of the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages were significantly greater in the sitting position. Regarding motion of the left lateral abdominal rib cage, lateral motion was greatest in the lateral position. [Conclusion] Chest-wall configuration and motion changed according to posture in healthy men, particularly in the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages. PMID:28210033

  1. [Changes in left ventricular regional wall motion induced by Verapamil (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, E; Allegri, P; Morlino, T; Vincenzi, M

    1980-01-01

    28 subjects with atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries were studied by means of cineventriculography both before and after IV administration of verapamil Regional wall motion has been analyzed by means of two different methods. Imporvement of regional wall motion has been demonstrated in about 65% of cases. No significant result has been achieved in segments corresponding to previous infarctions. Such a response does not differ substantially from that evoked by nitroglycerin or other calcium antagonist drugs.

  2. Abnormal Color Flow Signal Traversing the Myocardial Wall: Not Everything is What it Appears to Be

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Kathy; López-Candales, Angel

    2016-01-01

    A case of a patient presenting with an acute myocardial infarction is presented. A transthoracic echocardiographic examination revealed an abnormal color flow signal that traversed the myocardial wall from a large inferior aneurysm and initially considered to be a ventricular septal defect. However, further echocardiographic manipulation utilizing modified views along with sequential injections of both agitated saline and Definity® proved very useful to identify a pseudoaneurysm. There was no further need for any other diagnostic test, and the patient was treated surgically, undergoing successful repair of the pseudoaneurysm as well as coronary artery bypass grafting of the left coronary artery.

  3. Deterministic Domain Wall Motion Orthogonal To Current Flow Due To Spin Orbit Torque

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Debanjan; Nowakowski, Mark E.; You, Long; Lee, OukJae; Keating, David; Wong, Mark; Bokor, Jeffrey; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-01-01

    Spin-polarized electrons can move a ferromagnetic domain wall through the transfer of spin angular momentum when current flows in a magnetic nanowire. Such current induced control of a domain wall is of significant interest due to its potential application for low power ultra high-density data storage. In previous reports, it has been observed that the motion of the domain wall always happens parallel to the current flow – either in the same or opposite direction depending on the specific nature of the interaction. In contrast, here we demonstrate deterministic control of a ferromagnetic domain wall orthogonal to current flow by exploiting the spin orbit torque in a perpendicularly polarized Ta/CoFeB/MgO heterostructure in presence of an in-plane magnetic field. Reversing the polarity of either the current flow or the in-plane field is found to reverse the direction of the domain wall motion. Notably, such orthogonal motion with respect to current flow is not possible from traditional spin transfer torque driven domain wall propagation even in presence of an external magnetic field. Therefore the domain wall motion happens purely due to spin orbit torque. These results represent a completely new degree of freedom in current induced control of a ferromagnetic domain wall. PMID:26139349

  4. Spin-wave-driven high-speed domain-wall motions in soft magnetic nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaehak; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-10-28

    We report on a micromagnetic simulation study of interactions between propagating spin waves and a head-to-head domain wall in geometrically confined magnetic nanotubes. We found that incident spin waves of specific frequencies can lead to sufficiently high-speed (on the order of a few hundreds of m/s or higher) domain-wall motions in the same direction as that of the incident spin-waves. The domain-wall motions and their speed vary remarkably with the frequency and the amplitude of the incident spin-waves. High-speed domain-wall motions originate from the transfer torque of spin waves' linear momentum to the domain wall, through the partial or complete reflection of the incident spin waves from the domain wall. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the spin waves with a domain wall in the magnetic nanotubes as well as a route to all-magnetic control of domain-wall motions in the magnetic nanoelements.

  5. Current-Induced Generation and Synchronous Motion of Highly Packed Coupled Chiral Domain Walls.

    PubMed

    P Del Real, Rafael; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2017-03-08

    Chiral domain walls of Neel type emerge in heterostructures that include heavy metal (HM) and ferromagnetic metal (FM) layers owing to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction at the HM/FM interface. In developing storage class memories based on the current induced motion of chiral domain walls, it remains to be seen how dense such domain walls can be packed together. Here we show that a universal short-range repulsion that scales with the strength of the DM interaction exists among chiral domain walls. The distance between the two walls can be reduced with the application of the out-of-plane field, allowing the formation of coupled domain walls. Surprisingly, the current driven velocity of such coupled walls is independent of the out-of-plane field, enabling manipulation of significantly compressed coupled domain walls using current pulses. Moreover, we find that a single current pulse with optimum amplitude can create a large number of closely spaced domain walls. These features allow current induced generation and synchronous motion of highly packed chiral domain walls, a key feature essential for developing domain wall based storage devices.

  6. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  7. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  8. Abnormal Size-Dependent Modulation of Motion Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Galuta, Ilia A.; Davletshina, Maria S.; Orekhova, Elena V.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2017-01-01

    Excitation/Inhibition (E/I) imbalance in neural networks is now considered among the core neural underpinnings of autism psychopathology. In motion perception at least two phenomena critically depend on E/I balance in visual cortex: spatial suppression (SS), and spatial facilitation (SF) corresponding to impoverished or improved motion perception with increasing stimuli size, respectively. While SS is dominant at high contrast, SF is evident for low contrast stimuli, due to the prevalence of inhibitory contextual modulations in the former, and excitatory ones in the latter case. Only one previous study (Foss-Feig et al., 2013) investigated SS and SF in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Our study aimed to replicate previous findings, and to explore the putative contribution of deficient inhibitory influences into an enhanced SF index in ASD—a cornerstone for interpretation proposed by Foss-Feig et al. (2013). The SS and SF were examined in 40 boys with ASD, broad spectrum of intellectual abilities (63 < IQ < 127) and 44 typically developing (TD) boys, aged 6–15 years. The stimuli of small (1°) and large (12°) radius were presented under high (100%) and low (1%) contrast conditions. Social Responsiveness Scale and Sensory Profile Questionnaire were used to assess the autism severity and sensory processing abnormalities. We found that the SS index was atypically reduced, while SF index abnormally enhanced in children with ASD. The presence of abnormally enhanced SF in children with ASD was the only consistent finding between our study and that of Foss-Feig et al. While the SS and SF indexes were strongly interrelated in TD participants, this correlation was absent in their peers with ASD. In addition, the SF index but not the SS index correlated with the severity of autism and the poor registration abilities. The pattern of results is partially consistent with the idea of hypofunctional inhibitory transmission in visual areas in ASD. Nonetheless, the absence of

  9. Abnormal Size-Dependent Modulation of Motion Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    PubMed

    Sysoeva, Olga V; Galuta, Ilia A; Davletshina, Maria S; Orekhova, Elena V; Stroganova, Tatiana A

    2017-01-01

    Excitation/Inhibition (E/I) imbalance in neural networks is now considered among the core neural underpinnings of autism psychopathology. In motion perception at least two phenomena critically depend on E/I balance in visual cortex: spatial suppression (SS), and spatial facilitation (SF) corresponding to impoverished or improved motion perception with increasing stimuli size, respectively. While SS is dominant at high contrast, SF is evident for low contrast stimuli, due to the prevalence of inhibitory contextual modulations in the former, and excitatory ones in the latter case. Only one previous study (Foss-Feig et al., 2013) investigated SS and SF in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Our study aimed to replicate previous findings, and to explore the putative contribution of deficient inhibitory influences into an enhanced SF index in ASD-a cornerstone for interpretation proposed by Foss-Feig et al. (2013). The SS and SF were examined in 40 boys with ASD, broad spectrum of intellectual abilities (63 < IQ < 127) and 44 typically developing (TD) boys, aged 6-15 years. The stimuli of small (1°) and large (12°) radius were presented under high (100%) and low (1%) contrast conditions. Social Responsiveness Scale and Sensory Profile Questionnaire were used to assess the autism severity and sensory processing abnormalities. We found that the SS index was atypically reduced, while SF index abnormally enhanced in children with ASD. The presence of abnormally enhanced SF in children with ASD was the only consistent finding between our study and that of Foss-Feig et al. While the SS and SF indexes were strongly interrelated in TD participants, this correlation was absent in their peers with ASD. In addition, the SF index but not the SS index correlated with the severity of autism and the poor registration abilities. The pattern of results is partially consistent with the idea of hypofunctional inhibitory transmission in visual areas in ASD. Nonetheless, the absence of

  10. Synchronous precessional motion of multiple domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire by perpendicular field pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, June-Seo; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Bisig, André; Krüger, Benjamin; Reeve, Robert M; Schulz, Tomek; Büttner, Felix; Yoon, Jungbum; You, Chun-Yeol; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Swagten, Henk J M; Koopmans, Bert; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2014-03-24

    Magnetic storage and logic devices based on magnetic domain wall motion rely on the precise and synchronous displacement of multiple domain walls. The conventional approach using magnetic fields does not allow for the synchronous motion of multiple domains. As an alternative method, synchronous current-induced domain wall motion was studied, but the required high-current densities prevent widespread use in devices. Here we demonstrate a radically different approach: we use out-of-plane magnetic field pulses to move in-plane domains, thus combining field-induced magnetization dynamics with the ability to move neighbouring domain walls in the same direction. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that synchronous permanent displacement of multiple magnetic walls can be achieved by using transverse domain walls with identical chirality combined with regular pinning sites and an asymmetric pulse. By performing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, we are able to experimentally demonstrate in-plane magnetized domain wall motion due to out-of-plane magnetic field pulses.

  11. Insufficient Lymph Drainage Causes Abnormal Lipid Accumulation and Vein Wall Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Suzuki, Minoru; Mano, Yuuki; Sano, Masaki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Previously, we analyzed human varicose veins (VV) using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and detected the abnormal accumulation of lipid molecules in the walls of VV, possibly due to insufficient lipid drainage by the lymphatic vessels. In this study, we created an animal model of lymphatic insufficiency to investigate the effects of insufficient lymph drainage on vein walls. Methods: In rats, the lymphatic collecting vessels surrounding the femoral vein were ligated on one side (the model tissue), which caused the local retention of lymphatic fluid in the perivascular tissue. The equivalent contralateral tissue was used as a control. A histological study of the femoral vein and the surrounding perivascular tissue was conducted. IMS was used to analyze the distribution of lipid molecules in the perivascular tissue. Results: Fourteen days after the procedure, the lymphatic vessels in the model tissue were significantly dilated. Furthermore, IMS revealed that the composition of the lipid molecules in the perivascular regions of the model tissue had altered. Compared with the control tissue, the model tissue exhibited marked perivascular accumulation of lysophosphatidylcholine (1-acyl 16:0), phosphatidylcholine (16:0/20:4), and triglycerides (52:2). Interestingly, the walls of the femoral veins running through the model tissue were 3.4-fold thicker than those of the femoral veins running through the control tissue. The number of tumor necrosis factor α-positive adipocytes was increased in the perivascular regions of the model tissue. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the accumulation of lymphatic fluid due to insufficient lymph drainage changes the structure of vein walls, and such changes might be associated with chronic venous insufficiency. (This is a translation of Jpn J Phlebol 2015; 26: 227–235.) PMID:28018498

  12. Manipulating antiferromagnets with magnetic fields: Ratchet motion of multiple domain walls induced by asymmetric field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomonay, O.; Kläui, M.; Sinova, J.

    2016-10-01

    Future applications of antiferromagnets (AFs) in many spintronics devices rely on the precise manipulation of domain walls. The conventional approach using static magnetic fields is inefficient due to the low susceptibility of AFs. Recently proposed electrical manipulation with spin-orbit torques is restricted to metals with a specific crystal structure. Here, we propose an alternative, broadly applicable approach: using asymmetric magnetic field pulses to induce controlled ratchet motion of AF domain walls. The efficiency of this approach is based on three peculiarities of AF dynamics. First, a time-dependent magnetic field couples with an AF order parameter stronger than a static magnetic field, which leads to higher mobility of the domain walls. Second, the rate of change of the magnetic field couples with the spatial variation of the AF order parameter inside the domain, and this enables a synchronous motion of multiple domain walls with the same structure. Third, tailored asymmetric field pulses in combination with static friction can prevent backward motion of domain walls and thus lead to the desired controlled ratchet effect. The proposed use of an external field, rather than internal spin-orbit torques, avoids any restrictions on size, conductivity, and crystal structure of the AF material. We believe that our approach paves a way for the development of AF-based devices based on the controlled motion of AF domain walls.

  13. Ab initio study of edge effect on relative motion of walls in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V

    2013-01-14

    Interwall interaction energies of double-walled nanotubes with long inner and short outer walls are calculated as functions of coordinates describing relative rotation and displacement of the walls using van der Waals corrected density functional theory. The magnitude of corrugation and the shape of the potential energy relief are found to be very sensitive to changes of the shorter wall length at subnanometer scale and atomic structure of the edges if at least one of the walls is chiral. Threshold forces required to start relative motion of the short walls and temperatures at which the transition between diffusive and free motion of the short walls takes place are estimated. The edges are also shown to provide a considerable contribution to the barrier to relative rotation of commensurate nonchiral walls. For such walls, temperatures of orientational melting, i.e., the crossover from rotational diffusion to free relative rotation, are estimated. The possibility to produce nanotube-based bolt∕nut pairs and nanobearings is discussed.

  14. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  15. Fast Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in a Ring-Shaped Nanowire Driven by a Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Momeni, Kasra; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Chen, Lei; Lei, Shiming; Zhang, Shujun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Carman, Gregory P; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic domain-wall motion driven by a voltage dissipates much less heat than by a current, but none of the existing reports have achieved speeds exceeding 100 m/s. Here phase-field and finite-element simulations were combined to study the dynamics of strain-mediated voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion in curved nanowires. Using a ring-shaped, rough-edged magnetic nanowire on top of a piezoelectric disk, we demonstrate a fast voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion with average velocity up to 550 m/s, which is comparable to current-driven wall velocity. An analytical theory is derived to describe the strain dependence of average magnetic domain-wall velocity. Moreover, one 180° domain-wall cycle around the ring dissipates an ultrasmall amount of heat, as small as 0.2 fJ, approximately 3 orders of magnitude smaller than those in current-driven cases. These findings suggest a new route toward developing high-speed, low-power-dissipation domain-wall spintronics.

  16. Temperature dependence of the spin torque effect in current-induced domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Laufenberg, M; Bührer, W; Bedau, D; Melchy, P-E; Kläui, M; Vila, L; Faini, G; Vaz, C A F; Bland, J A C; Rüdiger, U

    2006-07-28

    We present an experimental study of domain wall motion induced by current pulses as well as by conventional magnetic fields at temperatures between 2 and 300 K in a 110 nm wide and 34 nm thick Ni80Fe20 ring. We observe that, in contrast with field-induced domain wall motion, which is a thermally activated process, the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion increases with increasing temperature, which implies a reduction of the spin torque efficiency. The effect of Joule heating due to the current pulses is measured and taken into account to obtain critical fields and current densities at constant sample temperatures. This allows for a comparison of our results with theory.

  17. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Purnama, I; Kerk, I S; Lim, G J; Lew, W S

    2015-03-04

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire.

  18. Domain Wall Motion by the Magnonic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.

    2011-07-01

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  19. Domain wall motion by the magnonic spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2011-07-08

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  20. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  1. Role of resting thallium201 perfusion in predicting coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome in unstable angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.R.; Williams, A.E.; Chisholm, R.J.; Patt, N.L.; Greyson, N.D.; Armstrong, P.W.

    1989-02-01

    We performed quantitative thallium scintigraphy in 66 unstable angina patients, 5.6 +/- 5.1 hours after rest pain, to predict coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome. Thallium defects and/or washout abnormalities were present in 5 of 10 (50%) patients with coronary stenoses less than 50%, 27 of 33 (82%) patients with coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 50% and no history of previous myocardial infarction, and in 23 of 23 patients (100%) with histories of previous infarction. Defects were uncommon in the territory of vessels with less than 50% (13 of 61, 21%), but significantly more common in the territory of vessels with greater than or equal to 50% stenosis (57 of 137, 42%), p less than 0.005. With the addition of washout abnormalities to defect analysis, sensitivity for detection of coronary stenoses improved to 67% (92 of 137), p less than or equal to 0.005, but specificity fell to 59% (36 of 61), p less than 0.01. Segmental wall motion abnormalities were less common in segments with normal perfusion (21%) or in those with washout abnormalities alone (19%), than in segments with thallium defects (45%, p less than 0.005). Defects in patients with previous infarction were common in both segments, with normal (26 of 66, 40%) or abnormal (24 of 45, 53%) wall motion. Eleven of 18 patients with in-hospital cardiac events, but no history of myocardial infarction, had resting thallium defects, whereas only 8 of 25 patients without cardiac event had thallium defect (p = 0.056).

  2. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  3. Transfer Function Analysis of the Longitudinal Motion of the Common Carotid Artery Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yli-Ollila, Heikki; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Laitinen, Tomi P.; Laitinen, Tiina M.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal motion of the carotid wall is a potential new measure of arterial stiffness. Despite the over decade long research on the subject, the driving force and the specific longitudinal kinetics of the carotid wall has remained unclear. In this study, a transfer function analysis with 20 healthy subjects is presented to derive how the energy from the blood pressure moves the innermost arterial wall longitudinally and how the kinetic energy is then transferred to the outermost arterial layer. The power spectrums display that the main kinetic energy of the longitudinal motion is on band 0–3 Hz with a peak on the 1.1 Hz frequency. There is a large variation among the individuals, how the energy from the blood pressure transfers into the longitudinal motion of the arterial wall since the main direction of the longitudinal motion varies individually and because early arterial stiffening potentially has an effect on the time characteristics of the energy transfer. The energy transfer from the innermost to the outermost wall layer is more straightforward: on average, a 17% of the longitudinal amplitude is lost and an 18.9 ms delay is visible on the 1.0 Hz frequency. PMID:28082917

  4. Vortex motion in wall-bounded viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    A factor of general interest in a broad class of wall-bounded flows is the dynamic evolution of vortical structures through the flow. The structures are three-dimensional, and an overall mathematical description of such entities has not yet been formulated. One of the objectives of the present investigation is concerned with the establishment of a framework, based on first principles, which may form a basis for more detailed analytical studies. Another aim is related to the establishment of boundary and initial conditions in numerical experiments. The mathematical framework employed involves the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and an inner solution field is constructed which consists of a two-dimensional vortical structure. The outer solution field is taken to be an otherwise undisturbed laminar two-dimensional parallel or self-similar viscous flowfield.

  5. Current-Driven Motion of Magnetic Domain Wall with Many Bloch Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-08-01

    The current-driven motion of a domain wall (DW) in a ferromagnet with many Bloch lines (BLs) via the spin transfer torque is studied theoretically. It is found that the motion of BLs changes the current-velocity (j-v) characteristic considerably. In particular, the critical current density for overcoming the pinning force is even lower than that of a skyrmion by the factor of the Gilbert damping coefficient α. This is in sharp contrast to the case of magnetic-field-driven motion, where the existence of BLs reduces the mobility of the DW.

  6. Theory of Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion: Spin Transfer versus Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen; Kohno, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    A self-contained theory of the domain wall dynamics in ferromagnets under finite electric current is presented. The current has two effects: one is momentum transfer, which is proportional to the charge current and wall resistivity (ρw); the other is spin transfer, proportional to spin current. For thick walls, as in metallic wires, the latter dominates and the threshold current for wall motion is determined by the hard-axis magnetic anisotropy, except for the case of very strong pinning. For thin walls, as in nanocontacts and magnetic semiconductors, the momentum-transfer effect dominates, and the threshold current is proportional to V0/ρw, V0 being the pinning potential.

  7. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  8. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z Z

    2016-04-27

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  9. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-04-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  10. Distance-from-the-wall scaling of turbulent motions in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya, R.; Philip, J.; Hutchins, N.; Monty, J. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-02-01

    An assessment of self-similarity in the inertial sublayer is presented by considering the wall-normal velocity, in addition to the streamwise velocity component. The novelty of the current work lies in the inclusion of the second velocity component, made possible by carefully conducted subminiature ×-probe experiments to minimise the errors in measuring the wall-normal velocity. We show that not all turbulent stress quantities approach the self-similar asymptotic state at an equal rate as the Reynolds number is increased, with the Reynolds shear stress approaching faster than the streamwise normal stress. These trends are explained by the contributions from attached eddies. Furthermore, the Reynolds shear stress cospectra, through its scaling with the distance from the wall, are used to assess the wall-normal limits where self-similarity applies within the wall-bounded flow. The results are found to be consistent with the recent prediction from the work of Wei et al. ["Properties of the mean momentum balance in turbulent boundary layer, pipe and channel flows," J. Fluid Mech. 522, 303-327 (2005)], Klewicki ["Reynolds number dependence, scaling, and dynamics of turbulent boundary layers," J. Fluids Eng. 132, 094001 (2010)], and others that the self-similar region starts and ends at z+˜O (√{δ+}) and O (δ+) , respectively. Below the self-similar region, empirical evidence suggests that eddies responsible for turbulent stresses begin to exhibit distance-from-the-wall scaling at a fixed z+ location; however, they are distorted by viscous forces, which remain a leading order contribution in the mean momentum balance in the region z+≲O (√{δ+}) , and thus result in a departure from self-similarity.

  11. Electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion and local magnetization reversal

    PubMed Central

    Lahtinen, Tuomas H. E.; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2012-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls by an external magnetic field or spin-polarized current. Achieving the same degree of magnetic controllability using an electric field has potential advantages including enhanced functionality and low power consumption. Here we report on an approach to electrically control local magnetic properties, including the writing and erasure of regular ferromagnetic domain patterns and the motion of magnetic domain walls, in CoFe-BaTiO3 heterostructures. Our method is based on recurrent strain transfer from ferroelastic domains in ferroelectric media to continuous magnetostrictive films with negligible magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Optical polarization microscopy of both ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain structures reveals that domain correlations and strong inter-ferroic domain wall pinning persist in an applied electric field. This leads to an unprecedented electric controllability over the ferromagnetic microstructure, an accomplishment that produces giant magnetoelectric coupling effects and opens the way to electric-field driven spintronics. PMID:22355770

  12. Domain wall motion and Barkhausen effect in magnetic nanoparticles for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Mirza Khurram; Soleimani, Hassan; Yahya, Noorhana

    2016-11-01

    The domain wall motion in magnetic nanoparticles is a useful parameter of study. The subject of this research is to study of the phenomenon of discontinuous domain wall motion, or the Barkhausen Effect in magnetic nanoparticles. In this work hematite (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) for crystal structure, morphology, shape, size and magnetic properties respectively. The FESEM and TEM results show that the particles are spherical in nature and average size is 60nm that is suitable for domain walls and barkhuasen effect. The VSM results show high coercivity 175 Oe and low saturation magnetization due to domain wall pinning and barkhausen effect. The size and magnetic properties reveals the existence of domain walls in the synthesized sample. The magnetic properties confirm the energy losses due to domain wall pinning, discontinuous domain rotation or barkhausen effect during magnetization which is useful for oil-water interfacial tension reduction and viscosity of oil. The high surface charge of magnetic nanoparticles and adsorption at the rock surface is useful for wettability alteration of rocks.

  13. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  14. Near and far-wall effects on the three-dimensional motion of bacteria-driven microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Bio-hybrid microrobots have been heavily studied due to their potential applications as minimally invasive medical microdevices. Though most researchers have focused on two-dimensional and near-wall motion, this letter uses a defocused optical tracking method to quantify the three-dimensional motion of 5 μm diameter polystyrene beads driven by attached Serratia marcescens bacteria. Away from walls the beads trace out helical trajectories, demonstrating kinematics produced by near-constant forces and torques. Near-wall motion is observed to be more stochastic. The motion of beads driven by single bacteria is analyzed in detail, providing an understanding of the forces and torques on the beads.

  15. Current driven domain wall motion in rare-earth transition metal alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Songtian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimistu

    2012-09-01

    The domain wall movement behaviors under current combining with magnetic field in perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo wire were studied by a polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope. The velocity for domain wall creeping along electrons flowing direction was found to be apparently higher than that of domain wall creeping against electrons flowing, which is the signature of the spin transfer torque effect. By employing the modified field-driven creep motion law, a spin transfer efficiency of 2.7 Oe cm2/10(6) A was determined for TbFeCo wire by treating the spin transfer torque as an effective field adding to the external field. The high spin transfer efficiency suggests that perpendicularly magnetized system with sharp domain walls in TbFeCo film shows high superiorities for applications in spin transfer torque based devices compared with in-plane magnetized systems.

  16. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  17. Inspiratory flow rate, not type of incentive spirometry device, influences chest wall motion in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela T; Palmer, Kerry R; McNaught, Jessie; Thomas, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of flow rates and spirometer type on chest wall motion in healthy individuals. Twenty-one healthy volunteers completed breathing trials to either two times tidal volume (2xV(T)) or inspiratory capacity (IC) at high, low, or natural flow rates, using a volume- or flow-oriented spirometer. The proportions of rib cage movement to tidal volume (%RC/V(T)), chest wall diameters, and perceived level of exertion (RPE) were compared. Low and natural flow rates resulted in significantly lower %RC/V(T) compared to high flow rate trials (p=0.001) at 2xV(T). Low flow trials also resulted in significantly less chest wall motion in the upper anteroposterior direction than high and natural flow rates (p<0.001). At IC, significantly greater movement occurred in the abdominal lateral direction during low flow compared to high and natural flow trials (both p<0.003). RPE was lower for the low flow trials compared to high flow trials at IC and 2xV(T) (p<0.01). In healthy individuals, inspiratory flow (not device type) during incentive spirometry determines the resultant breathing pattern. High flow rates result in greater chest wall motion than low flow rates.

  18. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  19. Echocardiographic evaluation of mitral stenosis using diastolic posterior left ventricular wall motion.

    PubMed

    Wise, J R

    1980-05-01

    The slope of the posterior left ventricular wall motion in diastole (LVDS) was determined by echocardiography in 25 normal subjects and 21 patients with mitral stenosis. Patients with mitral stenosis had reduced LVDS that was related to the degree of mitral stenosis determined by calculated mitral valve area (r = 0.92). The mitral valve area correlated more closely with the LVDS than with the left atrial emptying index derived from the posterior aortic wall motion. Three patients with mitral stenosis had an increased LVDS after mitral valvotomy or mitral valve replacement. One patient with a stenotic mitral valve prosthesis had reduced LVDS. The results of this study suggest that analysis of the LVDS would be useful in predicting the severity of mitral stenosis and may be beneficial in evaluating patients with suspected prosthetic mitral valve malfunction.

  20. Mechanical analysis of arterial plaques in native geometry with OCT wall motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claire; Heidari, Andrew E.; Chen, Zhongping; George, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of an atherosclerotic plaque may encode information about the type, composition, and vulnerability to rupture. Human arterial segments with varying plaque burden were analyzed ex vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to determine plaque type and to determine compliance during pulsatile inflation in their native geometry. Calcifications and lipid filled plaques showed markedly different compliance when analyzed with OCT wall motion analysis. There was also a trend towards increased circumferential variation in arterial compliance with increasing plaque burden. PMID:24388166

  1. Usefulness of color kinesis imaging for evaluation of regional right ventricular wall motion in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Hayabuchi, Y; Matsuoka, S; Kubo, M; Kuroda, Y

    1998-11-15

    We evaluated regional right ventricular wall motion during systole in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) using color kinesis imaging. Color kinesis images were obtained in a subcostal sagittal view from 19 patients with repaired TOF (TOF group), aged 3 to 5 years, and 20 age-matched normal subjects (control group). For regional wall motion analysis, the endocardial motion distance and the fractional area change (FAC) were calculated for 6 segments obtained from color kinesis images. The endocardial inward excursion distances and the FACs in the upper, middle, and lower posterior segments of the TOF group were significantly greater than those of the control group (p <0.01 for each segment). The upper anterior segment showed significantly reduced inward excursion distance and FAC in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01, both). The dyskinetic outward excursion distances of the middle and lower posterior segments were significantly lower in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01, both). In the upper and middle anterior segments, the endocardial outward excursion distances were significantly higher in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01 and 0.05). Correlation between right ventriculographic and color kinesis measurements was excellent (y = 1.14x - 1.30, r = 0.87 for the endocardial inward excursion, and y = 1.03x +/- 0.56, r = 0.91 for the FAC). In conclusion, color kinesis is a useful method for assessing regional right ventricular wall motion. Segmental analysis of color kinesis images provides accurate, automated, and quantitative diagnosis of regional right ventricular wall motion abnormalities in patients with surgically repaired TOF.

  2. Motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in low-Reynolds-number Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staben, Michelle E.; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2003-06-01

    A new boundary-integral algorithm for the motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number was developed to study the translational and rotational velocities for a broad range of particle sizes and depths in the channel. Instead of the free-space Green's function more commonly employed in boundary-integral equations, we used the Green's function for the domain between two infinite plane walls [Liron and Mochon, J. Eng. Math. 10, 287 (1976)]. This formulation allows us to directly incorporate the effects of the wall interactions into the stress tensor, without discretizing the bounding walls, and use well-established iterative methods. Our results are in good agreement with previous computations [Ganatos et al., J. Fluid Mech. 99, 755 (1980)] and limiting cases, over their range of application, with additional results obtained for very small particle-wall separations of less than 1% of the particle radius. In addition to the boundary-integral solution in the mobility formulation, we used the resistance formulation to derive the near-field asymptotic forms for the translational and rotational velocities, extending the results to even smaller particle-wall separations. The decrease in translational velocity from the unperturbed fluid velocity increases with particle size and proximity of the particle to one or both of the walls. The rotational velocity exhibits a maximum magnitude between the centerline and either wall, due to the competing influences of wall retardation and the greater fluid velocity gradient near the walls. The average particle velocity for a uniform distribution of particles was generally found to exceed the average fluid velocity, due in large part to exclusion of the particle centers from the region of slowest fluid near the walls. The maximum average particle velocity is 18% greater than the average fluid velocity and occurs for particle diameters that are 42% of the channel height; particles with

  3. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  4. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Nisar, Z.; Ahmad, B.; Yasmin, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  5. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  6. Model tags: direct three-dimensional tracking of heart wall motion from tagged magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Young, A A

    1999-12-01

    Although magnetic resonance tissue tagging is a useful tool for the non-invasive measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) heart wall motion, the clinical utility of current analysis techniques is limited by the prohibitively long time required for image analysis. A method was therefore developed for the reconstruction of 3-D heart wall motion directly from tagged magnetic resonance images, without prior identification of ventricular boundaries or tag stripe locations. The method utilized a finite-element model to describe the shape and motion of the heart. Initially, the model geometry was determined at the time of tag creation by fitting a small number of guide points which were placed interactively on the images. Model tags were then created within the model as material surfaces which defined the location of the magnetic tags. An objective function was derived to measure the degree of match between the model tags and the image stripes. The objective was minimized by allowing the model to deform directly under the influence of the images, utilizing an efficient method for calculating image-derived motion constraints. The model deformation could also be manipulated interactively by guide points. Experiments were performed using clinical images of a normal volunteer, as well as simulated images in which the true motion was specified. The root-mean-squared errors between the known and calculated displacement and strain for the simulated images were similar to those obtained using previous stripe-tracking and model-fitting methods. A significant improvement in analysis time was obtained for the normal volunteer and further improvements may allow the method to be applied in a 'real-time' clinical environment.

  7. Phase-sensitive lateral motion estimator for measurement of artery-wall displacement--phantom study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Artery-wall motion due to the pulsation of the heart is often measured to evaluate mechanical properties of the arterial wall. Such motion is thought to occur only in the arterial radial direction because the main source of the motion is an increase of blood pressure. However, it has recently been reported that the artery also moves in the longitudinal direction. Therefore, a 2-D motion estimator is required even when the artery is scanned in the longitudinal direction because the arterial wall moves both in the radial (axial) and longitudinal (lateral) directions. Methods based on 2-D correlation of RF echoes are often used to estimate the lateral displacement together with axial displacement. However, these methods require much interpolation of the RF echo or correlation function to achieve a sufficient resolution in the estimation of displacement. To overcome this problem, Jensen et al. modulated the ultrasonic field in the lateral direction at a designed spatial frequency to use the lateral phase for the estimation of lateral motion. This method, namely, the lateral modulation method, generates complex signals whose phases change depending on the lateral motion. Therefore, the lateral displacement can be estimated with a good resolution without interpolation, although special beamformers are required. The present paper describes a method that can be applied to ultrasonic echoes obtained by a conventional beamformer to estimate lateral displacements using the phases of lateral fluctuations of ultrasonic echoes. In the proposed method, complex signals were generated by the Hilbert transform, and the phase shift was estimated by correlation-based estimators. The proposed method was validated using a cylindrical phantom mimicking an artery. The error in the lateral displacement estimated by the proposed method was 13.5% of the true displacement of 0.5 mm with a kernel size used for calculating the correlation function of 0.6 mm in the lateral direction, which was

  8. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  9. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, Daniel S; Secomb, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s^{-1} are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  10. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed towards the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 s−1 to 600 s−1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases non-linearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels. PMID:25493888

  11. Influence of wall motion on particle sedimentation using hybrid LB-IBM scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, Mussie A.; Wu, ChuiJie

    2017-03-01

    We integrate the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and immersed boundary method (IBM) to capture the coupling between a rigid boundary surface and the hydrodynamic response of an enclosed particle laden fluid. We focus on a rigid box filled with a Newtonian fluid where the drag force based on the slip velocity at the wall and settling particles induces the interaction. We impose an external harmonic oscillation on the system boundary and found interesting results in the sedimentation behavior. Our results reveal that the sedimentation and particle locations are sensitive to the boundary walls oscillation amplitude and the subsequent changes on the enclosed flow field. Two different particle distribution analyses were performed and showed the presence of an agglomerate structure of particles. Despite the increase in the amplitude of wall motion, the turbulence level of the flow field and distribution of particles are found to be less in quantity compared to the stationary walls. The integrated LBM-IBM methodology promised the prospect of an efficient and accurate dynamic coupling between a non-compliant bounding surface and flow field in a wide-range of systems. Understanding the dynamics of the fluid-filled box can be particularly important in a simulation of particle deposition within biological systems and other engineering applications.

  12. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  13. Energy-efficient writing scheme for magnetic domain-wall motion memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ham, Woo Seung; Ernst, Rick; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Ono, Teruo

    2017-04-01

    We present an energy-efficient magnetic domain-writing scheme for domain wall (DW) motion-based memory devices. A cross-shaped nanowire is employed to inject a domain into the nanowire through current-induced DW propagation. The energy required for injecting the magnetic domain is more than one order of magnitude lower than that for the conventional field-based writing scheme. The proposed scheme is beneficial for device miniaturization because the threshold current for DW propagation scales with the device size, which cannot be achieved in the conventional field-based technique.

  14. Generalized analysis of thermally activated domain-wall motion in Co/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Umachi, Chinedum K.; Bono, David C.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion driven by magnetic field and electric current is investigated experimentally in out-of-plane magnetized Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. We directly extract the thermal activation energy barrier for DW motion and observe the dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and viscous flow. Further analysis reveals that the activation energy must be corrected with a factor dependent on the Curie temperature, and we derive a generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion. By using this generalized equation, we quantify the efficiency of current-induced spin torque in assisting DW motion. Current produces no effect aside from Joule heating in the multilayer with 7-Å thick Co layers, whereas it generates a finite spin torque on DWs in the multilayer with atomically thin 3-Å Co layers. These findings suggest that conventional spin-transfer torques from in-plane spin-polarized current do not drive DWs in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers.

  15. Time evolution of domain-wall motion induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Logunov, M. V.; Spirin, A. V.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Tokman, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    The time evolution of the magnetization normal component change in a garnet film with a labyrinthine domain structure under the action of circularly and linearly polarized laser pump pulses (the pulse duration is 5 ns; the wavelength is 527 nm) has been studied. The dynamic state of the magnetic film was registered using an induction method with a time resolution of 1 ns. It was found that for the initial state of the magnetic film with an equilibrium domain structure, the form of the photomagnetization pulse reflects the time evolution of a domain-wall motion. The domain-wall motion initiated by the circularly polarized laser pump pulse continues in the same direction for a time more than an order of magnitude exceeding the laser pulse duration. In general, the time evolution of the domain-wall movement occurs in three stages. The separation of the contributions to the photomagnetization from the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects was carried out. The photomagnetization pulses that reflect the contributions by the aforementioned effects differ by form, and more than two orders of magnitude by duration. Their form doesn't change under a magnetic bias field change, only the photomagnetization pulse amplitude does: for the polarization-dependent contribution, it's an even function of the field, and for the polarization-independent contribution, it's an odd function. The interconnection between the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects, on the one hand, and the domain-wall displacement and the change of the film's saturation magnetization, on the other hand, was identified and described.

  16. Identification of intestinal wall abnormalities and ischemia by modeling spatial uncertainty in computed tomography imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Taichiro; Pham, Tuan D; Fujita, Takashi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal abnormalities and ischemia are medical conditions in which inflammation and injury of the intestine are caused by inadequate blood supply. Acute ischemia of the small bowel can be life-threatening. Computed tomography (CT) is currently a gold standard for the diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia in the emergency department. However, the assessment of the diagnostic performance of CT findings in the detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia has been a difficult task for both radiologists and surgeons. Little effort has been found in developing computerized systems for the automated identification of these types of complex gastrointestinal disorders. In this paper, a geostatistical mapping of spatial uncertainty in CT scans is introduced for medical image feature extraction, which can be effectively applied for diagnostic detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia from control patterns. Experimental results obtained from the analysis of clinical data suggest the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty mapping model.

  17. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images.

    PubMed

    Murta, L O; Ruiz, E E S; Pazin-Filho, A; Schmidt, A; Almeida-Filho, O C; Simões, M V; Marin-Neto, J A; Maciel, B C

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV) segmental wall motion (WM) abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN) was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK) images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1) normal, 2) mild hypokinesia, 3) moderate hypokinesia, 4) severe hypokinesia, 5) akinesia, and 6) dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R2 = 0.99). In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  18. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  19. A Potential Echocardiographic Classification for Constrictive Pericarditis Based on Analysis of Abnormal Septal Motion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Lin, Zaw; Celemajer, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon condition that could be easily confused with congestive heart failure. In symptomatic patients, septal "wobble" on echocardiography may be an important sign of constrictive physiology. This study was planned to investigate the effects of constriction on septal motion as identified by echocardiography. Methods In this retrospective observational study, nine consecutive patients with constriction underwent careful echocardiographic analysis of the interventricular septum (IVS) with slow motion 2-dimensional echocardiography and inspiratory manoeuvres. Six patients who had undergone cardiac magnetic resonance imaging underwent similar analysis. Findings were correlated with haemodynamic data in five patients who had undergone cardiac catheterisation studies. Results In mild cases of constriction a single wobble of the IVS was seen during normal respiration. In more moderate cases a double motion of the septum (termed "double wobble") was seen where the septum bowed initially into the left ventricle (LV) cavity in diastole then relaxed to the middle only to deviate again into the LV cavity late in diastole after atrial contraction. In severe cases, the septum bowed into the LV cavity for the full duration of diastole (pan-diastolic motion). We describe how inspiration also helped to characterize the severity of constriction especially in mild to moderate cases. Conclusion Echocardiography appears a simple tool to help diagnose constriction and grade its severity. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the type of wobble motions helps to grade the severity of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26448822

  20. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  1. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nasu, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Ono, T.; Miyake, K.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2005-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7×1011A/m2 in a 10-nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm on thermally oxidized silicon substrate. The temperature was raised to 830 K for the current density of 7.5×1011A/m2, which is very close to the Curie temperature of bulk Ni81Fe19. When the current density exceeded 7.5×1011A/m2, an appearance of a multidomain structure in the wire was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting that the sample temperature exceeded the Curie temperature.

  2. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    invert spillway slab (not shown). The translation of the structural wedge is assumed to occur during earthquake shaking. A drop down box entitled...e.g., navigation walls retaining earth, spillway chute walls, spill- way discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures...1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs..................................................................... 27 1.6 Background and research

  3. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  4. Effect of microwaves on domain wall motion in thin Ni wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kimin; Giordano, N.

    1996-03-01

    We report new results on domain wall motion in thin (width and thickness ~ 300 ÅNi wires. The magnetoresistance exhibits discontinuities which we believe are associated with pinning and de-pinning of walls from structural defects, such as variations in the width of the sample. Upon repeated measurement, the de-pinning is found to occur over a narrow range of fields. The distribution of de-pinning fields, P(H), varies with temperature in a manner which suggests that de-pinning occurs via thermal activation at high temperatures, and quantum tunneling at low temperatures, with crossover between these two regimes at T ~ 2 - 6 K. We have also investigated the effect of a 30 GHz microwave field on P(H). In the thermal activation regime, microwaves have no effect on P(H), except through Joule heating. However, in the tunneling regime microwaves cause P(H) to split into several separate peaks. This behavior cannot be explained in terms of Joule heating, but suggests that the energy levels of a domain wall in a pinning well are quantized.

  5. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K.; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Schwemmer, Chris; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕi, max) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice.

  6. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (P<0.001) for all setups]. The isovolume tests present small variations of the obtained volume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviation<0.085 L for all setups). After validation by the isovolume test, an investigation of a patient with pleural effusion using the proposed method shows pulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  7. Enhanced stochasticity of domain wall motion in magnetic racetracks due to dynamic pinning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Bergman, Bastiaan; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2010-06-15

    Understanding the details of domain wall (DW) motion along magnetic racetracks has drawn considerable interest in the past few years for their applications in non-volatile memory devices. The propagation of the DW is dictated by the interplay between its driving force, either field or current, and the complex energy landscape of the racetrack. In this study, we use spin-valve nanowires to study field-driven DW motion in real time. By varying the strength of the driving magnetic field, the propagation mode of the DW can be changed from a simple translational mode to a more complex precessional mode. Interestingly, the DW motion becomes much more stochastic at the onset of this propagation mode. We show that this unexpected result is a consequence of an unsustainable gain in Zeeman energy of the DW, as it is driven faster by the magnetic field. As a result, the DW periodically releases energy and thereby becomes more susceptible to pinning by local imperfections in the racetrack.

  8. Magnetic-field-induced domain-wall motion in permalloy nanowires with modified Gilbert damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas A.; Möhrke, Philipp; Heyne, Lutz; Kaldun, Andreas; Kläui, Mathias; Backes, Dirk; Rhensius, Jan; Heyderman, Laura J.; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich; Woltersdorf, Georg; Fraile Rodríguez, Arantxa; Nolting, Frithjof; Menteş, Tevfik O.; Niño, Miguel Á.; Locatelli, Andrea; Potenza, Alessandro; Marchetto, Helder; Cavill, Stuart; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.

    2010-09-01

    Domain wall (DW) depinning and motion in the viscous regime induced by magnetic fields, are investigated in planar permalloy nanowires in which the Gilbert damping α is tuned in the range 0.008-0.26 by doping with Ho. Real time, spatially resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements yield depinning field distributions and DW mobilities. Depinning occurs at discrete values of the field which are correlated with different metastable DW states and changed by the doping. For α<0.033 , the DW mobilities are smaller than expected while for α≥0.033 , there is agreement between the measured DW mobilities and those predicted by the standard one-dimensional model of field-induced DW motion. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that this is because as α increases, the DW spin structure becomes increasingly rigid. Only when the damping is large can the DW be approximated as a pointlike quasiparticle that exhibits the simple translational motion predicted in the viscous regime. When the damping is small, the DW spin structure undergoes periodic distortions that lead to a velocity reduction. We therefore show that Ho doping of permalloy nanowires enables engineering of the DW depinning and mobility, as well as the extent of the viscous regime.

  9. Domain wall motion effect on the anelastic behavior in lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourim, El Mostafa; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Gabbay, Maurice; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Cheng, Bo Lin

    2002-05-01

    Three undoped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were prepared with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary: Pb(Zr0.50Ti0.50)O3, Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3, and Pb(Zr0.54Ti0.46)O3. Internal friction Q-1 and shear modulus G were measured versus temperature from 20 °C to 500 °C. Experiments were performed on an inverted torsional pendulum at low frequencies (0.1, 0.3, and 1 Hz). The ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition results in a peak (P1) of Q-1 correlated with a sharp minimum M1 of G. Moreover the Q-1(T) curves show two relaxation peaks called R1 and R2 respectively, correlated with two shear modulus anomalies called A1 and A2 on the G(T) curves. The main features of the transition P1 peak are studied, they suggest that its behavior is similar to the internal friction peaks associated with martensitic transformation. The relaxation peak, R1 and R2 are both attributed to motion of domain walls (DWs), and can be analyzed by thermal activated process described by Arrhenius law. The R2 peak is demonstrated to be due to the interaction of domain walls and oxygen vacancies because it depends on oxygen vacancy concentration and electrical polarization. However, the R1 peak is more complex; its height is found to be increased as stress amplitude and heating rate increase. It seems that the R1 peak is influenced by three mechanisms: (i) relaxation due to DW-point defects interaction, (ii) variation of domain wall density, and (iii) domain wall depinning from point defect clusters.

  10. The stability of steady motion of magnetic domain wall: Role of higher-order spin-orbit torques

    SciTech Connect

    He, Peng-Bin Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2015-12-14

    The steady motion of magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques is investigated analytically in the heavy/ferromagnetic metal nanowires for three cases with a current transverse to the in-plane and perpendicular easy axis, and along the in-plane easy axis. By the stability analysis of Walker wall profile, we find that if including the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the Walker breakdown can be avoided in some parameter regions of spin-orbit torques with a current transverse to or along the in-plane easy axis. However, in the case of perpendicular anisotropy, even considering the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the velocity of domain wall cannot be efficiently enhanced by the current. Furthermore, the direction of wall motion is dependent on the configuration and chirality of domain wall with a current along the in-plane easy axis or transverse to the perpendicular one. Especially, the direction of motion can be controlled by the initial chirality of domain wall. So, if only involving the spin-orbit mechanism, it is preferable to adopt the scheme of a current along the in-plane easy axis for enhancing the velocity and controlling the direction of domain wall.

  11. Myocardial perfusion abnormality in the area of ventricular septum-free wall junction and cardiovascular events in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaimoto, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Kuribayashi, Toshiro; Yamano, Michiyo; Miki, Shigeyuki; Kamitani, Tadaaki; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion abnormality in the left ventricle is known to be prognostic in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Magnetic resonance imaging and necropsy studies on HCM hearts revealed myocardial lesions predominating in the area of ventricular septum-free wall junction. We assessed perfusion abnormality in this area and correlated it with the prognosis of HCM patients. We performed exercise Tc-99m tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy in 55 patients with nonobstructive HCM. Perfusion abnormalities were semiquantified using a 5-point scoring system in small areas of anterior junctions of basal, mid, and apical short axis views in addition to a conventional 17-segment model. All patients were prospectively followed for sudden death, cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure or stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Cardiovascular events occurred in 10 patients during an average follow-up period of 5.7 years. Stress and rest scores from anterior junction, and conventional summed stress score were significantly higher in patients with cardiovascular events than without (all P < 0.05). Anterior junction stress score of >2 produced a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 98% for cardiovascular events and was an independent predictor (hazard ratio 8.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-43.5; P = 0.01), with rest scores producing similar values, which were higher than summed stress score of >8 (5.68; 1.23-26.3; P = 0.03). The absence of myocardial perfusion abnormality in the narrow area of anterior junction differentiated HCM patients with low-risk.

  12. 4D Blood Flow Reconstruction Over the Entire Ventricle From Wall Motion and Blood Velocity Derived From Ultrasound Data.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alberto; de Vecchi, Adelaide; Jantsch, Martin; Shi, Wenzhe; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Simpson, John M; Smith, Nicolas P; Rueckert, Daniel; Schaeffter, Tobias; Penney, Graeme P

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new method to recover 4D blood flow over the entire ventricle from partial blood velocity measurements using multiple 3D+t colour Doppler images and ventricular wall motion estimated using 3D+t BMode images. We apply our approach to realistic simulated data to ascertain the ability of the method to deal with incomplete data, as typically happens in clinical practice. Experiments using synthetic data show that the use of wall motion improves velocity reconstruction, shows more accurate flow patterns and improves mean accuracy particularly when coverage of the ventricle is poor. The method was applied to patient data from 6 congenital cases, producing results consistent with the simulations. The use of wall motion produced more plausible flow patterns and reduced the reconstruction error in all patients.

  13. Micromagnetic modeling of domain wall motion in sub-100-nm-wide wires with individual and periodic edge defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Siddiqui, S. A.; Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Reducing the switching energy of devices that rely on magnetic domain wall motion requires scaling the devices to widths well below 100 nm, where the nanowire line edge roughness (LER) is an inherent source of domain wall pinning. We investigate the effects of periodic and isolated rectangular notches, triangular notches, changes in anisotropy, and roughness measured from images of fabricated wires, in sub-100-nm-wide nanowires with in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using micromagnetic modeling. Pinning fields calculated for a model based on discretized images of physical wires are compared to experimental measurements. When the width of the domain wall is smaller than the notch period, the domain wall velocity is modulated as the domain wall propagates along the wire. We find that in sub-30-nm-wide wires, edge defects determine the operating threshold and domain wall dynamics.

  14. Domain wall motion in ultrathin Co70Fe30/Pd multilayer nanowires with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaoliang; He, Shikun; Qiu, Jinjun; Zhou, Tiejun; Han, Guchang; Teo, Kie-Leong

    2016-02-01

    We report the investigation of spin polarized current induced domain wall (DW) displacement in the perpendicularly magnetized nanowires patterned on ultrathin CoFe/Pd multilayer films by anomalous Hall-effect measurement. We find that DWs can be driven to propagate in the nanowire by the threshold current density (Jth) as low as 5.2 × 1010 A/m2 under a bias field H = 115 Oe. The spin-torque efficiency ɛ = (1.68 ± 0.09) × 10-14 T.m2/A is derived by measuring the effective field (HJ) generated by the pulsed current as well as through the dependency of Jth on H from the DW depinning field experiment. Our result indicates that the current induced DW motion is essentially dominated by the non-adiabatic spin transfer torque effect and the non-adiabaticity factor β is estimated to be as high as 0.96 ± 0.04.

  15. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-10-11

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the "end to end" circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic.

  16. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the “end to end” circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic.

  17. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  18. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn2Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthem, Vitoria M. T. S.; Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier; Givord, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn2Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn2Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is <110>. For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn2Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  19. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the “end to end” circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic. PMID:27725741

  20. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  1. Normal modes of magnetic domain wall motion in a confined stripe domain lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Spreen, J.H.; Argyle, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    We report the observation of standing wave modes in an array of stripe domains confined by a pair of parallel cracks in a Gd, Ga:YIG film. These modes appear in the response spectrum of the confined lattice as shallow minima or maxima at frequencies lower than that of the usual domain wall resonance peak. A simple model, analogous to the forced response of a membrane clamped at the edges, fits the spatial patterns of wall motion observed at the frequencies of the maxima and minima. Experimental frequency-wave vector values, interpreted with guidance from this analogy, provide the first experimental dispersion curve for a stripe domain lattice. We compare this result with recent theoretical calculations. The experimental value of the uniform mode frequency is 41.5 +- 0.2 MHz, with a long wavelength group velocity of 330 +- 50 m/sec. A surprising conclusion from the observed extrema of the spatial patterns is that the damping of the waves is an order of magnitude less than expected from the damping of the uniform mode. The estimated decay length for a propagating wave is 400 ..mu...

  2. Steady motion of skyrmions and domains walls under diffusive spin torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elías, Ricardo Gabriel; Vidal-Silva, Nicolas; Manchon, Aurélien

    2017-03-01

    We explore the role of the spin diffusion of conducting electrons in two-dimensional magnetic textures (domain walls and skyrmions) with spatial variation of the order of the spin precession length λex. The effect of diffusion reflects in four additional torques that are third order in spatial derivatives of magnetization and bilinear in λex and in the nonadiabatic parameter β'. In order to study the dynamics of the solitons when these diffusive torques are present, we derive the Thiele equation in the limit of steady motion and we compare the results with the nondiffusive limit. When considering a homogenous current these torques increase the longitudinal velocity of transverse domain walls of width Δ by a factor (λex/Δ)2(α/3), α being the magnetic damping constant. In the case of single skyrmions with core radius r0these new contributions tend to increase the Magnus effect in an amount proportional to (λex/r0) 2(1 +2 α β') .

  3. Nanoparticle stochastic motion in the inertial regime and hydrodynamic interactions close to a cylindrical wall

    PubMed Central

    Vitoshkin, Helena; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equation together with the particle equations governing the motion of a nanosized particle or nanoparticle (NP) in a cylindrical tube. The effects of the confining boundary, its curvature, particle size, and particle density variations have all been investigated. To reveal how the nature of the temporal correlations (hydrodynamic memory) in the inertial regime is altered by the full hydrodynamic interaction due to the confining boundaries, we have employed the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method to determine the dynamical relaxation of a spherical NP located at various positions in the medium over a wide span of time scales compared to the fluid viscous relaxation time τv = a2/v, where a is the spherical particle radius and v is the kinematic viscosity. The results show that, as compared to the behavior of a particle in regions away from the confining boundary, the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) for a particle in the lubrication layer initially decays exponentially with a Stokes drag enhanced by a factor that is proportional to the ratio of the particle radius to the gap thickness between the particle and the wall. Independent of the particle location, beyond time scales greater than a2/v, the decay is always algebraic followed by a second exponential decay (attributed to the wall curvature) that is associated with a second time scale D2/v, where D is the vessel diameter. PMID:27830213

  4. Spin-Transfer-Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in (Ga,Mn)(As,P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehstedt, E. K.; Zarbo, L. P.; Vyborny, K.; de Ranieri, E.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, J.

    2012-02-01

    Precise control of domain wall (DW) motion in magnetic materials is a prerequisite for the realization of novel non-volatile and down-scalable logic/memory devices which promise to overcome the limitations of current technologies. While magnetic fields are the obvious choice for DW manipulation, in spin-orbit (SO) coupled materials, electric fields provide an additional means of control via current-induced spin torque. We extend the existing theoretical framework used to describe magnetization dynamics in uniform ferromagnets (FM) to dilute FM semiconductors. Analogous to the study of homogeneous systems, we compute the current-induced internal fields (CIF) corresponding to the spin torques and perform a quantitative analysis of the effect of CIFs on DW motion by solving the phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations. Microscopic calculations based on an accurate description of the SO coupling effects are used to estimate the observed anisotropies. Our theoretical efforts are complemented by experimental studies in the SO coupled FM (Ga,Mn)(As,P).

  5. [Reaction of the uterine wall on IUD of abnormal positioning and size].

    PubMed

    Nesit, V

    1973-05-01

    The reliability of an IUD was examined in 9 women 1-7 days prior to hysterectomy or supracervical amputation of the uterus. An extra large Dana, Dana super, or Dana cor was inserted. All the women complained of hypogastric pains; in 2 cases, the IUD was removed after only a few hours. After the surgery, the uterus was prepared for histological verification of the effects of the IUD. Significant deformation of the uterine wall was found, especially in the region of the cervix and corpus uteri. This was particularly marked with the Dana super, which also caused a rotary deformation. There were changes seen in the IUD itself as well. The results show that an excessively large or incorrectly positioned IUD will cause pronounced deformation of the corpus, uterine cavity and of the cervix with subsequent pains, staining, and expulsion.

  6. Leaflet motion abnormality after TAVI: genuine threat or much ado about nothing?

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Abramowitz, Yigal; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Makkar, Raj R

    2016-09-18

    Symptomatic transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis is noted in up to 1% of patients after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Recently, hypoattenuated leaflet thickening and reduced leaflet motion of bioprosthetic aortic valves associated with normal transvalvular gradients (and possibly related to subclinical leaflet thrombosis) have been reported. While trans-thoracic echocardiography is a useful initial screening imaging modality for the detection of symptomatic THV thrombosis associated with elevated transvalvular gradients, it has limited utility in the detection of subclinical THV thrombosis. In the present article, we describe the incidence, clinical presentation and strategies for the prevention and treatment of THV thrombosis, as well as the role of imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of this phenomenon.

  7. Theory of domain wall motion mediated magnetoelectric effects in a multiferroic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-10-01

    A model is discussed for magnetoelectric (ME) interactions originating from the motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a multiferroic composite of orthoferrites RFeO3 (RFO) with magnetic stripe domains and a piezoelectric such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). The DWs in RFO can be set in motion with an ac magnetic field up to a critical speed of 20 km/s, the highest for any magnetic system, leading to the excitation of bulk and shear magnetoacoustic waves. Thus, the ME coupling will arise from flexural deformation associated with DW motion (rather than the Joule magnetostriction mediated coupling under a static or quasistatic condition). A c plane orthoferrite with a single Néel-type DW in the bc plane and an ac magnetic field H along the c axis is assumed. The deflection in the bilayer due to DW motion is obtained when the DW velocity is a linear function H and the resulting induced voltage across PMN-PT is estimated. It is shown that a combination of spatial and time harmonics of the bending deformation leads to (i) a linear ME coefficient defined by αE=E/H and (ii) a quadratic ME coefficient αEQ=E/H2. The model is applied to yttrium orthoferrites (YFO) and a PMN-PT bilayer since YFO has one of the highest DW mobility amongst the orthoferrites. The coefficient αE is dependent on the DW position, and it is maximum when the DW equilibrium position is at the center of the sample. In YFO/PMN-PT the estimated low-frequency αE ˜ 30 mV/cm Oe and resonance value is 1.5 V/(cm Oe). Since orthoferrites (and PMN-PT) are transparent in the visible region and have a large Faraday rotation, the DW dynamics and the ME coupling could be studied simultaneously. The theory discussed here is of interest for studies on ME coupling and for applications such as magnetically controlled electro-optic devices.

  8. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  9. Induction of Embryogenesis in Brassica Napus Microspores Produces a Callosic Subintinal Layer and Abnormal Cell Walls with Altered Levels of Callose and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of microspore embryogenesis produces dramatic changes in different aspects of the cell physiology and structure. Changes at the cell wall level are among the most intriguing and poorly understood. In this work, we used high pressure freezing and freeze substitution, immunolocalization, confocal, and electron microscopy to analyze the structure and composition of the first cell walls formed during conventional Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis, and in cultures treated to alter the intracellular Ca2+ levels. Our results revealed that one of the first signs of embryogenic commitment is the formation of a callose-rich, cellulose-deficient layer beneath the intine (the subintinal layer), and of irregular, incomplete cell walls. In these events, Ca2+ may have a role. We propose that abnormal cell walls are due to a massive callose synthesis and deposition of excreted cytoplasmic material, and the parallel inhibition of cellulose synthesis. These features were absent in pollen-like structures and in microspore-derived embryos, few days after the end of the heat shock, where abnormal cell walls were no longer produced. Together, our results provide an explanation to a series of relevant aspects of microspore embryogenesis including the role of Ca2+ and the occurrence of abnormal cell walls. In addition, our discovery may be the explanation to why nuclear fusions take place during microspore embryogenesis. PMID:26635844

  10. Ultrawideband through-wall radar for detecting the motion of people in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Soumya; Barnes, Mark A.; Payment, Tim; Holladay, Gary

    2002-07-01

    Law enforcement officers and search-and-rescue workers often face the difficult task of determining the locations of people inside a building or obscured by smoke and debris. To address this problem, Time Domain Corporation (TDC) has developed a real-time, hand-held radar to detect the motion of persons in range and azimuth through non-metallic walls. This radar is a time modulated ultra-wide band (TM-UWB) impulse radar that generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of moving targets in real time. The intentional transmit power emitted from the radar is comparable to the FCC Part 15, Class B limits. It has the following benefits: (1) covertness because of its ultra-low power noise-like signal, (2) high resolution at low radio frequencies for penetrating building materials, (3) reduced range ambiguities and clutter fold-over because of pseudo-random time modulation, and (4) clutter rejection because of the ultra-wide bandwidth of the signal. In this paper, an outline of the key parameters of the TDC prototype radar RadarVision2000 (RV2000) and a brief description of the algorithm that generates a motion map showing the range and direction of the moving people are presented. Some typical radar images of multiple targets for a variety of building materials and cluttered environment obtained using the prototype are shown. Finally, the paper presents some preliminary results for resolving the targets in the elevation plane along with a processing technique for reducing the intensity of multi-path responses in the images.

  11. Domain wall motion and precursor dynamics in PbZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchberger, S.; Soprunyuk, V.; Majchrowski, A.; Roleder, K.; Schranz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of PbZrO3 have been studied by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements in the low-frequency range f =0.02 -50 Hz. The complex Young's modulus exhibits a quite rich behavior and depends strongly on the direction of the applied dynamic force. In pseudocubic [100] c direction, we found intrinsic elastic behavior as expected from the Landau theory; at the antiferroelectric transition Tc≈510 K, a downwards cusp anomaly in Y' accompanied by a peak in Y'' points to a quadratic/linear order parameter/strain coupling in the Landau free energy. Both anomalies are increasing with decreasing frequency showing that the measurements are performed in the limit ω τth>1 . Frequency scans around Tc show energy dissipation, which could result from interphase boundary motion and/or heat diffusion. Above Tc, we observe a pronounced precursor softening, quite similar as it was found in other perovskites, which can be perfectly fitted including isotropic order parameter fluctuations. The low-frequency elastic response in [110] c direction is different. Below Tc, we find in addition to the intrinsic anomaly a strong contribution from ferroelastic domains, which leads to an additional softening in Y'. With decreasing temperatures this superelastic softening gradually disappears, due to an increasing relaxation time τDW for domain wall motion, indicating glassy behavior of domain freezing in PbZrO3. In contrast to the [100] c direction, for forces along [110] c, we found a pronounced precursor hardening, starting at about 60 K above Tc. Since this anomaly is of dynamic nature, starting at the same temperature as the observed birefringence and piezoelectric anomalies [Ko et al. Phys. Rev. B 87, 184110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.184110], we conclude that it originates from slow dynamic polar clusters, which freeze at T*≈550 K>Tc .

  12. Motion, relaxation dynamics, and diffusion processes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined between walls.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Dorothea; Virnau, Peter; Snook, Ian K; Binder, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The dynamical behavior of single-component two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined in a slit geometry is studied by Langevin dynamics simulation of a simple model. The colloids are modeled as pointlike particles, interacting with the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential, and the fluid molecules in the colloidal suspension are not explicitly considered. Considering a crystalline strip of triangular lattice structure with n=30 rows, the (one-dimensional) walls confining the strip are chosen as two rigidly fixed crystalline rows at each side, commensurate with the lattice structure and, thus, stabilizing long-range order. The case when the spacing between the walls is incommensurate with the ideal triangular lattice is also studied, where (due to a transition in the number of rows, n → n-1) the confined crystal is incommensurate with the confining boundaries, and a soliton staircase forms along the walls. It is shown that mean-square displacements (MSDs) of particles as a function of time show an overshoot and then saturate at a horizontal plateau in the commensurate case, the value of the plateau being largest in the center of the strip. Conversely, when solitons are present, MSDs are largest in the rows containing the solitons, and all MSDs do not settle down at well-defined plateaus in the direction parallel to the boundaries, due to the lack of positional long-range order in ideal two-dimensional crystals. The MSDs of the solitons (which can be treated like quasiparticles at very low temperature) have also been studied and their dynamics are found to be about an order of magnitude slower than that of the colloidal particles themselves. Finally, transport of individual colloidal particles by diffusion processes is studied: both standard vacancy-interstitial pair formation and cooperative ring rotation processes are identified. These processes require thermal activation, with activation energies of the order of 10T(m) (T(m) being the melting

  13. Gating-like Motions and Wall Porosity in a DNA Nanopore Scaffold Revealed by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Maingi, Vishal; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Howorka, Stefan; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-11-24

    Recently developed synthetic membrane pores composed of folded DNA enrich the current range of natural and engineered protein pores and of nonbiogenic channels. Here we report all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA nanotube (DNT) pore scaffold to gain fundamental insight into its atomic structure, dynamics, and interactions with ions and water. Our multiple simulations of models of DNTs that are composed of a six-duplex bundle lead to a coherent description. The central tube lumen adopts a cylindrical shape while the mouth regions at the two DNT openings undergo gating-like motions which provide a possible molecular explanation of a lower conductance state observed in our previous experimental study on a membrane-spanning version of the DNT (ACS Nano 2015, 9, 1117-26). Similarly, the central nanotube lumen is filled with water and ions characterized by bulk diffusion coefficients while the gating regions exhibit temporal fluctuations in their aqueous volume. We furthermore observe that the porous nature of the walls allows lateral leakage of ions and water. This study will benefit rational design of DNA nanopores of enhanced stability of relevance for sensing applications, of nanodevices with tunable gating properties that mimic gated ion channels, or of nanopores featuring defined permeation behavior.

  14. Structure, stability, and motion of dislocations in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Wang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Jian; Peng, Xiang-Yang; Tan, Xin-Jun; Sun, Li-Zhong; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with both edge and screw dislocations is studied by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The differences between two adjacent tubule indexes of armchair and zigzag nanotubes are determined to be 5 and 9, respectively, by taking into account the symmetry, integrality, and thermal stability of the composite structures. It is found that melting first occurs near the dislocations, and the melting temperatures of the dislocated armchair and zigzag DWCNTs are around 2600 K—2700 K. At the pre-melting temperatures, the shrink of the dislocation loop, which is comprised of edge and screw dislocations, implies that the composite dislocation in DWCNTs has self-healing ability. The dislocated DWCNTs first fracture at the edge dislocations, which induces the entire break in axial tensile test. The dislocated DWCNTs have a smaller fracture strength compared to the perfect DWCNTs. Our results not only match with the dislocation glide of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in experiments, but also can free from the electron beam radiation under experimental conditions observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), which is deemed to cause the motion of dislocation loop.

  15. Feasibility and Reproducibility of Two-Dimensional Wall Motion Tracking (WMT) in Fetal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Enzensberger, Christian; Achterberg, Friederike; Degenhardt, Jan; Wolter, Aline; Graupner, Oliver; Herrmann, Johannes; Axt-Fliedner, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and reproducibility of 2-dimensional speckle tracking imaging based on the wall motion tracking (WMT) technique in fetal echocardiography. The secondary objective was to compare left and right ventricular global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was performed. Global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) were assessed prospectively. Based on apical 4-chamber views, cine loops were acquired and digitally stored. Strain analysis was performed offline. Intra- and interobserver variabilities were analyzed. Results A total of 29 healthy fetuses with an echocardiogram performed between 19 and 37 weeks of gestation were included. Analysis was performed with a temporal resolution of 60 frames per second (fps). For both examiners, in all cases Cronbach’s alpha was>0.7. The interobserver variability showed a strong agreement in 50% of the segments (ICC 0.71–0.90). The global strain values for LV and RV were −16.34 and −14.65%, respectively. Segmental strain analysis revealed a basis to apex gradient with the lowest strain values in basal segments and the highest strain values in apical segments. Conclusion The assessment of fetal myocardial deformation parameters by 2D WMT is technically feasible with good reproducibility. PMID:28210715

  16. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  17. A cellular scale numerical study of the effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Qiao; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2014-04-01

    The effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets was numerically studied with the immersed boundary method. Cells were modeled as viscous-fluid-filled capsules surrounded by hyper-elastic membranes with negligible thickness. The numerical results show that with the increase of hematocrit, the near-wall approaching of platelets is enhanced, with which platelets exhibit larger deformation and orientation angle of its near-wall tank-treading motion, and the lateral force pushing platelets to the wall is increased with larger fluctuation amplitude. Meanwhile the near-wall approaching is reduced by increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Anomalous switching in Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological junctions by chiral domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Nakamura, Taketomo; Yonezawa, S.; Yakabe, M.; Ishiguro, R.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2013-08-01

    A spontaneous symmetry breaking in a system often results in domain wall formation. The motion of such domain walls is utilized to realize novel devices like racetrack-memories, in which moving ferromagnetic domain walls store and carry information. Superconductors breaking time reversal symmetry can also form domains with degenerate chirality of their superconducting order parameter. Sr2RuO4 is the leading candidate of a chiral p-wave superconductor, expected to be accompanied by chiral domain structure. Here, we present that Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological superconducting-junctions, with which the phase winding of order parameter can be effectively probed by making use of real-space topology, exhibit unusual switching between higher and lower critical current states. This switching is well explained by chiral-domain-wall dynamics. The switching can be partly controlled by external parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and current. These results open up a possibility to utilize the superconducting chiral domain wall motion for future novel superconducting devices.

  19. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B.

    2014-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  20. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stern and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Unit 4402JC, entitled “Soil-Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls ” for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling...Introduction Figure 1.3 Earthquake-induced flexural yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall ...effects depends on the reserve capacity available in the design for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall

  1. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stem and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls " for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling, Engineering and Informatic...yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall structures is more complex due to soil-structure...for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall systems by examining the margin of safety inherent in the old working 4

  2. Evaluating MRI based vascular wall motion as a biomarker of Fontan hemodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Hong, Haifa

    2015-03-01

    The Fontan procedure for single-ventricle heart disease involves creation of pathways to divert venous blood from the superior & inferior venacavae (SVC, IVC) directly into the pulmonary arteries (PA), bypassing the right ventricle. For optimal surgical outcomes, venous flow energy loss in the resulting vascular construction must be minimized and ensuring close to equal flow distribution from the Fontan conduit connecting IVC to the left & right PA is paramount. This requires patient-specific hemodynamic evaluation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations which are often time and resource intensive, limiting applicability for real-time patient management in the clinic. In this study, we report preliminary efforts at identifying a new non-invasive imaging based surrogate for CFD simulated hemodynamics. We establish correlations between computed hemodynamic criteria from CFD modeling and cumulative wall displacement characteristics of the Fontan conduit quantified from cine cardiovascular MRI segmentations over time (i.e. 20 cardiac phases gated from the start of ventricular systole), in 5 unique Fontan surgical connections. To focus our attention on diameter variations while discounting side-to-side swaying motion of the Fontan conduit, the difference between its instantaneous regional expansion and inward contraction (averaged across the conduit) was computed and analyzed. Maximum Fontan conduit-average expansion over the cardiac cycle correlated with the anatomy-specific diametric offset between the axis of the IVC and SVC (r2=0.13, p=0.55) - a known factor correlated with Fontan energy loss and IVC-to-PA flow distribution. Investigation in a larger study cohort is needed to establish stronger statistical correlations.

  3. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    spillway chute walls, spillway discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures, highway and railway relocation retaining...design criteria for Corps retaining structures..................................................28 1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs...158 5.2.3 Structural geometry input

  4. Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, A; Hirohata, A; Ono, T; Miyajima, H

    2012-01-18

    We observed a magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by the spin-polarized pulsed current in a nanoscale Fe(19)Ni(81) wire using a magnetic force microscope. High current density, which is of the order of 10(11) A m(-2), was required for the DW motion. A simple method to estimate the temperature of the wire was developed by comparing the wire resistance measured during the DW motion with the temperature dependence of the wire resistance. Using this method, we found the temperature of the wire was proportional to the square of the current density and became just beneath at the threshold Curie temperature. Our experimental data qualitatively support this analytical model that the temperature is proportional to the resistivity, thickness, width of the wire and the square of the current density, and also inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity.

  5. Two-barrier stability that allows low-power operation in current-induced domain-wall motion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Koyama, Tomohiro; Ueda, Kohei; Yoshimura, Yoko; Chiba, Daichi; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Fukami, Shunsuke; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ohno, Hideo; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen; Ono, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Energy barriers in magnetization reversal dynamics have long been of interest because the barrier height determines the thermal stability of devices as well as the threshold force triggering their dynamics. Especially in memory and logic applications, there is a dilemma between the thermal stability of bit data and the operation power of devices, because larger energy barriers for higher thermal stability inevitably lead to larger magnetic fields (or currents) for operation. Here we show that this is not the case for current-induced magnetic domain-wall motion induced by adiabatic spin-transfer torque. By quantifying domain-wall depinning energy barriers by magnetic field and current, we find that there exist two different pinning barriers, extrinsic and intrinsic energy barriers, which govern the thermal stability and threshold current, respectively. This unique two-barrier system allows low-power operation with high thermal stability, which is impossible in conventional single-barrier systems.

  6. Two-barrier stability that allows low-power operation in current-induced domain-wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Koyama, Tomohiro; Ueda, Kohei; Yoshimura, Yoko; Chiba, Daichi; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Fukami, Shunsuke; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ohno, Hideo; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen; Ono, Teruo

    2013-06-01

    Energy barriers in magnetization reversal dynamics have long been of interest because the barrier height determines the thermal stability of devices as well as the threshold force triggering their dynamics. Especially in memory and logic applications, there is a dilemma between the thermal stability of bit data and the operation power of devices, because larger energy barriers for higher thermal stability inevitably lead to larger magnetic fields (or currents) for operation. Here we show that this is not the case for current-induced magnetic domain-wall motion induced by adiabatic spin-transfer torque. By quantifying domain-wall depinning energy barriers by magnetic field and current, we find that there exist two different pinning barriers, extrinsic and intrinsic energy barriers, which govern the thermal stability and threshold current, respectively. This unique two-barrier system allows low-power operation with high thermal stability, which is impossible in conventional single-barrier systems.

  7. Investigation of domain wall motion in RE-TM magnetic wire towards a current driven memory and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Current driven magnetic domain wall (DW) motions of ferri-magnetic TbFeCo wires have been investigated. In the case of a Si substrate, the critical current density (Jc) of DW motion was successfully reduced to 3×106 A/cm2. Moreover, by using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate with a molding groove of 600 nm width, the Jc was decreased to 6×105 A/cm2. In order to fabricate a logic in memory, a current driven spin logics (AND, OR, NOT) have been proposed and successfully demonstrated under the condition of low Jc. These results indicate that TbFeCo nanowire is an excellent candidate for next generation power saving memory and logic.

  8. Controlling Chaos of Magnetic-Domain-Wall Motion by using Delayed-Feedback-Control with Automatic Gain-Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Takuya; Okuno, Hikaru

    In this research, the chaotic motion of magnetic domain wall is controlled by using Delayed-Feedback-Control (DFC) with automatic gain-adjustment, modified by Nakajima and Ueda in 1995. The method of automatic gain-adjustment is newly applied to Extended-DFC (E-DFC) for more highly performance. It is clearly confirmed that the control-gain was automatically adjusted on each results. But, in this case, the response of E-DFC has not been improved. It is found that the delayed time has strongly influenced on the response. The selective E-DFC is proposed and the response was best.

  9. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo; Serpico, Claudio; Durin, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell intervention rescues ventricular wall motion disparity, achieving biological cardiac resynchronization post-infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Kane, Garvan C; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Dyssynchronous myocardial motion aggravates cardiac pump function. Cardiac resynchronization using pacing devices is a standard-of-care in the management of heart failure. Post-infarction, however, scar tissue formation impedes the efficacy of device-based therapy. The present study tests a regenerative approach aimed at targeting the origin of abnormal motion to prevent dyssynchronous organ failure. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells harbour a reparative potential, and were here bioengineered from somatic fibroblasts reprogrammed with the stemness factors OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In a murine infarction model, within 30 min of coronary ligation, iPS cells were delivered to mapped infarcted areas. Focal deformation and dysfunction underlying progressive heart failure was resolved prospectively using speckle-tracking imaging. Tracked at high temporal and spatial resolution, regional iPS cell transplantation restored, within 10 days post-infarction, the contractility of targeted infarcted foci and nullified conduction delay in adjacent non-infarcted regions. Local iPS cell therapy, but not delivery of parental fibroblasts or vehicle, prevented or normalized abnormal strain patterns correcting the decrease in peak strain, disparity of time-to-peak strain, and pathological systolic stretch. Focal benefit of iPS cell intervention translated into improved left ventricular conduction and contractility, reduced scar, and reversal of structural remodelling, protecting from organ decompensation. Thus, in ischaemic cardiomyopathy, targeted iPS cell transplantation synchronized failing ventricles, offering a regenerative strategy to achieve biological resynchronization. PMID:23568891

  11. An all-metallic logic gate based on current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Xia, Ke; Gu, Changzhi; Tang, Ling; Yang, Haifang; Li, Junjie

    2008-02-01

    The walls of magnetic domains can become trapped in a ferromagnetic metallic point contact when the thickness of the film and the width of the contact are less than their critical values. The discovery that domain walls can be moved from such constrictions by a sufficiently large current has attracted considerable attention from researchers working on both fundamental research and potential applications. Here we show that Invar nanocontacts fabricated on silica substrates exhibit a sharp drop in resistance with increasing bias voltage at room temperature in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Moreover, when two nanocontacts are combined in an all-metallic comparison circuit, it is possible to perform logical NOT operations. The use of electrical currents rather than applied magnetic fields to control the domain walls also reduces energy consumption and the risk of crosstalk in devices.

  12. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  13. Planar positron imaging of rubidium-82 for myocardial infarction: A comparison with thallium-201 and regional wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Ryan, J.W.; Resnekov, L.; Stark, V.; Peterson, E.L.; Gustafson, G.C.; Martin, W.B.; Freier, P.A.; Harper, P.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Rubidium-82 (Rb-82) is a generator-produced, short half-life (76 seconds) positron emitting potassium analog. Using a mobile gamma camera equipped with a rotating tungsten collimator and high-energy shielding, we examined the use of Rb-82 in the coronary care unit and clinical laboratory for detection of perfusion defects due to myocardial infarction. We studied 31 subjects, 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 12 with remote myocardial infarction, and nine controls. Rb-82 images were compared with Tl-201 and regional wall motion for detection of infarct-related arteries. Of the 22 patients with myocardial infarction, 16 were identified with Rb-82 and Tl-201. In nine control subjects, eight were normal with each method. Correlation between Rb-82 and Tl-201 defect scores was excellent. Sensitivity and specificity for infarct-related arteries were similar for Rb-82, Tl-201, and wall motion imaging. Thus planar Rb-82 imaging can detect MI reliably in the coronary care unit and in the clinical laboratory.

  14. Confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Hee; Son, Jong Yeog; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2014-05-14

    We report confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at conducting-nanofilament wall in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin film on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate. The BiFeO3 film exhibited well-defined ferroelectric response and unipolar resistive switching behavior. We artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in the BiFeO3 via conducting atomic force microscope techniques. The conducting-nanofilament wall, which does not possess any ferroelectric polarization, is then able to block domain propagation. Consequently, we demonstrate that the domain-wall motion is effectively confined within the conducting-nanofilament wall during polarization switching. This significant new insight potentially gives an opportunity for the artificial manipulation of nanoscale ferroelectric domain.

  15. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  16. On the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices: Vortex motions induced by wall roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip; Seddougui, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The receptivity problem for Goertler vortices induced by wall roughness is investigated. The roughness is modelled by small amplitude perturbations to the curved wall over which the flow takes place. The amplitude of these perturbations is taken to be sufficiently small for the induced Goertler vortices to be described by linear theory. The roughness is assumed to vary in the spanwise direction on the boundary layer lengthscale, while in the flow direction the corresponding variation is on the lengthscale over which the wall curvature varies. In fact the latter condition can be relaxed to allow for a faster streamwise roughness variation so long as the variation does not become as fast as that in the spanwise direction. The function which describes the roughness is assumed to be such that its spanwise and streamwise dependences can be separated; this enables progress by taking Fourier or Laplace transforms where appropriate. The cases of isolated and distributed roughness elements are investigated and the coupling coefficient which relates the amplitude of the forcing and the induced vortex amplitude is found asymptotically in the small wavelength limit. It is shown that this coefficient is exponentially small in the latter limit so that it is unlikely that this mode can be stimulated directly by wall roughness. The situation at 0(1) wavelengths is quite different and this is investigated numerically for different forcing functions. It is found that an isolated roughness element induces a vortex field which grows within a wedge at a finite distance downstream of the element. However, immediately downstream of the obstacle the disturbed flow produced by the element decays in amplitude. The receptivity problem at larger Goertler numbers appropriate to relatively large wall curvature is discussed in detail.

  17. The streamwise drag-reduction response of a boundary layer subjected to a sudden imposition of transverse oscillatory wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeau, Sylvain; Leschziner, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    A direct numerical simulation study is presented, which examines the response of a spatially developing boundary layer to oscillatory spanwise wall motion imposed over a limited streamwise stretch. At the heart of the study is the dependence of the streamwise variations in skin friction and turbulence properties on the period of the oscillatory motion, with particular emphasis placed on the behaviour downstream of the start of the actuation. The friction Reynolds number just upstream of the actuation is Reτ = 520, and the wall-scaled actuation period, T+ = Tuτ2/ν, covers the range 80-200. In contrast to channel flow, the present configuration allows the processes during the transition stretch from the unactuated state to the low-drag state and the recovery from the low-drag state to be studied. Attention focuses primarily on the former. Results are included for the time-averaged turbulent stresses, their budgets and probability-density functions, as well as a range of phase-averaged properties. The study brings out, for low-drag conditions, a number of features and processes that are common with those in actuated channel flow, but suggests that the maximum drag-reduction margins are lower than those in equivalent channel flow, and that the optimum actuation period is significantly shorter. The transition to the low-drag state occurs over about 5 boundary-layer thicknesses, and is characterised by substantial oscillations in all phase-averaged properties. These oscillations, provoked at the start of the spanwise motion, propagate convectively as waves and decay as the low-drag state is approached. The interactions contributing to the oscillations are discussed as part of the analysis of phase-averaged quantities.

  18. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  19. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  20. Motion of Domain Walls and the Dynamics of Kinks in the Magnetic Peierls Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijnsters, F. J.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in the Peierls potential due to the discreteness of the crystal lattice. The propagation of a narrow domain wall (comparable to the lattice parameter) under the effect of a magnetic field proceeds through the formation of kinks in its profile. We predict that, despite the discreteness of the system, such kinks can behave like sine-Gordon solitons in thin films of materials such as yttrium iron garnets, and we derive general conditions for other materials. In our simulations, we also observe long-lived breathers. We provide analytical expressions for the effective mass and limiting velocity of the kink in excellent agreement with our numerical results.

  1. Motion of domain walls and the dynamics of kinks in the magnetic Peierls potential.

    PubMed

    Buijnsters, F J; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I

    2014-11-21

    We study the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in the Peierls potential due to the discreteness of the crystal lattice. The propagation of a narrow domain wall (comparable to the lattice parameter) under the effect of a magnetic field proceeds through the formation of kinks in its profile. We predict that, despite the discreteness of the system, such kinks can behave like sine-Gordon solitons in thin films of materials such as yttrium iron garnets, and we derive general conditions for other materials. In our simulations, we also observe long-lived breathers. We provide analytical expressions for the effective mass and limiting velocity of the kink in excellent agreement with our numerical results.

  2. Discrete domain wall positioning due to pinning in current driven motion along nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2011-01-12

    Racetrack memory is a novel storage-class memory device in which a series of domain walls (DWs), representing zeros and ones, are shifted to and fro by current pulses along magnetic nanowires. Here we show, by precise measurements of the DW's position using spin-valve nanowires, that these positions take up discrete values. This results from DW relaxation after the end of the current pulse into local energy minima, likely derived from imperfections in the nanowire.

  3. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  4. Electrical probing of magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in single-crystalline Mn₅Ge₃ nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Jiang, Wanjun; Chang, Li-Te; Fan, Yabin; Chan, Michael; Wu, Can; Hung, Min-Hsiu; Liu, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2012-12-12

    In this Letter, the magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in a single-crystalline Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire were investigated by temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements. The ferromagnetic Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire was fabricated by fully germaniding a single-crystalline Ge nanowire through the solid-state reaction with Mn contacts upon thermal annealing at 450 °C. Temperature-dependent four-probe resistance measurements on the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire showed a clear slope change near 300 K accompanied by a magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. The transition temperature was able to be controlled by both axial and radial magnetic fields as the external magnetic field helped maintain the magnetization aligned in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. Near the magnetic phase transition, the critical behavior in the 1D system was characterized by a power-law relation with a critical exponent of α = 0.07 ± 0.01. Besides, another interesting feature was revealed as a cusp at about 67 K in the first-order derivative of the nanowire resistance, which was attributed to a possible magnetic transition between two noncollinear and collinear ferromagnetic states in the Mn(5)Ge(3) lattice. Furthermore, temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements demonstrated a hysteretic, symmetric, and stepwise axial magnetoresistance of the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. The interesting features of abrupt jumps indicated the presence of multiple domain walls in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire and the annihilation of domain walls driven by the magnetic field. The Kurkijärvi model was used to describe the domain wall depinning as thermally assisted escape from a single energy barrier, and the fitting on the temperature-dependent depinning magnetic fields yielded an energy barrier of 0.166 eV.

  5. Influence of large-scale low- and high-speed structures on the near-wall vortical motions in turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer (Reτ = 1000) are used to investigate the large-scale influences on the vortical structures in the near-wall region. The streamwise swirling strength (λx) depends on the strength of large-scale streamwise velocity fluctuations (ul) . The amplitude of λx decreases under the negative ul rather than the positive ul , analogous to the amplitude modulation of the velocity fluctuations. The dependence of λxon ul is due to the opposite spanwise motions in the footprints of low- and high-speed structures, which are congregative and dispersive, respectively. Conditionally averaged fields conditioned on λx under the negative- and positive-ul events show that the swirling motions lie within the congregative and dispersive motions. The dispersive motion is more intense than the congregative motion because the sweep of high-momentum fluid under ul > 0 splats on the wall while the spanwise motions under ul < 0 decrease as the flows come close to each other. Due to the strong dispersive motion, the small-scale spanwise velocity fluctuations (ws) are strengthened, whereas ws are relatively weak (attenuated) under ul < 0 . As a result, the wall-normal components are also enhanced under ul > 0 , which contributes to the amplification of λx. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and partially supported by KISTI under the Strategic Supercomputing Support Program.

  6. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  8. The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to dielectric properties quantified from in situ X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Fancher, C. M.; Brewer, S.; Chung, C. C.; ...

    2016-12-27

    Here, the contribution of 180° domain wall motion to polarization and dielectric properties of ferroelectric materials has yet to be determined experimentally. In this paper, an approach for estimating the extent of (180°) domain reversal during application of electric fields is presented. We demonstrate this method by determining the contribution of domain reversal to polarization in soft lead zirconate titanate during application of strong electric fields. At the maximum applied field, domain reversal was determined to account for >80% of the measured macroscopic polarization. We also apply the method to quantify the contribution of domain reversal to the weak-field dielectricmore » permittivity of BaTiO3. The results of this analysis determined that domain reversal accounts for up to ~70% of the macroscopic dielectric permittivity in BaTiO3. These results demonstrate the predominance of domain reversal to high and low-field dielectric response in ferroelectric polycrystalline materials.« less

  9. Electromechanical actuation with controllable motion based on a single-walled carbon nanotube and natural biopolymer composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Chen, Wei; Lu, Luhua; Liu, Jinghai; Chang, Chunrui

    2010-06-22

    This paper reports novel electromechanical behavior for a natural biopolymer film due to the incorporation of a conductive carbon nanotube network. Through simple solution blending and casting, high weight fraction single-walled carbon nanotube-chitosan composite films were fabricated and exhibited electromechanical actuation properties with motion controlled by low alternating voltage stimuli in atmospheric conditions. Of particular interest and importance is that the displacement output imitated perfectly the electrical input signal in terms of frequency (<10 Hz) and waveform. Operational reliability was confirmed by stable vibration testing in air for more than 3000 cycles. Proposed electrothermal mechanism considering the alternating current-induced periodic thermal expansion and contraction of the composite film was discussed. The unique actuation performance of the carbon nanotube-biopolymer composite, coupled with ease of fabrication, low driven voltage, tunable vibration, reliable operation, and good biocompatibility, shows great possibility for implementation of dry actuators in artificial muscle and microsystems for biomimetic applications.

  10. Analytic expression for the temperature of the current-heated nanowire for the current-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chun-Yeol; Sung, In Mo; Joe, Byung-Kyu

    2006-11-01

    The authors find a simple analytic expression for the temperature of Joule heated nanowire by current pulse, which is important in the study of the current induced domain wall motion. Since the effect of spin transfer torque depends on the thermal energy of the system, the temperature of the nanowire is a vital information. Even though the numerical solution of the heat conduction equation is well established, not only does it require a lot of numerical effort, but neither does it give any physical insight. With appropriate assumptions and Green's function method, the author derive a simple expression for the temperature of the nanowire as a function of the current density, sample geometry, and thermal properties of the substrate. The authors confirm the validity of their analytic expression by the comparison between the results of a simple expression and a commercial finite element method.

  11. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Pierce, Timothy H

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  12. Field-induced domain wall motion of amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y. H.; Lee, K. J.; Jung, M. H.; Yoon, J. B.; Cho, J. H.; You, C.-Y.; Kim, T. W.

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous CoSiB/Pt multilayer is a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material to achieve high squareness, low coercivity, strong anisotropy, and smooth domain wall (DW) motion, because of the smoother interface compared with crystalline multilayers. For [CoSiB(6 Å)/Pt (14 Å)]{sub N} multilayers with N = 3, 6, and 9, we studied the field-induced DW dynamics. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub 1}{sup eff} is 1.5 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} for all the N values, and the linear increment of coercive field H{sub c} with N gives constant exchange coupling J. By analyzing the field dependence of DW images at room temperature, a clear creep motion with the exponent μ = 1/4 could be observed. Even though the pinning field H{sub dep} slightly increases with N, the pinning potential energy U{sub c} is constant (=35 k{sub B}T) for all the N values. These results imply that the amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers are inherently homogeneous compared to crystalline multilayers. For N ≤ 6, the pinning site density ρ{sub pin} is less than 1000/μm{sup 2}, which is about 1 pinning site per the typical device junction size of 30 × 30 nm{sup 2}. Also, the exchange stiffness constant A{sub ex} is obtained to be 0.48 × 10{sup −6} erg/cm, and the domain wall width is expected to be smaller than 5.5 nm. These results may be applicable for spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory and DW logic device applications.

  13. Domain wall motion in ferromagnetically and antiferromagnetically coupled nanowires (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteifan, Majd; Fu, Sidi; Mangin, Stephane; Fullerton, Eric E.; Lomakin, Vitaliy

    2016-10-01

    demonstrate that the DW velocity can be significantly increased in antiferomagnetically coupled nanowires. The DW velocity increase is related to the exchange fields and reduction or elimination of the magnetostatic effects, which lead to reduction or elimination of the Walker breakdown. In addition, the reduction of the magnetostatic effects results in the reduction of the effects due to the pinning sites and disorder present in most nanomagnetic systems. The reduction of the pinning site and disorder effects further leads to a steadier DW motion. The study includes an analytical model for explaining how and why the Walker breakdown is overcome as well as numerical study supporting the analytical model and providing insights into the effects of the material and structural disorder. The numerical study is based on micromagnetic simulations solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with continuous spin transfer torque components. The parameter space considered in the models and simulations includes the material properties, various types of disorder, and the exchange coupling in coupled systems. In addition, we discuss various aspects associated with modeling the DW motion in thin nanowires with disorder, including simulation speed, numerical stability, and the simulation model creation.

  14. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  15. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  16. Analysis of Peristaltic Motion of a Nanofluid with Wall Shear Stress, Microrotation, and Thermal Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapal, C.; Kamalakkannan, J.; Prakash, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the peristaltic flow of an incompressible micropolar nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel in the presence of thermal radiation and heat sources parameters. The rotation of the nanoparticles is incorporated in the flow model. The equations governing the nanofluid flow are modeled and exact solutions are managed under long wavelength and flow Reynolds number and long wavelength approximations. Explicit expressions of axial velocity, stream function, microrotation, nanoparticle temperature, and concentration have been derived. The phenomena of shear stress and trapping have also been discussed. Finally, the influences of various parameters of interest on flow variables have been discussed numerically and explained graphically. Besides, the results obtained in this paper will be helpful to those who are working on the development of various realms like fluid mechanics, the rotation, Brownian motion, thermophoresis, coupling number, micropolar parameter, and the nondimensional geometry parameters. PMID:27688703

  17. Effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ooba, Ayaka; Fujimura, Yuma; Takahashi, Kota; Komine, Takashi; Sugita, Ryuji

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using micromagnetic simulations. In order to estimate the pinning field in notched nanowires, we conducted wall energy calculations for nanowires with various saturation magnetizations. The pinning field increased as the notch size increased. The pinning field decreased as the saturation magnetization decreased. As a result, the decreased in the pinning field causes the reduction of the critical current density. Therefore, a significant reduction of the critical current density can be obtained by decreasing the saturation magnetization, even if wall pinning occurs.

  18. Bubble Formation on a Wall in Cross-Flowing Liquid and Surrounding Fluid Motion,With and Without Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhunia, Avijit; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Application of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems for space-based thermal management and for the HEDS program demands a precise control of bubble size distribution in liquid. The necessity of bulk liquid motion for controlling bubble size and frequency in the space environment has been suggested by recent studies on pool, forced convection boiling and bubble formation in flowing liquid. The present work, consisting of two parts, explores bubble generation at wall in a cross-flowing liquid, i.e., in a forced convection boiling configuration. A schematic is shown. The first part looks into the bubble formation process under isothermal conditions in a reduced gravity environment, by injecting gas through a hole in the wall of a flowing liquid channel. In the latter part with channel wall heating, flow and temperature fields near a single bubble are studied under normal (1-g) and micro-gravity (mu-g) conditions. The objective of the isothermal experiments is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter (D(sub N)), the gas flow rate (Q(sub g)), and the liquid cross-flow velocity (U(sub L)). The reduced gravity data are shown. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small

  19. Voltage Control of Domain Wall Motion in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2013-03-01

    High-performance solid-state operation of a wide variety of spintronic devices requires efficient electrical control of domain walls (DWs). In this work we examine DW dynamics in ultrathin Co films under the influence of an electric field applied across a gadolinium oxide gate dielectric. By measuring the velocity scaling with temperature, driving field, and gate voltage, we verify domain expansion via thermally-activated creep dynamics. We show that an electric field linearly modulates the activation energy barrier EA that governs DW creep, leading to an exponential dependence of DW velocity on gate voltage. As a consequence, significant voltage-induced velocity enhancement can be achieved in the low-velocity regime, but the efficiency is diminished at high velocities where EA is correspondingly small. We overcome this limitation by engineering novel device structures with significantly larger voltage induced effects on magnetic anisotropy and demonstrate voltage modulation of the DW propagation field by hundreds of Oe. Implementation into magnetic nanowire devices allows us to engineer gate voltage controlled DW traps which are nonvolatile and robustly switchable for many cycles. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through grant ECCS-1128439

  20. Soliton of Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap with rapidly oscillating walls: I. Multiscale method and analysis of soliton motion in the limit of extremely fast wall oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenov, N. A.; Vysotina, N. V.; Nesterov, L. A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    Motion of a soliton of Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms captured by a trap with rapidly oscillating walls has been studied. This motion can be described using both the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a condensate wave function and an approximate equation in the form of the Newton equation for the soliton center coordinate. An analytical approach for solving the Newton equation has been developed. This approach is based on the multiscale method where the solution is sought for in the form of small-parameter expansion. This parameter is a ratio of the frequency of intrinsic slow soliton oscillations around the equilibrium position to the frequency of fast oscillations of the trap walls. In the first part of the study, an approach based on two time scales is described and the case of extremely fast wall oscillations is investigated. The calculation performed within the zero approximation shows a very good coincidence with the numerical solution of the Newton equation with respect to all parameters. A good agreement with the numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is also demonstrated for calculations of the parameters such as oscillation frequency and shift of the soliton equilibrium position under the action of the wall motion. In the second part, the role of corrections to the obtained solution is analyzed for a decreasing wall-oscillation frequency and the range of applicability of the used analytical approach is discussed.

  1. Motion of a particle near a rough wall in a viscous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charru, F.; Larrieu, E.; Dupont, J.-B.; Zenit, R.

    The motion of a spherical particle along a rough bed in a simple shear viscous flow is studied experimentally for a wide range of parameters, varying the particle size and density, the fluid viscosity and the shear rate gamma. The instantaneous particle velocity is calculated in the stream, transverse and vertical directions, using a high-speed video imaging system. It is found that the normalized streamwise mean particle velocity U/U_S, where U_S is the Stokes settling velocity, depends only on the dimensionless shear rate mu gamma/(Delta rho g d), this relationship being independent of the particle Reynolds number {Re}_p. This result holds for small {Re}_p, which was the case in our experiments ({Re}_p {<} 10). The characteristic amplitude and frequency of the velocity fluctuations are also given and discussed. A model is then proposed for the mean streamwise velocity, based on ideas of Bagnold (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, vol. 332, 1973, p. 473) and calculations of Goldman et al. (Chem. Engng Sci., vol. 22, 1967b, p. 653) for the velocity of a particle close to a smooth plane. From this model an equivalent bed roughness and an effective friction coefficient are deduced.

  2. Effects of mannequin and walk-by motion on flow and spillage characteristics of wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Dai, Guan-Zhong; Chen, Jia-Kun

    2010-08-01

    Laser-assisted flow-visualization experiments and tracer gas concentration tests were conducted for the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods to examine the physical mechanisms and relative magnitudes of hood spillages. The effects of a mannequin standing in front of the test rig and walk-by motions (which are situations always encountered in kitchens) were emphasized. The results showed that a mannequin (or a cook) standing in front of the counter would attract oil fumes toward the mannequin's body, induce large turbulent flows, and cause a significant dispersion of oil fumes into the environment through the front edge of the hood. Very high tracer gas concentrations were detected around the breathing zone of the mannequin. Increasing the suction flow rate did not reduce the spillage levels of the wall-mounted range hood but could moderately lower those of the jet-isolated hood. Serious spillages from both the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods were detected as the simulated walk-by motion was performed. The jet-isolated range hood presented a much lower robustness in resisting the influence of people's walk-bys than did the wall-mounted range hood. In summary, both the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods were vulnerable to the influences of a cook's presence and a cook's walk-by motions. Increasing the suction flow rate might not obtain satisfactorily low spillages of pollutants but might increase noise level and energy consumption.

  3. An in situ diffraction study of domain wall motion contributions to the frequency dispersion of the piezoelectric coefficient in lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, Shruti B.; Prewitt, Anderson D.; Jones, Jacob L.; Studer, Andrew J.; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2013-01-28

    The contribution of non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall displacement to the frequency dependence of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient has been determined experimentally in lead zirconate titanate using time-resolved, in situ neutron diffraction. Under subcoercive electric fields of low frequencies, approximately 3% to 4% of the volume fraction of non-180 Degree-Sign domains parallel to the field experienced polarization reorientation. This subtle non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion directly contributes to 64% to 75% of the magnitude of the piezoelectric coefficient. Moreover, part of the 33 pm/V decrease in piezoelectric coefficient across 2 orders of magnitude in frequency is quantitatively attributed to non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion effects.

  4. Detection of postischemic regional left ventricular delayed outward wall motion or diastolic stunning after exercise-induced ischemia in patients with stable effort angina by using color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsuhisa; Miwa, Kunihisa; Sakurai, Takahiro; Kataoka, Kazuaki; Imai, Makoto; Kintaka, Aya; Aoyama, Takeshi; Kawanami, Masaki

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether postischemic diastolic stunning could be detected using color kinesis, we evaluated regional left ventricular (LV) diastolic wall motion in 36 patients with stable effort angina and a coronary stenosis (> or = 70% of luminal diameter), and in 30 control subjects. Regional LV filling fraction in the short-axis view during the first 30% of the LV filling time (color kinesis diastolic index) was determined before, 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 24 hours after the treadmill exercise test. In 33 of the 36 patients (92%), new regional LV delayed outward motion during early diastole (color kinesis diastolic index < or = 40%) was detected at 20 minutes after exercise. The regional LV delayed diastolic wall motion showed significant improvement but persisted 1 hour afterward in 20 of 36 patients (56%), and disappeared 24 hours after exercise. Detection of regional stunned myocardium with impaired diastolic function may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease.

  5. A novel approach to simulate chest wall micro-motion for bio-radar life detection purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qiang; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Chen, Fuming; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-10-01

    Volunteers are often recruited to serve as the detection targets during the research process of bio-radar life detection technology, in which the experiment results are highly susceptible to the physical status of different individuals (shape, posture, etc.). In order to objectively evaluate the radar system performance and life detection algorithms, a standard detection target is urgently needed. The paper first proposed a parameter quantitatively controllable system to simulate the chest wall micro-motion caused mainly by breathing and heart beating. Then, the paper continued to analyze the material and size selection of the scattering body mounted on the simulation system from the perspective of back scattering energy. The computational electromagnetic method was employed to determine the exact scattering body. Finally, on-site experiments were carried out to verify the reliability of the simulation platform utilizing an IR UWB bioradar. Experimental result shows that the proposed system can simulate a real human target from three aspects: respiration frequency, amplitude and body surface scattering energy. Thus, it can be utilized as a substitute for a human target in radar based non-contact life detection research in various scenarios.

  6. Early Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy for assessment of regional wall motion asynergy on discharge after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    van Vlies, B.; Baas, J.; Visser, C.A.; van Royen, E.; Delemarre, B.J.; Bot, H.; Dunning, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    To assess the relation between early Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin antibody scintigraphy and degree of regional asynergy on discharge, 38 patients with a first acute myocardial infarct were studied (18 anterior, 20 inferoposterior infarctions). In 21 patients thrombolytic therapy was administered. On the first day of myocardial infarction, 80 MBq Indium-111 Antimyosin was injected. Planar images, anterior, lateral and left anterior oblique, were made 24 hours later. Localized myocardial uptake was present in 37/38 patients, and was evaluated for Count Density Index (count density of infarct zone/left lung count density) in the left anterior oblique images, which displayed the infarct zone well. Regional asynergy on discharge was evaluated by cross-sectional echocardiography and defined mild (hypokinesia) or severe (akinesia or dyskinesia). Count density index was significantly lower in 15 patients with mild asynergy, compared with 22 patients with severe asynergy (1.61 +/- 0.25 vs. 2.42 +/- 0.40, p less than 0.001). This difference was present in both patient groups treated with or without thrombolysis. We conclude that early count density index, reflecting the amount of local necrosis, is highly correlated to the ultimate degree of wall motion impairment.

  7. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He{sup +}-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Diez, L. García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D.; Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R.; Ocker, B.

    2015-07-20

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He{sup +} ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H{sup −1∕4} behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H{sub dep}. In turn, H* ≈ H{sub dep} is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  8. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J. S.; Nikita, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABMFIRF2, which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABMFIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMAPWL) and longitudinal (LMAPWL) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMAPTS), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSIPL) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSIPL), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OFLK(WLS) and ABMKF-K2, MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers.

  9. Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2012-01-18

    We have experimentally studied micrometer-scale domain wall (DW) motion driven by a magnetic field and an electric current in a Co/Pt multilayer strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The thermal activation energy for DW motion, along with its scaling with the driving field and current, has been extracted directly from the temperature dependence of the DW velocity. The injection of DC current resulted in an enhancement of the DW velocity independent of the current polarity, but produced no measurable change in the activation energy barrier. Through this analysis, the observed current-induced DW velocity enhancement can be entirely and unambiguously attributed to Joule heating.

  10. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Cristiana M.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A.; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S. P. P.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. Objectives 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction. PMID:27556390

  11. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-05

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta.

  12. Current-driven domain wall motion due to volume spin transfer torque in Co/Ni multilayer systems on Au underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Thomas, Luc; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the current-induced domain wall (CIDW) dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayers deposited on Au underlayer, where the conventional spin transfer torque governs the domain wall dynamics, by the Kerr microscope. It is found that the DW angle tilting following Oersted field profile plays an important role in domain wall (DW) motion at high current density J by decreasing DW velocity with the increasing J, while distorting its DW morphology. Also we find that the DW pinning becomes pronounced as the anisotropy decreases by increasing number of Co/Ni repeats. Most remarkably, the DW tilting angle changes its sign by inserting ultrathin Pt layer between Au and Co layer, which suggests that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and spin Hall effect induces opposite effect in DW tilting. Our findings can be of use for application of CIDW to spintronics with perpendicularly magnetized systems.

  13. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  14. Longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using MDCT in COPD: do the CT measurements of airway wall thickness and small pulmonary vessels change in parallel with emphysematous progression?

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Shin; Kawata, Naoko; Tada, Yuji; Ikari, Jun; Matsuura, Yukiko; Matsuoka, Shin; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) facilitate acquiring important clinical information for managing patients with COPD. MDCT can detect the loss of lung tissue associated with emphysema as a low-attenuation area (LAA) and the thickness of airways as the wall area percentage (WA%). The percentage of small pulmonary vessels <5 mm2 (% cross-sectional area [CSA] <5) has been recently recognized as a parameter for expressing pulmonary perfusion. We aimed to analyze the longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using these CT parameters and analyze the effect of exacerbation and smoking cessation on structural changes in COPD patients. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs), an MDCT, and a COPD assessment test (CAT) in 58 patients with COPD at the time of their enrollment at the hospital and 2 years later. We analyzed the change in clinical parameters including CT indices and examined the effect of exacerbations and smoking cessation on the structural changes. Results The CAT score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) did not significantly change during the follow-up period. The parameters of emphysematous changes significantly increased. On the other hand, the WA% at the distal airways significantly decreased or tended to decrease, and the %CSA <5 slightly but significantly increased over the same period, especially in ex-smokers. The parameters of emphysematous change were greater in patients with exacerbations and continued to progress even after smoking cessation. In contrast, the WA% and %CSA <5 did not change in proportion to emphysema progression. Conclusion The WA% at the distal bronchi and the %CSA <5 did not change in parallel with parameters of LAA over the same period. We propose that airway disease and vascular remodeling may be reversible to some extent by smoking cessation and appropriate treatment. Optimal management may have a greater effect on pulmonary vascularity and airway disease

  15. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  16. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  17. Use of Echocardiography Reveals Reestablishment of Ventricular Pumping Efficiency and Partial Ventricular Wall Motion Recovery upon Ventricular Cryoinjury in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Inês João; Sánchez-Iranzo, Héctor; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Mercader, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Aims While zebrafish embryos are amenable to in vivo imaging, allowing the study of morphogenetic processes during development, intravital imaging of adults is hampered by their small size and loss of transparency. The use of adult zebrafish as a vertebrate model of cardiac disease and regeneration is increasing at high speed. It is therefore of great importance to establish appropriate and robust methods to measure cardiac function parameters. Methods and Results Here we describe the use of 2D-echocardiography to study the fractional volume shortening and segmental wall motion of the ventricle. Our data show that 2D-echocardiography can be used to evaluate cardiac injury and also to study recovery of cardiac function. Interestingly, our results show that while global systolic function recovered following cardiac cryoinjury, ventricular wall motion was only partially restored. Conclusion Cryoinjury leads to long-lasting impairment of cardiac contraction, partially mimicking the consequences of myocardial infarction in humans. Functional assessment of heart regeneration by echocardiography allows a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac regeneration and has the advantage of being easily transferable to other cardiovascular zebrafish disease models. PMID:25532015

  18. Soluble surfactants favorably modify fluid structure and wall shear stress profiles during near-occluding bubble motion in a computational model of intravascular gas embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, T. N.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2009-11-01

    Finite sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel causes temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface lining the vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it and passes it by. Rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress imparted to the cell surface during this motion. The sign-reversing shear is a potently coupled source of cell surface mechanical stretch, potentiating cell injury. The presence of a suitable soluble surfactant in the bulk medium considerably reduces the level of the shear stress gradients imparted to the cell surface as compared to an equivalent surfactant-free system. The bubble shape and the film thickness between the bubble and the vessel wall are also different. Furthermore, the bubble residence time near the proximity of a cell surface changes in comparison. These results based on our modeling may help explain several phenomena observed in experimental studies related to gas embolism, a significant problem in cardiac surgery and decompression sickness.

  19. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  20. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  1. Analytical solution of the strain-controlled magnetic domain wall motion in bilayer piezoelectric/magnetostrictive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The one-dimensional propagation of magnetic domain walls in an isotropic, linearly elastic, magnetostrictive material is investigated in the framework of the extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation where the effects of a spin-polarized current and a rate-independent dry-friction dissipation are taken into account. In our analysis, it is assumed that the ferromagnet is subject to a spatially uniform biaxial in-plain stress generated by a piezoelectric substrate combined with the former in a multiferroic heterostructure. Moreover, a possible connection between the dry-friction mechanism and the piezo-induced strains is conjectured. By adopting the traveling waves ansatz, the effect of such a stress on the domain wall dynamics is explored in both steady and precessional regimes. In particular, it is proved that the magnetoelastic contribution, while it does not formally modify the classical solution, affects both the propagation threshold and the Walker Breakdown conditions involved in the steady regime, in agreement with recent experimental results. In the precessional regime, it is shown that the existence of a correlation between the piezo-induced strains and dry-friction leads to an upward shift of the domain wall velocity.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  3. Feedback effect on the large-scale fluid motion in wall-bounded gas-solid disperse flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    Influence of the forces, exerted by dispersed particles, in a channel, in which gas is flowing turbulently, is examined using a direct numerical simulation to calculate the gas velocities seen by the particles and a point force method to calculate the forces exerted by the particles on the gas. Influence of gravity and inter-particle collisions is ignored. Distributions of the mean streamwise body forces, exerted on the fluid by the turbulence and by the particles, are calculated to show the mean large-scale motions of the fluid phase and of the disperse phase. The fluid turbulence forces decrease with increasing volume fraction to accommodate the inter-phase body forces. Thus the large-scale fluid motions, which make a major contribution to the fluid turbulence, are damped. The turbophoretic velocities, which represent the mean drifts, show that mean contribution of each particle to the mean large-scale motion of the disperse phase decreases with increasing volume fraction. This is caused by the decreases in the fluid turbulence and the turbulent transport, with increasing volume fraction.

  4. The Effect of Abnormal Speed Motion Picture Films on a Child's Spatio-Temporal Recognition. Part 1: On the Deviation of Estimated Time of a Falling Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mori, Ichio; Tadang, Nikom

    1973-01-01

    Reports the effects of exposing both kindergarten and elementary school children to high and low speed motion pictures on children's estimation of time. Concluded the children's judgment is dependent upon their chronological ages and daily experiences of visual perception. (CC)

  5. The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to dielectric properties quantified from in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fancher, C. M.; Brewer, S.; Chung, C. C.; Rohrig, S.; Rojac, T.; Esteves, G.; Deluca, M.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.; Jones, J. L.

    2016-12-27

    Here, the contribution of 180° domain wall motion to polarization and dielectric properties of ferroelectric materials has yet to be determined experimentally. In this paper, an approach for estimating the extent of (180°) domain reversal during application of electric fields is presented. We demonstrate this method by determining the contribution of domain reversal to polarization in soft lead zirconate titanate during application of strong electric fields. At the maximum applied field, domain reversal was determined to account for >80% of the measured macroscopic polarization. We also apply the method to quantify the contribution of domain reversal to the weak-field dielectric permittivity of BaTiO3. The results of this analysis determined that domain reversal accounts for up to ~70% of the macroscopic dielectric permittivity in BaTiO3. These results demonstrate the predominance of domain reversal to high and low-field dielectric response in ferroelectric polycrystalline materials.

  6. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software. PMID:22461994

  7. An in vitro comparative study of intracanal fluid motion and wall shear stress induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files in a simulated root canal model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software.

  8. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  9. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  10. Asymmetric grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and anisotropic domain wall motion in obliquely grown nanocrystalline Co films.

    PubMed

    Quirós, C; Peverini, L; Díaz, J; Alija, A; Blanco, C; Vélez, M; Robach, O; Ziegler, E; Alameda, J M

    2014-08-22

    Strong asymmetries have been observed in grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ patterns obtained from 30 nm-thick nanocrystalline Co films prepared by oblique sputtering (15°-75° off-sample normal). These asymmetries have been qualitatively simulated by a simple model consisting of an ensemble of 8 nm-wide inclined Co nanocolumns. It is found that narrow inclined features appear in the diffuse background resembling those characteristic of faceted systems, which can be used to obtain straightforward non-destructive estimations of buried nanocolumnar grains inclination, even for oblique angles below 45°, when the stronger and broader asymmetric features of the pattern are not yet fully formed. Furthermore, using magneto-optical microscopy, a marked change in the magnetic domain's nucleation and growth process has been observed in the sample prepared at 75°, with the stronger GISAXS asymmetries. Easy axis magnetization reversal starts by a random and homogeneous nucleation of small (∼μm) elongated domains aligned with the nanocolumn's long axis and proceeds through the preferred propagation of head-to-head domain walls (DWs) along the applied field direction. This peculiar magnetic behavior indicates that the strongly anisotropic nanostructuring created by the oblique growth process is equivalent, from a magnetic point of view, to an array of self-assembled buried nanowires. These results show how GISAXS and magneto-optical microscopy can be combined as a powerful tool for correlating the morphology and magnetism of thin nanostructured systems.

  11. Coexistence of abnormal systolic motion of mitral valve in a consecutive group of 324 adult Tetralogy of Fallot patients assessed with echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anushree; Harris, Ian S; Mahadevan, Vaikom S; Foster, Elyse

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) in congenital heart disease (CHD) patients is not well described. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cyanotic CHD associated with overall good long-term survival after palliation. Since MVP is more often identified in adults and TOF patients are now surviving longer, we thus sought to perform this cohort study with a case–control design to (1) determine the prevalence of MVP and systolic displacement of mitral leaflets (SDML) in adult TOF patients, and (2) describe their clinical and imaging characteristics. Methods Retrospective interrogation of our echocardiography database identified 328 consecutive TOF patients ≥18 years from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2014. All images were reviewed to identify patients with concomitant MVP (prolapse >2 mm beyond the long-axis annular plane) or SDML (<2 mm beyond the annular plane). Results 26 (8%) TOF patients fulfilled criteria for systolic mitral valve abnormality (SMVA) (15 MVP; 11 SDML). 2 had moderate to severe mitral regurgitation requiring repair. When compared with 52 TOF patients without SMVA, those with SMVA were more likely to be females (60.7% vs 33.9%, p=0.03), less likely to have transannular patch (52% vs 97.4%, p<0.0001), had lower right ventricular ejection fraction (36.5% vs 43.8%, p=0.03) and a trend towards increased risk of atrial (44% vs 30.4%, p=0.5) and ventricular arrhythmias (32% vs 25.5%, p=0.6). On multivariate logistic regression, SMVA was independently associated with the absence of transannular patch (p=0.002) and atrial arrhythmias (p=0.04). Conclusions In this series of adult TOF patients, we describe a novel finding of a high prevalence of systolic mitral valve abnormalities. PMID:28123759

  12. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Simultaneous assessment of left ventricular wall motion and myocardial perfusion with technetium-99m-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile at stress and rest in patients with angina: Comparison with thallium-201 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva-Meyer, J.; Mena, I.; Narahara, K.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The newly developed technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) isonitriles can be used for the simultaneous evaluation of ventricular function and myocardial perfusion. We compared technetium-99m hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (({sup 99m}Tc) MIBI) derived first-pass left ventricular wall motion at stress and rest with simultaneous myocardial perfusion defined by ({sup 99m}Tc)MIBI SPECT. These results were then compared with {sup 201}TI SPECT. We examined 28 patients with coronary artery disease; 25 had a previous myocardial infarction. We found concordance between segmental wall motion and myocardial perfusion imaging in defining normal, ischemic, and infarcted myocardium in 68% and 69% of segments using ({sup 99m}Tc)MIBI and {sup 201}TI respectively. The best agreement between wall motion and myocardial perfusion was seen in the inferior wall, while most of the discrepancies were found at the apex. Agreement between ({sup 99m}Tc)MIBI and {sup 201}TI SPECT myocardial perfusion was seen in 93% of segments. Technetium-99m-MIBI appears to be an ideal radiopharmaceutical for the simultaneous evaluation of ventricular function and myocardial perfusion during stress and at rest.

  14. Computational replication of the abnormal secondary kinetic isotope effects in a hydride transfer reaction in solution with a motion assisted H-tunneling model.

    PubMed

    Kashefolgheta, Sadra; Razzaghi, Mortezaali; Hammann, Blake; Eilers, James; Roston, Daniel; Lu, Yun

    2014-03-07

    We recently reported abnormal secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects (2° KIEs) for hydride transfer reactions from alcohols to carbocations in acetonitrile (Chem. Comm. 2012, 48, 11337). Experimental 2° KIE values were found to be inflated on the 9-C position in the xanthylium cation but deflated on the β-C position in 2-propanol with respect to the values predicted by the semi-classical transition-state theory. No primary (1°) isotope effect on 2° KIEs was observed. Herein, the KIEs were replicated by the Marcus-like H-tunneling model that requires a longer donor-acceptor distance (DAD) in a lighter isotope transfer process. The 2° KIEs for a range of potential tunneling-ready-states (TRSs) of different DADs were calculated and fitted to the experiments to find the TRS structure. The observed no effect of 1° isotope on 2° KIEs is explained in terms of the less sterically hindered TRS structure so that the change in DAD due to the change in 1° isotope does not significantly affect the reorganization of the 2° isotope and hence the 2° KIE. The effect of 1° isotope on 2° KIEs may be expected to be more pronounced and thus observable in reactions occurring in restrictive environments such as the crowded and relatively rigid active site of enzymes.

  15. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  16. Echocardiographic assessment of abnormal left ventricular relaxation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Upton, M T; Gibson, D G; Brown, D J

    1976-01-01

    In 64 patients requiring cardiac catheterization for chest pain, echocardiograms showing anterior mitral leaflet and left ventricular cavity simultaneously were recorded. These were digitized and their first derivatives computed in order to study time relations between mitral valve and left ventricular wall movement in early distole. In 10 patients with normal left ventricular angiograms and coronary arteriograms, mitral valve opening began 1-1 +/- 9-3 ms (mean +/- SD) before the onset of outward wall movement, and reached peak opening velocity 2-0 +/- 13 ms after maximum rate of change of dimension. Virtually identical time relations were seen in 15 patients with normal left ventricular angiograms but with obstructive coronary artery disease (3-6 +/- 9-3 ms and 0-7 +/- 7-3 ms, respectively). These close relations were lost in patients with segmental abnormalities of contraction on left ventricular angiogram. In 19 such patients with normal septal motion, outward wall movement began 53 +/- 31 ms before the onset of anterior movement of the mitral valve leaflet, and this isovolumic wall movement accounted for 31 per cent of the total diastolic excursion. In 9 patients with reversed septal movement, these abnormalities were greater, 92 +/- 39 ms and 33 per cent, respectively, while in 11 patients with diffuse left ventricular involvement they were small, 5-5 +/- 13 ms and 3 per cent. Frame-by-frame digitization of cineangiograms was used to confirm these findings which appear to reflect an abnormal change in left ventricular cavity shape during isovolumic relaxation. Images PMID:973873

  17. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  18. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure and Two-dimensional (axial and radial) Motion of the Carotid Artery Wall: Physiological Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenchu; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yanping; Du, Xiuquan; Wu, Wanqing; Liu, Guotao; Li, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    The physiological relationship between local arterial displacement and blood pressure (BP) plays an integral role in assess- ment of the mechanical properties of arteries. In this study, we used more advanced methods to obtain reliable continuous BP and the displacement of the common carotid artery (CCA) simultaneously. We propose a novel evaluation method for arterial stiffness that relies on determining the physiological relationship between the axial and radial displacements of the CCA wall and beat-to-beat BP. Patients (total of 138) were divided into groups according to the following three criteria: essential hyper- tension (EH) and normotension, male and female, elderly and younger. The Pearson correlation test and canonical correlation analysis showed that the CCA indices were significantly correlated with BP indices (r = 0:787; p < 0:05). The slope of the CCA displacement/pressure curve showed a progressive reduction with increasing age and EH disease occurrence (EH: 0.496 vs. normotension: 0.822; age <= 60:0.585 vs. age > 60:0.783). Our method provides an explicit reference value and relationship for the manner in which the CCA wall responds to changes in BP. Short-term and continuous BP were significantly correlated with CCA displacement and exhibited a close inverse relationship with each subject’s BP and EH, age, and systolic blood pressure. PMID:28198819

  19. Motion correction for MR cystography by an image processing approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qin; Liang, Zhengrong; Duan, Chaijie; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Haifang; Roque, Clement; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Guangxiang; Lu, Hongbing; He, Xiaohai

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) cystography or MR-based virtual cystoscopy is a promising new technology to evaluate the entire bladder in a fully noninvasive manner. It requires the anatomical bladder images be acquired at high spatial resolution and with adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This often leads to a long-time scan (>5 min) and results in image artifacts due to involuntary bladder motion and deformation. In this paper, we investigated an image-processing approach to mitigate the problem of motion and deformation. Instead of a traditional single long-time scan, six repeated short-time scans (each of approximately 1 min) were acquired for the purpose of shifting bladder motion from intrascan into interscans. Then, the interscan motions were addressed by registering the short-time scans to a selected reference and finally forming a single average motion-corrected image. To evaluate the presented approach, three types of images were generated: 1) the motion-corrected image by registration and average of the short-time scans; 2) the directly averaged image of the short-time scans (without motion correction); and 3) the single image of the corresponding long-time scan. Six experts were asked to blindly score these images in terms of two important aspects: 1) the definition of the bladder wall and 2) the overall expression on the image quality. Statistical analysis on the scores suggested that the best result in both the aspects is achieved by the presented motion-corrected average. Furthermore, the superiority of the motion-corrected average over the other two is statistically significant by the measure of a linear mixed-effect model with p -values < 0.05. Our findings may facilitate the detection of bladder abnormality in MR cystography by mitigating the motion challenge. The effectiveness of this approach depends on the noise level of acquired short-time scans and the robustness of image registration, and future effort on these two aspects is needed.

  20. The dynamics of domain walls and strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Haws, David; Garfinkle, David

    1989-01-01

    The leading order finite-width corrections to the equation of motion describing the motion of a domain wall are derived. The regime in which this equation of motion is invalid is discussed. Spherically and cylindrically symmetric solutions to this equation of motion are found. A misconception that has arisen in recent years regarding the rigidity (or otherwise) of cosmic strings is also clarified.

  1. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Yoshimura, Y; Kim, K-J; Lee, K; Kim, T W; Ono, T; You, C-Y; Jung, M H

    2016-03-31

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices.

  2. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kim, K.-J.; Lee, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ono, T.; You, C.-Y.; Jung, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices. PMID:27030379

  3. Scaling relationship between rotation and translation motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Rotation motion and its effects are not well known and our knowledge about translation motions is much better than that of the rotation motions. Since rotation motions show to have a close relationship with translation motions, deriving such relationship might improve our understanding on rotation motions. Rotation motion can be obtained by taking a spatial derivative of translation motion. Therefore, rotation motion is always accompanied by translation motions. Although rotation motion cannot be detected by strong motion record, the rotation-induced centrifugal acceleration and gravity effects are recorded in a strong-motion record. In this study we derive empirical relationships for rotation motion and its effects. Results show that rotation motion and its effects are small and can be ignored in weak motion, but they grow up very fast as the increasing of translation motion and become important in near-fault ground motions. We also found that those abnormal strong-motion records observed in near-fault are closely related to rotation motions.

  4. The effects of cervical joint manipulation, based on passive motion analysis, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture, and cervical ROM in university students with abnormal posture of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wontae

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cervical posture manipulation, based on passive motion analysis (MBPMA) and general mobilization, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture (FHP), and cervical ROM in university students with problems in cervical posture and range of motion (ROM). [Subjects] The Subjects were 40 university students in their 20s who displayed problems in cervical posture and ROM; they were divided into an MBPMA group (n=20) and a mobilization group (n=20). [Methods] Each group underwent MBPMA or mobilization three times a week for four weeks. The effects of MBPMA and mobilization on cervical lordosis, FHP, and cervical ROM were analyzed by radiography. [Results] MBPMA was effective in increasing the cervical lordosis, cervical extension ROM (CER), and ranges of flexion and extension motion (RFEM) and in decreasing FHP. Mobilization was effective in increasing CER and decreasing FHP. [Conclusion] MBPMA can be utilized as an effective method for decreasing FHP and improving cervical lordosis and cervical ROM.

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  8. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  9. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  10. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  11. [Segmental wall movement of the left ventricle in healthy persons and myocardial infarct patients studied by a catheter-less nuclear medical method (camera-cinematography of the heart)].

    PubMed

    Geffers, H; Sigel, H; Bitter, F; Kampmann, H; Stauch, M; Adam, W E

    1976-08-01

    Camera-Kinematography is a nearly noninvasive method to investigate regional motion of the myocard, and allows evaluation of the function of the heart. About 20 min after injection of 15-20 mCi of 99mTC-Human-Serum-Albumin, when the tracer is distributed homogenously within the bloodpool, data acquisition starts. Myocardial wall motion is represented in an appropriate quasi three-dimensional form. In this representation scars can be revealed as "silent" (akinetic) regions, aneurysms by asynchronic motion. Time activity curves for arbitrarily chosen regions can be calculated and give an equivalent for regional volume changes. 16 patients with an old infarction have been investigated. In fourteen cases the location and extent of regions with abnormal motion could be evaluated. Only two cases of a small posterior wall infarction did not show deviations from normal contraction pattern.

  12. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances.

  13. Prognostic impact of coronary microcirculation abnormalities in systemic sclerosis: a prospective study to evaluate the role of non-invasive tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Microcirculation dysfunction is a typical feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and represents the earliest abnormality of primary myocardial involvement. We assessed coronary microcirculation status by combining two functional tests in SSc patients and estimating its impact on disease outcome. Methods Forty-one SSc patients, asymptomatic for coronary artery disease, were tested for coronary flow velocity reserve (CFR) by transthoracic-echo-Doppler with adenosine infusion (A-TTE) and for left ventricular wall motion abnormalities (WMA) by dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Myocardial multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enabled the presence of epicardial stenosis, which could interfere with the accuracy of the tests, to be excluded. Patient survival rate was assessed over a 6.7- ± 3.5-year follow-up. Results Nineteen out of 41 (46%) SSc patients had a reduced CFR (≤2.5) and in 16/41 (39%) a WMA was observed during DSE. Furthermore, 13/41 (32%) patients showed pathological CFR and WMA. An inverse correlation between wall motion score index (WMSI) during DSE and CFR value (r = -0.57, P <0.0001) was observed; in addition, CFR was significantly reduced (2.21 ± 0.38) in patients with WMA as compared to those without (2.94 ± 0.60) (P <0.0001). In 12 patients with abnormal DSE, MDCT was used to exclude macrovasculopathy. During a 6.7- ± 3.5-year follow-up seven patients with abnormal coronary functional tests died of disease-related causes, compared to only one patient with normal tests. Conclusions A-TTE and DSE tests are useful tools to detect non-invasively pre-clinical microcirculation abnormalities in SSc patients; moreover, abnormal CFR and WMA might be related to a worse disease outcome suggesting a prognostic value of these tests, similar to other myocardial diseases. PMID:23302110

  14. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  15. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  16. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  17. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  19. Personalized fall detection and classification through walls and in heavy indoor clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Jokanovic, Branka

    2015-05-01

    Recent research and developments for in home radar monitoring have shown real promise of the technology in detecting normal and abnormal gross-motor activities of humans inside their residences and at private homes. Attention is now paid to challenges in system integration, operations, and installations. One important question touches on the required number of radar units for a given residence and whether eventually one radar unit per room would become the nominal approach. Towards addressing this question and assessing the effectiveness of radar unit to sense adjacent rooms and hallways of the same residence, this paper examines through-wall radar monitoring where the radar signal faces both wall attenuation and dispersion. We show that typical interior walls do not significantly alter the radar time-frequency (TF) signature of a fall, and the radar signal return is slightly weakened by wall penetration. Additionally, we show that there is a wide variation of the TF feature values associated with fall motions which confuse a classifier, trained with generic subjects, and cause it to falsely declare a different motion.

  20. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  1. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  2. Abnormal magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Zhao, H.; Chen, G. F.; Zhang, Y.; Du, H. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Wang, C. S.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yang, J. B.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that the hysteresis loops show wasp-waisted character at low temperatures, which has been proved to be related to the existence of multi-phases, the Fe/Ni soft magnetic phases and the CaCu5-type hard magnetic phase. A smooth-jump behavior of the magnetization is observed at T>5 K, whereas a step-like magnetization process appears at T<5 K. The CaCu5-type phase is responsible for such abnormal magnetization behavior. The magnetic moment reversal model with thermal activation is used to explain the relation of the critical magnetic field (Hcm) to the temperature (T>5 K). The reversal of the moment direction has to cross over an energy barrier of about 6.6×10-15 erg. The step-like jumps of the magnetization below 5 K is proposed to be resulted from a sharp increase of the sample temperature under the heat released by the irreversible domain wall motion.

  3. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  4. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  5. Analysis of myocardial motion using generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Rose, Stephen E.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Veidt, Martin; Bennett, Cameron J.; Doddrell, David M.

    2000-06-01

    Heart wall motion abnormalities are the very sensitive indicators of common heart diseases, such as myocardial infarction and ischemia. Regional strain analysis is especially important in diagnosing local abnormalities and mechanical changes in the myocardium. In this work, we present a complete method for the analysis of cardiac motion and the evaluation of regional strain in the left ventricular wall. The method is based on the generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the left ventricle. The whole method combines dynamical tracking of tag deformation, simulating cardiac movement and accurately computing the regional strain distribution. More specifically, the analysis of cardiac motion is performed in three stages. Firstly, material points within the myocardium are tracked over time using a semi-automated snake-based tag tracking algorithm developed for this purpose. This procedure is repeated in three orthogonal axes so as to generate a set of one-dimensional sample measurements of the displacement field. The 3D-displacement field is then reconstructed from this sample set by using a generalized vector spline model. The spline reconstruction of the displacement field is explicitly expressed as a linear combination of a spline kernel function associated with each sample point and a polynomial term. Finally, the strain tensor (linear or nonlinear) with three direct components and three shear components is calculated by applying a differential operator directly to the displacement function. The proposed method is computationally effective and easy to perform on tagged MR images. The preliminary study has shown potential advantages of using this method for the analysis of myocardial motion and the quantification of regional strain.

  6. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  7. Local Nanomechanical Motion In Single Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew; Gimzewski, James

    2004-03-01

    We present new evidence that the nanoscale motion of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits local bionanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies and which is not caused by random or Brownian processes. This motion is measured with the AFM tip which acts as a nanomechanical sensor, permitting the motion of the cell wall to be recorded as a function of time, applied force, etc. We present persuasive evidence which shows that the local nanomechanical motion is characteristic of metabolic processes taking place inside the cell. This is demonstrated by clear differences between living cells and living cells treated with a metabolic inhibitor. This inhibitor specifically targets cytochrome oxidase inside the mitochondria and inhibits ATP production. The cells observed in this study display characteristic local cell wall motion with amplitudes between 1 and 3 nm and frequencies between 500 and 1700 Hz. The motion is temperature dependant which also suggests the mechanism for the observed motion has biological origins. In addition to a stringent series of control experiments we also discuss local measurements of the cell's mechanical properties and their influence on the observed bionanomechanical motion.

  8. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  9. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  10. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  11. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  12. Prediction of compliant wall drag reduction, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of turbulent boundary layer flows over compliant walls was investigated. The model is based on Burton's observation that outer flow structures in turbulent boundary layers produce large scale pressure fluctuations near the wall. The results of calculations indicate that certain small wavelength wall motions can have a significant effect upon the stability of turbulent boundary layers.

  13. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  14. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  15. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... but it is more common in children, pregnant women, and people taking certain medicines. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy feeling and cold sweats. It can then lead to dizziness and nausea and vomiting. Your brain senses movement by getting signals from your inner ears, eyes, ...

  16. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  17. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  18. Analysis of dynamic diffuse wall based on two-dimensional twist wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Kumosaki, K.; Inoue, M.

    1981-03-01

    The mechanism and the dynamic properties of the dynamic diffuse wall observed in Garnet bubbles have been analyzed based on two dimensional twist wall with a finite film thickness. The analysis reveals that during wall motion, 360 °-spin twist nucleates inside the wall and propagates along the film thickness. The wall distortion takes place where the 360 °-twist appears. Annihilation and/or accumulation of the 360 °-twist occurs at the film surface. The number of the 360 °-twists contained in a wall increases with increasing drive and in-plane fields, which leads to an increase of the apparent wall width obtained by domain walls observed by transmitted light (Faraday effect). Most of the experimental results may be well interpreted by the present analysis.

  19. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  20. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  1. Development and pathologies of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Seidelmann, Sara B; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-06-01

    Arteries consist of an inner single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by layers of smooth muscle and an outer adventitia. The majority of vascular developmental studies focus on the construction of endothelial networks through the process of angiogenesis. Although many devastating vascular diseases involve abnormalities in components of the smooth muscle and adventitia (i.e., the vascular wall), the morphogenesis of these layers has received relatively less attention. Here, we briefly review key elements underlying endothelial layer formation and then focus on vascular wall development, specifically on smooth muscle cell origins and differentiation, patterning of the vascular wall, and the role of extracellular matrix and adventitial progenitor cells. Finally, we discuss select human diseases characterized by marked vascular wall abnormalities. We propose that continuing to apply approaches from developmental biology to the study of vascular disease will stimulate important advancements in elucidating disease mechanism and devising novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  4. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape. PMID:23978905

  5. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities.

    PubMed

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  6. Magnetic bubblecade memory based on chiral domain walls.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Yoo, Sang-Cheol; Je, Soong-Geun; Chun, Byong Sun; Kim, Wondong; Min, Byoung-Chul; Hwang, Chanyong; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2015-03-16

    Unidirectional motion of magnetic domain walls is the key concept underlying next-generation domain-wall-mediated memory and logic devices. Such motion has been achieved either by injecting large electric currents into nanowires or by employing domain-wall tension induced by sophisticated structural modulation. Herein, we demonstrate a new scheme without any current injection or structural modulation. This scheme utilizes the recently discovered chiral domain walls, which exhibit asymmetry in their speed with respect to magnetic fields. Because of this asymmetry, an alternating magnetic field results in the coherent motion of the domain walls in one direction. Such coherent unidirectional motion is achieved even for an array of magnetic bubble domains, enabling the design of a new device prototype-magnetic bubblecade memory-with two-dimensional data-storage capability.

  7. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  8. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  9. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  10. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Domain wall motion and electromechanical strain in lead-free piezoelectrics: Insight from the model system (1 − x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tutuncu, Goknur; Li, Binzhi; Bowman, Keith; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-04-14

    The piezoelectric compositions (1 − x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} (BZT-xBCT) span a model lead-free morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between room temperature rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at approximately x = 0.5. In the present work, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements during electric field application are used to elucidate the origin of electromechanical strain in several compositions spanning the tetragonal compositional range 0.6 ≤ x ≤ 0.9. As BCT concentration decreases towards the MPB, the tetragonal distortion (given by c/a-1) decreases concomitantly with an increase in 90° domain wall motion. The increase in observed macroscopic strain is predominantly attributed to the increased contribution from 90° domain wall motion. The results demonstrate that domain wall motion is a significant factor in achieving high strain and piezoelectric coefficients in lead-free polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  12. Domain wall motion and electromechanical strain in lead-free piezoelectrics: Insight from the model system (1 - x)Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3-x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tutuncu, Goknur; Li, Binzhi; Bowman, Keith; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-07-17

    The piezoelectric compositions (1 - x)Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3–x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BZT-xBCT) span a model lead-free morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between room temperature rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at approximately x = 0.5. In the present work, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements during electric field application are used to elucidate the origin of electromechanical strain in several compositions spanning the tetragonal compositional range 0.6 ≤ x ≤ 0.9. As BCT concentration decreases towards the MPB, the tetragonal distortion (given by c/a-1) decreases concomitantly with an increase in 90° domain wall motion. The increase in observed macroscopic strain is predominantly attributed to the increased contribution from 90° domain wall motion. The results demonstrate that domain wall motion is a significant factor in achieving high strain and piezoelectric coefficients in lead-free polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  13. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  14. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  15. A programmable motion phantom for quality assurance of motion management in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, L; Kron, T; Johnston, P N; McDermott, L N; Taylor, M L; Callahan, J; Franich, R D

    2012-03-01

    A commercially available motion phantom (QUASAR, Modus Medical) was modified for programmable motion control with the aim of reproducing patient respiratory motion in one dimension in both the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, as well as, providing controllable breath-hold and sinusoidal patterns for the testing of radiotherapy gating systems. In order to simulate realistic patient motion, the DC motor was replaced by a stepper motor. A separate 'chest-wall' motion platform was also designed to accommodate a variety of surrogate marker systems. The platform employs a second stepper motor that allows for the decoupling of the chest-wall and insert motion. The platform's accuracy was tested by replicating patient traces recorded with the Varian real-time position management (RPM) system and comparing the motion platform's recorded motion trace with the original patient data. Six lung cancer patient traces recorded with the RPM system were uploaded to the motion platform's in-house control software and subsequently replicated through the phantom motion platform. The phantom's motion profile was recorded with the RPM system and compared to the original patient data. Sinusoidal and breath-hold patterns were simulated with the motion platform and recorded with the RPM system to verify the systems potential for routine quality assurance of commercial radiotherapy gating systems. There was good correlation between replicated and actual patient data (P 0.003). Mean differences between the location of maxima in replicated and patient data-sets for six patients amounted to 0.034 cm with the corresponding minima mean equal to 0.010 cm. The upgraded motion phantom was found to replicate patient motion accurately as well as provide useful test patterns to aid in the quality assurance of motion management methods and technologies.

  16. Nonstationary current-driven dynamics of vortex domain walls in films with in-plane anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, M. N.; Filippov, B. N.; Korzunin, L. G.

    2017-02-01

    Micromagnetic simulation of a current-driven vortex domain wall motion in a film with in-plane anisotropy was carried out. The current density values j >jc were considered corresponding to the nonstationary motion, with the domain wall structure dynamic transformation occurred. A nonlinear dependence of the jc value on the film thickness was obtained. The nonstationary motion regime existence restricted the possibility to increase the domain wall velocity by increasing j and decreasing the damping parameter.

  17. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  18. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  19. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  20. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  1. Local Domain-Wall Velocity Engineering via Tailored Potential Landscapes in Ferromagnetic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    We report the local control of the domain-wall velocity by tailoring the domain-wall potential landscape via local variations of a curved ring geometry. Employing time-resolved scanning-transmission x-ray microscopy, we dynamically image the motion of domain walls in rotating magnetic fields and quantify the contribution of the spatially varying potential to the domain-wall dynamics. We explain our experimentally obtained angular dependences of domain-wall velocities by the interplay between long-range forces arising from the Zeeman interaction of domain walls with the external magnetic field with local forces arising from variations of domain-wall energy due to a varying ring width. The interplay of these forces leads to distortion-free wall motion, and we use the engineered domain-wall potential landscape for spatial synchronization of domain-wall velocities in ferromagnetic rings, which are both a key prerequisite for the implementation of domain-wall-based devices.

  2. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  3. Development of Motion Processing in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annaz, Dagmara; Remington, Anna; Milne, Elizabeth; Coleman, Mike; Campbell, Ruth; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Swettenham, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that children with autism may be impaired in the perception of biological motion from moving point-light displays. Some children with autism also have abnormally high motion coherence thresholds. In the current study we tested a group of children with autism and a group of typically developing children aged 5 to 12 years of…

  4. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  5. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  6. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christopher C.; Ehrsson, H. Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates. PMID:27994538

  7. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  8. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  9. Unusual case of left ventricular ballooning involving the inferior wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Tako – tsubo like syndrome (also named left ventricular apical ballooning) is an unusual cardiomyopathy with an high incidence in Japanese population of female sex, following an emotional stress. The clinical features (typical chest pain), and the electrocardiographic changes (negative T wave and persistent ST elevation in anterior leads), are suggestive of an acute myocardial infarction; nevertheless the coronary angiography show coronary arteries without lesions and the ventriculography show specific segmental dysfunction. In the literature there are many reports of typical left ventricular ballooning (apical); due to the rarity of the atypical localizations (such as mid, basal, anterior or inferior left ventricular wall) many authors think they are different physiopatologic entity. Case report We report a case of 50 – years old woman, with a family history of ischeamic cardiomyopathy but with no additional cardiovascular risk factors, who arrived to emergency department with a recent episode of chest pain (about 30 minutes) with electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features suggested of a inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed coronary arteries without atherosclerotic lesions; ventriculography showed an inferior dysfunction. Conclusion This data can suggest for an atypical form (in term of clinical presentation and localization) of left ventricular ballooning involving the inferior wall (never described in the literature), not preceded by any emotional or physical stress. The follow – up performed by transthoracic echocardiography (2 months later) revealed a complete regression of wall motions abnormalities. PMID:19232097

  10. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  11. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  12. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  15. Hydrodynamic interaction of micro-swimmers near a wall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gao-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of an archetypal low-Reynolds number swimmer, called “squirmer”, near a wall has been numerically studied. For a single squirmer, depending on the swimming mechanism, three different modes are distinguished: (a) the squirmer escaping from the wall, (b) the squirmer swimming along the wall at a constant distance and orientation angle, and (c) the squirmer swimming near the wall in a periodic trajectory. The role of inertial effects on the near-wall motion of the squirmer is quantified. The dynamics of multiple squirmers swimming between two walls is found to be very different from a single squirmer. Near-wall accumulation of squirmers are observed. At a relatively small concentration c = 0.1, around 60 – 80% of the squirmers are accumulated near the walls and attraction of pushers and pullers towards the wall is stronger than neutral squirmers. Near-wall squirmers orient normal to the wall, while in the bulk region, the squirmers are mostly oriented parallel to the wall. At a high concentration, c = 0.4, the percentage of the near-wall squirmers is around 40%. The orientation angle of squirmers in the bulk region is more uniformly distributed at high concentrations. In the near-wall region, pullers repel each other, while pushers are attracted to each other and form clusters. PMID:25122372

  16. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  17. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  18. Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes by trajectory cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zhang, Zhijiang; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes has been a challenge due to volatility of the definitions for both normality and abnormality, the small number of pixels on the target, appearance ambiguity resulting from the dense packing, and severe inter-object occlusions. A novel framework was proposed for the detection of unusual events in crowded scenes using trajectories produced by moving pedestrians based on an intuition that the motion patterns of usual behaviors are similar to these of group activity, whereas unusual behaviors are not. First, spectral clustering is used to group trajectories with similar spatial patterns. Different trajectory clusters represent different activities. Then, unusual trajectories can be detected using these patterns. Furthermore, behavior of a mobile pedestrian can be defined by comparing its direction with these patterns, such as moving in the opposite direction of the group or traversing the group. Experimental results indicated that the proposed algorithm could be used to reliably locate the abnormal events in crowded scenes.

  19. Direct observation of massless domain wall dynamics in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Rougemaille, N; Boulle, O; Miron, I M; Auffret, S; Rodmacq, B; Gaudin, G; Cezar, J C; Sirotti, F; Pizzini, S

    2012-06-15

    Domain wall motion induced by nanosecond current pulses in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Pt/Co/AlO(x)) is shown to exhibit negligible inertia. Time-resolved magnetic microscopy during current pulses reveals that the domain walls start moving, with a constant speed, as soon as the current reaches a constant amplitude, and no or little motion takes place after the end of the pulse. The very low "mass" of these domain walls is attributed to the combination of their narrow width and high damping parameter α. Such a small inertia should allow accurate control of domain wall motion by tuning the duration and amplitude of the current pulses.

  20. Experimental Study of Short-Time Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Riegler, David; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report our progress on the study of short-time Brownian motion of optically-trapped microspheres. In earlier work, we observed the instantaneous velocity of microspheres in gas and in liquid, verifying a prediction by Albert Einstein from 1907. We now report a more accurate test of the energy equipartition theorem for a particle in liquid. We also observe boundary effects on Brownian motion in liquid by setting a wall near the trapped particle, which changes the dynamics of the motion. We find that the velocity autocorrelation of the particle decreases faster as the particle gets closer to the wall.

  1. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  2. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  4. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  5. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  6. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  7. Magnetic Domain Wall Floating on a Spin Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the transfer of angular momentum between a spin superfluid and a domain wall in an exchange coupled easy-axis and easy-plane magnetic insulator system. A domain wall in the easy-axis magnet absorbs spin angular momentum via disrupting the flow of a superfluid spin current in the easy-plane magnet. Focusing on an open geometry, where the spin current is injected electrically via a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, we derive analytical expressions for the resultant superfluid-mediated motion of the domain wall. The analytical results are supported by micromagnetic simulations. The proposed phenomenon extends the regime of magnon-driven domain-wall motion to the case where the magnons are condensed and exhibit superfluidity. Furthermore, by controlling the pinning of the domain wall, we propose a realization of a reconfigurable spin transistor. The long-distance dissipationless character of spin superfluids can thus be exploited for manipulating soliton-based memory and logic devices.

  8. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  9. Thermal spin-transfer torques on magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Shuai; Xia, Ke

    2010-04-01

    We studied the spin-transfer torques acting on magnetic domain walls in the presence of a nonequilibrium thermal distribution using a generalized Landauer-Büttiker formalism, where the energy flow is described on the same footing as the electric current. First-principles transport calculations have been performed in Ni and Co domain walls as typical examples. The temperature difference between two sides of the domain wall can induce remarkable spin- transfer torques, which are comparable with the current-induced torques required for the domain wall motion.

  10. Is the great attractor really a great wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences are discussed of a late time phase transition which produces light domain walls. The observed peculiar velocity field of the Universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave background radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such a scenario. The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion reported by the Seven Samurai could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall with the Hubble volume (the Great Wall).

  11. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  12. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  13. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  14. Enhanced ductile behavior of tensile-elongated individual double-walled and triple-walled carbon nanotubes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y; Chen, S; Ren, Z F; Wang, Z; Kempa, K; Naughton, M J; Chen, G; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-05-04

    We report exceptional ductile behavior in individual double-walled and triple-walled carbon nanotubes at temperatures above 2000 degrees C, with tensile elongation of 190% and diameter reduction of 90%, during in situ tensile-loading experiments conducted inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Concurrent atomic-scale microstructure observations reveal that the superelongation is attributed to a high temperature creep deformation mechanism mediated by atom or vacancy diffusion, dislocation climb, and kink motion at high temperatures. The superelongation in double-walled and triple-walled carbon nanotubes, the creep deformation mechanism, and dislocation climb in carbon nanotubes are reported here for the first time.

  15. Moving Towards Domain Wall Devices in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    Domain walls in ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic oxides are distinct functional materials in their own right. They can be conducting, or even superconducting, when surrounding domains are insulating; they can demonstrate magnetism when the surrounding bulk is non-magnetic and they can contain ordered electrical dipoles when the matrix containing them is non-polar. Since domain walls can also be created, destroyed, and controllably moved from place to place, there is an amazing opportunity for us to design new forms of devices in which functionality is actively and dynamically deployed (now you see it; now you don't). This is the essence of the emerging field known as ``domain wall nanoelectronics''. In time, this arena of research could change the way we think of nanoscale functional devices, moving increasingly towards agile circuitry and neuromorphic device architectures. While the control of domain wall injection, movement and annihilation has been developed rather well in the nanomagnetics community (in race-track and domain wall logic research), similar research has not been widely performed in nanoscale ferroelectrics, ferroelastics and multiferroics. This talk will discuss progress that has been made to date and the way in which nanomagnetics research can be used as a source of inspiration. Site-specific domain wall injection and motion control in both proper and improper ferroelectrics using inhomogeneous electric and elastic fields, as well as dielectric patterning in uniaxial ferroelectrics, will be specifically considered. As will be shown, sufficient control has been developed to allow the creation of a diode for domain wall motion in ferroelectrics, for example. The author acknowledges support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  16. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    PubMed

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  17. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  18. Domain-wall oscillations studies by time-resolved soft x-ray mircorscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, L.; Kruger, B.; Eiselt, R.; Bolte, M.; Fischer, P.; Meier, G.

    2009-03-25

    Fast magnetization dynamics in the micro- and nanometer regime are an interesting field of research. On these length scales magnetic structures can be designed to contain a single vortex or a single domain wall. Both size and speed of these patterns are of great interest in todays research for prospective non-volatile data storage devices. Especially the possibility to move domain-walls by spin-polarized current gained a lot of interest. Magnetic configurations can be imaged by soft X-ray magnetic microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 15 nm. By a stroboscopic pump and probe measurement scheme a temporal resolution below 100 ps is achieved. This provides the opportunity to directly image changes in magnetic domains and domain-wall motion. We image oscillations of a single domain wall in a confining potential in time steps of 200 ps by time resolved X-ray microscopy at the full-field soft X-ray transmission microscope at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley (beamline 6.1.2). Domain walls are prepared in permalloy nanostructures with a restoring potential. The oscillation of a 180{sup o} domain wall is triggered by nanosecond current pulses. The spin-polarized current and the accompanying Oersted field can contribute to the motion of the wall. By analysis of the distinct domain-wall dynamics the dominant contribution is determined. In our geometry the motion of the wall is determined by the Oersted field although the spin-polarized current directly flows through the ferromagnetic structure. An analytical model of a rigid particle precisely describes the domain-wall motion. Oscillations are studied for different pulse length and amplitudes. From the observed oscillations we extract the driving force, the confining potential, and the domain-wall mass. Nonharmonic terms determine the motion of the wall. The influence of the nonharmonic potential is studied by looking at various phase spaces of the domain-wall motion.

  19. Role of orientation reference selection in motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal were developed to further explore and quantify the orientation reference selection abilities of subjects and the relation, if any, between motion sickness and orientation reference selection. The overall objectives of this proposal are to determine (1) if motion sickness susceptibility is related to sensory orientation reference selection abilities of subjects, (2) if abnormal vertical canal-otolith function is the source of these abnormal posture control strategies and if it can be quantified by vestibular and oculomotor reflex measurements, and (3) if quantifiable measures of perception of vestibular and visual motion cues can be related to motion sickness susceptibility and to orientation reference selection ability demonstrated by tests which systematically control the sensory imformation available for orientation.

  20. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p < 0.050). One participant showed an increase in motion of 8.2 mm (p < 0.001) with vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (<1 mm) in kidney motion. No relationship was observed for abdominal wall motion and motion changes in the left kidney (r = 0.345, p = 0.402) or right kidney (r = 0.527, p = 0.145). Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion.

  1. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  2. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  3. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    The motion of domain walls due to the spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport is of considerable interest for the development of spintronic devices. We model the charge and spin transport through domain walls in ferromagnetic semiconductors for various systems. With an appropriate model Hamiltonian for the spin-dependent potential, we calculate wavefunctions inside the domain walls which are then used to calculate transmission and reflection coefficients, which are then in turn used to calculate current and spin torque. Starting with a simple approximation for the change in magnetization inside the domain wall, and ending with a sophisticated transfer matrix method, we model the common pi wall, the less-studied 2pi wall, and a system of two pi walls separated by a variable distance. We uncover an interesting width dependence on the transport properties of the domain wall. 2pi walls in particular, have definitive maximums in resistance and spin torque for certain domain wall widths that can be seen as a function of the spin mistracking in the system---when the spins are either passing straight through the domain wall (narrow walls) or adiabatically following the magnetization (wide walls), the resistance is low as transmission is high. In the intermediate region, there is room for the spins to rotate their magnetization, but not necessarily all the way through a 360 degree rotation, leading to reflection and resistance. We also calculate that there are widths for which the total velocity of a 2pi wall is greater than that of a same-sized pi wall. In the double-wall system, we model how the system reacts to changes in the separation of the domain walls. When the domain walls are far apart, they act as a spin-selective resonant double barrier, with sharp resonance peaks in the transmission profile. Brought closer and closer together, the number and sharpness of the peaks decrease, the spectrum smooths out, and the domain walls brought together have a

  4. A substantial and unexpected enhancement of motion perception in autism.

    PubMed

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Tadin, Duje; Schauder, Kimberly B; Cascio, Carissa J

    2013-05-08

    Atypical perceptual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented. In addition, growing evidence supports the hypothesis that an excitatory/inhibitory neurochemical imbalance might underlie ASD. Here we investigated putative behavioral consequences of the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in the context of visual motion perception. As stimulus size increases, typical observers exhibit marked impairments in perceiving motion of high-contrast stimuli. This result, termed "spatial suppression," is believed to reflect inhibitory motion-processing mechanisms. Motion processing is also affected by gain control, an inhibitory mechanism that underlies saturation of neural responses at high contrast. Motivated by these behavioral correlates of inhibitory function, we investigated motion perception in human children with ASD (n = 20) and typical development (n = 26). At high contrast, both groups exhibited similar impairments in motion perception with increasing stimulus size, revealing no apparent differences in spatial suppression. However, there was a substantial enhancement of motion perception in ASD: children with ASD exhibited a consistent twofold improvement in perceiving motion. Hypothesizing that this enhancement might indicate abnormal weakening of response gain control, we repeated our measurements at low contrast, where the effects of gain control should be negligible. At low contrast, we indeed found no group differences in motion discrimination thresholds. These low-contrast results, however, revealed weaker spatial suppression in ASD, suggesting the possibility that gain control abnormalities in ASD might have masked spatial suppression differences at high contrast. Overall, we report a pattern of motion perception abnormalities in ASD that includes substantial enhancements at high contrast and is consistent with an underlying excitatory/inhibitory imbalance.

  5. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  6. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  7. Characterization of the Test Section Walls at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Charles B.; Graves, Sharon S.

    2003-01-01

    The test section walls of the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are known to move under thermal and pressure loads. Videogrammetry was used to measure wall motion during the summer of 2002. In addition, a laser distancemeter was used to measure the relative distance between the test section walls at a single point. Distancemeter and videogrammetry results were consistent. Data were analyzed as a function of temperature and pressure to determine their effects on wall motion. Data were collected between 50 and 100 F, 0 and 0.315 Mach, and dynamic pressures of 0 and 120 psf. The overall motion of each wall was found to be less than 0.25 in. and less than facility personnel anticipated. The results show how motion depends on the temperature and pressure inside the test section as well is the position of the boundary layer vane. The repeatability of the measurements was +/-0.06 in. This report describes the methods used to record the motion of the test section walls and the results of the data analysis. Future facility plans include the development of a suitable wall restraint system and the determination of the effects of the wall motion on tunnel calibration.

  8. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  9. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  10. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  11. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  12. Inferior wall diverticulum of left ventricle coexisting with mental retardation and atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Henry; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jiao; Tong, Yiru; Shanewise, Jack S

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of congenital inferior wall left ventricular diverticulum (LVD), atrial septal defect and mental retardation detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. The combination of three features strongly suggests that genetic factors play important role in the pathogenesis of the disorder. Most LVDs are asymptomatic. Echocardiographers and cardiac anesthesiologists should be aware of this anomaly, and include it in the differential diagnosis of abnormally shaped ventricular wall and seek other congenital abnormalities if LVD is detected.

  13. Origin of stationary domain wall enhanced ferroelectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-03-01

    Ferroelectrics usually adopt a multidomain state with domain walls separating domains with polarization axes oriented differently. It has long been recognized that domain walls can dramatically impact the properties of ferroelectric materials. The enhancement of low-field susceptibility/permittivity under subswitching conditions is usually attributed to reversible domain wall vibration. Recent experiments highlight the stationary domain wall contribution to the dielectric susceptibility irrespective of any lateral displacements or deformations of the wall. We study the effects of domain walls on the low-field permittivity of PbTiO3 with density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The static dielectric constant is calculated as a function of increasing domain wall density and temperature. We find an increase of dielectric permittivity with increasing domain wall density, which is expected to occur at a low driving field where the lateral motion of domain walls is forbidden. Real-space decomposition of the dielectric response reveals that frustrated dipoles within the finite width of the domain walls are responsible for the enhanced low-field permittivity. We explain the 100 % enhancement of the dielectric susceptibility form domain walls, which arises from the softer potential wells within them.

  14. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  15. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  16. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  17. Dual motion valve with single motion input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A dual motion valve includes two dual motion valve assemblies with a rotary input which allows the benefits of applying both rotary and axial motion to a rotary sealing element with a plurality of ports. The motion of the rotary sealing element during actuation provides axial engagement of the rotary sealing element with a stationary valve plate which also has ports. Fluid passages are created through the valve when the ports of the rotary sealing element are aligned with the ports of the stationary valve plate. Alignment is achieved through rotation of the rotary sealing element with respect to the stationary valve plate. The fluid passages provide direct paths which minimize fluid turbulence created in the fluid as it passes through the valve.

  18. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  19. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  20. Abnormal eye movements in three types of chorea.

    PubMed

    Attoni, Tiago; Beato, Rogério; Pinto, Serge; Cardoso, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Chorea is an abnormal movement characterized by a continuous flow of random muscle contractions. This phenomenon has several causes, such as infectious and degenerative processes. Chorea results from basal ganglia dysfunction. As the control of the eye movements is related to the basal ganglia, it is expected, therefore, that is altered in diseases related to chorea. Sydenham's chorea, Huntington's disease and neuroacanthocytosis are described in this review as basal ganglia illnesses that can present with abnormal eye movements. Ocular changes resulting from dysfunction of the basal ganglia are apparent in saccade tasks, slow pursuit, setting a target and anti-saccade tasks. The purpose of this article is to review the main characteristics of eye motion in these three forms of chorea.

  1. Saliency-based abnormal event detection in crowded scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanjiao; Liu, Yunxiang; Zhang, Qing; Yi, Yugen; Li, Wenju

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal event detection plays a critical role for intelligent video surveillance, and detection in crowded scenes is a challenging but more practical task. We present an abnormal event detection method for crowded video. Region-wise modeling is proposed to address the inconsistent detected motion of the same object due to different depths of field. Comparing to traditional block-wise modeling, the region-wise method not only can reduce heavily the number of models to be built but also can enrich the samples for training the normal events model. In order to reduce the computational burden and make the region-based anomaly detection feasible, a saliency detection technique is adopted in this paper. By identifying the salient parts of the image sequences, the irrelevant blocks are ignored, which removes the disturbance and improves the detection performance further. Experiments on the benchmark dataset and comparisons with the state-of-the-art algorithms validate the advantages of the proposed method.

  2. Broadband boundary effects on Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Raizen, Mark G.

    2015-12-01

    Brownian motion of particles in confined fluids is important for many applications, yet the effects of the boundary over a wide range of time scales are still not well understood. We report high-bandwidth, comprehensive measurements of Brownian motion of an optically trapped micrometer-sized silica sphere in water near an approximately flat wall. At short distances we observe anisotropic Brownian motion with respect to the wall. We find that surface confinement not only occurs in the long time scale diffusive regime but also in the short time scale ballistic regime, and the velocity autocorrelation function of the Brownian particle decays faster than that of a particle in bulk fluid. Furthermore, at low frequencies the thermal force loses its color due to the reflected flow from the no-slip boundary. The power spectrum of the thermal force on the particle near a no-slip boundary becomes flat at low frequencies. This detailed understanding of boundary effects on Brownian motion opens a door to developing a 3D microscope using particles as remote sensors.

  3. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  4. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  5. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  6. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  7. Effect of active control on optimal structures in wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, BingQing; Xu, ChunXiao; Huang, WeiXi; Cui, GuiXiang

    2013-02-01

    The effect of active control imposed at the wall on optimal structures in wall turbulence is studied by using a linear transient growth model. When the detection plane of the control is located in the buffer layer, the influence of the control on the transient growth of large scale motion becomes negligible as Reynolds number increases. However, if the control signal is detected at the plane located in the logarithm region, the transient growth at large scale can be greatly suppressed. New peak values of transient growth resulting from the strong blowing and suction on the wall exist. The study indicates that a proper selection of control imposed on the wall can suppress the large scale motion in the logarithmic region.

  8. Why is placentation abnormal in preeclampsia?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The causes of preeclampsia remain one of the great medical mysteries of our time. This syndrome is thought to occur in two stages with abnormal placentation leading to a maternal inflammatory response. Specific regions of the placenta have distinct pathological features. During normal pregnancy, cytotrophoblasts emigrate from the chorionic villi and invade the uterus, reaching the inner third of the myometrium. This unusual process is made even more exceptional by the fact that the placental cells are hemi-allogeneic, co-expressing maternal and paternal genomes. Within the uterine wall, cytotrophoblasts deeply invade the spiral arteries. Cytotrophoblasts migrate up these vessels and replace, in a retrograde fashion, the maternal endothelial lining. They also insert themselves amongst the smooth muscle cells that form the tunica media. As a result, the spiral arteries attain the physiological properties that are required to adequately perfuse the placenta. In comparison, invasion of the venous side of the uterine circulation is minimal, sufficient to enable venous return. In preeclampsia, cytotrophoblast invasion of the interstitial uterine compartment is frequently shallow, although not consistently so. In many locations, spiral artery invasion is incomplete. There are many fewer endovascular cytotrophoblasts and some vessels retain portions of their endothelial lining with relatively intact muscular coats while others are not modified. Work from our group showed that these defects mirror deficits in the differentiation program that enables cytotrophoblast invasion of the uterine wall. During normal pregnancy, invasion is accompanied by downregulation of epithelial-like molecules that are indicative of their ectodermal origin and upregulation of numerous receptors and ligands that are typically expressed by endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. For example, the expression of epithelial-cadherin, the cell-cell adhesion molecule that many ectodermal

  9. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  10. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  11. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  12. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  13. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M; Hu, W-F; Farutin, A; Rafaï, S; Lai, M-C; Peyla, P; Misbah, C

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  14. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  15. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  16. Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo; Fortin, J.-Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier E{sub B} to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find E{sub B}=0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

  17. Electric field induced domain-wall dynamics: Depinning and chirality switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Dusad, Ritika; Hoffman, Silas; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Alzate, Juan G.; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically study the equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and magnetic wires, in which an electric field controls the magnetic anisotropy through spin-orbit coupling. By performing micromagnetic simulations, we construct a rich phase diagram and find that, in particular, the equilibrium magnetic textures can be tuned between Néel and Bloch domain walls in an elliptical MTJ. Furthermore, we develop a phenomenological model of a quasi-one-dimensional domain wall confined by a parabolic potential and show that, near the Néel-to-Bloch-wall transition, a pulsed electric field induces precessional domain-wall motion which can be used to reverse the chirality of a Néel wall and even depin it. This domain-wall motion controlled by electric fields, in lieu of applied current, may provide a model for ultralow-power domain-wall memory and logic devices.

  18. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  19. Motion through syntactic frames.

    PubMed

    Feist, Michele I

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of Talmy's (1985, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the fact of motion in motion verbs, while a second class, S-languages, tends to encode manner. In the experimental literature, it was reasoned that speakers may be expected to extend novel verbs in accordance with the lexicalization patterns of their native languages. However, the results regarding this prediction are mixed. In this paper, I examine the interplay between the meaning encoded in the motion verb itself and the meaning encoded in the motion description construction, offering a Gricean explanation for co-occurrence patterns and, by extension, for the mixed results. I then explore the implications of this argument for research on possible language effects on thought in this domain.

  20. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  1. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  2. Airway wall stiffening increases peak wall shear stress: a fluid-structure interaction study in rigid and compliant airways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-05-01

    The airflow characteristics in a computed tomography (CT) based human airway bifurcation model with rigid and compliant walls are investigated numerically. An in-house three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method is applied to simulate the flow at different Reynolds numbers and airway wall stiffness. As the Reynolds number increases, the airway wall deformation increases and the secondary flow becomes more prominent. It is found that the peak wall shear stress on the rigid airway wall can be five times stronger than that on the compliant airway wall. When adding tethering forces to the model, we find that these forces, which produce larger airway deformation than without tethering, lead to more skewed velocity profiles in the lower branches and further reduced wall shear stresses via a larger airway lumen. This implies that pathologic changes in the lung such as fibrosis or remodeling of the airway wall-both of which can serve to restrain airway wall motion-have the potential to increase wall shear stress and thus can form a positive feed-back loop for the development of altered flow profiles and airway remodeling. These observations are particularly interesting as we try to understand flow and structural changes seen in, for instance, asthma, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

  3. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  4. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  6. Possible Genetic Origin of Limb-Body Wall Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gajzer, David C.; Hirzel, Alicia Cristina; Saigal, Gaurav; Rojas, Claudia Patricia; Rodriguez, Maria Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) is characterized by multiple severe congenital malformations including an abdominal and/or thoracic wall defect covered by amnion, a short or absent umbilical cord with the placenta almost attached to the anterior fetal wall, intestinal malrotation, scoliosis, and lower extremity anomalies. There is no consensus about the etiology of LBWC and many cases with abnormal facial cleft do not meet the requirements for the true complex. We describe a series of four patients with LBWC and other malformations in an attempt to explain their etiology. There are several reports of fetuses with LBWC and absent gallbladder and one of our patients also had polysplenia. Absent gallbladder and polysplenia are associated with laterality genes including HOX, bFGF, transforming growth factor beta/activins/BMP4, WNT 1–8, and SHH. We postulate that this severe malformation may be due to abnormal genes involved in laterality and caudal development. PMID:26111189

  7. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  8. Measurement of visual motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the measurement of visual motion and the use of relative movement to locate the boundaries of physical objects in the environment. It investigates the nature of the computations that are necessary to perform this analysis by any vision system, biological or artificial. Contents: Introduction. Background. Computation of the Velocity Field. An Algorithm to Compute the Velocity Field. The Computation of Motion Discontinuities. Perceptual Studies of Motion Measurement. The Psychophysics of Discontinuity Detection. Neurophysiological Studies of Motion. Summary and Conclusions. References. Author and Subject Indexes.

  9. 1980 Volvo award in clinical sciences. Assessment of patients with low-back pain by biplanar radiographic measurement of intervertebral motion.

    PubMed

    Stokes, I A; Wilder, D G; Frymoyer, J W; Pope, M H

    1981-01-01

    Abnormalities of intervertebral joint motion including hypermobility, reduced mobility, torsional abnormality, and displacement of the center of rotation have been associated with degenerative change. However, measurement of these signs in plane X-ray films is handicapped by the three-dimensional motion and geometry of the spine. This study aimed to relate three-dimensional motion of the joints to their pathological state. We have used biplanar radiography to measure intervertebral motion during voluntary movements by patients with low back pain. Primary (or intentional) and coupled motions were measured by a refined technique, along with disc shear and facet joint motion. Abnormalities were found, especially in the "coupled" motions which were related to narrowed disc space, and to proximity to previous fusions. There was asymmetry of motion specific to joints with herniated nucleus pulposus.

  10. Spin Hall torque magnetometry of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Martinez, Eduardo; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Bauer, Uwe; Ahn, Sung-Min; Agrawal, Parnika; Bono, David C.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2014-11-01

    Current-induced domain wall motion in the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is experimentally and theoretically investigated in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayers. The angular dependence of the current-induced torque and the magnetization structure of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls are described and quantified simultaneously in the presence of in-plane fields. We show that the DMI strength depends strongly on the heavy metal, varying by a factor of 20 between Ta and Pa, and that strong DMI leads to wall distortions not seen in conventional materials. These findings provide essential insights for understanding and exploiting chiral magnetism for emerging spintronics applications.

  11. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  12. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  13. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  14. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  15. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  16. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  17. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  18. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  19. On the theory of compliant wall drag reduction in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed which can explain how the motion of a compliant wall reduces turbulent skin friction drag. Available experimental evidence at low speeds has been used to infer that a compliant surface selectively removes energy from the upper frequency range of the energy containing eddies and through resulting surface motions can produce locally negative Reynolds stresses at the wall. The theory establishes a preliminary amplitude and frequency criterion as the basis for designing effective drag reducing compliant surfaces.

  20. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  1. Thermal stability of a magnetic domain wall in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, S.; Ieda, J.; Ohno, H.

    2015-06-01

    We study the thermal stability of a magnetic domain wall pinned in nanowires with various widths and thicknesses made of Co/Ni multilayers and analyze the effective volume that governs the thermal stability. We find that, above a critical wire width, the domain wall depinning is initiated by a subvolume excitation and that the critical width is dependent on the wire thickness. The obtained findings are supported by the distribution of critical current density for domain wall depinning and are qualitatively described by an analytical model in which the balance between the Zeeman energy and domain wall elastic energy is considered. We also show a different behavior between the device size dependence of the thermal stability and that of critical current, leading to an enhancement of domain wall motion efficiency with decreasing the device size.

  2. Dynamics of magnetic domain walls under their own inertia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2010-12-24

    The motion of magnetic domain walls induced by spin-polarized current has considerable potential for use in magnetic memory and logic devices. Key to the success of these devices is the precise positioning of individual domain walls along magnetic nanowires, using current pulses. We show that domain walls move surprisingly long distances of several micrometers and relax over several tens of nanoseconds, under their own inertia, when the current stimulus is removed. We also show that the net distance traveled by the domain wall is exactly proportional to the current pulse length because of the lag derived from its acceleration at the onset of the pulse. Thus, independent of its inertia, a domain wall can be accurately positioned using properly timed current pulses.

  3. Ultrasound diagnosis of fetal renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tiran; Sairam, Shanthi; Kumarasiri, Shanya

    2014-04-01

    Development of the urogenital system in humans is a complex process; consequently, renal anomalies are among the most common congenital anomalies. The fetal urinary tract can be visualised ultrasonically from 11 weeks onwards, allowing recognition of megacystis at 11-14 weeks, which warrants comprehensive risk assessment of possible underlying chromosomal aneuploidy or obstructive uropathy. A mid-trimester anomaly scan enables detection of most renal anomalies with higher sensitivity. Bilateral renal agenesis can be confirmed ultrasonically, with empty renal fossae and absent bladder filling, along with severe oligohydramnios or anhydramnios. Dysplastic kidneys are recognised as they appear large, hyperechoic, and with or without cystic spaces, which occurs within the renal cortex. Presence of dilated ureters without obvious dilatation of the collecting system needs careful examination of the upper urinary tract to exclude duplex kidney system. Sonographically, it is also possible to differentiate between infantile type and adult type of polycystic kidney diseases, which are usually single gene disorders. Upper urinary tract dilatation is one of the most common abnormalities diagnosed prenatally. It is usually caused by transient urine flow impairment at the level of the pelvi-ureteric junction and vesico-ureteric junction, which improves with time in most cases. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction is mainly caused by posterior urethral valves and urethral atresia. Thick bladder walls and a dilated posterior urethra (keyhole sign) are suggestive of posterior urethral valves. Prenatal ultrasounds cannot be used confidently to assess renal function. Liquor volume and echogenicity of renal parenchyma, however, can be used as a guide to indirectly assess the underlying renal reserve. Renal tract anomalies may be isolated but can also be associated with other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a thorough examination of the other systems is mandatory to exclude possible

  4. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  5. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  6. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  7. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of…

  8. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  9. Naive Conceptions of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Two experiments were conducted to characterize the system of beliefs that make up the naive impetus theory of motion and to determine what effects physics instruction has on students' conceptions of motion. Thirteen college students were asked to solve several quantitative problems and were interviewed about their answers in the first experiment.…

  10. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  11. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  12. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, Paul; Lodge, Martin; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-03-02

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the measurement of EF. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimation of the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction is shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  13. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  14. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  15. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. Dynamics of a Sliding Ladder Leaning against a Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, J. B.; Simeão Carvalho, P.; Mota, M. F.; Quintas, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study is about the dynamics of a sliding ladder leaning against a vertical wall. The results are understood by considering the motion divided in two parts: (i) for 0 = t = t[subscript s] with one degree of freedom, and (ii) for t > t[subscript s] with two degrees of freedom, where the separation is determined by the instance t[subscript…

  17. MIR wall surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    1998-08-01

    This report addresses the problem of determining the layer thickness of a wall probed with a monostatic, hand-held implementation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR). Our goal is to locate the layers of the wall, and measure its overall thickness. The physical constraints require the device to be held fixed or swept rapidly over the wall. Thus an insufficient amount of backscattered data are collected to use diffraction tomographic [3] techniques to form images. The problem is therefore one of determining the wall layers from a set of time series reflection data. We develop two channel signal processing algorithms to determine the location of the layers of a wall, using as inputs the time series returned from the wall and the incident pulse. We study the problem using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computer code to simulate the electromagnetic propagation within and scattering from a wall probed with five pulses. We use the results to develop and test signal processing procedures for locating the individual layers. We study two classes of algorithms: a deconvolution approach to determine a layered impulse response, and a correlation approach. After testing the algorithms on the FDTD results, we down-select to a suitable method.

  18. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  19. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Background— Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Methods and Results— Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Conclusions— Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. PMID

  20. Visualizing motion in video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lisa M.; Crayne, Susan

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present a visualization system and method for measuring, inspecting and analyzing motion in video. Starting from a simple motion video, the system creates a still image representation which we call a digital strobe photograph. Similar to visualization techniques used in conventional film photography to capture high-speed motion using strobe lamps or very fast shutters, and to capture time-lapse motion where the shutter is left open, this methodology creates a single image showing the motion of one or a small number of objects over time. Based on digital background subtraction, we assume that the background is stationary or at most slowing changing and that the camera position is fixed. The method is capable of displaying the motion based on a parameter indicating the time step between successive movements. It can also overcome problems of visualizing movement that is obscured by previous movements. The method is used in an educational software tool for children to measure and analyze various motions. Examples are given using simple physical objects such as balls and pendulums, astronomical events such as the path of the stars around the north pole at night, or the different types of locomotion used by snakes.

  1. Analysis of Dicke Narrowing in Wall-Coated and Buffer-Gas-Filled Atomic Storage Cells,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    unshifted frequency. For the various reasons outlined the " particle in a box " analysis of motional narrowing in bufferless, wall-coated cells is...buffer gas or a wall, and consequently, one should not need two apparently distinct formalisms, buffer gas and particle in a box , to describe spectral line

  2. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-06-11

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  3. Motion Recognition and Modifying Motion Generation for Imitation Robot Based on Motion Knowledge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzawa, Yuki; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    A knowledge-based approach to imitation learning of motion generation for humanoid robots and an imitative motion generation system based on motion knowledge learning and modification are described. The system has three parts: recognizing, learning, and modifying parts. The first part recognizes an instructed motion distinguishing it from the motion knowledge database by the continuous hidden markov model. When the motion is recognized as being unfamiliar, the second part learns it using locally weighted regression and acquires a knowledge of the motion. When a robot recognizes the instructed motion as familiar or judges that its acquired knowledge is applicable to the motion generation, the third part imitates the instructed motion by modifying a learned motion. This paper reports some performance results: the motion imitation of several radio gymnastics motions.

  4. Inflation and cyclotron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the Universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that slow roll conditions on the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field satisfying unconventional dispersion relations.

  5. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-08-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  6. Convex hull of a Brownian motion in confinement.

    PubMed

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of confinement on the mean perimeter of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory. We use a minimal model where an infinite reflecting wall confines the walk to one side. We show that the mean perimeter displays a surprising minimum with respect to the starting distance to the wall and exhibits a nonanalyticity for small distances. In addition, the mean span of the trajectory in a fixed direction θ∈]0,π/2[, which can be shown to yield the mean perimeter by integration over θ, presents these same two characteristics. This is in striking contrast to the one-dimensional case, where the mean span is an increasing analytical function. The nonmonotonicity in the two-dimensional case originates from the competition between two antagonistic effects due to the presence of the wall: reduction of the space accessible to the Brownian motion and effective repulsion.

  7. Convex hull of a Brownian motion in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of confinement on the mean perimeter of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory. We use a minimal model where an infinite reflecting wall confines the walk to one side. We show that the mean perimeter displays a surprising minimum with respect to the starting distance to the wall and exhibits a nonanalyticity for small distances. In addition, the mean span of the trajectory in a fixed direction θ ∈]0 ,π /2 [ , which can be shown to yield the mean perimeter by integration over θ , presents these same two characteristics. This is in striking contrast to the one-dimensional case, where the mean span is an increasing analytical function. The nonmonotonicity in the two-dimensional case originates from the competition between two antagonistic effects due to the presence of the wall: reduction of the space accessible to the Brownian motion and effective repulsion.

  8. OSCILLATING LIGHT WALL ABOVE A SUNSPOT LIGHT BRIDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Fayu; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2015-05-10

    With the high tempo-spatial Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph 1330 Å images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a light wall. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope Hα and the Solar Dynamics Observatory 171 and 131 Å images are also used to study the light-wall properties. In 1330, 171, and 131 Å, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the Hα line, the wall-top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 Å and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s{sup −1}, and 3.9 minutes, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the light wall as the leakage of p-modes from below the photosphere. The constant brightness enhancement of the wall top implies the existence of some kind of atmospheric heating, e.g., via the persistent small-scale reconnection or the magneto-acoustic waves. In another series of 1330 Å images, we find that the wall top in the upward motion phase is significantly brighter than in the downward phase. This kind of oscillation may be powered by the energy released due to intermittent impulsive magnetic reconnection.

  9. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  10. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown.

  11. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  12. Periodic oscillation of a colloidal disk near a wall in an optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhengdong; Mason, Thomas G; Chaikin, P M

    2003-11-01

    Colloidal disks can be stably trapped using optical tweezers. However, when the tweezers press the disk against an opposing wall, we observe an instability leading to periodic motion which we model using coupled nonlinear equations. The resulting "switchback" oscillation involves combined orientational and translational motion of the disk. This observation reveals a new degree of freedom in colloidal architectures, that is, the ability to drive translational motion from a static light field energy source.

  13. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  14. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  15. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  16. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  17. Motion Sickness: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... soon as the motion stops. The more you travel, the more easily you'll adjust to being ... at least 30 to 60 minutes before you travel. Expect drowsiness as a side effect. Consider scopolamine ( ...

  18. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  19. Motion Alters Color Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Wook; Kang, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Chromatic induction compellingly demonstrates that chromatic context as well as spectral lights reflected from an object determines its color appearance. Here, we show that when one colored object moves around an identical stationary object, the perceived saturation of the stationary object decreases dramatically whereas the saturation of the moving object increases. These color appearance shifts in the opposite directions suggest that normalization induced by the object’s motion may mediate the shift in color appearance. We ruled out other plausible alternatives such as local adaptation, attention, and transient neural responses that could explain the color shift without assuming interaction between color and motion processing. These results demonstrate that the motion of an object affects both its own color appearance and the color appearance of a nearby object, suggesting a tight coupling between color and motion processing. PMID:27824098

  20. Explanations of Superluminal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, P. A. G.

    Recent developments in models of core-jet sources with apparent superluminal motions are reviewed. Emphasis is given to new versions of the so-called "Christmas tree" model and the relativistic beaming model.

  1. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  2. Modulation of energetic coherent motions by large-scale topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wing; Hamed, Ali M.; Troolin, Dan; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The distinctive characteristics and dynamics of the large-scale coherent motions induced over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were explored experimentally with time-resolved volumetric PIV, and selected wall-normal high-resolution stereo PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall consists of a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The ?ow was characterized at Re 8000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls are such that the amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio is a/ δ99 0.1, which resemble geophysical-like topography. Insight on the dynamics of the coherent motions, Reynolds stress and spatial interaction of sweep and ejection events will be discussed in terms of the wall topography modulation.

  3. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  4. Abnormal band of lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian; Goldblatt, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a case of an "abnormal band" of the lateral meniscus, extending from the posterior horn of the true lateral meniscus to its antero-mid portion, observed during arthroscopy in a 45-year-old white man of Bosnian descent. The periphery of the aberrant lateral meniscus was freely mobile, and not connected to the underlying true lateral meniscus. Preoperative physical examination findings were consistent with medial-sided meniscal pathology only; however, evidence of an anomalous lateral meniscus was seen with magnetic resonance imaging. This anatomical pattern is rare and has been reported in the literature only once, in a report of 2 Asian patients. This article illustrates an anatomical variant of the lateral meniscus in a non-Asian patient with a clinical presentation that has not been previously described. In addition to the case report, the article presents a comprehensive review of the existing body of literature on anomalous lateral meniscus patterns. We believe that the definitions of the types of aberrant meniscus can be clarified to establish improved accuracy in reporting.

  5. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  6. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  7. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  8. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  9. Magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometer for the analysis of magnetic domain wall dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kataja, Mikko; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2011-10-01

    Domain wall dynamics in thin magnetic films with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy is studied using a novel magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometery method. The method allows for measurements of domain wall motion under ac field excitation and the analysis of dynamic modes as a function of driving frequency and magnetic field amplitude. Domain wall dynamics in the perpendicular anisotropy system, a Co/Pt multilayer, is characterized by thermally activated creep motion. For this dynamic mode, a polydispersivity exponent of β = 0.50 ± 0.03 is derived at small excitation energy, which is in excellent agreement with theoretical models. The dynamics of the other system, a Co wire with transverse uniaxial anisotropy, is dominated by viscous slide motion in a regular magnetic stripe pattern. Analytical expressions are derived for this magnetic configuration and by using these expressions, accurate values for the depinning field and the domain wall mobility are extracted from the susceptibility measurements.

  10. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  11. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  12. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  13. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya domain walls in magnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Tretiakov, Oleg A.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytic study of domain-wall statics and dynamics in ferromagnetic nanotubes with spin-orbit-induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Even at the level of statics, dramatic effects arise from the interplay of space curvature and DMI: the domains become chirally twisted, leading to more compact domain walls. The dynamics of these chiral structures exhibits several interesting features. Under weak applied currents, they propagate without distortion. The dynamical response is further enriched by the application of an external magnetic field: the domain-wall velocity becomes chirality dependent and can be significantly increased by varying the DMI. These characteristics allow for enhanced control of domain-wall motion in nanotubes with DMI, increasing their potential as information carriers in future logic and storage devices.

  14. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    forms of ordered phases such as antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who happily agreed to contribute their latest results to this special issue, and the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. In such a fast-moving field it is not possible to give a definitive account, and this special issue can be no more than a snapshot of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Nevertheless, we hope that this collection of papers is a useful resource for experienced workers in the field, forms a useful introduction to researchers early in their careers and inspires others in related areas of nanotechnology to enter into the study of domain dynamics in nanostructures. Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures contents Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motionA Yamaguchi, A Hirohata, T Ono and H Miyajima Magnetization reversal in magnetic nanostripes via Bloch wall formation M Zeisberger and R Mattheis Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowiresMi-Young Im, Lars Bocklage, Guido Meier and Peter Fischer Domain wall propagation in meso- and nanoscale ferroelectrics R G P McQuaid, M McMillen, L-W Chang, A Gruverman and J M Gregg Transverse and vortex domain wall structure in magnetic nanowires with uniaxial in-plane anisotropyM T Bryan, S Bance, J Dean, T Schrefl and D A Allwood The stochastic nature of the domain wall motion along high perpendicular anisotropy strips with surface roughness Eduardo Martinez Temperature-dependent dynamics of stochastic domain-wall depinning in nanowiresClemens Wuth, Peter Lendecke and Guido Meier Controlled pinning and depinning of domain walls in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropyTheo Gerhardt, André Drews and Guido Meier The interaction of transverse domain wallsBenjamin Krüger The increase of the

  15. Yugoslav strong motion network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Vladimir

    1985-04-01

    Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response data used by the structural engineering community in developing earthquake resistant design. Instruments, accelerographs SMA-1 and seismoscopes WM-1, were installed in free-field stations and on structures (high-rise buildings, dams, bridges, etc.). A total number of 176 accelerographs and 137 seismoscopes have been installed and are operating in Yugoslavia. The strong-motion programme in Yugoslavia consists of five subactivities: network design, network operation, data processing, network management and research as well as application. All these activities are under the responsibility of IZIIS in cooperation with the Yugoslav Association of Seismology. By 1975 in the realisation of this project participated the CALTECH as cooperative institution in the joint American-Yugoslav cooperative project. The results obtained which are presented in this paper, and their application in the aseismic design justify the necessity for the existence of such a network in Yugoslavia.

  16. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  17. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  18. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  19. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  20. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  1. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual analysis was possible 67% of the time and with computer analysis 95% of the time. Ninety four per cent of abnormalities in frequency were detected by visual analysis and 93.7% by computer analysis. Abnormalities involving a loss of coupling, however, were not recognised by transcutaneous recordings. Transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity assessed by computer analysis can usually recognise normal gastric electrical activity and tachygastria. Current techniques, however, are unable to detect abnormalities in electrical coupling. PMID:1864531

  2. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  3. Normal and abnormal US findings at the mastectomy site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Park, Jeong Mi

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of a mastectomy site is more effective with ultrasonography (US) than with either mammography or chest computed tomography because abnormalities are usually small and close to the skin surface. US does not involve the use of ionizing radiation and has a multiplanar scanning capability. The technique is readily available and inexpensive, and it allows real-time monitoring of needle tip placement during biopsy of a lesion. Normal US anatomy of the chest wall after mastectomy usually consists of four layers: skin, subcutaneous fat, pectoral muscles, and rib and intercostal muscle. The axilla is changed in appearance after lymph node dissection, but it remains the same in patients who have undergone simple mastectomy. US can accurately depict benign and malignant conditions in the mastectomy site, including fluid collection, fibrosis, local recurrent tumor, and metastatic lymphadenopathy, and can enable accurate diagnosis based on findings at fine needle aspiration biopsy.

  4. Myocardial wall thickening from gated magnetic resonance images using Laplace's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, M.; Ramesh, A.; Kavanagh, P.; Gerlach, J.; Germano, G.; Berman, D. S.; Slomka, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our work is to present a robust 3D automated method for measuring regional myocardial thickening using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on Laplace's equation. Multiple slices of the myocardium in short-axis orientation at end-diastolic and end-systolic phases were considered for this analysis. Automatically assigned 3D epicardial and endocardial boundaries were fitted to short-axis and long axis slices corrected for breathold related misregistration, and final boundaries were edited by a cardiologist if required. Myocardial thickness was quantified at the two cardiac phases by computing the distances between the myocardial boundaries over the entire volume using Laplace's equation. The distance between the surfaces was found by computing normalized gradients that form a vector field. The vector fields represent tangent vectors along field lines connecting both boundaries. 3D thickening measurements were transformed into polar map representation and 17-segment model (American Heart Association) regional thickening values were derived. The thickening results were then compared with standard 17-segment 6-point visual scoring of wall motion/wall thickening (0=normal; 5=greatest abnormality) performed by a consensus of two experienced imaging cardiologists. Preliminary results on eight subjects indicated a strong negative correlation (r=-0.8, p<0.0001) between the average thickening obtained using Laplace and the summed segmental visual scores. Additionally, quantitative ejection fraction measurements also correlated well with average thickening scores (r=0.72, p<0.0001). For segmental analysis, we obtained an overall correlation of -0.55 (p<0.0001) with higher agreement along the mid and apical regions (r=-0.6). In conclusion 3D Laplace transform can be used to quantify myocardial thickening in 3D.

  5. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  6. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  7. Electrophoretic motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhemin; Gao, Yandong; Li, Dongqing

    2009-03-01

    The induced-charge electrophoretic (ICEP) motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel is numerically studied in this paper. A complete 3-D multi-physics model is set up to simulate the transient ICEP motion of spherical ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel. The study shows that a non-uniform distribution of induced surface charge occurs when an ideally polarizable particle is immersed in an externally applied electric field, resulting in a varying slipping (EOF) velocity along the particle's surface and hence producing micro vortexes in the liquid. The numerical results verify that the steady-state ICEP velocity of an ideally polarizable particle does not differ from the electrophoretic velocity of a non-conducting particle, although the flow field near the particle does. A strong wall-repelling effect of ICEP is found when the polarizable particle is placed close to the channel wall. This is due to the lifting effect generated from the interaction between the induced micro vortexes and the channel wall and depends on the electric field and the particle size. The wall effects on ICEP motion can be used for focusing particles and for separation of particle by density.

  8. Brownian motion of graphene.

    PubMed

    Maragó, Onofrio M; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Saija, Rosalba; Privitera, Giulia; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Iatì, Maria Antonia; Calogero, Giuseppe; Jones, Philip H; Borghese, Ferdinando; Denti, Paolo; Nicolosi, Valeria; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2010-12-28

    Brownian motion is a manifestation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical mechanics. It regulates systems in physics, biology, chemistry, and finance. We use graphene as prototype material to unravel the consequences of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in two dimensions, by studying the Brownian motion of optically trapped graphene flakes. These orient orthogonal to the light polarization, due to the optical constants anisotropy. We explain the flake dynamics in the optical trap and measure force and torque constants from the correlation functions of the tracking signals, as well as comparing experiments with a full electromagnetic theory of optical trapping. The understanding of optical trapping of two-dimensional nanostructures gained through our Brownian motion analysis paves the way to light-controlled manipulation and all-optical sorting of biological membranes and anisotropic macromolecules.

  9. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  10. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  11. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  12. Detecting Abnormal Vehicular Dynamics at Intersections Based on an Unsupervised Learning Approach and a Stochastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; González-Barbosa, Jose-Joel; Garcia-Ramírez, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This investigation demonstrates an unsupervised approach for modeling traffic flow and detecting abnormal vehicle behaviors at intersections. In the first stage, the approach reveals and records the different states of the system. These states are the result of coding and grouping the historical motion of vehicles as long binary strings. In the second stage, using sequences of the recorded states, a stochastic graph model based on a Markovian approach is built. A behavior is labeled abnormal when current motion pattern cannot be recognized as any state of the system or a particular sequence of states cannot be parsed with the stochastic model. The approach is tested with several sequences of images acquired from a vehicular intersection where the traffic flow and duration used in connection with the traffic lights are continuously changed throughout the day. Finally, the low complexity and the flexibility of the approach make it reliable for use in real time systems. PMID:22163616

  13. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  14. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  15. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  16. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  17. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6–2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes. PMID:22127058

  18. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  19. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L

    2011-11-29

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6-2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes.

  20. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-16

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  1. Induced motion at texture-defined motion boundaries.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, A; Benton, C P; McOwan, P W

    1999-01-01

    When a static textured background is covered and uncovered by a moving bar of the same mean luminance we can clearly see the motion of the bar. Texture-defined motion provides an example of a naturally occurring second-order motion. Second-order motion sequences defeat standard spatio-temporal energy models of motion perception. It has been proposed that second-order stimuli are analysed by separate systems, operating in parallel with luminance-defined motion processing, which incorporate identifiable pre-processing stages that make second-order patterns visible to standard techniques. However, the proposal of multiple paths to motion analysis remains controversial. Here we describe the behaviour of a model that recovers both luminance-defined and an important class of texture-defined motion. The model also accounts for the induced motion that is seen in some texture-defined motion sequences. We measured the perceived direction and speed of both the contrast envelope and induced motion in the case of a contrast modulation of static noise textures. Significantly, the model predicts the perceived speed of the induced motion seen at second-order texture boundaries. The induced motion investigated here appears distinct from classical induced effects resulting from motion contrast or the movement of a reference frame. PMID:10643088

  2. Analytical and numerical investigation of structural response of compliant wall materials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Surface motion of compliant walls in drag reduction experiments was analyzed. Critical comparison was made between the dynamic motion of the structure and the postulated mechanism of drag reduction. The spectrum of surface motion indicated that membranes over deep cavities respond at low frequencies and large wavelengths. The membrane over a deep cavity is therefore found not to yield the desired response predicted by the postulated mechanism. The membrane over a thin air gap is found to act as a wavelength chopper, and analysis of the nonlinear response of that compliant surface indicated its possible suitability for compliant wall experiments. Periodic structures are found to lock in the desired wavelengths of motion, and it was shown that at least in Kramer's initial experiments they produced high frequency surface motions. Laminated structures are found to be very ineffective as compliant models, except when there is no bonding between the membrane and the backing. Computer programs developed for these analyses are documented.

  3. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  4. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  5. A School without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Len Tai

    1994-01-01

    During the summer, selected students of Hawaiian ancestry who have completed seventh or eighth grade participate in a boarding program with outdoor activities such as pulling taro, star gazing, and camping. The activities eliminate walls of doubt and fear and nurture self-confidence, creativity, personal growth, leadership, and cultural awareness.…

  6. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  7. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  8. Tailoring the chirality of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Ma, Tianping; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Kwon, Heeyoung; Won, Changyeon; Wu, Yizheng; Schmid, Andreas K

    2013-01-01

    Contacting ferromagnetic films with normal metals changes how magnetic textures respond to electric currents, enabling surprisingly fast domain wall motions and spin texture-dependent propagation direction. These effects are attributed to domain wall chirality induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at interfaces, which suggests rich possibilities to influence domain wall dynamics if the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted. Chiral magnetism was seen in several film structures on appropriately chosen substrates where interfacial spin-orbit-coupling effects are strong. Here we use real-space imaging to visualize chiral domain walls in cobalt/nickel multilayers in contact with platinum and iridium. We show that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted to stabilize either left-handed or right-handed Néel walls, or non-chiral Bloch walls by adjusting an interfacial spacer layer between the multilayers and the substrate. Our findings introduce domain wall chirality as a new degree of freedom, which may open up new opportunities for spintronics device designs.

  9. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  10. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  11. Congenital abnormalities of the ovine paramesonephric ducts.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C; Long, S E; Parkinson, T J

    1995-01-01

    A 15 month survey of ovine reproductive tracts was undertaken in slaughterhouses in southwest England. A total of 33506 tracts were examined; 23536 from lambs and 9970 from adults. In total, 3.4% of tracts were pregnant and 3.3% exhibited abnormalities. Twenty cases of uterus unicornis, six of uterus didelphys and 11 of segmental aplasia were encountered, such that partial aplasia of the paramesonephric ducts accounted for 3.3% of all abnormalities. Although developmental abnormalities of the ovine female genital system are relatively uncommon, a substantial proportion of these can be accounted for by development defects of the paramesonephric ducts.

  12. [Radionuclide studies of congenital kidney abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Vlakhov, N

    1984-06-01

    Using the potentialities of isotope nephrograms as a screening test a total of 4746 patients suspected of renal abnormalities were examined. The author established pathological deviations in 561 cases (11.8%). During further verification using scintigraphy unsuspected congenital renal abnormalities (aplasia, hypoplasia, dystopia, double kidney, horseshoe kidney, solitary cyst and polycystic renal disease) were found in 46 patients (8.2%). The diagnosis was confirmed at subsequent venous x-ray urography. A conclusion has been made as to the role of comprehensive nephrographic-scintigraphic examination in the diagnosis of congenital renal abnormalities.

  13. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A world in motion

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  15. Superluminal motion (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  16. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  17. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  18. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... review the actual safety data or call the patient’s obstetric provider for suggestions. Web-based information may be found at the websites www.Motherisk.org and www.Reprotox.org . PREVENTION Nonpharmacologic interventions to prevent or treat motion sickness include the ...

  19. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  20. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.