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Sample records for abnormally folded isoform

  1. Progesterone regulates the expression and activity of two mouse isoforms of the glycoprotein folding sensor UDP-Glc: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT).

    PubMed

    Prados, María B; Caramelo, Julio J; Miranda, Silvia E

    2013-12-01

    UDP-Glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a central component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein-folding quality control system, which prevents the exit of partially folded species. UGGT activity can be regulated by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER, a stimulus that triggers a complex signaling pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR) which is closely associated with inflammation and disease. In this work, we investigated the effect of progesterone (P4) on the expression and activity of UGGT in a mouse hybridoma. We detected the expression of two UGGT isoforms, UGGT1 and UGGT2, and demonstrated that both isoforms are active in these cells. Interestingly, the expression of each isoform is regulated by high physiological P4 concentrations. This work provides the first evidence of a hormonal regulation of UGGT isoform expression and activity, which might influence the glycoprotein quality control mechanism. These findings could contribute to the study of pathologies triggered by the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  2. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  3. Detection of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein associated with chronic wasting disease in the optic pathways of the brain and retina of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Spraker, T R; O'Rourke, K I; Gidlewski, T; Powers, J G; Greenlee, J J; Wild, M A

    2010-05-01

    Eyes and nuclei of the visual pathways in the brain were examined in 30 Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) representing 3 genotypes of the prion protein gene PRNP (codon 132: MM, ML, or LL). Tissues were examined for the presence of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein associated with chronic wasting disease (PrP(CWD)). Nuclei and axonal tracts from a single section of brain stem at the level of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve were scored for intensity and distribution of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and degree of spongiform degeneration. This obex scoring ranged from 0 (elk with no PrP(CWD) in the brain stem) to 10 (representing elk in terminal stage of disease). PrP(CWD) was detected in the retina of 16 of 18 (89%) elk with an obex score of > 7. PrP(CWD) was not detected in the retina of the 3 chronic wasting disease-negative elk and 9 elk with an obex score of < 6. PrP(CWD) was found in the nuclei of the visual pathways in the brain before it was found in the retina. Within the retina, PrP(CWD) was first found in the inner plexiform layer, followed by the outer plexiform layer. Intracytoplasmic accumulation of PrP(CWD) was found in a few neurons in the ganglion cell layer in the PRNP 132ML elk but was a prominent feature in the PRNP 132LL elk. Small aggregates of PrP(CWD) were present on the inner surface of the outer limiting membrane in PRNP 132LL elk but not in PRNP 132MM or 132ML elk. This study demonstrates PrP(CWD) accumulation in nuclei of the visual pathways of the brain, followed by PrP(CWD) in the retina.

  4. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-06

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5' and 3' untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5' untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3' untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels.

  5. A Novel Kleefstra Syndrome-associated Variant That Affects the Conserved TPLX Motif within the Ankyrin Repeat of EHMT1 Leads to Abnormal Protein Folding*

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Patrick R.; Tischer, Alexander; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Kemppainen, Jennifer L.; Sastry, Sujatha; Knight Johnson, Amy E.; Cousin, Margot A.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Oliver, Gavin; Misra, Vinod K.; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Lomberk, Gwen; Auton, Matthew; Urrutia, Raul; Klee, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS) (Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) no. 610253), also known as 9q34 deletion syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatic histone methyltransferase-1 (EHMT1). The clinical phenotype of KS includes moderate to severe intellectual disability with absent speech, hypotonia, brachycephaly, congenital heart defects, and dysmorphic facial features with hypertelorism, synophrys, macroglossia, protruding tongue, and prognathism. Only a few cases of de novo missense mutations in EHMT1 giving rise to KS have been described. However, some EHMT1 variants have been described in individuals presenting with autism spectrum disorder or mild intellectual disability, suggesting that the phenotypic spectrum resulting from EHMT1 alterations may be quite broad. In this report, we describe two unrelated patients with complex medical histories consistent with KS in whom next generation sequencing identified the same novel c.2426C>T (p.P809L) missense variant in EHMT1. To examine the functional significance of this novel variant, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type and p.P809L variant, which predicted that the latter would have a propensity to misfold, leading to abnormal histone mark binding. Recombinant EHMT1 p.P809L was also studied using far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy and intrinsic protein fluorescence. These functional studies confirmed the model-based hypotheses and provided evidence for protein misfolding and aberrant target recognition as the underlying pathogenic mechanism for this novel KS-associated variant. This is the first report to suggest that missense variants in EHMT1 that lead to protein misfolding and disrupted histone mark binding can lead to KS. PMID:28057753

  6. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  7. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  8. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  9. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  10. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  11. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  12. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  13. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  14. Regional heterogeneity of cellular prion protein isoforms in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Beringue, Vincent; Mallinson, Gary; Kaisar, Maria; Tayebi, Mourad; Sattar, Zahid; Jackson, Graham; Anstee, David; Collinge, John; Hawke, Simon

    2003-09-01

    Prion diseases are a group of invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders that include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep and goats, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. The infectious agent or prion is largely composed of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of a host encoded normal cellular protein (PrPc). The conversion of PrPc to PrPSc is a dynamic process and, for reasons that are not clear, the distribution of spongiform change and PrPSc deposition varies among prion strains. An obvious explanation for this would be that the transformation efficiency in any given brain region depends on favourable interactions between conformations of PrPc and the prion strain being propagated within it. However, identification of specific PrPc conformations has until now been hampered by a lack of suitable panels of antibodies that discriminate PrPc subspecies under native conditions. In this study, we show that monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant human prion protein folded into alpha or beta conformations exhibit striking heterogeneity in their specificity for truncations and glycoforms of mouse brain PrPc. We then show that some of these PrPc isoforms are expressed differentially in certain mouse brain regions. This suggests that variation in the expression of PrPc conformations in different brain regions may dictate the pattern of PrPSc deposition and vacuolation, characteristic for different prion strains.

  15. Constitutive nuclear localization of an alternatively spliced sirtuin-2 isoform.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes G M; VanLinden, Magali R; Lutter, Timo; Aasland, Rein; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-04-17

    Sirtuin-2 (SIRT2), the cytoplasmic member of the sirtuin family, has been implicated in the deacetylation of nuclear proteins. Although the enzyme has been reported to be located to the nucleus during G2/M phase, its spectrum of targets suggests functions in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. While a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mechanism has been proposed for SIRT2, recent studies have indicated the presence of a constitutively nuclear isoform. Here we report the identification of a novel splice variant (isoform 5) of SIRT2 that lacks a nuclear export signal and encodes a predominantly nuclear isoform. This novel isoform 5 fails to show deacetylase activity using several assays, both in vitro and in vivo, and we are led to conclude that this isoform is catalytically inactive. Nevertheless, it retains the ability to interact with p300, a known interaction partner. Moreover, changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon denaturation indicate that the protein is properly folded. These data, together with computational analyses, confirm the structural integrity of the catalytic domain. Our results suggest an activity-independent nuclear function of the novel isoform.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  18. Actin and myosin isoforms in aneural and malformed chick hearts.

    PubMed

    Kirby, M L; Shimizu, N; Gagnon, J; Toyofuku, T; Kennedy, J; Conrad, D C; Zak, R

    1990-09-01

    Although it is generally accepted that actin and myosin isoforms adapt to their functional requirements, the sequence of expression of these proteins in hearts developing abnormally is unknown. In the chick embryo it is possible to change various aspects of heart development without direct manipulation of the cardiovascular system, by removing various regions of the neural crest from early embryos. The neural crest provides both neural (sympathetic and parasympathetic) and ectomesenchymal components to the heart, and selective removal of various areas results in embryos with sympathetically aneural hearts, or persistent truncus arteriosus with or without parasympathetic denervation. Myosin isoform expression was studied in each of these types of hearts using an array of myosin antibodies specific for atrium, ventricle or the conduction system. Myosin expression in experimental hearts was found to follow the normal pattern of development using these antibodies. Actin expression was studied using cDNA probes for the 3' untranslated region of actin mRNA of the alpha-skeletal, alpha-cardiac and beta-actin isoforms. Using slot-blot hybridization analysis, the pattern of actin expression in atrium and ventricle was followed throughout the period of incubation in normal hearts. The pattern of actin expression was found to be abnormal in hearts which were sympathetically aneural and those which had persistent truncus arteriosus combined with parasympathetic denervation. ATPase activity was increased only in atria of hearts with persistent truncus arteriosus. It appears from these experiments that actin isoform expression is influenced in the chick heart by autonomic innervation.

  19. Akt isoforms in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease. PMID:25929188

  20. ICAM-1: isoforms and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Bullard, Daniel C; Barnum, Scott R

    2014-05-15

    ICAM-1 plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, immunological synapse formation, and numerous cellular immune responses. Although considered a single glycoprotein, there are multiple membrane-bound and soluble ICAM-1 isoforms that arise from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage during inflammatory responses. The function and expression of these isoforms on various cell types are poorly understood. In the generation of ICAM-1-deficient mice, two isoform-deficient ICAM-1 mutants were inadvertently produced as a result of alternative splicing. These mice, along with true ICAM-1-deficient mice and newly generated ICAM-1-transgenic mice, have provided the opportunity to begin examining the role of ICAM-1 isoforms (singly or in combination) in various disease settings. In this review, we highlight the sharply contrasting disease phenotypes using ICAM-1 isoform mutant mice. These studies demonstrate that ICAM-1 immunobiology is highly complex but that individual isoforms, aside from the full-length molecule, make significant contributions to disease development and pathogenesis.

  1. ICAM-1: Isoforms and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, immunological synapse formation and, numerous cellular immune responses. Although considered a single glycoprotein, there are multiple membrane bound and soluble ICAM-1 isoforms which arise from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage during inflammatory responses. The function and expression of these isoforms on various cell types is poorly understood. In the generation of ICAM-1-deficient mice, two isoform-deficient ICAM-1 mutants were inadvertently produced due to alternative splicing. These mice along with true ICAM-1-deficient mice and newly generated ICAM-1 transgenic mice have provided the opportunity to begin examining the role of ICAM-1 isoforms (singly or in combination) in various disease settings. In this review we highlight the sharply contrasting disease phenotypes using ICAM-1 isoform mutant mice. These studies demonstrate that ICAM-1 immunobiology is highly complex but that individual isoforms, aside from the full-length molecule, make significant contributions to disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:24795464

  2. AMPK beta subunits display isoform specific affinities for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Koay, Ann; Woodcroft, Ben; Petrie, Emma J; Yue, Helen; Emanuelle, Shane; Bieri, Michael; Bailey, Michael F; Hargreaves, Mark; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Ralph, Stuart; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R

    2010-08-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimer of catalytic (alpha) and regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits with at least two isoforms for each subunit. AMPK beta1 is widely expressed whilst AMPK beta2 is highly expressed in muscle and both beta isoforms contain a mid-molecule carbohydrate-binding module (beta-CBM). Here we show that beta2-CBM has evolved to contain a Thr insertion and increased affinity for glycogen mimetics with a preference for oligosaccharides containing a single alpha-1,6 branched residue. Deletion of Thr-101 reduces affinity for single alpha-1,6 branched oligosaccharides by 3-fold, while insertion of this residue into the equivalent position in the beta1-CBM sequence increases affinity by 3-fold, confirming the functional importance of this residue.

  3. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  4. Histamine H3-receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bakker, R A

    2004-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for HA as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in various brain functions, including emotion, cognition, and feeding. The recent cloning of the histamine H3 receptor allowed for the subsequent cloning of a variety of H3 receptor isoforms from different species as well as the H4 receptor. As a result a wide variety of H3-receptor isoforms are now known that display differential brain expression patterns and signalling properties. These recent discoveries are discussed in view of the growing interest of the H3 receptor as a target for the development of potential therapeutics.

  5. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-05-02

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40{sup -/-} deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40{sup -/-} mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may

  6. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  7. Enhanced expression of two discrete isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Min Young; Rhee, Harin; Kim, Il Young; Seong, Eun Young; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Lovett, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We recently reported on the enhanced expression of two isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in human renal transplantation delayed graft function. These consist of the conventional secreted, full length MMP-2 isoform (FL-MMP-2) and a novel intracellular N-Terminal Truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2) generated by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the MMP-2 first intron. Here we evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus on the in vitro and in vivo expression of the two MMP-2 isoforms. Methods We quantified the abundance of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts by qPCR in HK2 cells cultured in high glucose or 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE) and tested the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). The streptozotocin (STZ) murine model of Type I diabetes mellitus and renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy were used in this study. Results Both isoforms of MMP-2 in HK2 cells were upregulated by culture in high glucose or with HHE. PDTC treatment did not suppress high glucose-mediated FL-MMP-2 expression but potently inhibited NTT-MMP-2 expression. With STZ-treated mice, renal cortical expression of both isoforms was increased (FL-MMP-2, 1.8-fold; NTT-MMP-2, greater than 7-fold). Isoform-specific immunohistochemical staining revealed low, but detectable levels of the FL-MMP-2 isoform in controls, while NTT-MMP-2 was not detected. While there was a modest increase in tubular epithelial cell staining for FL-MMP-2 in STZ-treated mice, NTT-MMP-2 was intensely expressed in a basolateral pattern. FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoform expression as quantified by qPCR were both significantly elevated in renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy (12-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Conclusions The expression of both isoforms of MMP-2 was enhanced in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy and in human diabetic nephropathy. Selective MMP-2 isoform inhibition could offer a novel approach for

  8. Functional specificity of PMCA isoforms?

    PubMed

    Domi, Teuta; Di Leva, Francesca; Fedrizzi, Laura; Rimessi, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2007-03-01

    In mammals, four different genes encode four PMCA isoforms. PMCA1 and PMCA4 are expressed ubiquitously. PMCA2 and PMCA3 are expressed prevalently in the central nervous systems. More than 30 variants are generated by mechanisms of alternative splicing. The physiological meaning of the existence of such elevated number of isoforms is not clear, but it would be plausible to relate it to the cell-specific demands of Ca2+ homeostasis. To characterize functional specificity of PMCA variants we have investigated two aspects: the effects of the overexpression of the different PMCA variants on cellular Ca2+ handling and the existence of possible isoform-specific interactions with partner proteins using a yeast two-hybrid technique. The four basic PMCA isoforms were coexpressed in CHO cells together with the Ca2+-sensitive recombinant photoprotein aequorin. The effects of their overexpression on Ca2+ homeostasis were monitored in the living cells. They had revealed that the ubiquitous isoforms 1 and 4 are less effective in reducing the Ca2+ peaks generated by cell stimulation as compared to the neuron-specific isoforms 2 and 3. To establish whether these differences were related to different and new physiological regulators of the pump, the 90 N-terminal residues of PMCA2 and PMCA4 have been used as baits for the search of molecular partners. Screening of a human brain cDNA library with the PMCA4 bait specified the epsilon-isoform of protein 14-3-3, whereas no 14-3-3 epsilon clone was obtained with the PMCA2 bait. Overexpression of PMCA4/14-3-3 epsilon (but not of PMCA2/14-3-3 epsilon) in HeLa cells together with targeted aequorins showed that the ability of the cells to export Ca2+ was impaired. Thus, the interaction with 14-3-3 epsilon inhibited PMCA4 but not PMCA2. The role of PMCA2 has been further characterized by Ca2+ measurements in cells overexpressing different splicing variants. The results indicated that the combination of alternative splicing at two different

  9. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  10. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  11. A galaxy of folds

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  12. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains.

  13. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  14. Inference of Isoforms from Short Sequence Reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianxing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    Due to alternative splicing events in eukaryotic species, the identification of mRNA isoforms (or splicing variants) is a difficult problem. Traditional experimental methods for this purpose are time consuming and cost ineffective. The emerging RNA-Seq technology provides a possible effective method to address this problem. Although the advantages of RNA-Seq over traditional methods in transcriptome analysis have been confirmed by many studies, the inference of isoforms from millions of short sequence reads (e.g., Illumina/Solexa reads) has remained computationally challenging. In this work, we propose a method to calculate the expression levels of isoforms and infer isoforms from short RNA-Seq reads using exon-intron boundary, transcription start site (TSS) and poly-A site (PAS) information. We first formulate the relationship among exons, isoforms, and single-end reads as a convex quadratic program, and then use an efficient algorithm (called IsoInfer) to search for isoforms. IsoInfer can calculate the expression levels of isoforms accurately if all the isoforms are known and infer novel isoforms from scratch. Our experimental tests on known mouse isoforms with both simulated expression levels and reads demonstrate that IsoInfer is able to calculate the expression levels of isoforms with an accuracy comparable to the state-of-the-art statistical method and a 60 times faster speed. Moreover, our tests on both simulated and real reads show that it achieves a good precision and sensitivity in inferring isoforms when given accurate exon-intron boundary, TSS and PAS information, especially for isoforms whose expression levels are significantly high.

  15. Characterization of RON protein isoforms in pancreatic cancer: implications for biology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Mose, Evangeline; Cheng, Peter; Holman, Patrick; Howard, Haleigh; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Porras, Paula; Walterscheid, Zakk; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Esdar, Christina; Schadt, Oliver; Eickhoff, Jan; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    The RON tyrosine kinase receptor is under investigation as a novel target in pancreatic cancer. While RON mutations are uncommon, RON isoforms are produced in cancer cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this study we sought to: 1) characterize RON isoform expression in pancreatic cancer, 2) investigate mechanisms that regulate isoform expression, and 3) determine how various isoforms effect gene expression, oncogenic phenotypes and responses to RON directed therapies. We quantified RON transcripts in human pancreatic cancer and found expression levels 2500 fold that of normal pancreas with RON isoform expression comprising nearly 50% of total transcript. RNA seq studies revealed that the short form (sfRON) and P5P6 isoforms which have ligand independent activity, induce markedly different patterns of gene expression than wild type RON. We found that transcription of RON isoforms is regulated by promoter hypermethylation as the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine decreased all RON transcripts in a subset of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The viability of sfRON-expressing HPDE cells was reduced by a RON specific small molecule inhibitor, while a therapeutic monoclonal antibody had no demonstrable effects. In summary, RON isoforms may comprise half of total RON transcript in human pancreatic cancer and their expression is regulated at least in part by promoter hypermethylation. RON isoforms activate distinct patterns of gene expression, have transforming activity and differential responses to RON directed therapies. These findings further our understanding of RON biology in pancreatic cancer and have implications for therapeutic strategies to target RON activity. PMID:27323855

  16. Characterization of RON protein isoforms in pancreatic cancer: implications for biology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Mose, Evangeline; Cheng, Peter; Holman, Patrick; Howard, Haleigh; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Porras, Paula; Walterscheid, Zakk; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Esdar, Christina; Schadt, Oliver; Eickhoff, Jan; Lowy, Andrew M

    2016-07-19

    The RON tyrosine kinase receptor is under investigation as a novel target in pancreatic cancer. While RON mutations are uncommon, RON isoforms are produced in cancer cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this study we sought to: 1) characterize RON isoform expression in pancreatic cancer, 2) investigate mechanisms that regulate isoform expression, and 3) determine how various isoforms effect gene expression, oncogenic phenotypes and responses to RON directed therapies. We quantified RON transcripts in human pancreatic cancer and found expression levels 2500 fold that of normal pancreas with RON isoform expression comprising nearly 50% of total transcript. RNA seq studies revealed that the short form (sfRON) and P5P6 isoforms which have ligand independent activity, induce markedly different patterns of gene expression than wild type RON. We found that transcription of RON isoforms is regulated by promoter hypermethylation as the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine decreased all RON transcripts in a subset of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The viability of sfRON-expressing HPDE cells was reduced by a RON specific small molecule inhibitor, while a therapeutic monoclonal antibody had no demonstrable effects. In summary, RON isoforms may comprise half of total RON transcript in human pancreatic cancer and their expression is regulated at least in part by promoter hypermethylation. RON isoforms activate distinct patterns of gene expression, have transforming activity and differential responses to RON directed therapies. These findings further our understanding of RON biology in pancreatic cancer and have implications for therapeutic strategies to target RON activity.

  17. Folding of polyglutamine chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manan; Reddy, Allam S.; Abbott, N. L.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    Long polyglutamine chains have been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. These include Huntington's disease, where expanded polyglutamine (PolyQ) sequences longer than 36 residues are correlated with the onset of symptoms. In this paper we study the folding pathway of a 54-residue PolyQ chain into a β-helical structure. Transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations are used to generate unbiased reactive pathways between unfolded configurations and the folded β-helical structure of the polyglutamine chain. The folding process is examined in both explicit water and an implicit solvent. Both models reveal that the formation of a few critical contacts is necessary and sufficient for the molecule to fold. Once the primary contacts are formed, the fate of the protein is sealed and it is largely committed to fold. We find that, consistent with emerging hypotheses about PolyQ aggregation, a stable β-helical structure could serve as the nucleus for subsequent polymerization of amyloid fibrils. Our results indicate that PolyQ sequences shorter than 36 residues cannot form that nucleus, and it is also shown that specific mutations inferred from an analysis of the simulated folding pathway exacerbate its stability.

  18. Divergent roles for thyroid hormone receptor β isoforms in the endocrine axis and auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Abel, E. Dale; Boers, Mary-Ellen; Pazos-Moura, Carmen; Moura, Egberto; Kaulbach, Helen; Zakaria, Marjorie; Lowell, Bradford; Radovick, Sally; Liberman, M. Charles; Wondisford, Fredric

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) modulate various physiological functions in many organ systems. The TRα and TRβ isoforms are products of 2 distinct genes, and the β1 and β2 isoforms are splice variants of the same gene. Whereas TRα1 and TRβ1 are widely expressed, expression of the TRβ2 isoform is mainly limited to the pituitary, triiodothyronine-responsive TRH neurons, the developing inner ear, and the retina. Mice with targeted disruption of the entire TRβ locus (TRβ-null) exhibit elevated thyroid hormone levels as a result of abnormal central regulation of thyrotropin, and also develop profound hearing loss. To clarify the contribution of the TRβ2 isoform to the function of the endocrine and auditory systems in vivo, we have generated mice with targeted disruption of the TRβ2 isoform. TRβ2-null mice have preserved expression of the TRα and TRβ1 isoforms. They develop a similar degree of central resistance to thyroid hormone as TRβ-null mice, indicating the important role of TRβ2 in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Growth hormone gene expression is marginally reduced. In contrast, TRβ2-null mice exhibit no evidence of hearing impairment, indicating that TRβ1 and TRβ2 subserve divergent roles in the regulation of auditory function. PMID:10430610

  19. Programmable matter by folding

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  20. Folding of apominimyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, G; Ascoli, F; Brunori, M

    1994-01-01

    The acid unfolding pathway of apominimyoglobin (apo-mini-Mb), a 108-aa fragment (aa 32-139) of horse heart apomyoglobin has been studied by means of circular dichroism, in comparison with the native apoprotein. Similar to sperm whale apomyoglobin [Hughson, F. M., Wright, P. E. & Baldwin, R. L. (1990) Science 249, 1544-1548], a partly folded intermediate (alpha-helical content approximately 35%) is populated at pH 4.2 for horse heart apomyoglobin. For this intermediate, Hughson et al. proposed a structural model with a compact subdomain involving tertiary interactions between the folded A, G, and H helices, with the remainder of the protein essentially unfolded. As described in this paper, a folding intermediate with an alpha-helical content of approximately 33% is populated at pH 4.3-5.0 also in apo-mini-Mb. The acid unfolding pathway is similarly affected in both the native and the mini apoprotein by 15% trifluoroethanol, a helix-stabilizing compound. Thus, the folding of the apo-mini-Mb intermediate is similar to that observed for the native apoprotein, in spite of the absence in the miniprotein of the A helix and of a large part of the H helix, which are crucial for the stability of apo-Mb intermediate. Our results suggest that acquisition of a folded state in apo-mini-Mb occurs through an alternative pathway, which may or may not be shared also by apo-Mb. PMID:7972092

  1. Modulation of estrogen receptor-beta isoforms by phytoestrogens in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Vera; Miodini, Patrizia; Di Fronzo, Giovanni; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2006-05-01

    High consumption of phytoestrogen-rich food correlates with reduced incidence of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogens on growth of pre-existing breast tumors presents concerns when planning the use of phytoestrogens as chemoprevention st rategy. Genistein, the active phytoestrogen in soy, displays weak estrogenic activity mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) with a preferential binding for the ER-beta species. However, no information is at present available on the interaction between phytoestrogens and the various isoforms generated by alternative splicing. In two human breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT20, which express variable levels of ER-beta, the effect of genistein and quercetin was evaluated singly and in comparison with 17beta-estradiol, on mRNA expression of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) isoforms evaluated by a triple primer RT-PCR assay. In T47D cells estradiol caused a 6-fold up-regulation of total ER-beta, and modified the relative expression pattern of the various isoforms, up-regulating the beta2 and down-regulating the beta5 isoform. Genistein up-regulated ER-beta2 and ER-beta1 in T47D cells, and after treatment the ER-beta2 isoform became prevalent, while in BT20 cells it almost doubled the percent contribution of ER-beta1 and ER-beta2 to total ER-beta. Quercetin did not alter the total levels nor the percent distribution of ER-beta isoforms in either cell line. Genistein, through the modulation of ER-beta isoform RNA expression inhibited estrogen-promoted cell growth, without interfering on estrogen-regulated transcription. ER-beta and its ER-beta mRNA isoforms may be involved in a self-limiting mechanism of estrogenic stimulation promoted either by the natural hormone or by weaker estrogen agonists like genistein.

  2. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  3. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Because hearts with a temporally induced knockout of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (Acsl1T−/−) are virtually unable to oxidize fatty acids, glucose use increases 8-fold to compensate. This metabolic switch activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which initiates growth by increasing protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35–43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure and function, mTORC1 was inhibited by treating Acsl1T−/− and littermate control mice with rapamycin or vehicle alone for 2 wk. Rapamycin treatment normalized mitochondrial structure, number, and the maximal respiration rate in Acsl1T−/− hearts, but did not improve ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, which was likely caused by the 33–51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1T−/− hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1T−/− hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and increasing the number of damaged mitochondria.—Grevengoed, T. J., Cooper, D. E., Young, P. A., Ellis, J. M., Coleman, R. A. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation. PMID:26220174

  4. Probing the surface of human carbonic anhydrase for clues towards the design of isoform specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Mahon, Brian; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) are a group of structurally related zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-). Humans have 15 different α-CAs with numerous physiological roles and expression patterns. Of these, 12 are catalytically active, and abnormal expression and activities are linked with various diseases, including glaucoma and cancer. Hence there is a need for CA isoform specific inhibitors to avoid off-target CA inhibition, but due to the high amino acid conservation of the active site and surrounding regions between each enzyme, this has proven difficult. However, residues towards the exit of the active site are variable and can be exploited to design isoform selective inhibitors. Here we discuss and characterize this region of "selective drug targetability" and how these observations can be utilized to develop isoform selective CA inhibitors.

  5. Probing the Surface of Human Carbonic Anhydrase for Clues towards the Design of Isoform Specific Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    The alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) are a group of structurally related zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3−. Humans have 15 different α-CAs with numerous physiological roles and expression patterns. Of these, 12 are catalytically active, and abnormal expression and activities are linked with various diseases, including glaucoma and cancer. Hence there is a need for CA isoform specific inhibitors to avoid off-target CA inhibition, but due to the high amino acid conservation of the active site and surrounding regions between each enzyme, this has proven difficult. However, residues towards the exit of the active site are variable and can be exploited to design isoform selective inhibitors. Here we discuss and characterize this region of “selective drug targetability” and how these observations can be utilized to develop isoform selective CA inhibitors. PMID:25811028

  6. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  7. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  8. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  9. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  10. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  11. Exposing the Specific Roles of the Invariant Chain Isoforms in Shaping the MHC Class II Peptidome.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Simon; Cloutier, Maryse; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-12-13

    The peptide repertoire (peptidome) associated with MHC class II molecules (MHCIIs) is influenced by the polymorphic nature of the peptide binding groove but also by cell-intrinsic factors. The invariant chain (Ii) chaperones MHCIIs, affecting their folding and trafficking. Recent discoveries relating to Ii functions have provided insights as to how it edits the MHCII peptidome. In humans, the Ii gene encodes four different isoforms for which structure-function analyses have highlighted common properties but also some non-redundant roles. Another layer of complexity arises from the fact that Ii heterotrimerizes, a characteristic that has the potential to affect the maturation of associated MHCIIs in many different ways, depending on the isoform combinations. Here, we emphasize the peptide editing properties of Ii and discuss the impact of the various isoforms on the MHCII peptidome.

  12. Differential expression and subcellular distribution of dystrophin Dp71 isoforms during differentiation process.

    PubMed

    Marquez, F G; Cisneros, B; Garcia, F; Ceja, V; Velázquez, F; Depardón, F; Cervantes, L; Rendón, A; Mornet, D; Rosas-vargas, H; Mustre, M; Montañez, C

    2003-01-01

    Dp71 is the major product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain. In order to study the function of Dp71 in the nervous system we examined the expression of Dp71 isoforms in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line, a well-established system to study neuronal differentiation. We show by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assays that PC12 cells express two Dp71 isoforms. One isoform lacks exon 71 and the other isoform lacks exons 71 and 78 (Dp71d and Dp71f isoforms respectively). Nerve growth factor-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells results in differential regulation of the expression and subcellular localization of Dp71 isoforms: a) the amount of Dp71f protein increases nine-fold in total extracts while Dp71d increases up to seven-fold in nuclear extracts; b) Dp71f relocates from the cytoplasm to neuritic processes, being prominent at varicosities and the growth cone; c) Dp71d relocates almost entirely to the nucleus and is detected to a lower extent in the cytoplasm and neuritic processes. Dp71f co-localizes with beta-dystroglycan and synaptophysin while Dp71d co-localizes with beta-dystroglycan in the nucleus. Dp71d accumulates at cell-cell contacts where Dp71f is absent. These results suggest that Dp71d and Dp71f associate with different subcellular complexes and therefore may have distinct functions in PC12 cells.

  13. Functional redundancy and nonredundancy between two Troponin C isoforms in Drosophila adult muscles.

    PubMed

    Chechenova, Maria B; Maes, Sara; Oas, Sandy T; Nelson, Cloyce; Kiani, Kaveh G; Bryantsev, Anton L; Cripps, Richard M

    2017-03-15

    We investigated the functional overlap of two muscle Troponin C (TpnC) genes that are expressed in the adult fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster: TpnC4 is predominantly expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), whereas TpnC41C is the main isoform in the tergal depressor of the trochanter muscle (TDT; jump muscle). Using CRISPR/Cas9, we created a transgenic line with a homozygous deletion of TpnC41C and compared its phenotype to a line lacking functional TpnC4 We found that the removal of either of these genes leads to expression of the other isoform in both muscle types. The switching between isoforms occurs at the transcriptional level and involves minimal enhancers located upstream of the transcription start points of each gene. Functionally, the two TpnC isoforms were not equal. Although ectopic TpnC4 in TDT muscles was able to maintain jumping ability, TpnC41C in IFMs could not effectively support flying. Simultaneous functional disruption of both TpnC genes resulted in jump-defective and flightless phenotypes of the survivors, as well as abnormal sarcomere organization. These results indicated that TpnC is required for myofibril assembly, and that there is functional specialization among TpnC isoforms in Drosophila.

  14. Information from folds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudleston, Peter J.; Treagus, Susan H.

    2010-12-01

    Folds are spectacular geological structures that are seen in layered rock on many different scales. To mark 30 years of the Journal of Structural Geology, we review the information that can be gained from studies of folds in theory, experiment and nature. We first review theoretical considerations and modeling, from classical approaches to current developments. The subject is dominated by single-layer fold theory, with the assumption of perfect layer-parallel shortening, but we also review multilayer fold theory and modeling, and folding of layers that are oblique to principal stresses and strains. This work demonstrates that viscosity ratio, degree of non-linearity of the flow law, anisotropy, and the thickness and spacing distribution of layers of different competence are all important in determining the nature and strength of the folding instability. Theory and modeling provide the basis for obtaining rheological information from natural folds, through analysis of wavelength/thickness ratios of single layer folds, and fold shapes. They also provide a basis for estimating the bulk strain from folded layers. Information about folding mechanisms can be obtained by analysis of cleavage and fabric patterns in folded rocks, and the history of deformation can be revealed by understanding how asymmetry can develop in folds, by how folds develop in shear zones, and how folds develop in more complex three-dimensional deformations.

  15. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  16. PKC Isoform Expression in Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that modeled (MMG) and true (USA Space Shuttle Missions STS-54 and STS-56) microgravity (MG) inhibit human lymphocyte locomotion, Modeled MG also suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Activation of PKC by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) restored the microgravity-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion as well as activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas calcium ionophore (ionomycin) was unable to restore these functions. Based on these results we hypothesized that MG-induced changes in lymphocyte functions are caused by a fundamental defect in signal transduction mechanism. This defect may be localized either at the PKC level or upstream of PKC, most likely, at the cell membrane level. In this study we examined the expression of PKC isoforms alpha, epsilon and delta in PBMC cultured in rotating wall vessel bioreactor, developed at NASA JSC, which models microgravity by sustaining cells in continuous free fall. The assessment of the isoforms was performed by FACS analysis following cell permeabilization. A decrease in the expression of isoforms epsilon and delta, but not isoform a, was observed in PBMC cultured in microgravity conditions. These data suggest that MMG might selectively affect the expression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC Molecular analysis confirm selective suppression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC.

  17. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  18. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  19. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  20. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  1. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  2. Folds on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 26, 1998, shows features on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa that a scientific report published today interprets as signs of compressive folding.

    The imaged area is in the Astypalaea Linea region of Europa's southern hemisphere, seen with low-angle sunshine coming from the upper right. North is toward the top.

    Astypalaea Linea is the smooth, gray area that stretches from north to south across the image mosaic. It is thought to have formed by a combination of pulling apart and sliding of the icy surface. The telltale fold features are within the smoother portions of the surface between the more dominant ridges, which are attributed to upwelling of material through surface ice. In the smooth areas, the surface has gentle swells and dips, which show most clearly in the version on the right, processed to accentuate broader-scale shapes. For example, a dip about 15 kilometers (about 10 miles) wide cuts diagonally across the northern half of the largest smooth area, and a rise runs parallel to that in the southern half of the smooth area. closeup detail

    Louise M. Prockter, at Johns Hopkins University, and Robert T. Pappalardo, at Brown University, report in the journal Science today that those rises, or anticlines, and dips, or synclines, appear to be the result of compression causing the crust to fold.

    Additional evidence comes from smaller features more visible in the version on the left, covering the same area. At the crest of the gentle rise in the largest smooth area are small fractures that could be caused by the stretching stress of bending the surface layer upwards. Similarly, at the bottom of the adjacent dip are small, wrinkle-like ridges that could be caused by stress from bending the surface layer downwards.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  4. Protein photo-folding and quantum folding theory.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liaofu

    2012-06-01

    The rates of protein folding with photon absorption or emission and the cross section of photon -protein inelastic scattering are calculated from quantum folding theory by use of a field-theoretical method. All protein photo-folding processes are compared with common protein folding without the interaction of photons (non-radiative folding). It is demonstrated that there exists a common factor (thermo-averaged overlap integral of the vibration wave function, TAOI) for protein folding and protein photo-folding. Based on this finding it is predicted that (i) the stimulated photo-folding rates and the photon-protein resonance Raman scattering sections show the same temperature dependence as protein folding; (ii) the spectral line of the electronic transition is broadened to a band that includes an abundant vibration spectrum without and with conformational transitions, and the width of each vibration spectral line is largely reduced. The particular form of the folding rate-temperature relation and the abundant spectral structure imply the existence of quantum tunneling between protein conformations in folding and photo-folding that demonstrates the quantum nature of the motion of the conformational-electronic system.

  5. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  6. Characterization of endogenous human promyelocytic leukemia isoforms.

    PubMed

    Condemine, Wilfried; Takahashi, Yuki; Zhu, Jun; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Guegan, Sarah; Janin, Anne; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) has been implicated in a variety of functions, including control of TP53 function and modulation of cellular senescence. Sumolated PML is the organizer of mature PML bodies, recruiting a variety of proteins onto these nuclear domains. The PML gene is predicted to encode a variety of protein isoforms. Overexpression of only one of them, PML-IV, promotes senescence in human diploid fibroblasts, whereas PML-III was proposed to specifically interact with the centrosome. We show that all PML isoform proteins are expressed in cell lines or primary cells. Unexpectedly, we found that PML-III, PML-IV, and PML-V are quantitatively minor isoforms compared with PML-I/II and could not confirm the centrosomal targeting of PML-III. Stable expression of each isoform, in a pml-null background, yields distinct subcellular localization patterns, suggesting that, like in other RBCC/TRIM proteins, the COOH-terminal domains of PML are involved in interactions with specific cellular components. Only the isoform-specific sequences of PML-I and PML-V are highly conserved between man and mouse. That PML-I contains all conserved exons and is more abundantly expressed than PML-IV suggests that it is a critical contributor to PML function(s).

  7. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  8. Folded dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Salaris, Claudio; DeRossi, Danilo

    2007-04-01

    Polymer-based linear actuators with contractile ability are currently demanded for several types of applications. Within the class of dielectric elastomer actuators, two basic configurations are available today for such a purpose: the multi-layer stack and the helical structure. The first consists of several layers of elementary planar actuators stacked in series mechanically and parallel electrically. The second configuration relies on a couple of helical compliant electrodes alternated with a couple of helical dielectrics. The fabrication of both these configurations presents some specific drawbacks today, arising from the peculiarity of each structure. Accordingly, the availability of simpler solutions may boost the short-term use of contractile actuators in practical applications. For this purpose, a new configuration is here described. It consists of a monolithic structure made of an electroded sheet, which is folded up and compacted. The resulting device is functionally equivalent to a multi-layer stack with interdigitated electrodes. However, with respect to a stack the new configuration is advantageously not discontinuous and can be manufactured in one single phase, avoiding layer-by-layer multi-step procedures. The development and preliminary testing of prototype samples of this new actuator made of a silicone elastomer are presented here.

  9. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  10. Generation of choline for acetylcholine synthesis by phospholipase D isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Frohman, Michael A; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2001-01-01

    Dedication This article is dedicated to the memory of Sue Kim Hanson, a graduate student in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, who perished in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Abstract Background In cholinergic neurons, the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by a phospholipase D (PLD)-type enzyme generates some of the precursor choline used for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). We sought to determine the molecular identity of the relevant PLD using murine basal forebrain cholinergic SN56 cells in which the expression and activity of the two PLD isoforms, PLD1 and PLD2, were experimentally modified. ACh levels were examined in cells incubated in a choline-free medium, to ensure that their ACh was synthesized entirely from intracellular choline. Results PLD2, but not PLD1, mRNA and protein were detected in these cells and endogenous PLD activity and ACh synthesis were stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Introduction of a PLD2 antisense oligonucleotide into the cells reduced PLD2 mRNA and protein expression by approximately 30%. The PLD2 antisense oligomer similarly reduced basal- and PMA-stimulated PLD activity and ACh levels. Overexpression of mouse PLD2 by transient transfection increased basal- (by 74%) and PMA-stimulated (by 3.2-fold) PLD activity. Moreover, PLD2 transfection increased ACh levels by 26% in the absence of PMA and by 2.1-fold in the presence of PMA. Overexpression of human PLD1 by transient transfection increased PLD activity by 4.6-fold and ACh synthesis by 2.3-fold in the presence of PMA as compared to controls. Conclusions These data identify PLD2 as the endogenous enzyme that hydrolyzes PC to generate choline for ACh synthesis in cholinergic cells, and indicate that in a model system choline generated by PLD1 may also be used for this purpose. PMID:11734063

  11. ERCC1 function in nuclear excision and interstrand crosslink repair pathways is mediated exclusively by the ERCC1-202 isoform

    PubMed Central

    Friboulet, Luc; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Sourisseau, Tony; Adam, Julien; Stoclin, Annabelle; Ponsonnailles, Florence; Dorvault, Nicolas; Commo, Frédéric; Saulnier, Patrick; Salome-Desmoulez, Sophie; Pottier, Géraldine; André, Fabrice; Kroemer, Guido; Soria, Jean Charles; Olaussen, Ken André

    2013-01-01

    ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) plays essential roles in the removal of DNA intrastrand crosslinks by nucleotide excision repair, and that of DNA interstrand crosslinks by the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway and homology-directed repair processes (HDR). The function of ERCC1 thus impacts on the DNA damage response (DDR), particularly in anticancer therapy when DNA damaging agents are employed. ERCC1 expression has been proposed as a predictive biomarker of the response to platinum-based therapy. However, the assessment of ERCC1 expression in clinical samples is complicated by the existence of 4 functionally distinct protein isoforms, which differently impact on DDR. Here, we explored the functional competence of each ERCC1 protein isoform and obtained evidence that the 202 isoform is the sole one endowed with ERCC1 activity in DNA repair pathways. The ERCC1 isoform 202 interacts with RPA, XPA, and XPF, and XPF stability requires expression of the ERCC1 202 isoform (but none of the 3 others). ERCC1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells show abnormal mitosis, a phenotype reminiscent of the FA phenotype that can be rescued by isoform 202 only. Finally, we could not observe any dominant-negative interaction between ERCC1 isoforms. These data suggest that the selective assessment of the ERCC1 isoform 202 in clinical samples should accurately reflect the DDR-related activity of the gene and hence constitute a useful biomarker for customizing anticancer therapies. PMID:24036546

  12. Myosin isoforms in female human detrusor.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, M P; Manaves, V; Martin, A F; Shott, S; Brubaker, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document the relative proportions of two isoforms of myosin heavy chain in detrusor smooth muscle of women with detrusor overactivity and in asymptomatic controls. Women aged 35-65 with documented detrusor overactivity and without a history of neurologic disease, prior incontinence surgery, elevated post-void residual urine volume, or indwelling urinary catheter were eligible for the study. Full-thickness biopsies of extraperitoneal bladder dome were obtained at the time of laparotomy in six patients with documented detrusor overactivity and in a control group of eight continent patients. Biopsies were frozen in liquid nitrogen, crushed with a frozen mortar and pestle at -80 degrees C, and homogenized in buffer, and the extracts were electrophoresed on 6% polyacrylamide sodium dodecyl sulfate gels and stained with Coomassie blue. The gels were de-stained and then the protein bands were scanned with a densitometer. The mean patient age was 48 years (range, 36-59). Seven patients were Caucasian and seven patients were African American. Detrusor smooth muscle contains a mean of 34% (range, 27-43%) SM1 and 66% (range, 57-73%) SM2 isoforms. There was no difference in isoform composition when patients were compared according to urogynecologic diagnosis or according to race. In detrusor biopsies from women, approximately 34% of myosin is of the SM1 isoform and approximately 66% is of the SM2 isoform. This ratio is relatively constant in the two races studied and unchanged in women with detrusor overactivity. Animal models utilizing outlet obstruction of the bladder to provoke detrusor instability and detrusor hypertrophy are known to alter myosin isoform distribution and may not be appropriate models of detrusor instability in human females.

  13. Purification and characterization of soluble (cytosolic) and bound (cell wall) isoforms of invertases in barley (Hordeum vulgare) elongating stem tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karuppiah, N.; Vadlamudi, B.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1989-01-01

    Three different isoforms of invertases have been detected in the developing internodes of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Based on substrate specificities, the isoforms have been identified to be invertases (beta-fructosidases EC 3.2.1.26). The soluble (cytosolic) invertase isoform can be purified to apparent homogeneity by diethylaminoethyl cellulose, Concanavalin-A Sepharose, organo-mercurial Sepharose, and Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. A bound (cell wall) invertase isoform can be released by 1 molar salt and purified further by the same procedures as above except omitting the organo-mercurial Sepharose affinity chromatography step. A third isoform of invertase, which is apparently tightly associated with the cell wall, cannot be isolated yet. The soluble and bound invertase isoforms were purified by factors of 60- and 7-fold, respectively. The native enzymes have an apparent molecular weight of 120 kilodaltons as estimated by gel filtration. They have been identified to be dimers under denaturing and nondenaturing conditions. The soluble enzyme has a pH optimum of 5.5, Km of 12 millimolar, and a Vmax of 80 micromole per minute per milligram of protein compared with cell wall isozyme which has a pH optimum of 4.5, Km of millimolar, and a Vmax of 9 micromole per minute per milligram of protein.

  14. Molecular Mechanical Differences between Isoforms of Contractile Actin in the Presence of Isoforms of Smooth Muscle Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Lennart; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia N.; Blumenthal, Jenna L.; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The proteins involved in smooth muscle's molecular contractile mechanism – the anti-parallel motion of actin and myosin filaments driven by myosin heads interacting with actin – are found as different isoforms. While their expression levels are altered in disease states, their relevance to the mechanical interaction of myosin with actin is not sufficiently understood. Here, we analyzed in vitro actin filament propulsion by smooth muscle myosin for -actin (A), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), -actin (A), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), and -actin-tropomoysin- (A-Tm). Actin sliding analysis with our specifically developed video analysis software followed by statistical assessment (Bootstrapped Principal Component Analysis) indicated that the in vitro motility of A, A, and A-Tm is not distinguishable. Compared to these three ‘baseline conditions’, statistically significant differences () were: A-Tm – actin sliding velocity increased 1.12-fold, A-Tm – motile fraction decreased to 0.96-fold, stop time elevated 1.6-fold, A-Tm – run time elevated 1.7-fold. We constructed a mathematical model, simulated actin sliding data, and adjusted the kinetic parameters so as to mimic the experimentally observed differences: A-Tm – myosin binding to actin, the main, and the secondary myosin power stroke are accelerated, A-Tm – mechanical coupling between myosins is stronger, A-Tm – the secondary power stroke is decelerated and mechanical coupling between myosins is weaker. In summary, our results explain the different regulatory effects that specific combinations of actin and smooth muscle tropomyosin have on smooth muscle actin-myosin interaction kinetics. PMID:24204225

  15. Predicting protein folds with fold-specific PSSM libraries.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoojin; Chintapalli, Sree Vamsee; Ko, Kyung Dae; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Zhang, Zhenhai; van Rossum, Damian; Patterson, Randen L

    2011-01-01

    Accurately assigning folds for divergent protein sequences is a major obstacle to structural studies. Herein, we outline an effective method for fold recognition using sets of PSSMs, each of which is constructed for different protein folds. Our analyses demonstrate that FSL (Fold-specific Position Specific Scoring Matrix Libraries) can predict/relate structures given only their amino acid sequences of highly divergent proteins. This ability to detect distant relationships is dependent on low-identity sequence alignments obtained from FSL. Results from our experiments demonstrate that FSL perform well in recognizing folds from the "twilight-zone" SABmark dataset. Further, this method is capable of accurate fold prediction in newly determined structures. We suggest that by building complete PSSM libraries for all unique folds within the Protein Database (PDB), FSL can be used to rapidly and reliably annotate a large subset of protein folds at proteomic level. The related programs and fold-specific PSSMs for our FSL are publicly available at: http://ccp.psu.edu/download/FSLv1.0/.

  16. Evolutionary Optimization of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, 3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last 1.5 billion years that began during the “big bang” of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  17. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  18. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Oscar; Benito, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte--specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Detachment folding, fold amplification, and diapirism in thrust wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco

    2003-12-01

    The relations between detachment folding, fold amplification, and salt diapirism in contractional settings have been investigated by means of scaled analogue models. The viscosity of the silicone layer simulating salt in nature and the shortening rates were combined in order to reproduce weak (type 1 models) and strong (type 2 models) décollements. Deformation patterns in the roof sequence exhibited two contrasting styles, (1) outward propagation of detachment folding along the décollement (OFP mode) and (2) passive roof duplex (PRD mode). In type 2 models, detachment folding propagated away from the most external thrust in the floor sequence, while in type 1 models, long-lived detachment folds almost invariably localized amplified above a floor thrust tip as a result of strain localization. A silicone wall intruded occasionally into the crestal graben of detachment folds in type 1 and OFP models. Best fitting of transition models data points indicates nonlinear relations with regression curves close to the equilateral hyperbola equation for both OFP-PRD and amplified detachment folds-box folds transitions. A quantitative comparison of model results with nature has been attempted by plotting salt-based fold-and-thrust belts data points on the scaled transition curves obtained from the modeling. Such a comparison relates shear stress products and ratios to the conditions favoring the amplification of detachment folds and the potential emplacement of ductile diapirs in their core. By reducing the roof sequence strength, pore fluid pressure λb is inferred to shift the equilibrium of fold-and-thrust belts toward the field of OFP and diapirism.

  20. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  1. Design of isoform-selective phospholipase D inhibitors that modulate cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A; Selvy, Paige E; Buck, Jason R; Cho, Hyekyung P; Criswell, Tracy L; Thomas, Ashley L; Armstrong, Michelle D; Arteaga, Carlos L; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an essential enzyme responsible for the production of the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid participates in both G protein-coupled receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction networks. The lack of potent and isoform-selective inhibitors has limited progress in defining the cellular roles of PLD. We used a diversity-oriented synthetic approach and developed a library of PLD inhibitors with considerable pharmacological characterization. Here we report the rigorous evaluation of that library, which contains highly potent inhibitors, including the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors. Specific members of this series inhibit isoforms with > 100-fold selectivity both in vitro and in cells. A subset of inhibitors was shown to block invasiveness in metastatic breast cancer models. These findings demonstrate the power of diversity-oriented synthesis combined with biochemical assays and mass spectrometric lipid profiling of cellular responses to develop the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors—a new class of antimetastatic agents. PMID:19136975

  2. Cloning and expression of the mouse histamine H3 receptor: evidence for multiple isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Agnès; Héron, Anne; Cochois, Véronique; Pillot, Catherine; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-01

    The existence of mouse H3-receptor isoforms was investigated by PCR analysis and cDNA cloning. Splicing mechanisms previously reported in various species are conserved in the mouse. The retention/deletion of a fragment in the third intracellular loop of the mouse receptor leads to the existence of three isoforms designated mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) according to the length of their deduced amino acid sequence. PCR analysis showed that mouse H3-receptor isoforms display different expression patterns in the brain. Following expression in Cos-1 cells, [125I]iodoproxyfan binding indicated similar pharmacological profiles of the mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) isoforms. The pharmacological profile of the mouse H3 receptor is more similar to the rat receptor than to the human receptor, although some differences were also observed between the mouse and rat receptors. For example, the potency of thioperamide and ciproxifan is slightly higher at the mouse receptor than at the rat receptor but 40-100-fold higher than at the human receptor. In situ hybridization histochemistry showed that the distribution of H3-receptor mRNAs in the mouse brain is rather similar to that previously reported in the rat brain. However, the autoradiographic and cellular expression patterns observed in several brain areas such as the thalamus or hippocampus reveal important differences between the two species.

  3. Structure and characterization of AAT-1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eiko; Ishizaki, Ray; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-05-01

    A novel protein, AAT-1, was identified as a AMY-1-binding protein and three splicing variants of AAT-1, AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma were identified. The function of AAT-1 is thought to be related to spermatogenesis. In this study, we further identified other splicing isoforms of AAT-1, AAT-1L, AAT-1M and AAT-1S, consisting of 767, 603 and 252 amino acids, respectively. These isoforms were found to use a promoter different from that used by AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma in the aat-1 gene, which contains 20 exons. Only 60 amino acids in the C-terminal portion of AAT-1 derived from exons 15-17 are common among AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S and AAT-1alpha. While AAT-1alpha is specifically expressed in the testis, AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S were found to be differentially expressed in human tissues. All of the isoforms of AAT-1 were found to bind to and colocalized with AMY-1 in human cells. While AAT-1L and AAT-1M were found to be localized diffusely in the cytoplasm, AAT-1S, like AAT-1alpha, was found to be localized in the mitochondria-like structure, suggesting different roles of AAT-1 isoforms in cells.

  4. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  5. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  6. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Changes of protein stiffness during folding detect protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Małek, Katarzyna E; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule force-quench atomic force microscopy (FQ-AFM) is used to detect folding intermediates of a simple protein by detecting changes of molecular stiffness of the protein during its folding process. Those stiffness changes are obtained from shape and peaks of an autocorrelation of fluctuations in end-to-end length of the folding molecule. The results are supported by predictions of the equipartition theorem and agree with existing Langevin dynamics simulations of a simplified model of a protein folding. In the light of the Langevin simulations the experimental data probe an ensemble of random-coiled collapsed states of the protein, which are present both in the force-quench and thermal-quench folding pathways.

  8. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  9. Role of nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms in uterine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bansari; Elguero, Sonia; Thakore, Suruchi; Dahoud, Wissam; Bedaiwy, Mohamed; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    cellular signaling pathways required for growth. In contrast, progesterone via PR activation appears to increase leiomyoma growth. The exact role of PRs in cervical cancer is unclear. PRs regulate implantation and therefore aberrant PR function may be implicated in recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). PRs likely regulate key immunogenic factors involved in RPL. However, the exact role of PRs in the pathophysiology of RPL and the use of progesterone for therapeutic benefit remains uncertain. CONCLUSIONS PRs are key mediators of progesterone action in uterine tissues and are essential for normal uterine function. Aberrant PR function (due to abnormal expression and/or function) is a major cause of uterine pathophysiology. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms of PR isoform action in the uterus is required, as this knowledge will afford the opportunity to create progestin/PR-based therapeutics to treat various uterine pathologies. PMID:25406186

  10. Structural Bridges through Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2015-01-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes. PMID:26372166

  11. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  12. How Does Your Protein Fold? Elucidating the Apomyoglobin Folding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-01-17

    Although each type of protein fold and in some cases individual proteins within a fold classification can have very different mechanisms of folding, the underlying biophysical and biochemical principles that operate to cause a linear polypeptide chain to fold into a globular structure must be the same. In an aqueous solution, the protein takes up the thermodynamically most stable structure, but the pathway along which the polypeptide proceeds in order to reach that structure is a function of the amino acid sequence, which must be the final determining factor, not only in shaping the final folded structure, but in dictating the folding pathway. A number of groups have focused on a single protein or group of proteins, to determine in detail the factors that influence the rate and mechanism of folding in a defined system, with the hope that hypothesis-driven experiments can elucidate the underlying principles governing the folding process. Our research group has focused on the folding of the globin family of proteins, and in particular on the monomeric protein apomyoglobin. Apomyoglobin (apoMb) folds relatively slowly (∼2 s) via an ensemble of obligatory intermediates that form rapidly after the initiation of folding. The folding pathway can be dissected using rapid-mixing techniques, which can probe processes in the millisecond time range. Stopped-flow measurements detected by circular dichroism (CD) or fluorescence spectroscopy give information on the rates of folding events. Quench-flow experiments utilize the differential rates of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of amide protons protected in parts of the structure that are folded early; protection of amides can be detected by mass spectrometry or proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). In addition, apoMb forms an intermediate at equilibrium at pH ∼ 4, which is sufficiently stable for it to be structurally characterized by solution methods such as CD, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, and the

  13. Isoform-specific monoubiquitination, endocytosis, and degradation of alternatively spliced ErbB4 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Paatero, Ilkka; Gaudio, Eugenio; Melino, Gerry; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I; Elenius, Klaus

    2008-03-18

    Endocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation serve as a well characterized mechanism to fine-tune and down-regulate EGFR signaling. However, other members of the EGFR/ErbB receptor family have been reported to be endocytosis-impaired. Here we demonstrate that endocytosis of ErbB4 is regulated in an isoform-specific manner: CYT-1 isoforms were efficiently endocytosed whereas CYT-2 isoforms were endocytosis-impaired. CYT-1 isoforms in endocytic vesicles colocalized with Rab5 and Rab7 indicating trafficking via early endosomes to late endosomal/lysosomal structures. A PPXY motif within the CYT-1-specific sequence that lacks from CYT-2 was necessary both for ubiquitination and endocytosis of CYT-1 isoforms and provided a binding site for a WW domain-containing ubiquitin ligase Itch. Itch catalyzed ubiquitination of ErbB4 CYT-1, promoted its localization into intracellular vesicles, and stimulated degradation of ErbB4 CYT-1. Dominant negative Itch suppressed ErbB4 CYT-1 endocytosis and degradation. These data indicate that ErbB4 isoforms differ in endocytosis and degradation by a mechanism mediated by CYT-1-specific PPXY motif interacting with a WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  14. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  15. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings. PMID:27493521

  16. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  17. Tau isoforms imbalance impairs the axonal transport of the amyloid precursor protein in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas; Čarná, Mária; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2016-11-11

    Tau, as a microtubule-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of microtubule dynamics, axonal transport and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule binding repeats. While tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here we addressed this question using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectories analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP-vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Contrarely, the imbalance towards the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoforms imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  18. Tau Isoforms Imbalance Impairs the Axonal Transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Human Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas E; Čarná, Mária E; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2017-01-04

    Tau, as a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of MT dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) MT binding repeats. Although tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here, we addressed this issue using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content, neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectory analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Conversely, the imbalance toward the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoform imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  19. Primary Cortical Folding in the Human Newborn: An Early Marker of Later Functional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, J.; Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Leuchter, R. Ha-Vinh; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Huppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be…

  20. Diaphragm Abnormalities in Patients with End-Stage Heart Failure: NADPH Oxidase Upregulation and Protein Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Bumsoo; Coblentz, Philip D.; Beharry, Adam W.; Patel, Nikhil; Judge, Andrew R.; Moylan, Jennifer. S.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have diaphragm abnormalities that contribute to disease morbidity and mortality. Studies in animals suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause diaphragm abnormalities in HF. However, the effects of HF on ROS sources, antioxidant enzymes, and protein oxidation in the diaphragm of humans is unknown. NAD(P)H oxidase, especially the Nox2 isoform, is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm. Our main hypothesis was that diaphragm from patients with HF have heightened Nox2 expression and p47phox phosphorylation (marker of enzyme activation) that is associated with elevated protein oxidation. We collected diaphragm biopsies from patients with HF and brain-dead organ donors (controls). Diaphragm mRNA levels of Nox2 subunits were increased 2.5–4.6-fold over controls (p < 0.05). Patients also had increased protein levels of Nox2 subunits (p47phox, p22phox, and p67phox) and total p47phox phosphorylation, while phospho-to-total p47phox levels were unchanged. The antioxidant enzyme catalase was increased in patients, whereas glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutases were unchanged. Among markers of protein oxidation, carbonyls were increased by ~40% (p < 0.05) and 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosines were unchanged in patients with HF. Overall, our findings suggest that Nox2 is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm of patients with HF and increases in levels of antioxidant enzymes are not sufficient to maintain normal redox homeostasis. The net outcome is elevated diaphragm protein oxidation that has been shown to cause weakness in animals. PMID:28119629

  1. A differential association of Apolipoprotein E isoforms with the Aβ oligomer in solution

    PubMed Central

    Petrlova, Jitka; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Bricarello, Daniel; Harishchandra, Ghimire; Lorigan, Gary; Jin, Lee-Way; Voss, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of disorders arising from protein mis-folding and aggregation is difficult to elucidate, involving a complex ensemble of intermediates whose toxicity depends upon their state of progression along distinct processing pathways. To address the complex mis-folding and aggregation that initiates the toxic cascade resulting in Alzheimer's disease, we have developed a TOAC spin-labeled Aβ peptide to observe its isoform-dependent interaction with the apoE protein. While most individuals carry the E3 isoform of apoE, approximately 15% of humans carry the E4 isoform, which is recognized as the most significant genetic determinant for Alzheimer's. ApoE is consistently associated with the amyloid plaque marker for Alzheimer's disease. A vital question centers on the influence of the two predominant isoforms, E3 and E4, on Aβ peptide processing and hence Aβ toxicity. We employed EPR spectroscopy of incorporated spin labels to investigate the interaction of apoE with the toxic oligomeric species of Aβ in solution. EPR spectra of the spin labeled side chain report on side chain and backbone dynamics, as well as the spatial proximity of spins in an assembly. Our results indicate oligomer binding involves the C-terminal domain of apoE, with apoE3 reporting a much greater response through this conformational marker. Coupled with SPR binding measurements, apoE3 displays a higher affinity and capacity for the toxic Aβ oligomer. These findings support the hypothesis that apoE polymorphism and Alzheimer's risk can largely be attributed to the reduced ability of apoE4 to function as a clearance vehicle for the toxic form of Aβ. PMID:21069870

  2. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  3. Inframammary fold: a histologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Muntan, C D; Sundine, M J; Rink, R D; Acland, R D

    2000-02-01

    The inframammary fold is a defining element in the shape and structure of the female breast. It should be preserved whenever possible in ablative procedures and recreated accurately when the breast is reconstructed after mastectomy. To date, no accurate anatomic description of this essential structure exists. Previous studies have suggested that the fold is produced by a supporting ligament running from the dermis in the fold region to a variety of locations on the rib cage. This clinic's experience with mastectomy, augmentation mammaplasty, and breast reconstruction does not support the existence of a ligamentous structure. To define the structure of the inframammary fold, 10 female and 2 male cadavers were studied. The anterior chest wall was removed en bloc and frozen in orthostatic position. Parasagittal sections were made of the inframammary fold with the chest wall intact. After decalcification of the ribs and routine histologic preparation, thin sections were stained with Gomori's trichrome. On light microscopic examination, no demonstrable ligamentous structure of dense regular connective tissue could be identified in the fold region in any of the 12 specimens. Superficial and deep fascial layers were uniformly observed anterior to the pectoralis major and serratus anterior muscles. The superficial fascia was connected to the dermis in the fold region in a variety of configurations. In some cases, the deep fascia fused with the superficial fascia and dermis at the fold level. In other cases, bundles of collagen fibers arising from the superficial fascial layer were found to insert into the dermis at the inframammary fold, slightly inferior to it, or both. These bundles were observed consistently in sections from the sternum to the middle axillary line. They were distinct from Cooper's suspensory ligaments, which are seen more superiorly in the glandular tissue.

  4. Analysis of protein isoforms: can we do it better?

    PubMed

    Stastna, Miroslava; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2012-10-01

    Protein isoforms/splice variants can play important roles in various biological processes and can potentially be used as biomarkers or therapeutic targets/mediators. Thus, there is a need for efficient and, importantly, accurate methods to distinguish and quantify specific protein isoforms. Since protein isoforms can share a high percentage of amino acid sequence homology and dramatically differ in their cellular concentration, the task for accuracy and efficiency in methodology and instrumentation is challenging. The analysis of intact proteins has been perceived to provide a more accurate and complete result for isoform identification/quantification in comparison to analysis of the corresponding peptides that arise from protein enzymatic digestion. Recently, novel approaches have been explored and developed that can possess the accuracy and reliability important for protein isoform differentiation and isoform-specific peptide targeting. In this review, we discuss the recent development in methodology and instrumentation for enhanced detection of protein isoforms as well as the examples of their biological importance.

  5. Structural Basis of Dscam Isoform Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Meijers,R.; Puettmann-Holgado, R.; Skiniotis, G.; Liu, J.; Walz, T.; Wang, J.; Schmucker, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Dscam gene gives rise to thousands of diverse cell surface receptors1 thought to provide homophilic and heterophilic recognition specificity for neuronal wiring and immune responses. Mutually exclusive splicing allows for the generation of sequence variability in three immunoglobulin ecto-domains, D2, D3 and D7. We report X-ray structures of the amino-terminal four immunoglobulin domains (D1-D4) of two distinct Dscam isoforms. The structures reveal a horseshoe configuration, with variable residues of D2 and D3 constituting two independent surface epitopes on either side of the receptor. Both isoforms engage in homo-dimerization coupling variable domain D2 with D2, and D3 with D3. These interactions involve symmetric, antiparallel pairing of identical peptide segments from epitope I that are unique to each isoform. Structure-guided mutagenesis and swapping of peptide segments confirm that epitope I, but not epitope II, confers homophilic binding specificity of full-length Dscam receptors. Phylogenetic analysis shows strong selection of matching peptide sequences only for epitope I. We propose that peptide complementarity of variable residues in epitope I of Dscam is essential for homophilic binding specificity.

  6. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Thomas, Chris M G; Wodzig, Will K W H; Olthaar, André J; Jaeken, Jaak; Sweep, Fred C G J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2011-04-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns of five classic galactosemia patients with POI were compared to the pattern obtained in two patients with a primary glycosylation disorder (phosphomannomutase-2-deficient congenital disorders of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG) and POI, and in five postmenopausal women as controls. We used FPLC chromatofocussing with measurement of FSH concentration per fraction, and discovered that there were no significant differences between galactosemia patients, PMM2-CDG patients and postmenopausal controls. Our results do not support that FSH dysfunction due to a less acidic isoform pattern because of hypoglycosylation is a key mechanism of POI in this disease.

  7. Relation between α-isoform and phosphatase activity of Na+,K+-ATPase in rat skeletal muscle fiber types.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, M; Rigoard, P; Fares, M; Francois, C; Sottejeau, Y; Maixent, J M

    2011-07-25

    In skeletal muscle the relationship between Na+,K+-ATPase activity and isoform content remains controversial (9,6). It could be due to the fiber-type content, membrane isolation and analytical methods. We investigated the distribution of subunit α1 and α2 Na+,K+-ATPase catalytic isoforms and the Na+,K+-ATPase activity in isolated membranes from white ( type I and glycolitic fibers) and red (type II and oxidative fibers) skeletal muscles. Red Gastrocnemius and White Gastrocnemius muscles were sampled from 8 week-old female Wistar rats and crude membranes were performed. The Na+,K+-ATPase activity and membrane distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase α1 and α2 isoforms were assessed by ouabain sensitive K-phosphatase (Kpase) measurements and Western Blot respectively. The Na+,K+-ATPase activity was 6 fold lower in White Gastrocnemius membranes than in Red Gastrocnemius membranes. The α1 and α2-isoform levels are higher in RG than in White Gastrocnemius. The α1 and α2-subunit Red Gastrocnemius content was significantly higher than in WG. The correlation between crude membrane Kpase activity and both catalytic α-subunit of the Na+,K+-ATPase exist.These data suggest that the Na+,K+-ATPase phosphatase activity correlates with the α1 and α2 isoforms levels in Red Gastrocnemius and White Gastrocnemius and confirms the fiber-specific Na+,K+-ATPase catalytic α-subunits and α2-isoform as the major catalytic isoform in rat skeletal muscle.

  8. Two families of TARP isoforms that have distinct effects on the kinetic properties of AMPA receptors and synaptic currents.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang-Hoon; St-Gelais, Fannie; Zhang, Wei; Tomita, Susumu; Howe, James R

    2007-09-20

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are auxiliary AMPA receptor subunits that regulate both the trafficking and gating properties of AMPA receptors, and different TARP isoforms display distinct expression patterns in brain. Here, we compared the effects of four TARP isoforms on the kinetics of AMPA receptor currents. Each isoform slowed the deactivation of GluR1 currents, but the slowing was greatest with gamma-4 and gamma-8. Isoform-specific differences in desensitization were also observed that correlated with effects on deactivation. TARP isoforms also differentially modulated responses to trains of glutamate applications designed to mimic high-frequency presynaptic firing. Importantly, whereas both stargazin and gamma-4 rescued excitatory synaptic transmission in cerebellar granule cells from stargazer mice, the decay of miniature EPSCs was 2-fold slower in neurons expressing gamma-4. The results show that heterogeneity in the composition of AMPA receptor/TARP complexes contributes to synapse-specific differences in EPSC decays and frequency-dependent modulation of neurotransmission.

  9. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  10. Folding gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. R.; Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. Alternative interferometer topologies can mitigate the impact of thermal noise on interferometer noise curves. In this work, we explore the impact of introducing a single folding mirror into the arm cavities of dual-recycled Fabry–Perot interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options. Improvements to the folding mirror thermal noise through crystalline coatings or cryogenic cooling can increase interferometer range by as much as a factor of two over the Advanced LIGO reference design.

  11. Polar substitutions in helix 3 of the prion protein produce transmembrane isoforms that disturb vesicle trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; Arbelaez, Daniela; Jensen, Kurt; Rincon-Limas, Diego E.; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases encompass a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrP) isoforms. Other conformational variants of PrP have also been proposed to contribute to neurotoxicity in prion diseases, including misfolded intermediates as well as cytosolic and transmembrane isoforms. To better understand PrP neurotoxicity, we analyzed the role of two highly conserved methionines in helix 3 on PrP biogenesis, folding and pathogenesis. Expression of the PrP-M205S and -M205,212S mutants in Drosophila led to hyperglycosylation, intracellular accumulation and widespread conformational changes due to failure of oxidative folding. Surprisingly, PrP-M205S and -M205,212S acquired a transmembrane topology (Ctm) previously linked to mutations in the signal peptide (SP) and the transmembrane domain (TMD). PrP-M205,212S also disrupted the accumulation of key neurodevelopmental proteins in lipid rafts, resulting in shortened axonal projections. These results uncover a new role for the hydrophobic domain in promoting oxidative folding and preventing the formation of neurotoxic Ctm PrP, mechanisms that may be relevant in the pathogenesis of both inherited and sporadic prion diseases. PMID:23771030

  12. Polar substitutions in helix 3 of the prion protein produce transmembrane isoforms that disturb vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; Arbelaez, Daniela; Jensen, Kurt; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Prion diseases encompass a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrP) isoforms. Other conformational variants of PrP have also been proposed to contribute to neurotoxicity in prion diseases, including misfolded intermediates as well as cytosolic and transmembrane isoforms. To better understand PrP neurotoxicity, we analyzed the role of two highly conserved methionines in helix 3 on PrP biogenesis, folding and pathogenesis. Expression of the PrP-M205S and -M205,212S mutants in Drosophila led to hyperglycosylation, intracellular accumulation and widespread conformational changes due to failure of oxidative folding. Surprisingly, PrP-M205S and -M205,212S acquired a transmembrane topology (Ctm) previously linked to mutations in the signal peptide (SP) and the transmembrane domain (TMD). PrP-M205,212S also disrupted the accumulation of key neurodevelopmental proteins in lipid rafts, resulting in shortened axonal projections. These results uncover a new role for the hydrophobic domain in promoting oxidative folding and preventing the formation of neurotoxic Ctm PrP, mechanisms that may be relevant in the pathogenesis of both inherited and sporadic prion diseases.

  13. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  14. Protein folding by motion planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  15. Molecular mechanical differences between isoforms of contractile actin in the presence of isoforms of smooth muscle tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia N; Blumenthal, Jenna L; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The proteins involved in smooth muscle's molecular contractile mechanism - the anti-parallel motion of actin and myosin filaments driven by myosin heads interacting with actin - are found as different isoforms. While their expression levels are altered in disease states, their relevance to the mechanical interaction of myosin with actin is not sufficiently understood. Here, we analyzed in vitro actin filament propulsion by smooth muscle myosin for [Formula: see text]-actin ([Formula: see text]A), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]-actin ([Formula: see text]A), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), and [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomoysin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]). Actin sliding analysis with our specifically developed video analysis software followed by statistical assessment (Bootstrapped Principal Component Analysis) indicated that the in vitro motility of [Formula: see text]A, [Formula: see text]A, and [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] is not distinguishable. Compared to these three 'baseline conditions', statistically significant differences ([Formula: see text]) were: [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - actin sliding velocity increased 1.12-fold, [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - motile fraction decreased to 0.96-fold, stop time elevated 1.6-fold, [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - run time elevated 1.7-fold. We constructed a mathematical model, simulated actin sliding data, and adjusted the kinetic parameters so as to mimic the experimentally observed differences: [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - myosin binding to actin, the main, and the secondary myosin power stroke are accelerated, [Formula: see text

  16. Velocity field measurements in oblique static divergent vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron

    2005-11-01

    During normal phonation, the vocal fold cycle is characterized by the glottal opening transitioning from a convergent to a divergent passage and then closing before the cycle is repeated. Under ordinary phonatory conditions, both vocal folds, which form the glottal passage, move in phase with each other, creating a time-varying symmetric opening. However, abnormal pathological conditions, such as unilateral paralysis, and polyps, can result in geometrical asymmetries between the vocal folds throughout the phonatory cycle. This study investigates pulsatile flow fields through 7.5 times life-size vocal fold models with included divergence angles of 5 to 30 degrees, and obliquities between the vocal folds of up to 15 degrees. Flow conditions were scaled to match physiological parameters. Data were taken at the anterior posterior mid-plane using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Viscous flow phenomena including the Coanda effect, flow separation points, and jet "flapping" were investigated. The results are compared to previously reported work of flow through symmetric divergent vocal fold models.

  17. Regulation of CDPK isoforms during tuber development.

    PubMed

    Raíces, Marcela; Gargantini, Pablo Rubén; Chinchilla, Delphine; Crespi, Martín; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Ulloa, Rita María

    2003-07-01

    CDPK activities present during tuber development were analysed. A high CDPK activity was detected in the soluble fraction of early stolons and a lower one was detected in soluble and particulate fractions of induced stolons. The early and late CDPK activities displayed diverse specificity for in vitro substrates and different subcellular distribution. Western blot analysis revealed two CDPKs of 55 and 60 kDa that follow a precise spatial and temporal profile of expression. The 55 kDa protein was only detected in early-elongating stolons and the 60 kDa one was induced upon stolon swelling, correlating with early and late CDPK activities. A new member of the potato CDPK family, StCDPK3, was identified from a stolon cDNA library. Gene specific RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene is only expressed in early stolons, while the previously identified StCDPK1 is expressed upon stolon swelling. This expression profile suggests that StCDPK3 could correspond to the 55 kDa isoform while StCDPK1 could encode the 60 kDa isoform present in swelling stolons. StCDPK1 has myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus possibly involved in its dual intracellular localization. Transient expression studies with wild-type and mutated forms of StCDPK1 fused to GFP were used to show that subcellular localization of this isoform is controlled by myristoylation and palmitoylation. Altogether, our data suggest that sequential activation of StCDPK3 and StCDPK1 and the subcellular localisation of StCDPK1 might be critical regulatory steps of calcium signalling during potato tuber development.

  18. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  19. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  20. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  1. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures.

  2. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function—for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. PMID:25234928

  3. Folded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Bill; Zhu, Chen; Song, Binhuang; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-12-26

    We propose and demonstrate a new sub-carrier multiplexing scheme, utilizing orthogonal, periodic-sinc-shaped sub-carrier spectra. This 'folded' OFDM allows for multi-carrier bands to be generated with the precise, rectangular frequency definition of Nyquist WDM. We show that this scheme can be implemented with 10 GHz sub-bands, showing a 0.5-dB implementation penalty and successful transmission over 4160-km. We further investigate 40-GHz bands in an add/drop multiplexing scenario on a 50-GHz WDM grid, and show that folded OFDM can provided advantages over conventional OFDM in bandwidth-limited systems.

  4. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  5. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  6. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  7. Characterization of recombinant long-chain rat acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms 3 and 6: identification of a novel variant of isoform 6.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Cynthia G; Caviglia, Jorge M; Li, Lei O; Wang, Shuli; Granger, Deborah A; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2005-02-08

    The metabolism of long-chain fatty acids in brain and their incorporation into signaling molecules such as diacylglycerol and LPA and into structural components of membranes, including myelin, requires activation by long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL). Because ACSL3 and ACSL6 are the predominant ACSL isoforms in brain, we cloned and characterized these isoforms from rat brain and identified a novel ACSL6 clone (ACSL6_v2). ACSL6_v2 and the previously reported ACSL6_v1 represent splice variants that include exon 13 or 14, respectively. Homologue sequences of both of these variants are present in the human and mouse databases. ACSL3, ACSL6_v1, and ACSL6_v2 with Flag-epitopes at the C-termini were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified on Flag-affinity columns. The three recombinant proteins were characterized. Compared to ACSL4, another brain isoform, ACSL3, ACSL6_v1, and ACSL6_v2 showed similarities in kinetic values for CoA, palmitate, and arachidonate, but their apparent Km values for oleate were 4- to 6-fold lower than for ACSL4. In a direct competition assay with palmitate, all the polyunsaturated fatty acids tested were strong competitors only for ACSL4 with IC50 values of 0.5 to 5 microM. DHA was also strongly preferred by ACSL6_v2. The apparent Km value for ATP of ACSL6_v1 was 8-fold higher than that of ACSL6_v2. ACSL3 and the two variants of ACSL6 were more resistant than ACSL4 to heat inactivation. Despite the high amino acid identity between ACSL3 and ACSL4, rosiglitazone inhibited only ACSL4. Triacsin C, an inhibitor of ACSL1 and ACSL4, also inhibited ACSL3, but did not inhibit the ACSL6 variants. These data further document important differences in the closely related ACSL isoforms and show that amino acid changes near the consensus nucleotide binding site alter function in the two splice variants of ACSL6.

  8. The function of Drosophila p53 isoforms in apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B; Rotelli, M; Dixon, M; Calvi, B R

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is a major mediator of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and is a crucial suppressor of tumor formation. In a variety of organisms, p53 and its paralogs, p63 and p73, each encode multiple protein isoforms through alternative splicing, promoters, and translation start sites. The function of these isoforms in development and disease are still being defined. Here, we evaluate the apoptotic potential of multiple isoforms of the single p53 gene in the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster. Most previous studies have focused on the p53A isoform, but it has been recently shown that a larger p53B isoform can induce apoptosis when overexpressed. It has remained unclear, however, whether one or both isoforms are required for the apoptotic response to genotoxic stress. We show that p53B is a much more potent inducer of apoptosis than p53A when overexpressed. Overexpression of two newly identified short isoforms perturbed development and inhibited the apoptotic response to ionizing radiation. Analysis of physiological protein expression indicated that p53A is the most abundant isoform, and that both p53A and p53B can form a complex and co-localize to sub-nuclear compartments. In contrast to the overexpression results, new isoform-specific loss-of-function mutants indicated that it is the shorter p53A isoform, not full-length p53B, that is the primary mediator of pro-apoptotic gene transcription and apoptosis after ionizing radiation. Together, our data show that it is the shorter p53A isoform that mediates the apoptotic response to DNA damage, and further suggest that p53B and shorter isoforms have specialized functions. PMID:25882045

  9. VEGFA splicing: divergent isoforms regulate spermatogonial stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Kevin M.; Clopton, Debra T.; Lu, Ningxia; Pohlmeier, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being well-known for regulating angiogenesis in both normal and tumorigenic environments, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) has been recently implicated in male fertility, namely in the maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells (SSC). The VEGFA gene can be spliced into multiple distinct isoforms that are either angiogenic or antiangiogenic in nature. Although studies have demonstrated the alternative splicing of VEGFA, including the divergent roles of the two isoform family types, many investigations do not differentiate between them. Data concerning VEGFA in the mammalian testis are limited, but the various angiogenic isoforms appear to promote seminiferous cord formation and to form a gradient across which cells may migrate. Treatment with either antiangiogenic isoforms of VEGFA or with inhibitors to angiogenic signaling impair these processes. Serendipitously, expression of KDR, the primary receptor for both types of VEGFA isoforms, was observed on male germ cells. These findings led to further investigation of the way that VEGFA elicits avascular functions within testes. Following treatment of donor perinatal male mice with either antiangiogenic VEGFA165b or angiogenic VEGFA164 isoforms, seminiferous tubules were less colonized following transplantation with cells from VEGFA165b-treated donors. Thus, VEGFA165b and possibly other antiangiogenic isoforms of VEGFA reduce SSC number either by promoting premature differentiation, inducing cell death, or by preventing SSC formation. Thus, angiogenic isoforms of VEGFA are hypothesized to promote SSC self-renewal, and the divergent isoforms are thought to balance one another to maintain SSC homeostasis in vivo. PMID:26553653

  10. Charged residues distribution modulates selectivity of the open state of human isoforms of the voltage dependent anion-selective channel.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage Dependent Anion-selective Channels (VDACs) are pore-forming proteins located in the outer mitochondrial membrane. They are responsible for the access of ions and energetic metabolites into the inner membrane transport systems. Three VDAC isoforms exist in mammalian, but their specific role is unknown. In this work we have performed extensive (overall ∼5 µs) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the human VDAC isoforms to detect structural and conformational variations among them, possibly related to specific functional roles of these proteins. Secondary structure analysis of the N-terminal domain shows a high similarity among the three human isoforms of VDAC but with a different plasticity. In particular, the N-terminal domain of the hVDAC1 is characterized by a higher plasticity, with a ∼20% occurrence for the 'unstructured' conformation throughout the folded segment, while hVDAC2, containing a peculiar extension of 11 amino acids at the N-terminal end, presents an additional 310-helical folded portion comprising residues 10' to 3, adhering to the barrel wall. The N-terminal sequences of hVDAC isoforms are predicted to have a low flexibility, with possible consequences in the dynamics of the human VDACs. Clear differences were found between hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 against hVDAC2: a significantly modified dynamics with possible important consequence on the voltage-gating mechanism. Charge distribution inside and at the mouth of the pore is responsible for a different preferential localization of ions with opposite charge and provide a valuable rationale for hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 having a Cl-/K+ selectivity ratio of 1.8, whereas hVDAC2 of 1.4. Our conclusion is that hVDAC isoforms, despite sharing a similar scaffold, have modified working features and a biological work is now requested to give evidence to the described dissimilarities.

  11. Protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Mary-Jane; Sambrook, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    In the cell, as in vitro, the final conformation of a protein is determined by its amino-acid sequence. But whereas some isolated proteins can be denatured and refolded in vitro in the absence of other macromolecular cellular components, folding and assembly of polypeptides in vivo involves other proteins, many of which belong to families that have been highly conserved during evolution.

  12. Use of Protein Folding Reagents.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The reagents and methods for purification and use of the most commonly used denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea, are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and "oxido-shuffling" (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described.

  13. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  14. Characterization of IGF-II Isoforms in Binge Eating Disorder and Its Group Psychological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Lelievre, Julien Yockell; Qiu, Qing; Ritchie, Kerri; Little, John; Trinneer, Anne; Barber, Ann; Chyurlia, Livia; Bissada, Hany; Gruslin, Andreé

    2013-01-01

    Intro Binge eating disorder (BED) affects 3.5% of the population and is characterized by binge eating for at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and pharmacotherapy which are associated with varied success. Little is known about the biology of BED. Since there is evidence that the insulin like growth factor system is implicated in regulation of body weight, insulin sensitivity and feeding behavior, we speculated it may be involved in BED. Methods A cross-sectional comparison was made between three groups of women: overweight with BED, overweight without BED and normal weight without BED. Women were assigned to Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Blood was collected before therapy, at completion and at 6months follow up for evaluation of IGF-II using Western blot. Results 97 overweight women with BED contributed to the cross-sectional comparison. The two control groups comprised 53 overweight women without BED, and 50 age matched normal weight women without BED. Obese women had significantly lower Big IGF-II than normal weight women, p = .028; Overweight women with BED had higher Mature IGF-II than normal weight women, p<.05. Big IGF-II showed a significant decreasing slope from pre- to post- to six months post-group psychological treatment, unrelated to changes in BMI (p = .008). Conclusion Levels of IGF-II isoforms differed significantly between overweight and normal weight women. Overweight women with BED display abnormal levels of circulating IGF-II isoforms. BED is characterized by elevated mature IGF-II, an isoform shown to carry significant bioactivity. This finding is not related to BMI or to changes in body weight. The results also provide preliminary evidence that BIG IGF-II is sensitive to change due to group psychological treatment. We suggest that abnormalities in IGF-II processing may be involved in the neurobiology of BED. PMID:24386136

  15. Transcriptional profiles of glutathione-S-Transferase isoforms, Cyp, and AOE genes in atrazine-exposed zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Glisic, Branka; Hrubik, Jelena; Fa, Svetlana; Dopudj, Nela; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) superfamily consists of multiple members involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Expressional pattern of the GST isoforms in adult fish has been used as a biomarker of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, GST transcriptional responses vary across organs, thus requiring a cross-tissue examination of multiple mRNAs for GST profiling in an animal after chemical exposure. Zebrafish embryos express all GST isoforms as adult fish and could therefore represent an alternative model for identification of biomarkers of exposure. To evaluate such a possibility, we studied a set of cytosolic and microsomal GST isoform-specific expression profiles in the zebrafish embryos after exposure to atrazine, a widely used herbicide. Expression of the GST isoforms was compared with that of CYP genes involved in the phase I of xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant enzyme (AOE) genes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we showed dynamic changes in the expressional pattern of twenty GST isoforms, cyp1a, cyp3a65, ahr2, and four AOEs in early development of zebrafish. Acute (48 and 72 h) exposure of 24 h-old embryos to atrazine, from environmentally relevant (0.005 mg/L) to high (40 mg/L) concentrations, caused a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (<2.5-fold) in the GST isoforms, ahr2 and AOE genes response. However, expression of cyp1a and cyp3a65 mRNA was markedly and consistently induced by high doses of atrazine (5 and 40 mg/L). In summary, an analysis of the response of multiple systems in the zebrafish embryos provided a comprehensive understanding of atrazine toxicity and its potential impact on biological processes.

  16. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoforms: diverse responses to acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wolosker, H; Rocha, J B; Engelender, S; Panizzutti, R; De Miranda, J; de Meis, L

    1997-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on the kinetics of Ca2+-ATPase isoforms from intracellular membranes of skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, cerebellum and blood platelets were studied. At neutral pH, all four Ca2+-ATPase isoforms exhibited similar Ca2+-concentration requirements for half-maximal rates of Ca2+ uptake and ATP hydrolysis. A decrease in the pH from 7.0 to 6.0 promoted a decrease in both the apparent affinity for Ca2+ [increasing half-maximal activation (K0.5)] and the maximal velocity (Vmax) of Ca2+ uptake. With skeletal muscle vesicles these effect were 5 to 10 times smaller than those observed with all the other isoforms. Acidification of the medium from pH 7.0 to 6.5 caused the release of Ca2+ from loaded vesicles and a decrease in the amount of Ca2+ retained by the vesicles at the steady state. With the vesicles derived from skeletal muscle these effects were smaller than for vesicles derived from other tissues. The rate of passive Ca2+ efflux from skeletal and cardiac muscle vesicles, loaded with Ca2+ and diluted in a medium containing none of the ligands of Ca2+-ATPase, was the same at pH 7.0 and 6.0. In contrast, the rate of Ca2+ efflux from cerebellar and platelet vesicles increased 2-fold after acidification of the medium. The effects of DMSO, Mg2+ with Pi and arsenate on the rate of Ca2+ efflux varied among the different preparations tested. The differences became more pronounced when the pH of the medium was decreased from 7.0 to 6.0. It is proposed that the kinetic differences among the Ca2+-ATPase isoforms may reflect different adaptations to cellular acidosis, such as that which occurs during ischaemia. PMID:9020893

  17. Digoxin Derivatives with Enhanced Selectivity for the α2 Isoform of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Adriana; Tal, Daniel M.; Heller, Dan; Haviv, Haim; Rabah, Bilal; Barkana, Yaniv; Marcovich, Arie L.; Karlish, Steven J. D.

    2014-01-01

    In the ciliary epithelium of the eye, the pigmented cells express the α1β1 isoform of Na,K-ATPase, whereas the non-pigmented cells express mainly the α2β3 isoform of Na,K-ATPase. In principle, a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor with selectivity for α2 could effectively reduce intraocular pressure with only minimal local and systemic toxicity. Such an inhibitor could be applied topically provided it was sufficiently permeable via the cornea. Previous experiments with recombinant human α1β1, α2β1, and α3β1 isoforms showed that the classical cardiac glycoside, digoxin, is partially α2-selective and also that the trisdigitoxose moiety is responsible for isoform selectivity. This led to a prediction that modification of the third digitoxose might increase α2 selectivity. A series of perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin have been synthesized by periodate oxidation and reductive amination using a variety of R-NH2 substituents. Several derivatives show enhanced selectivity for α2 over α1, close to 8-fold in the best case. Effects of topically applied cardiac glycosides on intraocular pressure in rabbits have been assessed by their ability to either prevent or reverse acute intraocular pressure increases induced by 4-aminopyridine or a selective agonist of the A3 adenosine receptor. Two relatively α2-selective digoxin derivatives efficiently normalize the ocular hypertension, by comparison with digoxin, digoxigenin, or ouabain. This observation is consistent with a major role of α2 in aqueous humor production and suggests that, potentially, α2-selective digoxin derivatives could be of interest as novel drugs for control of intraocular pressure. PMID:24917667

  18. Platelet amyloid precursor protein isoform expression in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for peripheral marker.

    PubMed

    Vignini, A; Sartini, D; Morganti, S; Nanetti, L; Luzzi, S; Provinciali, L; Mazzanti, L; Emanuelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive and memory decline. Among peripheral markers of AD, great interest has been focused on the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In this regard, platelets represent an important peripheral source of APP since it has been demonstrated that the three major isoforms, that are constituted of 770, 751 and 695 aa residues, are inserted in the membrane of resting platelets. APP 751 and APP 770 contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APP KPI) and APP 695 lacks this domain. To address this issue, we first examined the platelet APP isoform mRNAs prospectively as biomarker for the diagnosis of AD by means of real-time quantitative PCR, and then evaluated the correlation between APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment of enrolled subjects. Differential gene expression measurements in the AD patient group (n=18) revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT (1.52-fold), APP KPI (1.32-fold), APP 770 (1.33-fold) and APP 751 (1.26-fold) compared to controls (n=22). Moreover, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between APP mRNA levels (TOT, KPI, 770 and 751) and cognitive impairment. Since AD definitive diagnosis still relies on pathological evaluation at autopsy, the present results are consistent with the hypothesis that platelet APP could be considered a potential reliable peripheral marker for studying AD and could contribute to define a signature for the presence of AD pathology.

  19. Genomic tagging reveals a random association of endogenous PtdIns5P 4-kinases IIα and IIβ and a partial nuclear localization of the IIα isoform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minchuan; Bond, Nicholas J.; Letcher, Andrew J.; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Irvine, Robin F.; Clarke, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    PtdIns5P 4-kinases IIα and IIβ are cytosolic and nuclear respectively when transfected into cells, including DT40 cells [Richardson, Wang, Clarke, Patel and Irvine (2007) Cell. Signalling 19, 1309–1314]. In the present study we have genomically tagged both type II PtdIns5P 4-kinase isoforms in DT40 cells. Immunoprecipitation of either isoform from tagged cells, followed by MS, revealed that they are associated directly with each other, probably by heterodimerization. We quantified the cellular levels of the type II PtdIns5P 4-kinase mRNAs by real-time quantitative PCR and the absolute amount of each isoform in immunoprecipitates by MS using selective reaction monitoring with 14N,13C-labelled internal standard peptides. The results suggest that the dimerization is complete and random, governed solely by the relative concentrations of the two isoforms. Whereas PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIβ is >95% nuclear, as expected, the distribution of PtdIns4P 4-kinase IIα is 60% cytoplasmic (all bound to membranes) and 40% nuclear. In vitro, PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIα was 2000-fold more active as a PtdIns5P 4-kinase than the IIβ isoform. Overall the results suggest a function of PtdIns5P 4-kinase IIβ may be to target the more active IIα isoform into the nucleus. PMID:20569199

  20. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  1. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  2. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  3. Isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the bivalve mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis: activation by cyclic nucleotides and effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Bardales, José R; Díaz-Enrich, María J; Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, J Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Two different isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been partially purified from the posterior adductor muscle and the mantle tissue of the sea mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The holoenzymes contain as regulatory subunit (R) the previously identified isoforms Rmyt1 and Rmyt2, and were named PKAmyt1 and PKAmyt2, respectively. Both cAMP and cGMP can activate these PKA isoforms completely, although they exhibit a sensitivity approximately 100-fold higher for cAMP than for cGMP. When compared to PKAmyt2, the affinity of PKAmyt1 for cAMP and cGMP is 2- and 3.5-fold higher, respectively. The effect of temperature on the protein kinase activity of both PKA isoforms was examined. Temperature changes did not affect significantly the apparent activation constants (Ka) for cAMP. However, the protein kinase activity was clearly modified and a remarkable difference was observed between both PKA isoforms. PKAmyt1 showed a linear Arrhenius plot over the full range of temperature tested, with an activation energy of 15.3+/-1.5 kJ/mol. By contrast, PKAmyt2 showed a distinct break in the Arrhenius plot at 15 degrees C; the activation energy when temperature was above 15 degrees C was 7-fold higher than that of lower temperatures (70.9+/-8.1 kJ/mol vs 10.6+/-6.5 kJ/mol). These data indicate that, above 15 degrees C, PKAmyt2 activity is much more temperature-dependent than that of PKAmyt1. This different behavior would be related to the different role that these isoforms may play in the tissues where they are located.

  4. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  5. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  6. Quantitative Morphology of Epithelial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Štorgel, Nick; Krajnc, Matej; Mrak, Polona; Štrus, Jasna; Ziherl, Primož

    2016-01-01

    The shape of spatially modulated epithelial morphologies such as villi and crypts is usually associated with the epithelium-stroma area mismatch leading to buckling. We propose an alternative mechanical model based on intraepithelial stresses generated by differential tensions of apical, lateral, and basal sides of cells as well as on the elasticity of the basement membrane. We use it to theoretically study longitudinal folds in simple epithelia and we identify four types of corrugated morphologies: compact, invaginated, evaginated, and wavy. The obtained tissue contours and thickness profiles are compared to epithelial folds observed in invertebrates and vertebrates, and for most samples, the agreement is within the estimated experimental error. Our model establishes the groove-crest modulation of tissue thickness as a morphometric parameter that can, together with the curvature profile, be used to estimate the relative differential apicobasal tension in the epithelium. PMID:26745429

  7. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; ...

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  8. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. As a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  11. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A.; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S.; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A.; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light [1, 2] including circadian entrainment [3], sleep induction [4], the pupillary light response (PLR) [5], and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light) [6]. How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails [7]. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments [7]. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  12. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W; Wood, Matthew J A; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-09-21

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light including circadian entrainment, sleep induction, the pupillary light response (PLR), and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light). How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors.

  13. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  14. DNMT3B7, a truncated DNMT3B isoform expressed in human tumors, disrupts embryonic development and accelerates lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mrinal Y.; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Barnes, Natalie Y.; Figueroa, Maria E.; Kamp, Anna; Hendrick, Christopher; Ostler, Kelly R.; Davis, Elizabeth M.; Lin, Shang; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Moskowitz, Ivan; Melnick, Ari; Pytel, Peter; Godley, Lucy A.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic changes are among the most common alterations observed in cancer cells, yet the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation patterns is not understood. Cancer cells have an altered distribution of DNA methylation and express aberrant DNA methyltransferase 3B transcripts, which encode truncated proteins, some of which lack the C-terminal catalytic domain. To test if a truncated DNMT3B isoform disrupts DNA methylation in vivo, we constructed two lines of transgenic mice expressing DNMT3B7, a truncated DNMT3B isoform commonly found in cancer cells. DNMT3B7 transgenic mice exhibit altered embryonic development, including lymphopenia, craniofacial abnormalities, and cardiac defects, similar to Dnmt3b-deficient animals, but rarely develop cancer. However, when DNMT3B7 transgenic are bred with Eμ-Myc transgenic mice, which model aggressive B cell lymphoma, DNMT3B7 expression increases the frequency of mediastinal lymphomas in Eμ-Myc animals. Eμ-Myc/DNMT3B7 mediastinal lymphomas have more chromosomal rearrangements, increased global DNA methylation levels, and more locus-specific perturbations in DNA methylation patterns compared to Eμ-Myc lymphomas. These data represent the first in vivo modeling of cancer-associated DNA methylation changes and suggest that truncated DNMT3B isoforms contribute to the re-distribution of DNA methylation characterizing virtually every human tumor. PMID:20587527

  15. Cardiac Spliced BIN1 Folds T-tubule Membrane, Controlling Ion Flux and Limiting Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y.; Shaw, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte T-tubules are important for regulating ionic flux. Bridging Integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is down-regulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T-tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac spliced isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology, but frees diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action potential duration, and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also find that T-tubule inner folds are rescued only by the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP dependent actin polymerization to stabilize T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z-discs. In conclusion, BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold T-tubule membrane, creating a fuzzy space that protectively restricts ionic flux. When BIN1+13+17 is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered and arrhythmias can result. PMID:24836577

  16. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  17. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    PubMed Central

    Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Marcovina, Santica M.; Albers, John J.; Kennedy, Hal; DeLuca, Carl; White, Charles C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; McNamara, Judith R.; Seman, Leo J.; Bongard, Vanina; Schaefer, Ernst J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examination cycle 5 in subjects participating in the Framingham Offspring Study who were free of CHD. After a mean follow-up of 12.3 years, 98 men and 47 women developed new CHD events. In multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio of CHD was approximately two-fold greater in men in the upper tertile of plasma Lp(a) levels, relative to those in the bottom tertile (P < 0.002). The apo(a) isoform size contributed only modestly to the association between Lp(a) and CHD and was not an independent predictor of CHD. In multivariate analysis, Lp(a) cholesterol was not significantly associated with CHD risk in men. In women, no association between Lp(a) and CHD risk was observed. Elevated plasma Lp(a) levels are a significant and independent predictor of CHD risk in men. The assessment of apo(a) isoform size in this cohort does not add significant information about CHD risk. In addition, the cholesterol content in Lp(a) is not a significant predictor of CHD risk. PMID:21478162

  18. Distribution of Different PML/RARα bcr Isoforms in Indian Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Patients and Clinicohematological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tathagata; Gupta, Srishti; Sharma, Sanjeevan; Ganguli, Prosenjit

    2014-01-01

    Context Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), an AML subtype, is characterized morphologically by abnormal promyelocytes. Molecular studies show three possible bcr isoforms of PML-RARα fusion gene. This study undertakes analysis of PML-RARα bcr isoforms and their correlation with haematological parameters and response to treatment in Indian patients. Aims To study different PML-RARα bcr isoforms in Indian patients and to find any correlation with various haematological parameters and response to treatment Settings and Design Patients diagnosed as APL on morphology or flowcytometry and confirmed by RQ PCR were included in the study. Treated APL patients or patients with relapse and on follow-up were excluded from the study. Methods and Material Twenty patients over thirty one months period were included. The clinical, haematological & morphological features were analysed, the latter using routine & special cytochemical stains on blood and bone marrow. Flow cytometric evaluation using 4-color Beckman Coulter FC 500 and molecular studies using RT PCR Fusion Quant® kits for bcr-1, bcr-2 and bcr-3 of PML-RARα bcr isoforms on the instrument Rotor Gene™ 3000 were performed. Statistical analysis used Student t test was applied to correlate different bcr isoforms with various haematological parameters and response to treatment. Results In our study, M:F ratio was 1.5:1 with median age 42 years, Hb - 8.0 g/dl, TLC-7900/μl, and platelet – 35000/μl and varied clinical presentation. Four patients were microgranular variants, and the rest were hypergranular. MPO and CAE positivity were100% and for NSE it was 33.33%. Molecular analysis revealed PML-RARα isoforms of bcr1 in 42.85%, bcr2 in 14.28% and bcr3 in 38.09% patients. No correlation was found between PML-RARα bcr isoforms, different haematological parameters and response to treatment. Conclusions Higher incidence of PML-RARα bcr-1 isoform was found in Indian APL patients with no significant correlation between

  19. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  20. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Differential binding of thyroxine and triiodothyronine to acidic isoforms of thyroid hormone binding globulin in human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, T.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1988-05-17

    The differential availability of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) to liver from the circulating thyroid hormone binding globulin (TBG)-bound pool suggests that the two thyroid hormones may bind to different TBG isoforms in human serum. In the present study, the binding of (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ and (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ to human serum proteins was investigated by using slab gel isoelectric focusing and chromatofocusing. In normal human male serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to four isoforms of TBG called TBG-I, -II, -III, and -IV, with isoelectric points (pI's) of 4.30, 4.35, 4.45, and 4.55, respectively. (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to only two isoforms of TBG, TBG-III, and -IV, with pI's that were identical with those for (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/. In normal female serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to the same four isoforms of TBG as those of normal male serum, while (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to TBG-II, -III, -IV, and -V (pI = 4.65). In pregnant female serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to five isoforms, whereas (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to four. IEF was also performed with male serum loaded with various concentrations of unlabeled T/sub 3/. The K/sub i/ values of T/sub 3/ binding to TBG-I, -II, -III, and -IV were 5.0, 2.4, 0.86, and 0.46 nM, respectively. The TBG isoforms in normal male serum were also separated by sequential concanavalin A-Sepharose affinity chromatography and the chromatofocusing (pH range of 3.5-5.0). T/sub 4/ preferentially bound to the most acidic isoforms of TBG in the pI range of 3.8-4.0, whereas the less acidic fractions (pH 4.0-4.2) bound both T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/. In conclusion, this study shows that T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ do not bind to a single competitive binding site on TBG. Instead, T/sub 4/ is preferentially bound by the most acidic TBG isoforms owing to a 10-fold lower affinity of T/sub 3/ for these proteins.

  2. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  3. Folded MEMS approach to NMRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundeti, Venu Madhav

    Atomic gyroscopes have a potential for good performance advantages and several attempts are being made to miniaturize them. This thesis describes the efforts made in implementing a Folded MEMS based NMRG. The micro implementations of all the essential components for NMRG (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) are described in detail in regards to their design, fabrication, and characterization. A set of micro-scale Helmholtz coils are described and the homogeneity of the generated magnetic field is analyzed for different designs of heaters. The dielectric mirrors and metallic mirrors are compared in terms of reflectivity and polarization change up on reflection. A pyramid shaped folded backbone structure is designed, fabricated, and assembled along with all the required components. A novel double-folded structure 1/4th the size of original version is fabricated and assembled. Design and modeling details of a 5 layered shield with shielding factor > 106 and total volume of around 90 cc are also presented. A table top setup for characterization of atomic vapor cell is described in detail. A micro vapor cell based Rb magnetometer with a sensitivity of 108 pT/√Hz is demonstrated. The challenges due to DC heating are addressed and mitigated using an AC heater. Several experiments related to measuring the relaxation time of Xe are provided along with results. For Xe131, relaxation times of T1 = 23.78 sec, T2 = 18.06 sec and for Xe129, T1 = 21.65 sec and T2 = 20.45 sec are reported.

  4. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  5. Redox-Assisted Protein Folding Systems in Eukaryotic Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Saikh Jaharul; Majumdar, Tanmay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The cysteine (Cys) residues of proteins play two fundamentally important roles. They serve as sites of post-translational redox modifications as well as influence the conformation of the protein through the formation of disulfide bonds. Recent Advances: Redox-related and redox-associated protein folding in protozoan parasites has been found to be a major mode of regulation, affecting myriad aspects of the parasitic life cycle, host-parasite interactions, and the disease pathology. Available genome sequences of various parasites have begun to complement the classical biochemical and enzymological studies of these processes. In this article, we summarize the reversible Cys disulfide (S-S) bond formation in various classes of strategically important parasitic proteins, and its structural consequence and functional relevance. Critical Issues: Molecular mechanisms of folding remain under-studied and often disconnected from functional relevance. Future Directions: The clinical benefit of redox research will require a comprehensive characterization of the various isoforms and paralogs of the redox enzymes and their concerted effect on the structure and function of the specific parasitic client proteins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 674–683. PMID:22122448

  6. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  7. New insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the etiological agent of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious disorders. Prions are due to post-translational modifications of the cellular prion protein leading to the formation of a β-sheet enriched conformer with altered biochemical properties. The molecular events causing prion formation in sporadic prion diseases are still elusive. Recently, we published a research elucidating the contribution of major structural determinants and environmental factors in prion protein folding and stability. Our study highlighted the crucial role of octarepeats in stabilizing prion protein; the presence of a highly enthalpically stable intermediate state in prion-susceptible species; and the role of disulfide bridge in preserving native fold thus avoiding the misfolding to a β-sheet enriched isoform. Taking advantage from these findings, in this work we present new insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

  8. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  9. Structural Basis of Protein Kinase C Isoform Function

    PubMed Central

    STEINBERG, SUSAN F.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms comprise a family of lipid-activated enzymes that have been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions. PKCs are modular enzymes comprised of a regulatory domain (that contains the membrane-targeting motifs that respond to lipid cofactors, and in the case of some PKCs calcium) and a relatively conserved catalytic domain that binds ATP and substrates. These enzymes are coexpressed and respond to similar stimulatory agonists in many cell types. However, there is growing evidence that individual PKC isoforms subserve unique (and in some cases opposing) functions in cells, at least in part as a result of isoform-specific subcellular compartmentalization patterns, protein-protein interactions, and posttranslational modifications that influence catalytic function. This review focuses on the structural basis for differences in lipid cofactor responsiveness for individual PKC isoforms, the regulatory phosphorylations that control the normal maturation, activation, signaling function, and downregulation of these enzymes, and the intra-/intermolecular interactions that control PKC isoform activation and subcellular targeting in cells. A detailed understanding of the unique molecular features that underlie isoform-specific posttranslational modification patterns, protein-protein interactions, and subcellular targeting (i.e., that impart functional specificity) should provide the basis for the design of novel PKC isoform-specific activator or inhibitor compounds that can achieve therapeutically useful changes in PKC signaling in cells. PMID:18923184

  10. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  11. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  12. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Jeanne N; Martin, Adam C

    2016-09-15

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical-basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT.

  13. IsoSel: Protein Isoform Selector for phylogenetic reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Philippon, Héloïse; Souvane, Alexia; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of molecular phylogenies is strongly dependent on the quality of the assembled datasets. In the case of eukaryotes, the selection of only one protein isoform per genomic locus is mandatory to avoid biases linked to redundancy. Here, we present IsoSel, a tool devoted to the selection of alternative isoforms in the context of phylogenetic reconstruction. It provides a better alternative to the widely used approach consisting in the selection of the longest isoforms and it performs better than Guidance, its only available counterpart. IsoSel is publicly available at http://doua.prabi.fr/software/isosel. PMID:28323858

  14. Differential localization of tropomyosin isoforms in cultured nonmuscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells and human bladder carcinoma (EJ) cells contain multiple isoforms of tropomyosin, identified as a, b, 1, 2, and 3 in CEF cells and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in human EJ cells by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE (Lin, J. J.-C., D. M. Helfman, S. H. Hughes, and C.-S. Chou. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100: 692-703; and Lin, J. J.-C., S. Yamashiro-Matsumura, and F. Matsumura. 1984. Cancer Cells 1:57-65). Both isoform 3 (TM-3) of CEF and isoforms 4,5 (TM-4,-5) of human EJ cells are the minor isoforms found respectively in normal chicken and human cells. They have a lower apparent molecular mass and show a weaker affinity to actin filaments when compared to the higher molecular mass isoforms. Using individual tropomyosin isoforms immobilized on nitrocellulose papers and sequential absorption of polyclonal antiserum on these papers, we have prepared antibodies specific to CEF TM-3 and to CEF TM-1,-2. In addition, two of our antitropomyosin mAbs, CG beta 6 and CG3, have now been demonstrated by Western blots, immunoprecipitation, and two- dimensional gel analysis to have specificities to human EJ TM-3 and TM- 5, respectively. By using these isoform-specific reagents, we are able to compare the intracellular localizations of the lower and higher molecular mass isoforms in both CEF and human EJ cells. We have found that both lower and higher molecular mass isoforms of tropomyosin are localized along stress fibers of cells, as one would expect. However, the lower molecular mass isoforms are also distributed in regions near ruffling membranes. Further evidence for this different localization of different tropomyosin isoforms comes from double-label immunofluorescence microscopy on the same CEF cells with affinity- purified antibody against TM-3, and monoclonal CG beta 6 antibody against TM-a, -b, -1, and -2 of CEF tropomyosin. The presence of the lower molecular mass isoform of tropomyosin in ruffling membranes may indicate a novel

  15. Distribution of caveolin isoforms in the lemur retina.

    PubMed

    Berta, Agnes I; Kiss, Anna L; Lukáts, Akos; Szabó, Arnold; Szél, Agoston

    2007-09-01

    The distribution of caveolin isoforms was previously evaluated in the retinas of different species, but has not yet been described in the primate retina. In this study, the distribution of caveolins was assessed via immunochemistry using isoform-specific antibodies in the retina of the black-and-white ruffed lemur. Here, we report the presence of a variety of caveolin isoforms in many layers of the lemur retina. As normal human retinas were not available for research and the retinas of primates are fairly similar to those of humans, the lemur retina can be utilized as a model for caveolin distribution in normal humans.

  16. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  17. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  18. Kinetic properties of three isoforms of trypsin isolated from the pyloric caeca of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    PubMed

    Toyota, Eiko; Iyaguchi, Daisuke; Sekizaki, Haruo; Itoh, Kunihiko; Tanizawa, Kazutaka

    2007-09-01

    Three isoforms of anionic chum salmon trypsin (ST-1, ST-2, and ST-3) were purified from the pyloric caeca of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). The molecular weights of the three isoforms were about 24 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric points of ST-1, ST-2, and ST-3 were 5.8, 5.4, and 5.6, respectively. The apparent K(m) values of two isoforms (ST-1 and ST-2) for BAPA (benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide) hydrolysis at 5, 15, 25 and 35 degrees C were slightly higher than that of the main isoform ST-3, depending on temperature. The turnover numbers, k(cat), of ST-1 and ST-2 were about twice as high as that of ST-3. Consequently, the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of ST-1 and ST-2 were more efficient than ST-3. There were marked differences in both apparent K(m) and k(cat) values of three anionic chum salmon trypsins as compared to bovine cationic trypsin. K(m) values of all chum salmon trypsins were approximately 10 times lower than those of bovine trypsin, depending on the temperature. The k(cat) values of all chum salmon trypsins were about 2- to 5-fold higher than those of bovine trypsin; therefore, the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of chum salmon trypsin were 20- to 40-fold more efficient than those of bovine trypsin. On the other hand, k(cat)/K(m) values of ST-1 for TAME (tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester) hydrolysis were lower than those of bovine trypsin, whereas k(cat)/K(m) values of ST-2 and ST-3 were comparable to those of bovine trypsin, depending on the temperature.

  19. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed. PMID:26573433

  20. Graminicide insensitivity correlates with herbicide-binding co-operativity on acetyl-CoA carboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Price, Lindsey J; Herbert, Derek; Moss, Stephen R; Cole, David J; Harwood, John L

    2003-10-15

    The sensitivity of grass species to important classes of graminicide herbicides inhibiting ACCase (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) is associated with a specific inhibition of the multifunctional ACCase located in the plastids of grasses. In contrast, the multisubunit form of ACCase found in the chloroplasts of dicotyledonous plants is insensitive and the minor cytosolic multifunctional isoforms of the enzyme in both types of plants are also less sensitive to inhibition. We have isolated, separated and characterized the multifunctional ACCase isoforms found in exceptional examples of grasses that are either inherently insensitive to these graminicides, or from biotypes showing acquired resistance to their use. Major and minor multifunctional enzymes were isolated from cell suspension cultures of Festuca rubra and the 'Notts A1'-resistant biotype of Alopecurus myosuroides, and their properties compared with those isolated from cells of wild-type sensitive A. myosuroides or from sensitive maize. Purifications of up to 300-fold were necessary to separate the two isoforms. The molecular masses (200-230 kDa) and K(m) values for all three substrates (ATP, bicarbonate and acetyl-CoA) were similar for the different ACCases, irrespective of their graminicide sensitivity. Moreover, we found no correlation between the ability of isoforms to carboxylate propionyl-CoA and their sensitivity to graminicides. However, insensitive purified forms of ACCase were characterized by herbicide-binding co-operativity, whereas, in contrast, sensitive forms of the enzymes were not. Our studies on isolated individual isoforms of ACCase from grasses support and extend previous indications that herbicide binding co-operativity is the only kinetic property that differentiates naturally or selected insensitive enzymes from the typical sensitive forms usually found in grasses.

  1. Na+-dependent nucleoside transport in liver: two different isoforms from the same gene family are expressed in liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Felipe, A; Valdes, R; Santo, B; Lloberas, J; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocytes show a Na+-dependent nucleoside transport activity that is kinetically heterogeneous and consistent with the expression of at least two independent concentrative Na+-coupled nucleoside transport systems (Mercader et al. Biochem. J. 317, 835-842, 1996). So far, only a single nucleoside carrier-related cDNA (SPNT) has been isolated from liver cells (Che et al. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 13596-13599, 1995). This cDNA presumably encodes a plasma membrane protein responsible for Na+-dependent purine nucleoside transport activity. Thus, the liver must express, at least, a second nucleoside transporter which should be pyrimidine-preferring. Homology cloning using RT-PCR revealed that a second isoform is indeed present in liver. This second isoform turned out to be identical to the 'epithelial-specific isoform' called cNT1, which shows in fact high specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. Although cNT1 mRNA is present at lower amounts than SPNT mRNA, the amounts of cNT1 protein, when measured using isoform-specific polyclonal antibodies, were even higher than the SPNT protein levels. Moreover, partially purified basolateral plasma membrane vesicles from liver were enriched in the SPNT but not in the cNT1 protein, which suggests that the subcellular localization of these carrier proteins is different. SPNT and cNT1 protein amounts in crude membrane extracts from 6 h-regenerating rat livers are higher than in the preparations from sham-operated controls (3.5- and 2-fold, respectively). These results suggest that liver parenchymal cells express at least two different isoforms of concentrative nucleoside carriers, the cNT1 and SPNT proteins, which show differential regulation and subcellular localization. PMID:9480921

  2. Essential role of the nuclear isoform of RBFOX1, a candidate gene for autism spectrum disorders, in the brain development

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Nanako; Ito, Hidenori; Nishijo, Takuma; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Morishita, Rika; Tabata, Hidenori; Momiyama, Toshihiko; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Gene abnormalities in RBFOX1, encoding an mRNA-splicing factor, have been shown to cause autism spectrum disorder and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Since pathophysiological significance of the dominant nuclear isoform in neurons, RBFOX1-isoform1 (iso1), remains to be elucidated, we performed comprehensive analyses of Rbfox1-iso1 during mouse corticogenesis. Knockdown of Rbfox1-iso1 by in utero electroporation caused abnormal neuronal positioning during corticogenesis, which was attributed to impaired migration. The defects were found to occur during radial migration and terminal translocation, perhaps due to impaired nucleokinesis. Axon extension and dendritic arborization were also suppressed in vivo in Rbfox1-iso1-deficient cortical neurons. In addition, electrophysiology experiments revealed significant defects in the membrane and synaptic properties of the deficient neurons. Aberrant morphology was further confirmed by in vitro analyses; Rbfox1-iso1-konckdown in hippocampal neurons resulted in the reduction of primary axon length, total length of dendrites, spine density and mature spine number. Taken together, this study shows that Rbfox1-iso1 plays an important role in neuronal migration and synapse network formation during corticogenesis. Defects in these critical processes may induce structural and functional defects in cortical neurons, and consequently contribute to the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders with RBFOX1 abnormalities. PMID:27481563

  3. Kinematics and thermodynamics of a folding heteropolymer.

    PubMed Central

    Fukugita, M; Lancaster, D; Mitchard, M G

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the folding dynamics of protein, we have carried out numerical simulations of a heteropolymer model of self-interacting random chains. We find that folding propensity depends strongly on sequence and that both folding and nonfolding sequences exist. Furthermore we show that folding is a two-step process: the transition from coil state to unique folded state takes place through a globule phase. In addition to the continuous coil-globule transition, there exists an abrupt transition that separates the unique folded state from the globule state and ensures the stability of the native state. PMID:8327518

  4. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  5. Ontogeny of mRNA expression and activity of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) isoforms in Mus musculus heart.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Hendrik; Neal, Andrea C; Coleman, Rosalind A; Lewin, Tal M

    2007-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) activate fatty acids (FA) and provide substrates for virtually every metabolic pathway that catabolizes FA or synthesizes complex lipids. We have hypothesized that each of the five cloned ACSL isoforms partitions FA towards specific downstream pathways. Adult heart expresses all five cloned ACSL isoforms, but their independent functional roles have not been elucidated. Studies implicate ACSL1 in both oxidative and lipid synthetic pathways. To clarify the functional role of ACSL1 and the other ACSL isoforms (3-6), we examined ACS specific activity and Acsl mRNA expression in the developing mouse heart which increases FA oxidative pathways for energy production after birth. Compared to the embryonic heart, ACS specific activity was 14-fold higher on post-natal day 1 (P1). On P1, as compared to the fetus, only Acsl1 mRNA increased, whereas transcripts for the other Acsl isoforms remained the same, suggesting that ACSL1 is the major isoform responsible for activating long-chain FA for myocardial oxidation after birth. In contrast, the mRNA abundance of Acsl3 was highest on E16, and decreased dramatically by P7, suggesting that ACSL3 may play a critical role during the development of the fetal heart. Our data support the hypothesis that each ACSL has a specific role in the channeling of FA towards distinct metabolic fates.

  6. Geometry of Miura-folded metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two folded metamaterials based on the Miura-ori fold pattern. The structural mechanics of these metamaterials are dominated by the kinematics of the folding, which only depends on the geometry and therefore is scale-independent. First, a folded shell structure is introduced, where the fold pattern provides a negative Poisson’s ratio for in-plane deformations and a positive Poisson’s ratio for out-of-plane bending. Second, a cellular metamaterial is described based on a stacking of individual folded layers, where the folding kinematics are compatible between layers. Additional freedom in the design of the metamaterial can be achieved by varying the fold pattern within each layer. PMID:23401549

  7. Folding tools for flat conductor cable harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loggins, R.

    1971-01-01

    Vise grip pliers have detachable metal gripping plates which are changed to accommodate cables from 1 to 3 in. wide and to form any desired fold angle. A second tool squeezes cable along crease to complete the fold.

  8. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  9. Dynamics of Folds in the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krylov, Nikolai A.; Rogers, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Take a strip of paper and fold a crease intersecting the long edges, creating two angles. Choose one edge and consider the angle with the crease. Fold the opposite edge along the crease, creating a new crease that bisects the angle. Fold again, this time using the newly created crease and the initial edge, creating a new angle along the chosen…

  10. Secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase isoform 2 and lactation: specific localization of plasmalemmal and secretory pathway Ca2+ pump isoforms in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Faddy, Helen M.; Smart, Chanel E.; Xu, Ren; Lee, Genee Y.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Feng, Mingye; Rao, Rajini; Brown, Melissa A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2008-04-09

    The supply of calcium to the developing neonate via milk is an important physiological process. Until recently the mechanism for the enrichment of milk with calcium was thought to be almost entirely mediated via the secretory pathway. However, recent studies suggest that a specific isoform of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, is the primary mechanism for calcium transport into milk, highlighting a major role for apical calcium transport. We compared the expression of the recently identified secretory calcium ATPase, SPCA2, and SPCA1, in the mouse mammary gland during different stages of development. SPCA2 levels increased over 35 fold during lactation, while SPCA1 increased only a modest two fold. The potential importance of SPCA2 in lactation was also highlighted by its localization to luminal secretory cells of the mammary gland during lactation, while SPCA1 was expressed throughout the cells of the mammary gland. We also observed major differences in the localization of PMCA2 and PMCA1 during lactation. Using the SCp2 mouse mammary epithelial cell 3D culture model, differences in the sub-cellular distribution of PMCA2 and PMCA1 were clear. These studies highlight the likely specific roles of PMCA2 and SPCA2 in lactation, and link the recently characterized SPCA2 calcium pump to the supply of calcium into milk and the regulation of Golgi resident enzymes important in lactation. They also indicate that calcium transport into milk is a complex interplay between apical and secretory pathways.

  11. Prion neuropathology follows the accumulation of alternate prion protein isoforms after infective titre has peaked

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Malin K.; Al-Doujaily, Huda; Sharps, Bernadette; De Oliveira, Michael Wiggins; Schmidt, Christian; Richard-Londt, Angela; Lyall, Sarah; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Brandner, Sebastian; Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Clarke, Anthony R.; Collinge, John

    2014-01-01

    Prions are lethal infectious agents thought to consist of multi-chain forms (PrPSc) of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrPC). Prion propagation proceeds in two distinct mechanistic phases: an exponential phase 1, which rapidly reaches a fixed level of infectivity irrespective of PrPC expression level, and a plateau (phase 2), which continues until clinical onset with duration inversely proportional to PrPC expression level. We hypothesized that neurotoxicity relates to distinct neurotoxic species produced following a pathway switch when prion levels saturate. Here we show a linear increase of proteinase K-sensitive PrP isoforms distinct from classical PrPSc at a rate proportional to PrPC concentration, commencing at the phase transition and rising until clinical onset. The unaltered level of total PrP during phase 1, when prion infectivity increases a million-fold, indicates that prions comprise a small minority of total PrP. This is consistent with PrPC concentration not being rate limiting to exponential prion propagation and neurotoxicity relating to critical concentrations of alternate PrP isoforms whose production is PrPC concentration dependent. PMID:25005024

  12. Fluconazole Binding and Sterol Demethylation in Three CYP51 Isoforms Indicate Differences in Active Site Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamine, A.; Lepesheva, Galina I.; Waterman, Mike

    2010-11-16

    14{alpha}-Demethylase (CYP51) is a key enzyme in all sterol biosynthetic pathways (animals, fungi, plants, protists, and some bacteria), catalyzing the removal of the C-14 methyl group following cyclization of squalene. Based on mutations found in CYP51 genes from Candida albicans azole-resistant isolates obtained after fluconazole treatment of fungal infections, and using site-directed mutagenesis, we have found that fluconazole binding and substrate metabolism vary among three different CYP51 isoforms: human, fungal, and mycobacterial. In C. albicans, the Y132H mutant from isolates shows no effect on fluconazole binding, whereas the F145L mutant results in a 5-fold increase in its IC{sub 50} for fluconazole, suggesting that F145 (conserved only in fungal 14{alpha}-demethylases) interacts with this azole. In C. albicans, F145L accounts, in part, for the difference in fluconazole sensitivity reported between mammals and fungi, providing a basis for treatment of fungal infections. The C. albicans Y132H and human Y145H CYP51 mutants show essentially no effect on substrate metabolism, but the Mycobacterium tuberculosis F89H CYP51 mutant loses both its substrate binding and metabolism. Because these three residues align in the three isoforms, the results indicate that their active sites contain important structural differences, and further emphasize that fluconazole and substrate binding are uncoupled properties.

  13. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  14. 3D fold growth in transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Geological folds in transpression are inherently 3D structures; hence their growth and rotation behavior is studied using 3D numerical finite-element simulations. Upright single-layer buckle folds in Newtonian materials are considered, which grow from an initial point-like perturbation due to a combination of in-plane shortening and shearing (i.e., transpression). The resulting fold growth exhibits three components: (1) fold amplification (vertical), (2) fold elongation (parallel to fold axis), and (3) sequential fold growth (perpendicular to axial plane) of new anti- and synforms adjacent to the initial fold. Generally, the fold growth rates are smaller for shearing-dominated than for shortening-dominated transpression. In spite of the growth rate, the folding behavior is very similar for the different convergence angles. The two lateral directions always exhibit similar growth rates implying that the bulk fold structure occupies an increasing roughly circular area. Fold axes are always parallel to the major horizontal principal strain axis (λ→max, i.e., long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse), which is initially also parallel to the major horizontal instantaneous stretching axis (ISA→max). After initiation, the fold axes rotate together with λ→max. Sequential folds appearing later do not initiate parallel to ISA→max, but parallel to λ→max, i.e. parallel to the already existing folds, and also rotate with λ→max. Therefore, fold axes do not correspond to passive material lines and hinge migration takes place as a consequence. The fold axis orientation parallel to λ→max is independent of convergence angle and viscosity ratio. Therefore, a triangular relationship between convergence angle, amount of shortening, and fold axis orientation exists. If two of these values are known, the third can be determined. This relationship is applied to the Zagros fold-and-thrust-belt to estimate the degree of strain partitioning between the Simply

  15. Folding of viscous sheets and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the nonlinear folding behavior of a viscous filament or a sheet under the influence of an external force such as gravity. Everyday examples of this phenomenon are provided by the periodic folding of a sheet of honey as it impinges on toast, or the folding of a stream of shampoo as it falls on one's hand. To understand the evolution of a fold, we formulate and solve a free-boundary problem for the phenomenon, give scaling laws for the size of the folds and the frequency with which they are laid out, and verify these experimentally.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of the two actin isoforms of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Bhargav, Saligram Prabhakar; Vahokoski, Juha; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a devastating disease caused by apicomplexan parasites of the genus Plasmodium that use a divergent actin-powered molecular motor for motility and invasion. Plasmodium actin differs from canonical actins in sequence, structure and function. Here, the purification, crystallization and secondary-structure analysis of the two Plasmodium actin isoforms are presented. The recombinant parasite actins were folded and could be purified to homogeneity. Plasmodium actins I and II were crystallized in complex with the gelsolin G1 domain; the crystals diffracted to resolutions of 1.19 and 2.2 Å and belonged to space groups P212121 and P21, respectively, each with one complex in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24100575

  17. Functional refolding and characterization of two Tom40 isoforms from human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mager, Frauke; Gessmann, Dennis; Nussberger, Stephan; Zeth, Kornelius

    2011-07-01

    Tom40 proteins represent an essential class of molecules which facilitate translocation of unfolded proteins from the cytosol into the mitochondrial intermembrane space. They are part of a high-molecular mass complex that forms the protein-conducting channel in outer mitochondrial membranes. This study concerns the recombinant expression, purification and folding of amino-terminally truncated variants of the two human Tom40 isoforms for structural biology experiments. Both CD and FTIR secondary structure analysis revealed a dominant beta-sheet structure and a short alpha-helical part for both proteins together with a high thermal stability. Two secondary structure elements can be denatured independently. Reconstitution of the recombinant protein into planar lipid bilayers demonstrated ion channel activity similar to Tom40 purified from Neurospora crassa mitochondrial membranes, but conductivity fingerprints differ from the structurally closely related VDAC proteins.

  18. Anatomy and Histology of an Epicanthal Fold.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the precise anatomical and histological detail of the epicanthal fold.Thirty-two hemifaces of 16 Korean adult cadavers were used in this study (30 hemifaces with an epicanthal fold, 2 without an epicanthal fold). In 2 patients who had an epicanthoplasty, the epicanthal folds were sampled.In a dissection, the periorbital skin and subcutaneous tissues were removed and the epicanthal fold was observed in relation to each part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Specimens including the epicanthal fold were embeddedin in paraffin, sectioned at 10 um, and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. The horizontal section in the level of the paplebral fissure was made and the prepared slides were observed under a light microscope.In the specimens without an epicanthal fold, no connection between the upper preseptal muscle and the lower preseptal muscle was found. In the specimens with an epicanthal fold, a connection of the upper preseptal muscle to the lower preseptal muscle was observed. It was present in all 15 hemifaces (100%). There was no connection between the pretarsal muscles. In a horizontal section, the epicanthal fold was composed of 3 compartments: an outer skin lining, a core structure, and an innerskin lining. The core structure was mainly composed of muscular fibers and fibrotic tissue and they were intermingled.Surgeons should be aware of the anatomical details of an epicanthal fold. In removing or reconstructing an epicanthal fold, the fibromuscular core band should also be removed or reconstructed.

  19. Controlled Folding of Single Crystal Graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Ming; Kim, Na Yeon; Cunning, Benjamin V; Huang, Yuan; Qu, Deshun; Chen, Xianjue; Jin, Sunghwan; Biswal, Mandakini; Zhang, Xu; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lim, Hyunseob; Yoo, Won Jong; Lee, Zonghoon; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2017-03-08

    Folded graphene in which two layers are stacked with a twist angle between them has been predicted to exhibit unique electronic, thermal, and magnetic properties. We report the folding of a single crystal monolayer graphene film grown on a Cu(111) substrate by using a tailored substrate having a hydrophobic region and a hydrophilic region. Controlled film delamination from the hydrophilic region was used to prepare macroscopic folded graphene with good uniformity on the millimeter scale. This process was used to create many folded sheets each with a defined twist angle between the two sheets. By identifying the original lattice orientation of the monolayer graphene on Cu foil, or establishing the relation between the fold angle and twist angle, this folding technique allows for the preparation of twisted bilayer graphene films with defined stacking orientations and may also be extended to create folded structures of other two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  20. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  1. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  2. Modeling autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C in mice reveals distinct functions for Ltbp-4 isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann-Mellin, Insa; Conradi, Anne; Maul, Alexandra C.; Dinger, Katharina; Wempe, Frank; Wohl, Alexander P.; Imhof, Thomas; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Bunck, Alexander C.; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Koli, Katri; Bloch, Wilhelm; Ghanem, Alexander; Heinz, Andrea; von Melchner, Harald; Sengle, Gerhard; Sterner-Kock, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an important role for LTBP-4 in elastogenesis. Its mutational inactivation in humans causes autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C (ARCL1C), which is a severe disorder caused by defects of the elastic fiber network. Although the human gene involved in ARCL1C has been discovered based on similar elastic fiber abnormalities exhibited by mice lacking the short Ltbp-4 isoform (Ltbp4S−/−), the murine phenotype does not replicate ARCL1C. We therefore inactivated both Ltbp-4 isoforms in the mouse germline to model ARCL1C. Comparative analysis of Ltbp4S−/− and Ltbp4-null (Ltbp4−/−) mice identified Ltbp-4L as an important factor for elastogenesis and postnatal survival, and showed that it has distinct tissue expression patterns and specific molecular functions. We identified fibulin-4 as a previously unknown interaction partner of both Ltbp-4 isoforms and demonstrated that at least Ltbp-4L expression is essential for incorporation of fibulin-4 into the extracellular matrix (ECM). Overall, our results contribute to the current understanding of elastogenesis and provide an animal model of ARCL1C. PMID:25713297

  3. Regulation of PGC-1α Isoform Expression in Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Popov, D. V.; Lysenko, E. A.; Kuzmin, I. V.; Vinogradova, Vinogradova; Grigoriev, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    The coactivator PGC-1α is the key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle expresses several PGC-1α isoforms. This review covers the functional role of PGC-1α isoforms and the regulation of their exercise-associated expression in skeletal muscle. The patterns of PGC-1α mRNA expression may markedly differ at rest and after muscle activity. Different signaling pathways are activated by different physiological stimuli, which regulate the expression of the PGC-1α gene from the canonical and alternative promoters: expression from a canonical (proximal) promoter is regulated by activation of the AMPK; expression from an alternative promoter, via a β2-adrenergic receptor. All transcripts from both promoters are subject to alternative splicing. As a result, truncated isoforms that possess different properties are translated: truncated isoforms are more stable and predominantly activate angiogenesis, whereas full-length isoforms manly regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. The existence of several isoforms partially explains the broad-spectrum function of this protein and allows the organism to adapt to different physiological stimuli. Regulation of the PGC-1α gene expression by different signaling pathways provides ample opportunity for pharmacological influence on the expression of this gene. Those opportunities might be important for the treatment and prevention of various diseases, such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of the PGC-1α gene expression and their functional role may provide an opportunity to control the expression of different isoforms through exercise and/or pharmacological intervention. PMID:25927001

  4. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  5. Insulin Receptor Isoform Variations in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Claire M.; Zielinska, H. A.; Wang, Jing; Jarrett, Caroline; Frankow, A.; Ladomery, Michael R.; Bahl, Amit; Rhodes, Anthony; Oxley, Jon; Holly, Jeff M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Men who develop prostate cancer (PCa) increasingly have one of the co-morbidities associated with a Western lifestyle that are characterized by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and increased expression of insulin-like growth factors-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. Each have been associated with poor prognosis and more aggressive cancers that exhibit increased metabolism and increased glucose uptake. The insulin receptor (IR) has two splice isoforms IR-A and IR-B: IR-A has a higher affinity for IGF-II comparable to that for insulin, whereas the IR-B isoform predominantly just binds to insulin. In this study, we assessed alterations in the IR-A and IR-B isoform ratio and associated changes in cell proliferation and migration of PCa cell lines following exposure to altered concentrations of glucose and treatment with IGF-II and insulin. We observed that where IR-B predominated insulin had a greater effect on migration than IGF-II and IGF-II was more effective when IR-A was the main isoform. With regard to proliferation IGF-II was more effective than insulin regardless of which isoform was dominant. We assessed the abundance of the IR isoforms both in vivo and in vitro and observed that the majority of the tissue samples and cell lines expressed more IR-A than IR-B. Alterations in the isoforms in response to changes in their hormonal milieu could have a profound impact on how malignant cells behave and play a role in promoting carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying changes in alternative splicing of the IR may provide additional targets for future cancer therapies. PMID:27733843

  6. Akt isoform specific effects in ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Linnerth-Petrik, Nicolle M.; Santry, Lisa A.; Moorehead, Roger; Jücker, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a significant therapeutic problem and novel, effective therapies are needed. Akt is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including ovarian. Mammalian cells express three Akt isoforms which are encoded by distinct genes. Although there are several Akt inhibitors in clinical trials, most indiscriminately target all isoforms. Current in vitro data and animal knockout experiments suggest that the Akt isoforms may have divergent roles. In this paper, we determined the isoform-specific functions of Akt in ovarian cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in ovarian cancer progression in vivo. For in vitro experiments, murine and human ovarian cancer cells were treated with Akt inhibitors and cell viability was assessed. We used two different in vivo approaches to identify the roles of Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression and their influence on the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment. In one experiment, wild-type C57Bl6 mice were orthotopically injected with ID8 cells with stable knockdown of Akt isoforms. In a separate experiment, mice null for Akt 1-3 were orthotopically injected with WT ID8 cells (Figure 1). Our data show that inhibition of Akt1 significantly reduced ovarian cancer cell proliferation and inhibited tumor progression in vivo. Conversely, disruption of Akt2 increased tumor growth. Inhibition of Akt3 had an intermediate phenotype, but also increased growth of ovarian cancer cells. These data suggest that there is minimal redundancy between the Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression. These findings have important implications in the design of Akt inhibitors for the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27533079

  7. Stress and strain evolution of folding rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Weikusat, Ilka

    2015-04-01

    One of the main objectives of structural geology is to unravel rock deformation histories. Fold shapes can be used to estimate the orientation and amount of strain associated with folding. However, much more information on rheology and kinematics can potentially be extracted from fold geometries (Llorens et al., 2013a). We can study the development of folds, quantify the relationships between the different parameters that determine their geometries and estimate their mechanical evolution. This approach allows us to better understand and predict not only rock but also ice deformation. One of the main parameters in fold development is the viscosity contrast between the folding layer and the matrix in which it is embedded (m), since it determines the initial fold wavelength and the amplification rate of the developing folds. Moreover, non-linear viscous rheology influences fold geometry too (Llorens et al., 2013b). We present a series of 2-dimensional simulations of folding of viscous single layers in pure and simple shear. We vary different parameters in order to compare and determine their influence on the resulting fold patterns and the associated mechanical response of the material. To perform these simulations we use the software platform ELLE (www.elle.ws) with the non-linear viscous finite element code BASIL. The results show that layers thicken at the beginning of deformation in all simulations, and visible folds start earlier or later depending on the viscosity contrast. When folds start to nucleate the layer maximum shear strain decreases, moving away from the theoretical trend for homogeneous strain (no folding). This allows the accurate determination of the onset of folding. Maximum deviatoric stresses are higher in power-law than in linear-viscosity materials, and it is initially double in pure shear than in simple shear conditions. Therefore, folding a competent layer requires less work in simple than in pure shear. The maximum deviatoric stress

  8. The plasma membrane Ca2+ pump isoform 4a differs from isoform 4b in the mechanism of calmodulin binding and activation kinetics: implications for Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Caride, Ariel J; Filoteo, Adelaida G; Penniston, John T; Strehler, Emanuel E

    2007-08-31

    The inhibition by the regulatory domain and the interaction with calmodulin (CaM) vary among plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) isoforms. To explore these differences, the kinetics of CaM effects on PMCA4a were investigated and compared with those of PMCA4b. The maximal apparent rate constant for CaM activation of PMCA4a was almost twice that for PMCA4b, whereas the rates of activation for both isoforms showed similar dependence on Ca2+. The inactivation of PMCA4a by CaM removal was also faster than for PMCA4b, and Ca2+ showed a much smaller effect (2- versus 30-fold modification). The rate constants of the individual steps that determine the overall rates were obtained from stopped-flow experiments in which binding of TA-CaM was observed by changes in its fluorescence. TA-CaM binds to two conformations of PMCA4a, an "open" conformation with high activity, and a "closed" one with lower activity. Compared with PMCA4b (Penheiter, A. R., Bajzer, Z., Filoteo, A. G., Thorogate, R., Török, K., and Caride, A. J. (2003) Biochemistry 41, 12115-12124), the model for PMCA4a predicts less inhibition in the closed form and a much faster equilibrium between the open and closed forms. Based on the available kinetic parameters, we determined the constants to fit the shape of a Ca2+ signal in PMCA4b-overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Using the constants for PMCA4a, and allowing small variations in parameters of other systems contributing to a Ca2+ signal, we then simulated the effect of PMCA4a on the shape of a Ca2+ signal in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The results reproduce the published data (Brini, M., Coletto, L., Pierobon, N., Kraev, N., Guerini, D., and Carafoli, E. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 24500-24508), and thereby demonstrate the importance of altered regulatory kinetics for the different functional properties of PMCA isoforms.

  9. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  10. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  11. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  12. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  14. Increased temporolimbic cortical folding complexity in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Voets, N.L.; Bernhardt, B.C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, U.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Converging evidence suggests that abnormalities of brain development may play a role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). As sulco-gyral patterns are thought to be a footprint of cortical development, we set out to quantitatively map folding complexity across the neocortex in TLE. Additionally, we tested whether there was a relationship between cortical complexity and features of hippocampal maldevelopment, commonly referred to as malrotation. Methods: To quantify folding complexity, we obtained whole-brain surface-based measures of absolute mean cortical curvature from MRI scans acquired in 43 drug-resistant patients with TLE with unilateral hippocampal atrophy, and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In patients, we correlated changes in cortical curvature with 3-dimensional measures of hippocampal positioning. Results: We found increased folding complexity in the temporolimbic cortices encompassing parahippocampal, temporopolar, insular, and fronto-opercular regions. Increased complexity was observed ipsilateral to the seizure focus in patients with left TLE (LTLE), whereas these changes were bilateral in patients with right TLE (RTLE). In both TLE groups, increased temporolimbic complexity was associated with increased hippocampal malrotation. We found tendencies for increased complexity in bilateral posterior temporal cortices in LTLE and contralateral parahippocampal cortices in RTLE to be predictive of unfavorable seizure outcome after surgery. Conclusion: The anatomic distribution of increased cortical complexity overlapping with limbic seizure networks in TLE and its association with hippocampal maldevelopment further imply that neurodevelopmental factors may play a role in the epileptogenic process of TLE. PMID:21148116

  15. Changes in isoform composition, structure, and functional properties of titin from Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle after space flight.

    PubMed

    Vikhlyantsev, I M; Okuneva, A D; Shpagina, M D; Shumilina, Yu V; Molochkov, N V; Salmov, N N; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2011-12-01

    Changes in isoform composition, secondary structure, and titin phosphorylation in Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle were studied after 12-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft Foton-M3. The effect of titin on the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity at pCa 7.5 and 4.6 was also studied. Almost twofold increase in titin long N2BA isoform content relative to that of short N2B isoform was found on electrophoregrams of cardiac muscle left ventricle of the flight group gerbils. Differences in secondary structure of titin isolated from cardiac muscle of control and flight groups of gerbils were found. An increase in phosphorylation (1.30-1.35-fold) of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils was found. A decrease in activating effect of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils on actomyosin ATPase activity in vitro was also found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of M. unguiculatus cardiac muscle adaptation to conditions of weightlessness.

  16. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  17. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  18. Lobster (Panulirus argus) hepatopancreatic trypsin isoforms and their digestion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Casariego, Javier; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Calero, Jorge; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Mancera, Juan M

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that crustaceans exhibit several isoforms of trypsin in their digestive system. Although the number of known crustacean trypsin isoforms continues increasing, especially those derived from cDNA sequences, the role of particular isoenzymes in digestion remains unknown. Among invertebrates, significant advances in the understanding of the role of multiple trypsins have been made only in insects. Since it has been demonstrated that trypsin isoenzyme patterns (phenotypes) in lobster differ in digestion efficiency, we used this crustacean as a model for assessing the biochemical basis of such differences. We demonstrated that the trypsin isoform known to be present in all individuals of Panulirus argus has a high catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m) ) and is the most reactive toward native proteinaceous substrates, whereas one of the isoforms present in less efficient individuals has a lower k(cat) and a lower k(cat)/K(m), and it is less competent at digesting native proteins. A fundamental question in biology is how genetic differences produce different physiological performances. This work is the first to demonstrate that trypsin phenotypic variation in crustacean protein digestion relies on the biochemical properties of the different isoforms. Results are relevant for understanding trypsin polymorphism and protein digestion in lobster.

  19. Differential expression of serum clusterin isoforms in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; de la Cadena, María Páez; López-Saco, Angel; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J

    2006-09-01

    Clusterin is an enigmatic protein altered in tumors of colorectal cancer patients. Because there is no information available about serum clusterin regarding this pathology, we applied proteomic techniques to analyze its isoforms in donors and patients. First we separated serum proteins through concanavalin A, obtaining a fraction with non- and O-glycosylated proteins (FI) and a second fraction enriched in N-glycoproteins (FII) wherein clusterin was supposed to elute on the basis of its glycosylation. Surprisingly analysis of the FI fraction revealed the existence of an unexpected and aberrantly N-glycosylated clusterin that was overexpressed in patients and comprised at least five isoforms with different isoelectric points. On the other hand, two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of the clusterin eluted in FII detected one isoform that was increased and 15 isoforms that were decreased or absent in serum of patients. Finally immunoquantification by slot blot showed that in total serum and in FI the clusterin levels were significantly increased in patients, whereas in FII there was no significant variation. Therefore, serum clusterin and some of its isoforms could have a potential value as colorectal tumor markers and are interesting subjects for biomarker studies.

  20. Chemical origins of isoform selectivity in histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butler, Kyle V; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-01-01

    Histones undergo extensive posttranslational modifications that affect gene expression. Acetylation is a key histone modification that is primarily regulated by two enzymes, one of which is histone deacetylase (HDAC). The activity of HDAC causes transcriptional silencing of DNA. Eleven distinct zinc-dependent histone deacetylase isoforms have been identified in humans. Each isoform has a unique structure and function, and regulates a unique set of genes. HDAC is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in cancer cell proliferation, and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological conditions. HDAC inhibitors are known to be very effective anti-cancer agents, and research has shown them to be potential treatments for many other conditions. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modify the expression of many genes, and it is possible that inhibition of one isoform could cause epigenetic changes that are beneficial to treatment of a disease, while inhibition of another isoform could cause contradictory changes. Selective HDAC inhibitors will be better able to avoid these types of situations than non-specific inhibitors, and may also be less toxic than pan-HDAC inhibitors. Many potent pan-HDAC inhibitors have already been developed, leaving the development of selective inhibitors at the forefront of HDAC drug development. Certain structural moieties may be added to HDAC inhibitors to give isoform selectivity, and these will be discussed in this review. This review will focus on the applications of selective HDAC inhibitors, inhibitors reported to show selectivity, and the relationship between inhibitor structure and selectivity.

  1. Opposing roles of glutaminase isoforms in determining glioblastoma cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) play pivotal roles in the malignant phenotype of brain tumors via multiple mechanisms. Glutaminase (GA, EC 3.5.1.2) metabolizes Gln to Glu and ammonia. Human GA isoforms are encoded by two genes: GLS gene codes for kidney-type isoforms, KGA and GAC, whereas GLS2 codes for liver-type isoforms, GAB and LGA. The expression pattern of both genes in different neoplastic cell lines and tissues implicated that the kidney-type isoforms are associated with cell proliferation, while the liver-type isoforms dominate in, and contribute to the phenotype of quiescent cells. GLS gene has been demonstrated to be regulated by oncogene c-Myc, whereas GLS2 gene was identified as a target gene of p53 tumor suppressor. In glioblastomas (GBM, WHO grade IV), the most aggressive brain tumors, high levels of GLS and only traces or lack of GLS2 transcripts were found. Ectopic overexpression of GLS2 in human glioblastoma T98G cells decreased their proliferation and migration and sensitized them to the alkylating agents often used in the chemotherapy of gliomas. GLS silencing reduced proliferation of glioblastoma T98G cells and strengthen the antiproliferative effect evoked by previous GLS2 overexpression.

  2. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Giannini, C; Sarkaria, J N; Schroeder, M; Rogers, J; Mastroeni, D; Scrable, H

    2013-06-27

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10 to 70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, some of which can modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry and reverse transcription-PCR. We found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared with tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions.

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  5. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  6. Optical methods for measuring DNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam D.; Ukogu, Obinna A.; Devenica, Luka M.; White, Elizabeth D.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important biological processes is the dynamic folding and unfolding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The folding process is crucial for DNA to fit within the boundaries of the cell, while the unfolding process is essential for DNA replication and transcription. To accommodate both processes, the cell employs a highly active folding mechanism that has been the subject of intense study over the last few decades. Still, many open questions remain. What are the pathways for folding or unfolding? How does the folding equilibrium shift? And, what is the energy landscape for a particular process? Here, we review these emerging questions and the in vitro, optical methods that have provided answers, introducing the topic for those physicists seeking to step into biology. Specifically, we discuss two iconic experiments for DNA folding, the tethered particle motion (TPM) experiment and the optical tweezers experiment.

  7. Structural features of protein folding nuclei.

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Kondratova, M S

    2008-03-05

    A crucial event of protein folding is the formation of a folding nucleus. We demonstrate the presence of a considerable coincidence between the location of folding nuclei and the location of so-called "root structural motifs", which have unique overall folds and handedness. In the case of proteins with a single root structural motif, the involvement in the formation of a folding nucleus is in average significantly higher for amino acids residues that are in root structural motifs, compared to residues in other parts of the protein. The tests carried out revealed that the observed difference is statistically reliable. Thus, a structural feature that corresponds to the protein folding nucleus is now found.

  8. Investigating the Three-dimensional Flow Separation Induced by a Model Vocal Fold Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kelley C.; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The fluid-structure energy exchange process for normal speech has been studied extensively, but it is not well understood for pathological conditions. Polyps and nodules, which are geometric abnormalities that form on the medial surface of the vocal folds, can disrupt vocal fold dynamics and thus can have devastating consequences on a patient's ability to communicate. Our laboratory has reported particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within an investigation of a model polyp located on the medial surface of an in vitro driven vocal fold model, which show that such a geometric abnormality considerably disrupts the glottal jet behavior. This flow field adjustment is a likely reason for the severe degradation of the vocal quality in patients with polyps. A more complete understanding of the formation and propagation of vortical structures from a geometric protuberance, such as a vocal fold polyp, and the resulting influence on the aerodynamic loadings that drive the vocal fold dynamics, is necessary for advancing the treatment of this pathological condition. The present investigation concerns the three-dimensional flow separation induced by a wall-mounted prolate hemispheroid with a 2:1 aspect ratio in cross flow, i.e. a model vocal fold polyp, using an oil-film visualization technique. Unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation and its impact of the wall pressure loading are examined using skin friction line visualization and wall pressure measurements. PMID:24513707

  9. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  10. Implicit modeling of folds and overprinting deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Ailleres, Laurent; Grose, Lachlan; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark; Armit, Robin

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional structural modeling is gaining importance for a broad range of quantitative geoscientific applications. However, existing approaches are still limited by the type of structural data they are able to use and by their lack of structural meaning. Most techniques heavily rely on spatial data for modeling folded layers, but are unable to completely use cleavage and lineation information for constraining the shape of modeled folds. This lack of structural control is generally compensated by expert knowledge introduced in the form of additional interpretive data such as cross-sections and maps. With this approach, folds are explicitly designed by the user instead of being derived from data. This makes the resulting structures subjective and deterministic. This paper introduces a numerical framework for modeling folds and associated foliations from typical field data. In this framework, a parametric description of fold geometry is incorporated into the interpolation algorithm. This way the folded geometry is implicitly derived from observed data, while being controlled through structural parameters such as fold wavelength, amplitude and tightness. A fold coordinate system is used to support the numerical description of fold geometry and to modify the behavior of classical structural interpolators. This fold frame is constructed from fold-related structural elements such as axial foliations, intersection lineations, and vergence. Poly-deformed terranes are progressively modeled by successively modeling each folding event going backward through time. The proposed framework introduces a new modeling paradigm, which enables the building of three-dimensional geological models of complex poly-deformed terranes. It follows a process based on the structural geologist approach and is able to produce geomodels that honor both structural data and geological knowledge.

  11. Screening of L-histidine-based ligands to modify monolithic supports and selectively purify the supercoiled plasmid DNA isoform.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Lúcia F A; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A; Cruz, Carla; Sousa, Ângela

    2015-06-01

    The growing demand of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA (pDNA) suitable for biotherapeutic applications fostered the development of new purification strategies. The surface plasmon resonance technique was employed for a fast binding screening of l-histidine and its derivatives, 1-benzyl-L-histidine and 1-methyl-L-histidine, as potential ligands for the biorecognition of three plasmids with different sizes (6.05, 8.70, and 14 kbp). The binding analysis was performed with different isoforms of each plasmid (supercoiled, open circular, and linear) separately. The results revealed that the overall affinity of plasmids to l-histidine and its derivatives was high (KD  > 10(-8)  M), and the highest affinity was found for human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 (K(D)  = 1.1 × 10(-10)  M and KD  = 3.34 × 10(-10)  M for open circular and linear plasmid isoforms, respectively). L-Histidine and 1-benzyl-L-histidine were immobilized on monolithic matrices. Chromatographic studies of L-histidine and 1-benzyl-L-histidine monoliths were also performed with the aforementioned samples. In general, the supercoiled isoform had strong interactions with both supports. The separation of plasmid isoforms was achieved by decreasing the ammonium sulfate concentration in the eluent, in both supports, but a lower salt concentration was required in the 1-benzyl-L-histidine monolith because of stronger interactions promoted with pDNA. The efficiency of plasmid isoforms separation remained unchanged with flow rate variations. The binding capacity for pDNA achieved with the l-histidine monolith was 29-fold higher than that obtained with conventional L-histidine agarose. Overall, the combination of either L-histidine or its derivatives with monolithic supports can be a promising strategy to purify the supercoiled isoform from different plasmids with suitable purity degree for pharmaceutical applications.

  12. Deterministic Folding in Stiff Elastic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, T.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2008-09-01

    Crumpled membranes have been found to be characterized by complex patterns of spatially seemingly random facets separated by narrow ridges of high elastic energy. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that compression of stiff elastic membranes with small randomness in their initial configurations leads to either random ridge configurations (high entropy) or nearly deterministic folds (low elastic energy). For folding with symmetric ridge configurations to appear in part of the crumpling processes, the crumpling rate must be slow enough. Folding stops when the thickness of the folded structure becomes important, and crumpling continues thereafter as a random process.

  13. Protein Folding and Self-Organized Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, Arun; Murray, Joelle

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. However, the complex dynamics of protein folding and the way they consistently fold into the same structures is not fully understood. Self-organized criticality (SOC) has provided a framework for understanding complex systems in various systems (earthquakes, forest fires, financial markets, and epidemics) through scale invariance and the associated power law behavior. In this research, we use a simple hydrophobic-polar lattice-bound computational model to investigate self-organized criticality as a possible mechanism for generating complexity in protein folding.

  14. Distinguishing between sequential and nonsequentially folded proteins: implications for folding and misfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Maizel, J. V.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here an algorithm for distinguishing sequential from nonsequentially folding proteins. Several experiments have recently suggested that most of the proteins that are synthesized in the eukaryotic cell may fold sequentially. This proposed folding mechanism in vivo is particularly advantageous to the organism. In the absence of chaperones, the probability that a sequentially folding protein will misfold is reduced significantly. The problem we address here is devising a procedure that would differentiate between the two types of folding patterns. Footprints of sequential folding may be found in structures where consecutive fragments of the chain interact with each other. In such cases, the folding complexity may be viewed as being lower. On the other hand, higher folding complexity suggests that at least a portion of the polypeptide backbone folds back upon itself to form three-dimensional (3D) interactions with noncontiguous portion(s) of the chain. Hence, we look at the mechanism of folding of the molecule via analysis of its complexity, that is, through the 3D interactions formed by contiguous segments on the polypeptide chain. To computationally splice the structure into consecutively interacting fragments, we either cut it into compact hydrophobic folding units or into a set of hypothetical, transient, highly populated, contiguous fragments ("building blocks" of the structure). In sequential folding, successive building blocks interact with each other from the amino to the carboxy terminus of the polypeptide chain. Consequently, the results of the parsing differentiate between sequentially vs. nonsequentially folded chains. The automated assessment of the folding complexity provides insight into both the likelihood of misfolding and the kinetic folding rate of the given protein. In terms of the funnel free energy landscape theory, a protein that truly follows the mechanism of sequential folding, in principle, encounters smoother free energy barriers

  15. Vitamin E isoforms as modulators of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2013-10-31

    Asthma and allergic diseases are complex conditions caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Clinical studies suggest a number of protective dietary factors for asthma, including vitamin E. However, studies of vitamin E in allergy commonly result in seemingly conflicting outcomes. Recent work indicates that allergic inflammation is inhibited by supplementation with the purified natural vitamin E isoform α-tocopherol but elevated by the isoform γ-tocopherol when administered at physiological tissue concentrations. In this review, we discuss opposing regulatory effects of α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on allergic lung inflammation in clinical trials and in animal studies. A better understanding of the differential regulation of inflammation by isoforms of vitamin E provides a basis towards the design of clinical studies and diets that would effectively modulate inflammatory pathways in lung disease.

  16. Actin isoform specificity is required for the maintenance of lactation

    PubMed Central

    Weymouth, Nate; Shi, Zengdun; Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is one of six highly conserved mammalian actin isoforms that appear to exhibit functional redundancy. Nonetheless, we have postulated a specific functional role for the smooth muscle specific isoform. Here, we show that Acta2 deficient mice have a remarkable mammary phenotype such that dams lacking Acta2 are unable to nurse their offspring effectively. The phenotype was rescued in cross fostering experiments with wild type mice, excluding a developmental defect in Acta2 null pups. The mechanism for the underlying phenotype is due to myoepithelial dysfunction postpartum resulting in precocious involution. Further, we demonstrate a specific defect in myoepithelial cell contractility in Acta2 null mammary glands, despite normal expression of cytoplasmic actins. We conclude that Acta2 specifically mediates myoepithelial cell contraction during lactation and that this actin isoform therefore exhibits functional specificity. PMID:22123032

  17. Laminin isoforms in endothelial and perivascular basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Lema F; Di Russo, Jacopo; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, one of the major functional components of basement membranes, are found underlying endothelium, and encasing pericytes and smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. Depending on the type of blood vessel (capillary, venule, postcapillary venule, vein or artery) and their maturation state, both the endothelial and mural cell phenotype vary, with associated changes in laminin isoform expression. Laminins containing the α4 and α5 chains are the major isoforms found in the vessel wall, with the added contribution of laminin α2 in larger vessels. We here summarize current data on the precise localization of these laminin isoforms and their receptors in the different layers of the vessel wall, and their potential contribution to vascular homeostasis.

  18. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  19. Biochemical properties of human pantothenate kinase 2 isoforms and mutations linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2006-01-06

    The PANK2 gene encodes the human pantothenate kinase 2 protein isoforms, and PANK2 mutations are linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Two PanK2 protein forms are proteolytically processed to form a mitochondrially localized, mature PanK2. Another isoform arose from a proposed initiation at a leucine codon and was not processed further. The fifth isoform was postulated to arise from an alternative splicing event and was found to encode an inactive protein. Fourteen mutant PanK2 proteins with single amino acid substitutions, associated with either early or late onset disease, were evaluated for activity. The PanK2(G521R), the most frequent mutation in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, was devoid of activity and did not fold properly. However, nine of the mutant proteins associated with disease possessed catalytic activities that were indistinguishable from wild type, including the frequently encountered PanK2(T528M) missense mutation. PanK2 was extremely sensitive to feedback inhibition by CoA thioesters (IC50 values between 250 and 500 nM), and the regulation of the active PanK2 mutants was comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Coexpression of the PanK2(G521R) and wild-type PanK2 did not interfere with wild-type enzyme activity, arguing against a dominant negative effect of the PanK2(G521R) mutation in heterozygous patients. These data described the unique biochemical features of the PanK2 isoforms and suggested that catalytic defects may not be the sole cause for the neurodegenerative phenotype.

  20. Distinct freshwater and seawater isoforms of Na+/K+-ATPase in gill chloride cells of Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Stephen D.; Regish, A.M.; Christensen, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) in teleost fishes is involved in ion regulation in both freshwater and seawater. We have developed and validated rabbit polyclonal antibodies specific to the NKA alpha1a and alpha1b protein isoforms of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar Linnaeus), and used western blots and immunohistochemistry to characterize their size, abundance and localization. The relative molecular mass of NKA alpha1a is slightly less than that for NKA beta1b. The abundance of gill NKA alpha1a was high in freshwater and became nearly undetectable after seawater acclimation. NKA alpha1b was present in small amounts in freshwater and increased 13-fold after seawater acclimation. Both NKA isoforms were detected only in chloride cells. NKA alpha1a was located in both filamental and lamellar chloride cells in freshwater, whereas in seawater it was present only as a faint background in filamental chloride cells. In freshwater, NKA alpha1b was found in a small number of filamental chloride cells, and after seawater acclimation it was found in all chloride cells on the filament and lamellae. Double simultaneous immunofluorescence indicated that NKA alpha1a and alpha1b are located in different chloride cells in freshwater. In many chloride cells in seawater, NKA alpha1b was present in greater amounts in the subapical region than elsewhere in the cell. The combined patterns in abundance and immunolocalization of these two isoforms can explain the salinity-related changes in total NKA and chloride cell abundance. The results indicate that there is a freshwater and a seawater isoform of NKA alpha-subunit in the gills of Atlantic salmon and that they are present in distinct chloride cells.

  1. Isoform-specific Inhibition of Cyclophilins

    PubMed Central

    Daum, Sebastian; Schumann, Michael; Mathea, Sebastian; Aumüller, Tobias; Balsley, Molly A.; Constant, Stephanie L.; de Lacroix, Boris Féaux; Kruska, Fabian; Braun, Manfred; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2009-01-01

    Cyclophilins belong to the enzyme class of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases which catalyze the cis/trans isomerization of prolyl bonds in peptides and proteins in different folding states. Cyclophilins have been shown to be involved in a multitude of cellular functions like cell growth, proliferation, and motility. Among the 20 human cyclophilin isoenzymes, the two most abundant members of the cyclophilin family CypA and CypB exhibit specific cellular functions in several inflammatory diseases, cancer development and HCV replication. A small-molecule inhibitor on the basis of aryl 1-indanylketones has now been shown to discriminate between CypA and CypB in vitro. CypA binding of this inhibitor has been characterized by fluorescence anisotropy- and isothermal titration calorimetry-based cyclosporin competition assays. Inhibition of CypA- but not CypB-mediated chemotaxis of mouse CD4+ T cells by the inhibitor provided biological proof of discrimination in vivo. PMID:19480458

  2. Autocrine VEGF Isoforms Differentially Regulate Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Rundqvist, Helene; Branco, Cristina; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration, and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell homeostasis in

  3. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform. PMID:26354849

  4. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E

    2015-11-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform.

  5. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  6. On the Role of Entropy in the Protein Folding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Travis

    2011-12-01

    A protein's ultimate function and activity is determined by the unique three-dimensional structure taken by the folding process. Protein malfunction due to misfolding is the culprit of many clinical disorders, such as abnormal protein aggregations. This leads to neurodegenerative disorders like Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease. We focus on a subset of the folding problem, exploring the role and effects of entropy on the process of protein folding. Four major concepts and models are developed and each pertains to a specific aspect of the folding process: entropic forces, conformational states under crowding, aggregation, and macrostate kinetics from microstate trajectories. The exclusive focus on entropy is well-suited for crowding studies, as many interactions are nonspecific. We show how a stabilizing entropic force can arise purely from the motion of crowders in solution. In addition we are able to make a a quantitative prediction of the crowding effect with an implicit crowding approximation using an aspherical scaled-particle theory. In order to investigate the effects of aggregation, we derive a new operator expansion method to solve the Ising/Potts model with external fields over an arbitrary graph. Here the external fields are representative of the entropic forces. We show that this method reduces the problem of calculating the partition function to the solution of recursion relations. Many of the methods employed are coarse-grained approximations. As such, it is useful to have a viable method for extracting macrostate information from time series data. We develop a method to cluster the microstates into physically meaningful macrostates by grouping similar relaxation times from a transition matrix. Overall, the studied topics allow us to understand deeper the complicated process involving proteins.

  7. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  8. Retinal and Choroidal Folds in Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick A.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Garvin, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency, patterns, associations, and biomechanical implications of retinal and choroidal folds in papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods Retinal and choroidal folds were studied in patients enrolled in the IIH Treatment Trial using fundus photography (n = 165 study eyes) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT; n = 125). We examined the association between folds and peripapillary shape, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, disc volume, Frisén grade, acuity, perimetric mean deviation, intraocular pressure, intracranial pressure, and refractive error. Results We identified three types of folds in IIH patients with papilledema: peripapillary wrinkles (PPW), retinal folds (RF), and choroidal folds (CF). Frequency, with photos, was 26%, 19%, and 1%, respectively; SD-OCT frequency was 46%, 47%, and 10%. At least one type of fold was present in 41% of patients with photos and 73% with SD-OCT. Spectral-domain OCT was more sensitive. Structural parameters related to the severity of papilledema were associated with PPW and RF, whereas anterior deformation of the peripapillary RPE/basement membrane layer was associated with CF and RF. Folds were not associated with vision loss at baseline. Conclusions Folds in papilledema are biomechanical signs of stress/strain on the optic nerve head and load-bearing structures induced by intracranial hypertension. Folds are best imaged with SD-OCT. The patterns of retinal and choroidal folds are the products of a complex interplay between the degree of papilledema and anterior deformation of the load-bearing structures (sclera and possibly the lamina cribrosa), both modulated by structural geometry and material properties of the optic nerve head. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26335066

  9. Guiding the folding pathway of DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Katherine E.; Dannenberg, Frits; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Bath, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    DNA origami is a robust assembly technique that folds a single-stranded DNA template into a target structure by annealing it with hundreds of short `staple' strands. Its guiding design principle is that the target structure is the single most stable configuration. The folding transition is cooperative and, as in the case of proteins, is governed by information encoded in the polymer sequence. A typical origami folds primarily into the desired shape, but misfolded structures can kinetically trap the system and reduce the yield. Although adjusting assembly conditions or following empirical design rules can improve yield, well-folded origami often need to be separated from misfolded structures. The problem could in principle be avoided if assembly pathway and kinetics were fully understood and then rationally optimized. To this end, here we present a DNA origami system with the unusual property of being able to form a small set of distinguishable and well-folded shapes that represent discrete and approximately degenerate energy minima in a vast folding landscape, thus allowing us to probe the assembly process. The obtained high yield of well-folded origami structures confirms the existence of efficient folding pathways, while the shape distribution provides information about individual trajectories through the folding landscape. We find that, similarly to protein folding, the assembly of DNA origami is highly cooperative; that reversible bond formation is important in recovering from transient misfoldings; and that the early formation of long-range connections can very effectively enforce particular folds. We use these insights to inform the design of the system so as to steer assembly towards desired structures. Expanding the rational design process to include the assembly pathway should thus enable more reproducible synthesis, particularly when targeting more complex structures. We anticipate that this expansion will be essential if DNA origami is to continue its

  10. Digoxin derivatives with selectivity for the α2β3 isoform of Na,K-ATPase potently reduce intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Adriana; Tal, Daniel M.; Heller, Dan; Habeck, Michael; Ben Zeev, Efrat; Rabah, Bilal; Bar Kana, Yaniv; Marcovich, Arie L.; Karlish, Steven J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The ciliary epithelium in the eye consists of pigmented epithelial cells that express the α1β1 isoform of Na,K-ATPase and nonpigmented epithelial cells that express mainly the α2β3 isoform. In principle, a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor with selectivity for α2β3 that penetrates the cornea could effectively reduce intraocular pressure, with minimal systemic or local toxicity. We have recently synthesized perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin by NaIO4 oxidation of the third digitoxose and reductive amination with various R-NH2 substituents and identified derivatives with significant selectivity for human α2β1 over α1β1 (up to 7.5-fold). When applied topically, the most α2-selective derivatives effectively prevented or reversed pharmacologically raised intraocular pressure in rabbits. A recent structure of Na,K-ATPase, with bound digoxin, shows the third digitoxose approaching one residue in the β1 subunit, Gln84, suggesting a role for β in digoxin binding. Gln84 in β1 is replaced by Val88 in β3. Assuming that alkyl substituents might interact with β3Val88, we synthesized perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin with diverse alkyl substituents. The methylcyclopropyl and cyclobutyl derivatives are strongly selective for α2β3 over α1β1 (22–33-fold respectively), as determined either with purified human isoform proteins or intact bovine nonpigmented epithelium cells. When applied topically on rabbit eyes, these derivatives potently reduce both pharmacologically raised and basal intraocular pressure. The cyclobutyl derivative is more efficient than Latanoprost, the most widely used glaucoma drug. Thus, the conclusion is that α2β3-selective digoxin derivatives effectively penetrate the cornea and inhibit the Na,K-ATPase, hence reducing aqueous humor production. The new digoxin derivatives may have potential for glaucoma drug therapy. PMID:26483500

  11. Digoxin derivatives with selectivity for the α2β3 isoform of Na,K-ATPase potently reduce intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Katz, Adriana; Tal, Daniel M; Heller, Dan; Habeck, Michael; Ben Zeev, Efrat; Rabah, Bilal; Bar Kana, Yaniv; Marcovich, Arie L; Karlish, Steven J D

    2015-11-03

    The ciliary epithelium in the eye consists of pigmented epithelial cells that express the α1β1 isoform of Na,K-ATPase and nonpigmented epithelial cells that express mainly the α2β3 isoform. In principle, a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor with selectivity for α2β3 that penetrates the cornea could effectively reduce intraocular pressure, with minimal systemic or local toxicity. We have recently synthesized perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin by NaIO4 oxidation of the third digitoxose and reductive amination with various R-NH2 substituents and identified derivatives with significant selectivity for human α2β1 over α1β1 (up to 7.5-fold). When applied topically, the most α2-selective derivatives effectively prevented or reversed pharmacologically raised intraocular pressure in rabbits. A recent structure of Na,K-ATPase, with bound digoxin, shows the third digitoxose approaching one residue in the β1 subunit, Gln84, suggesting a role for β in digoxin binding. Gln84 in β1 is replaced by Val88 in β3. Assuming that alkyl substituents might interact with β3Val88, we synthesized perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin with diverse alkyl substituents. The methylcyclopropyl and cyclobutyl derivatives are strongly selective for α2β3 over α1β1 (22-33-fold respectively), as determined either with purified human isoform proteins or intact bovine nonpigmented epithelium cells. When applied topically on rabbit eyes, these derivatives potently reduce both pharmacologically raised and basal intraocular pressure. The cyclobutyl derivative is more efficient than Latanoprost, the most widely used glaucoma drug. Thus, the conclusion is that α2β3-selective digoxin derivatives effectively penetrate the cornea and inhibit the Na,K-ATPase, hence reducing aqueous humor production. The new digoxin derivatives may have potential for glaucoma drug therapy.

  12. A Computational Model of Cerebral Cortex Folding

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Faraco, Carlos; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The geometric complexity and variability of the human cerebral cortex has long intrigued the scientific community. As a result, quantitative description of cortical folding patterns and the understanding of underlying folding mechanisms have emerged as important research goals. This paper presents a computational 3-dimensional geometric model of cerebral cortex folding initialized by MRI data of a human fetal brain and deformed under the governance of a partial differential equation modeling cortical growth. By applying different simulation parameters, our model is able to generate folding convolutions and shape dynamics of the cerebral cortex. The simulations of this 3D geometric model provide computational experimental support to the following hypotheses: 1) Mechanical constraints of the skull regulate the cortical folding process. 2) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the global cell growth rate of the whole cortex. 3) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on relative rates of cell growth in different cortical areas. 4) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the initial geometry of the cortex. PMID:20167224

  13. Fractures Sets Associated to Buckle Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Eckert, A.; Connolly, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Buckle folds of single and multilayered sedimentary strata in the literature are commonly associated to a variety of different fracture sets, both shear and tensile. Amongst the most noticeable fractures are tensile fractures occurring in the outer hinges of the fold crest and shear fractures in the bottom of fold hinge zones. These fractures are well explained and understood by the extensional and compressional strain/stress pattern in the fold hinge. However, tensile fractures parallel to the fold axis, tensile fractures cutting through the limb, normal faults on the fold hinge, and shear fractures of different orientations in the fold limb cannot intuitively be linked to the stress regime occurring during the buckling process. This study utilizes a 2D and 3D finite element modeling approach using Maxwell visco-elastic rheology to study the stress conditions during single and multilayer buckling for each fracture set to occur. The numerical simulations include sensitivity analyses on material parameters such as permeability, viscosity and overburden thickness. For fracture sets not likely to occur during the buckling process pre- and post folding processes such as initial overpressure, extensional unfolding, and erosional unloading are studied.

  14. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  15. Stochastic Resonance in Protein Folding Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Aram; Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin; Papoian, Garegin A

    2016-05-04

    Although protein folding reactions are usually studied under static external conditions, it is likely that proteins fold in a locally fluctuating cellular environment in vivo. To mimic such behavior in in vitro experiments, the local temperature of the solvent can be modulated either harmonically or using correlated noise. In this study, coarse-grained molecular simulations are used to investigate these possibilities, and it is found that both periodic and correlated random fluctuations of the environment can indeed accelerate folding kinetics if the characteristic frequencies of the applied fluctuations are commensurate with the internal timescale of the folding reaction; this is consistent with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance observed in many other condensed-matter processes. To test this theoretical prediction, the folding dynamics of phosphoglycerate kinase under harmonic temperature fluctuations are experimentally probed using Förster resonance energy transfer fluorescence measurements. To analyze these experiments, a combination of theoretical approaches is developed, including stochastic simulations of folding kinetics and an analytical mean-field kinetic theory. The experimental observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions of stochastic resonance in phosphoglycerate kinase folding. When combined with an alternative experiment on the protein VlsE using a power spectrum analysis, elaborated in Dave et al., ChemPhysChem 2016, 10.1002/cphc.201501041, the overall data overwhelmingly point to the experimental confirmation of stochastic resonance in protein folding dynamics.

  16. Protein folding: When ribosomes pick the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Elin M.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Anfinsen's principle tells us that the folded structure of a protein is determined solely by its sequence. Now, it has been shown that the rate at which a polypeptide chain is synthesized in the cell can affect which of two alternative folded structures it adopts.

  17. Local vs global motions in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Liwo, Adam; Senet, Patrick; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to know whether local fluctuations in a polypeptide chain play any role in the mechanism by which the chain folds to the native structure of a protein. This question is addressed by analyzing folding and non-folding trajectories of a protein; as an example, the analysis is applied to the 37-residue triple β-strand WW domain from the Formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (PDB ID: 1E0L). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were generated with the coarse-grained united-residue force field, and one- and two-dimensional free-energy landscapes (FELs) along the backbone virtual-bond angle θ and backbone virtual-bond-dihedral angle γ of each residue, and principal components, respectively, were analyzed. The key residues involved in the folding of the FBP28 WW domain are elucidated by this analysis. The correlations between local and global motions are found. It is shown that most of the residues in the folding trajectories of the system studied here move in a concerted fashion, following the dynamics of the whole system. This demonstrates how the choice of a pathway has to involve concerted movements in order for this protein to fold. This finding also sheds light on the effectiveness of principal component analysis (PCA) for the description of the folding dynamics of the system studied. It is demonstrated that the FEL along the PCs, computed by considering only several critically-placed residues, can correctly describe the folding dynamics. PMID:23914144

  18. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  19. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  20. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  1. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1996-06-11

    Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

  2. The origami of thioredoxin-like folds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jonathan L.; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Origami is the Japanese art of folding a piece of paper into complex shapes and forms. Much like origami of paper, Nature has used conserved protein folds to engineer proteins for a particular task. An example of a protein family, which has been used by Nature numerous times, is the thioredoxin superfamily. Proteins in the thioredoxin superfamily are all structured with a β-sheet core surrounded with α-helices, and most contain a canonical CXXC motif. The remarkable feature of these proteins is that the link between them is the fold; however, their reactivity is different for each member due to small variations in this general fold as well as their active site. This review attempts to unravel the minute differences within this protein family, and it also demonstrates the ingenuity of Nature to use a conserved fold to generate a diverse collection of proteins to perform a number of different biochemical tasks. PMID:17008712

  3. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  4. Murine Sirt3 protein isoforms have variable half-lives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sirt3 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase mainly localized in mitochondria. Recent studies indicate that the murine Sirt3 gene expresses different transcript variants resulting in three possible Sirt3 protein isoforms with variable lengths at the N-terminus: M1 (aa 1-334), M2 (aa 15-334), and M3...

  5. Bacteria-Induced Dscam Isoforms of the Crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus.

    PubMed

    Watthanasurorot, Apiruck; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Liu, Haipeng; Söderhäll, Irene; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    The Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule, also known as Dscam, is a member of the immunoglobulin super family. Dscam plays an essential function in neuronal wiring and appears to be involved in innate immune reactions in insects. The deduced amino acid sequence of Dscam in the crustacean Pacifastacus leniusculus (PlDscam), encodes 9(Ig)-4(FNIII)-(Ig)-2(FNIII)-TM and it has variable regions in the N-terminal half of Ig2 and Ig3 and the complete Ig7 and in the transmembrane domain. The cytoplasmic tail can generate multiple isoforms. PlDscam can generate more than 22,000 different unique isoforms. Bacteria and LPS injection enhanced the expression of PlDscam, but no response in expression occurred after a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection or injection with peptidoglycans. Furthermore, PlDscam silencing did not have any effect on the replication of the WSSV. Bacterial specific isoforms of PlDscam were shown to have a specific binding property to each tested bacteria, E. coli or S. aureus. The bacteria specific isoforms of PlDscam were shown to be associated with bacterial clearance and phagocytosis in crayfish.

  6. Characterization of a novel periodontal ligament-specific periostin isoform.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Tauchi, T; Awata, T; Maeda, K; Kajikawa, T; Yanagita, M; Murakami, S

    2014-09-01

    Periostin is a mesenchymal cell marker predominantly expressed in collagen-rich fibrous connective tissues, including heart valves, tendons, perichondrium, periosteum, and periodontal ligament (PDL). Knockdown of periostin expression in mice results in early-onset periodontitis and failure of cardiac healing after acute myocardial infarction, suggesting that periostin is essential for connective tissue homeostasis and regeneration. However, its role(s) in periodontal tissues has not yet been fully defined. In this study, we describe a novel human isoform of periostin (PDL-POSTN). Isoform-specific analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that PDL-POSTN was predominantly expressed in the PDL, with much lower expression in other tissues and organs. A PDL cell line transfected with PDL-POSTN showed enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity and calcified nodule formation, compared with cells transfected with the full-length periostin isoform. A neutralizing antibody against integrin-αv inhibited both ALPase activity and calcified nodule formation in cells transfected with PDL-POSTN. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that PDL-POSTN bound to integrin αvβ3 more strongly than the common isoform of periostin, resulting in strong activation of the integrin αvβ3-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. These results suggest that PDL-POSTN positively regulates cytodifferentiation and mineralization in PDL cells through integrin αvβ3.

  7. Role of p53 isoforms and aggregations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SeJin; An, Seong Soo A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract p53 is a master regulatory protein that is involved in diverse cellular metabolic processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The protective function of p53 (in its homotetrameric form) as a tumor suppressor is lost in more than 50% of human cancers. Despite considerable experimental evidence suggesting the presence of multiple p53 states, it has been difficult to correlate the status of p53 with cancer response to treatments and clinical outcomes, which suggest the importance of complex but essential p53 regulatory pathways. Recent studies have indicated that the expression pattern of p53 isoforms may play a crucial role in regulating normal and cancer cell fates in response to diverse stresses. The human TP53 gene encodes at least 12 p53 isoforms, which are produced in normal tissue through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates may be associated with cancer pathogenesis due to loss-of function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of function (GoF) effects. As different isoforms or the aggregation state of p53 may influence tumorigenesis, this review aims to examine the correlation of p53 isoforms and aggregation with cancer. PMID:27368003

  8. APPRIS: annotation of principal and alternative splice isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Maietta, Paolo; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lopez, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present APPRIS (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es), a database that houses annotations of human splice isoforms. APPRIS has been designed to provide value to manual annotations of the human genome by adding reliable protein structural and functional data and information from cross-species conservation. The visual representation of the annotations provided by APPRIS for each gene allows annotators and researchers alike to easily identify functional changes brought about by splicing events. In addition to collecting, integrating and analyzing reliable predictions of the effect of splicing events, APPRIS also selects a single reference sequence for each gene, here termed the principal isoform, based on the annotations of structure, function and conservation for each transcript. APPRIS identifies a principal isoform for 85% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE 7 release for ENSEMBL. Analysis of the APPRIS data shows that at least 70% of the alternative (non-principal) variants would lose important functional or structural information relative to the principal isoform.

  9. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  10. GroEL-mediated protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, W. A.; Horwich, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    I. Architecture of GroEL and GroES and the reaction pathway A. Architecture of the chaperonins B. Reaction pathway of GroEL-GroES-mediated folding II. Polypeptide binding A. A parallel network of chaperones binding polypeptides in vivo B. Polypeptide binding in vitro 1. Role of hydrophobicity in recognition 2. Homologous proteins with differing recognition-differences in primary structure versus effects on folding pathway 3. Conformations recognized by GroEL a. Refolding studies b. Binding of metastable intermediates c. Conformations while stably bound at GroEL 4. Binding constants and rates of association 5. Conformational changes in the substrate protein associated with binding by GroEL a. Observations b. Kinetic versus thermodynamic action of GroEL in mediating unfolding c. Crossing the energy landscape in the presence of GroEL III. ATP binding and hydrolysis-driving the reaction cycle IV. GroEL-GroES-polypeptide ternary complexes-the folding-active cis complex A. Cis and trans ternary complexes B. Symmetric complexes C. The folding-active intermediate of a chaperonin reaction-cis ternary complex D. The role of the cis space in the folding reaction E. Folding governed by a "timer" mechanism F. Release of nonnative polypeptides during the GroEL-GroES reaction G. Release of both native and nonnative forms under physiologic conditions H. A role for ATP binding, as well as hydrolysis, in the folding cycle V. Concluding remarks. PMID:9098884

  11. LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta is inhibited by KPI-containing isoforms of APP.

    PubMed

    Moir, Robert D; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2005-04-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the abnormal accumulation and deposition of beta-amyloid in cerebral blood vessels and in the brain parenchyma. Critical in modulating beta-amyloid deposition in brain is the flux of Abeta across the blood brain barrier. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), is a large endocytic receptor that mediates the efflux of Abeta out of brain and into the periphery. The first step in the LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta involves the formation of a complex between Abeta and the LRP ligands apolipoprotein E (apoE) or alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M). The Abeta/chaperone complexes then bind to LRP via binding sites on apoE or alpha(2)M. The efflux of Abeta/chaperone complexes out of the neuropil and into the periphery may be attenuated by LRP-ligands that compete with apoE or alpha(2)M for LRP binding. LRP is also the cell surface receptor for Kunitz Protease Inhibitor (KPI) containing isoforms of Abeta's parent protein, the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Protein and mRNA levels of KPI-containing APP isoforms (APP-KPI) are elevated in AD brain and are associated with increased Abeta production. In this study we show that soluble non-amyloidogenic APP-KPI can also inhibit the uptake of Abeta/alpha(2)M in a cell culture model of LRP mediated Abeta clearance. Clearance of Abeta/apoE complexes was not inhibited by APP-KPI. Our findings are consistent with studies showing that apoE and alpha(2)M have discrete binding sites on LRP. Most significantly, our data suggests that the elevated levels of APP-KPI in AD brain may attenuate the clearance of Abeta, the proteins own amyloidogenic catabolic product.

  12. Cooperativity and modularity in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Masaki; Chikenji, George; Terada, Tomoki P.

    2016-01-01

    A simple statistical mechanical model proposed by Wako and Saitô has explained the aspects of protein folding surprisingly well. This model was systematically applied to multiple proteins by Muñoz and Eaton and has since been referred to as the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton (WSME) model. The success of the WSME model in explaining the folding of many proteins has verified the hypothesis that the folding is dominated by native interactions, which makes the energy landscape globally biased toward native conformation. Using the WSME and other related models, Saitô emphasized the importance of the hierarchical pathway in protein folding; folding starts with the creation of contiguous segments having a native-like configuration and proceeds as growth and coalescence of these segments. The Φ-values calculated for barnase with the WSME model suggested that segments contributing to the folding nucleus are similar to the structural modules defined by the pattern of native atomic contacts. The WSME model was extended to explain folding of multi-domain proteins having a complex topology, which opened the way to comprehensively understanding the folding process of multi-domain proteins. The WSME model was also extended to describe allosteric transitions, indicating that the allosteric structural movement does not occur as a deterministic sequential change between two conformations but as a stochastic diffusive motion over the dynamically changing energy landscape. Statistical mechanical viewpoint on folding, as highlighted by the WSME model, has been renovated in the context of modern methods and ideas, and will continue to provide insights on equilibrium and dynamical features of proteins.

  13. Folding pathways of the Tetrahymena ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David; Russell, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Like many structured RNAs, the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme folds through multiple pathways and intermediates. Under standard conditions in vitro, a small fraction reaches the native state (N) with kobs ≈ 0.6 min–1, while the remainder forms a long-lived misfolded conformation (M) thought to differ in topology. These alternative outcomes reflect a pathway that branches late in folding, after disruption of a trapped intermediate (Itrap). Here, we use catalytic activity to probe the folding transitions from Itrap to the native and misfolded states. We show that mutations predicted to weaken the core helix P3 do not increase the rate of folding from Itrap but they increase the fraction that reaches the native state rather than forming the misfolded state. Thus, P3 is disrupted during folding to the native state but not to the misfolded state, and P3 disruption occurs after the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, P3-strengthening mutants also increase native folding. Additional experiments show that these mutants are rapidly committed to folding to the native state, although they reach the native state with approximately the same rate constant as the wild-type ribozyme (~1 min–1). Thus, the P3-strengthening mutants populate a distinct pathway that includes at least one intermediate but avoids the M state, most likely because P3 and the correct topology are formed early. Our results highlight multiple pathways in RNA folding and illustrate how kinetic competitions between rapid events can have long-lasting effects because the ‘choice’ is enforced by energy barriers that grow larger as folding progresses. PMID:24747051

  14. Cell, isoform, and environment factors shape gradients and modulate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chang, S Laura; Cavnar, Stephen P; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine gradient formation requires multiple processes that include ligand secretion and diffusion, receptor binding and internalization, and immobilization of ligand to surfaces. To understand how these events dynamically shape gradients and influence ensuing cell chemotaxis, we built a multi-scale hybrid agent-based model linking gradient formation, cell responses, and receptor-level information. The CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling axis is highly implicated in metastasis of many cancers. We model CXCL12 gradient formation as it is impacted by CXCR4 and CXCR7, with particular focus on the three most highly expressed isoforms of CXCL12. We trained and validated our model using data from an in vitro microfluidic source-sink device. Our simulations demonstrate how isoform differences on the molecular level affect gradient formation and cell responses. We determine that ligand properties specific to CXCL12 isoforms (binding to the migration surface and to CXCR4) significantly impact migration and explain differences in in vitro chemotaxis data. We extend our model to analyze CXCL12 gradient formation in a tumor environment and find that short distance, steep gradients characteristic of the CXCL12-γ isoform are effective at driving chemotaxis. We highlight the importance of CXCL12-γ in cancer cell migration: its high effective affinity for both extracellular surface sites and CXCR4 strongly promote CXCR4+ cell migration. CXCL12-γ is also more difficult to inhibit, and we predict that co-inhibition of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is necessary to effectively hinder CXCL12-γ-induced migration. These findings support the growing importance of understanding differences in protein isoforms, and in particular their implications for cancer treatment.

  15. Mast cells express novel functional IL-15 receptor alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Krause, Hans; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-05-15

    Mast cells previously have been reported to be regulated by IL-15 and to express a distinct IL-15R, termed IL-15RX. To further examine IL-15 binding and signaling in mast cells, we have studied the nature of the IL-15R and some of its biological activities in these cells. In this study, we report the existence of three novel isoforms of the IL-15R alpha chain in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells as a result of an alternative exon-splicing mechanism within the IL-15R alpha gene. These correspond to new mRNA transcripts lacking exon 4; exons 3 and 4; or exons 3, 4, and 5 (IL-15R alpha Delta 4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4,5). After transient transfection in COS-7 cells, all IL-15R alpha isoforms associate with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, the perinuclear space, and the cell membrane. Analysis of glycosylation pattern demonstrates the usage of a single N-glycosylation site, while no O-glycosylation is observed. Importantly, IL-15 binds with high affinity to, and promotes the survival of, murine BA/F3 cells stably transfected with the IL-15R alpha isoforms. Furthermore, we report that signaling mediated by IL-15 binding to the newly identified IL-15R alpha isoforms involves the phosphorylation of STAT3, STAT5, STAT6, Janus kinase 2, and Syk kinase. Taken together, our data indicate that murine mast cells express novel, fully functional IL-15R alpha isoforms, which can explain the selective regulatory effects of IL-15 on these cells.

  16. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  17. p53 isoform Δ133p53 promotes efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cells and ensures genomic integrity during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lu; Pan, Xiao; Chen, Haide; Rao, Lingjun; Zeng, Yelin; Hang, Honghui; Peng, Jinrong; Xiao, Lei; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have great potential in regenerative medicine, but this depends on the integrity of their genomes. iPS cells have been found to contain a large number of de novo genetic alterations due to DNA damage response during reprogramming. Thus, to maintain the genetic stability of iPS cells is an important goal in iPS cell technology. DNA damage response can trigger tumor suppressor p53 activation, which ensures genome integrity of reprogramming cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. p53 isoform Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene and functions to not only antagonize p53 mediated apoptosis, but also promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we report that Δ133p53 is induced in reprogramming. Knockdown of Δ133p53 results 2-fold decrease in reprogramming efficiency, 4-fold increase in chromosomal aberrations, whereas overexpression of Δ133p53 with 4 Yamanaka factors showes 4-fold increase in reprogamming efficiency and 2-fold decrease in chromosomal aberrations, compared to those in iPS cells induced only with 4 Yamanaka factors. Overexpression of Δ133p53 can inhibit cell apoptosis and promote DNA DSB repair foci formation during reprogramming. Our finding demonstrates that the overexpression of Δ133p53 not only enhances reprogramming efficiency, but also results better genetic quality in iPS cells. PMID:27874035

  18. A bidirectional shape memory alloy folding actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Jamie K.; Wood, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a low-profile bidirectional folding actuator based on annealed shape memory alloy sheets applicable for meso- and microscale systems. Despite the advantages of shape memory alloys—high strain, silent operation, and mechanical simplicity—their application is often limited to unidirectional operation. We present a bidirectional folding actuator that produces two opposing 180° motions. A laser-patterned nickel alloy (Inconel 600) heater localizes actuation to the folding sections. The actuator has a thin ( < 1 mm) profile, making it appropriate for use in robotic origami. Various design parameters and fabrication variants are described and experimentally explored in the actuator prototype.

  19. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  20. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  1. Geometric formalism for DNA quadruplex folding.

    PubMed

    Webba da Silva, Mateus

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the control of self-assembly and stereochemical properties of DNA higher order architectural folds is of fundamental importance in biology as well as biochemical technological applications. Guanine-rich DNA sequences can form tetrahelical architectures termed quadruplexes. A formalism is presented describing the interdependency of a set of structural descriptors as a geometric basis for folding of unimolecular quadruplex topologies. It represents a standard for interpretation of structural characteristics of quadruplexes, and is comprehensive in explicitly harmonizing the results of published literature with a unified language. The formalism is a fundamental step towards prediction of unimolecular quadruplex folding topologies from primary sequence.

  2. Identification of Krit1B: a novel alternative splicing isoform of cerebral cavernous malformation gene-1.

    PubMed

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Avolio, Maria; Francalanci, Floriana; Procida, Simone; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Tarone, Guido; Silengo, Lorenzo

    2004-01-21

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations, mostly located in the central nervous system, which occur in 0.1-0.5% of the population. They are characterized by abnormally enlarged and often leaking capillary cavities without intervening neural parenchyma. Some are clinically silent, whereas others cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhage or focal neurological deficits. These vascular malformations can arise sporadically or may be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance. At least 45% of families affected with cerebral cavernous malformations harbour a mutation in Krev interaction trapped-1 (Krit1) gene (cerebral cavernous malformation gene-1, CCM1). This gene contains 16 coding exons which encode a 736-amino acid protein containing three ankyrin repeats and a FERM domain. Neither the CCM1 pathogenetic mechanisms nor the function of the Krit1 protein are understood so far, although several hypotheses have been inferred from the predicted consequences of Krit1 mutations as well as from the identification of Krit1 as a binding partner of Rap1A, ICAP1A and microtubules. Here, we report the identification of Krit1B, a novel Krit1 isoform characterized by the alternative splicing of the 15th coding exon. We show that the Krit1B splice isoform is widely expressed in mouse cell lines and tissues, whereas its expression is highly restricted in human. In addition, we developed a real-time PCR strategy to accurately quantify the relative ratio of the two Krit1 alternative transcripts in different tissues, demonstrating a Krit1B/Krit1A ratio up to 20% in mouse thymus, but significantly lower ratios in other tissues. Bioinformatic analysis using exon/gene-prediction, comparative alignment and structure analysis programs supported the existence of Krit1 alternative transcripts lacking the 15th coding exon and showed that the splicing out of this exon occurs outside of potentially important Krit1 structural domains but in a

  3. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  4. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of two isoforms of Rubisco from Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S; Hough, E; Andersen, K

    1999-01-01

    Two different isoforms of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Alcaligenes eutrophus have been purified and crystallized. Both isoforms crystallize in space group P43212. Crystals of isoform I (unit-cell dimensions a = 112.0 and c = 402.7 A) diffract to 2.7 A, whereas isoform II (unit-cell dimensions a = 111.8 and c = 400.0 A) presently diffract to 3.2 A, using synchrotron radiation in both cases.

  6. Functional roles of the alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Lingrel, Jerry; Moseley, Amy; Dostanic, Iva; Cougnon, Marc; He, Suiwen; James, Paul; Woo, Alison; O'Connor, Kyle; Neumann, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and each subunit consists of multiple isoforms. In the case of alpha, four isoforms, alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 are present in mammalian cells. The distribution of these isoforms is tissue- and developmental-specific, suggesting that they may play specific roles, either during development or coupled to specific physiological processes. In order to understand the functional properties of each of these isoforms, we are using gene targeting, where animals are produced lacking either one copy or both copies of the corresponding gene or have a modified gene. To date, we have produced animals lacking the alpha1 and alpha2 isoform genes. Animals lacking both copies of the alpha1 isoform gene are not viable, while animals lacking both copies of the alpha2 isoform gene make it to birth, but are either born dead or die very soon after. In the case of animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 or alpha2 isoform gene, the animals survive and appear healthy. Heart and EDL muscle from animals lacking one copy of the alpha2 isoform exhibit an increase in force of contraction, while there is reduced force of contraction in both muscles from animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 isoform gene. These studies indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms carry out different physiological roles. The alpha2 isoform appears to be involved in regulating Ca(2+) transients involved in muscle contraction, while the alpha1 isoform probably plays a more generalized role. While we have not yet knocked out the alpha3 or alpha4 isoform genes, studies to date indicate that the alpha4 isoform is necessary to maintain sperm motility. It is thus possible that the alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 isoforms are involved in specialized functions of various tissues, helping to explain their tissue- and developmental-specific regulation.

  7. N Termini of apPDE4 Isoforms Are Responsible for Targeting the Isoforms to Different Cellular Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Park, Soo-Won; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Changhoon; Chae, Yeon-Su; Park, Hyungju; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Kim, Hyoung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are known to play a key role in the compartmentalization of cAMP signaling; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intracellular localization of different PDE isoforms are not understood. In this study, we have found that each of the supershort, short, and long forms of apPDE4 showed distinct localization in the…

  8. K-Cl cotransport in red blood cells from patients with KCC3 isoform mutants.

    PubMed

    Lauf, P K; Adragna, N C; Dupre, N; Bouchard, J P; Rouleau, G A

    2006-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) possess the K-Cl cotransport (KCC) isoforms 1, 3, and 4. Mutations within a given isoform may affect overall KCC activity. In a double-blind study, we analyzed, with Rb as a K congener, K fluxes (total flux, ouabain-sensitive Na+/K+ pump, and bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransport, Cl-dependent, and ouabain- and bumetanide-insensitive KCC with or without stimulation by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and staurosporine or Mg removal, and basal channel-mediated fluxes, osmotic fragility, and ions and water in the RBCs of 8 controls, and of 8 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with agenesis of corpus callosum (HMSN-ACC) with defined KCC3 mutations (813FsX813 and Phe529FsX532) involving the truncations of 338 and 619 C-terminal amino acids, respectively. Water and ion content and, with one exception, mean osmotic fragility, as well as K fluxes without stimulating agents, were similar in controls and HMSN-ACC RBCs. However, the NEM-stimulated KCC was reduced 5-fold (p < 0.0005) in HMSN-ACC vs control RBCs, as a result of a lower Vmax (p < 0.05) rather than a lower Km (p = 0.109), accompanied by corresponding differences in Cl activation. Low intracellular Mg activated KCC in 6 out of 7 controls vs 1 out of 6 HMSN-ACC RBCs, suggesting that regulation is compromised. The lack of differences in staurosporine-activated KCC indicates different action mechanisms. Thus, in HMSN-ACC patients with KCC3 mutants, RBC KCC activity, although indistinguishable from that of the control group, responded differently to biochemical stressors, such as thiol alkylation or Mg removal, thereby indirectly indicating an important contribution of KCC3 to overall KCC function and regulation.

  9. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  10. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J.; Probert, P.H.

    1993-12-31

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term stripline refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  11. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J. ); Probert, P.H. )

    1994-10-15

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term [ital stripline] refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  12. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding

    PubMed Central

    Jodoin, Jeanne N.; Martin, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical–basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena. Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT. PMID:27440923

  13. Dietary Macronutrient Composition Directs ChREBP Isoform Expression and Glucose Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Victor; Youngs, Kristina; Cowley, Michael A.; Sleeman, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a lipogenic transcription factor that is thought to be involved in the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Increased ChREBP expression in liver results in increased hepatic steatosis, and the isoform ChREBPβ in adipose tissue can predict insulin sensitivity in obese humans. As ChREBP is activated by glucose, it was postulated that the composition of diet would regulate ChREBP isoform expression in metabolically relevant tissues. We compared the effects of diets with high complex carbohydrate, high fat, or a normal chow on ChREBP expression and metabolic parameters in C57BL/6 mice. We found that diets high in fat decrease ChREBP expression in adipose tissue, but isocaloric diets high in carbohydrate have no effect. Interestingly, this decrease in adipose ChREBP was associated with increased inflammatory markers. In the same animals a high carbohydrate diet induced a robust increase in hepatic ChREBPβ expression (≈2-fold; p = 0.0002), but little detectable change in the more abundant ChREBPα transcript. This change was accompanied by increased expression of target genes liver pyruvate kinase (p<0.0001), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (p = 0.0191) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (p = 0.0045). This increase in ChREBP expression was associated with increased hepatic steatosis, despite no changes in body weight or body fat when compared to chow-fed mice. Unexpectedly, mice fed a high carbohydrate diet displayed enhanced sensitivity to exogenous insulin, despite having mild glucose intolerance and increased liver steatosis. In summary, we have shown the composition of diet can selectively regulate ChREBP isoform expression in a tissue specific manner. Furthermore, we have shown a high complex carbohydrate diet selectively increases hepatic ChREBPβ expression, which associates with hepatic steatosis but not insulin resistance. In contrast, a high fat diet reduces adipose ChREBP, which associates

  14. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  15. Cycle 22 COS/NUV Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, T.; Welty, A.

    2016-09-01

    We summarize the Cycle 22 COS/NUV Fold Distribution for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph's (COS) MAMA detector on the Hubble Space Telescope. The detector micro-channel plate's health state is determined and the results are presented.

  16. Folded Resonant Horns for Power Ultrasonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Askins, Stephen; Gradziel, Michael; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Dolgin, Benjamin; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Peterson, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Folded horns have been conceived as alternatives to straight horns used as resonators and strain amplifiers in power ultrasonic systems. Such systems are used for cleaning, welding, soldering, cutting, and drilling in a variety of industries. In addition, several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles have described instrumented drilling, coring, and burrowing machines that utilize combinations of sonic and ultrasonic vibrational actuation. The main advantage of a folded horn, relative to a straight horn of the same resonance frequency, is that the folded horn can be made shorter (that is, its greatest linear dimension measured from the outside can be made smaller). Alternatively, for a given length, the resonance frequency can be reduced. Hence, the folded-horn concept affords an additional degree of design freedom for reducing the length of an ultrasonic power system that includes a horn.

  17. Folding, Binding, Misfolding and Aggregation with AWSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Nicholas P.

    This thesis discusses our recent results using the Associative-memory, Water-mediated, Structure and Energy Model (AWSEM), an optimized, coarse-grained molecular dynamics protein folding model, to fold, bind, and predict the misfolding behavior of proteins. AWSEM is capable of performing de novo structure prediction on small alpha-helical protein domains and predict the binding interfaces of homo- and hetero-dimers. More recent work demonstrates how the misfolding behavior of tandem constructs in AWSEM is consistent with crucial aspects of ensemble and single molecule experiments on the aggregation and misfolding of these constructs. The first chapter is a review of the energy landscape theory of protein folding as it applies to the problem of protein structure prediction, and more specifically how energy landscape theory and the principle of minimal frustration can be used to optimize parameters of coarse-grained protein folding simulation models. The subsequent four chapters are reports of novel research performed with one such model.

  18. Self-folding miniature elastic electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Meeker, Laura; Tolley, Michael T.; Wood, Robert J.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Printing functional materials represents a considerable impact on the access to manufacturing technology. In this paper we present a methodology and validation of print-and-self-fold miniature electric devices. Polyvinyl chloride laminated sheets based on metalized polyester film show reliable self-folding processes under a heat application, and it configures 3D electric devices. We exemplify this technique by fabricating fundamental electric devices, namely a resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Namely, we show the development of a self-folded stretchable resistor, variable resistor, capacitive strain sensor, and an actuation mechanism consisting of a folded contractible solenoid coil. Because of their pre-defined kinematic design, these devices feature elasticity, making them suitable as sensors and actuators in flexible circuits. Finally, an RLC circuit obtained from the integration of developed devices is demonstrated, in which the coil based actuator is controlled by reading a capacitive strain sensor.

  19. Origami: Paper Folding--The Algorithmic Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heukerott, Pamela Beth

    1988-01-01

    Describes origami, the oriental art of paper folding as an activity to teach upper elementary students concepts and skills in geometry involving polygons, angles, measurement, symmetry, and congruence. (PK)

  20. Frustration in Condensed Matter and Protein Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Tanner, S.; Conroy, B.; Owens, F.; Tran, M. M.; Boekema, C.

    2014-03-01

    By means of computer modeling, we are studying frustration in condensed matter and protein folding, including the influence of temperature and Thomson-figure formation. Frustration is due to competing interactions in a disordered state. The key issue is how the particles interact to reach the lowest frustration. The relaxation for frustration is mostly a power function (randomly assigned pattern) or an exponential function (regular patterns like Thomson figures). For the atomic Thomson model, frustration is predicted to decrease with the formation of Thomson figures at zero kelvin. We attempt to apply our frustration modeling to protein folding and dynamics. We investigate the homogeneous protein frustration that would cause the speed of the protein folding to increase. Increase of protein frustration (where frustration and hydrophobicity interplay with protein folding) may lead to a protein mutation. Research is supported by WiSE@SJSU and AFC San Jose.

  1. The Ribosome Modulates Nascent Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christian M.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Chodera, John D.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized by the ribosome and generally must fold to become functionally active. Although it is commonly assumed that the ribosome affects the folding process, this idea has been extremely difficult to demonstrate. We have developed an experimental system to investigate the folding of single ribosome-bound stalled nascent polypeptides with optical tweezers. In T4 lysozyme, synthesized in a reconstituted in vitro translation system, the ribosome slows the formation of stable tertiary interactions and the attainment of the native state relative to the free protein. Incomplete T4 lysozyme polypeptides misfold and aggregate when free in solution, but they remain folding-competent near the ribosomal surface. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome not only decodes the genetic information and synthesizes polypeptides, but also promotes efficient de novo attainment of the native state. PMID:22194581

  2. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  3. Under-folded proteins: Conformational ensembles and their roles in protein folding, function, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-11-01

    For decades, protein function was intimately linked to the presence of a unique, aperiodic crystal-like structure in a functional protein. The two only places for conformational ensembles of under-folded (or partially folded) protein forms in this picture were either the end points of the protein denaturation processes or transiently populated folding intermediates. Recent years witnessed dramatic change in this perception and conformational ensembles, which the under-folded proteins are, have moved from the shadow. Accumulated to date data suggest that a protein can exist in at least three global forms-functional and folded, functional and intrinsically disordered (nonfolded), and nonfunctional and misfolded/aggregated. Under-folded protein states are crucial for each of these forms, serving as important folding intermediates of ordered proteins, or as functional states of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs), or as pathology triggers of misfolded proteins. Based on these observations, conformational ensembles of under-folded proteins can be classified as transient (folding and misfolding intermediates) and permanent (IDPs and stable misfolded proteins). Permanently under-folded proteins can further be split into intentionally designed (IDPs and IDPRs) and unintentionally designed (misfolded proteins). Although intrinsic flexibility, dynamics, and pliability are crucial for all under-folded proteins, the different categories of under-foldedness are differently encoded in protein amino acid sequences.

  4. FOLD PROFILER: A MATLAB ®—based program for fold shape classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisle, R. J.; Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Bobillo-Ares, N.; Menéndez, O.; Aller, J.; Bastida, F.

    2006-02-01

    FOLD PROFILER is a MATLAB code for classifying the shapes of profiles of folded surfaces. The classification is based on the comparison of the natural fold profile with curves representing mathematical functions. The user is offered a choice of four methods, each based on a different type of function: cubic Bezier curves, conic sections, power functions and superellipses. The comparison is carried out by the visual matching of the fold profile displayed on-screen from an imported digital image and computed theoretical curves which are superimposed on the image of the fold. To improve the fit with the real fold shape, the parameters of the theoretical curves are changed by simple mouse actions. The parameters of the mathematical function that best fits the real folds are used to classify the fold shape. FOLD PROFILER allows the rapid implementation of four existing methods for fold shape analysis. The attractiveness of this analytical tool lies in the way it gives an instant visual appreciation of the effect of changing the parameters that are used to classify fold geometry.

  5. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  6. The hydrogen exchange core and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R.; Woodward, C.

    1999-01-01

    A database of hydrogen-deuterium exchange results has been compiled for proteins for which there are published rates of out-exchange in the native state, protection against exchange during folding, and out-exchange in partially folded forms. The question of whether the slow exchange core is the folding core (Woodward C, 1993, Trends Biochem Sci 18:359-360) is reexamined in a detailed comparison of the specific amide protons (NHs) and the elements of secondary structure on which they are located. For each pulsed exchange or competition experiment, probe NHs are shown explicitly; the large number and broad distribution of probe NHs support the validity of comparing out-exchange with pulsed-exchange/competition experiments. There is a strong tendency for the same elements of secondary structure to carry NHs most protected in the native state, NHs first protected during folding, and NHs most protected in partially folded species. There is not a one-to-one correspondence of individual NHs. Proteins for which there are published data for native state out-exchange and theta values are also reviewed. The elements of secondary structure containing the slowest exchanging NHs in native proteins tend to contain side chains with high theta values or be connected to a turn/loop with high theta values. A definition for a protein core is proposed, and the implications for protein folding are discussed. Apparently, during folding and in the native state, nonlocal interactions between core sequences are favored more than other possible nonlocal interactions. Other studies of partially folded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Barbar E, Barany G, Woodward C, 1995, Biochemistry 34:11423-11434; Barber E, Hare M, Daragan V, Barany G, Woodward C, 1998, Biochemistry 37:7822-7833), suggest that developing cores have site-specific energy barriers between microstates, one disordered, and the other(s) more ordered. PMID:10452602

  7. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  8. Geometric Folding Algorithms: Bridging Theory to Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-03

    Proved that any orthogonal polyhedron can be folded from a single, universal crease pattern (box pleating). 1.2 Origami Design • Developed...mathematical theory for what happens in paper between creases, in partic- ular for the case of circular creases. • Circular crease origami on permanent...sheet of paper. • Developing mathematical theory of Robert Lang’s TreeMaker framework for efficiently folding tree-shaped origami "bases

  9. Protein folding and misfolding: mechanism and principles.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Krishna, Mallela M G

    2007-11-01

    Two fundamentally different views of how proteins fold are now being debated. Do proteins fold through multiple unpredictable routes directed only by the energetically downhill nature of the folding landscape or do they fold through specific intermediates in a defined pathway that systematically puts predetermined pieces of the target native protein into place? It has now become possible to determine the structure of protein folding intermediates, evaluate their equilibrium and kinetic parameters, and establish their pathway relationships. Results obtained for many proteins have serendipitously revealed a new dimension of protein structure. Cooperative structural units of the native protein, called foldons, unfold and refold repeatedly even under native conditions. Much evidence obtained by hydrogen exchange and other methods now indicates that cooperative foldon units and not individual amino acids account for the unit steps in protein folding pathways. The formation of foldons and their ordered pathway assembly systematically puts native-like foldon building blocks into place, guided by a sequential stabilization mechanism in which prior native-like structure templates the formation of incoming foldons with complementary structure. Thus the same propensities and interactions that specify the final native state, encoded in the amino-acid sequence of every protein, determine the pathway for getting there. Experimental observations that have been interpreted differently, in terms of multiple independent pathways, appear to be due to chance misfolding errors that cause different population fractions to block at different pathway points, populate different pathway intermediates, and fold at different rates. This paper summarizes the experimental basis for these three determining principles and their consequences. Cooperative native-like foldon units and the sequential stabilization process together generate predetermined stepwise pathways. Optional misfolding errors

  10. Optimum folding pathways for growing protein chains.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Serife; Baday, Sefer; Arkun, Yaman; Erman, Burak

    2007-11-26

    The folding of a protein is studied as it grows residue by residue from the N-terminus and enters an environment that stabilizes the folded state. This mode of folding of a growing chain is different from refolding where the full chain folds from a disordered initial configuration to the native state. We propose a sequential dynamic optimization method that computes the evolution of optimum folding pathways as amino acid residues are added to the peptide chain one by one. The dynamic optimization formulation is deterministic and uses Newton's equations of motion and a Go-type potential that establishes the native contacts and excluded volume effects. The method predicts the optimal energy-minimizing path among all the alternative feasible pathways. As two examples, the folding of the chicken villin headpiece, a 36-residue protein, and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2), a 64-residue protein, are studied. Results on the villin headpiece show significant differences from the refolding of the same chain studied previously. Results on CI2 mostly agree with the results of refolding experiments and computational work.

  11. Cortical Folding Patterns and Predicting Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Niranjini; Busa, Evelina; Augustinack, Jean; Hinds, Oliver; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is made up of a mosaic of structural areas, frequently referred to as Brodmann areas (BAs). Despite the widespread use of cortical folding patterns to perform ad hoc estimations of the locations of the BAs, little is understood regarding 1) how variable the position of a given BA is with respect to the folds, 2) whether the location of some BAs is more variable than others, and 3) whether the variability is related to the level of a BA in a putative cortical hierarchy. We use whole-brain histology of 10 postmortem human brains and surface-based analysis to test how well the folds predict the locations of the BAs. We show that higher order cortical areas exhibit more variability than primary and secondary areas and that the folds are much better predictors of the BAs than had been previously thought. These results further highlight the significance of cortical folding patterns and suggest a common mechanism for the development of the folds and the cytoarchitectonic fields. PMID:18079129

  12. "Wet" Versus "Dry" Folding of Polyproline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Bohrer, Brian C.; Kim, Doyong; Servage, Kelly A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-06-01

    When the all- cis polyproline-I helix (PPI, favored in 1-propanol) of polyproline-13 is introduced into water, it folds into the all- trans polyproline-II (PPII) helix through at least six intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we show that the solvent-free intermediates refold into the all- cis PPI helix with high (>90%) efficiency. Moreover, in the absence of solvent, each intermediate appears to utilize the same small set of pathways observed for the solution-phase PPII → PPI transition upon immersion of PPIIaq in 1-propanol. That folding in solution (under conditions where water is displaced by propanol) and folding in vacuo (where energy required for folding is provided by collisional activation) occur along the same pathway is remarkable. Implicit in this statement is that 1-propanol mimics a "dry" environment, similar to the gas phase. We note that intermediates with structures that are similar to PPIIaq can form PPII under the most gentle activation conditions—indicating that some transitions observed in water (i.e. , "we t" folding, are accessible (albeit inefficient) in vacuo. Lastly, these "dry" folding experiments show that PPI (all cis) is favored under "dry" conditions, which underscores the role of water as the major factor promoting preference for trans proline.

  13. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  14. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility.

  15. ER egress of invariant chain isoform p35 requires direct binding to MHCII molecules and is inhibited by the NleA virulence factor of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Maryse; Gauthier, Catherine; Fortin, Jean-Simon; Genève, Laetitia; Kim, Kyungho; Gruenheid, Samantha; Kim, Jinoh; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Four invariant chain (Ii) isoforms assist the folding and trafficking of human MHC class II (MHCIIs). The main isoforms, Iip33 and Iip35, assemble in the ER into homo- and/or hetero-trimers. The sequential binding of up to three MHCII αβ heterodimers to Ii trimers results in the formation of pentamers, heptamers and nonamers. MHCIIs are required to overcome the p35-encoded di-arginine (RxR) ER retention motif and to allow anterograde trafficking of the complex. Here, we show that inactivation of the RxR motif requires a direct cis interaction between p35 and the MHCII, precluding ER egress of some unsaturated Ii trimers. Interestingly, as opposed to MHCII/p33 complexes, those including p35 remained in the ER when co-expressed with the NleA protein of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Taken together, our results demonstrate that p35 influences distinctively MHCII/Ii assembly and trafficking.

  16. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  17. Dual folding pathways of an α /β protein from all-atom ab initio folding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Wu, Chun; Duan, Yong

    2009-10-01

    Successful ab initio folding of proteins with both α-helix and β-sheet requires a delicate balance among a variety of forces in the simulation model, which may explain that the successful folding of any α /β proteins to within experimental error has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrate that it is an achievable goal to fold α /β proteins with a force field emphasizing the balance between the two major secondary structures. Using our newly developed force field, we conducted extensive ab initio folding simulations on an α /β protein full sequence design (FSD) employing both conventional molecular dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics in combination with a generalized-Born solvation model. In these simulations, the folding of FSD to the native state with high population (>64.2%) and high fidelity (Cα-Root Mean Square Deviation of 1.29 Å for the most sampled conformation when compared to the experimental structure) was achieved. The folding of FSD was found to follow two pathways. In the major pathway, the folding started from the formation of the helix. In the minor pathway, however, folding of the β-hairpin started first. Further examination revealed that the helix initiated from the C-terminus and propagated toward the N-terminus. The formation of the hydrophobic contacts coincided with the global folding. Therefore the hydrophobic force does not appear to be the driving force of the folding of this protein.

  18. Cross folding in southern Bighorn basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, T.L.

    1986-08-01

    Analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery coupled with surface structural investigations of well-exposed folds in the southern Bighorn basin have revealed two northwest-trending folds that have been refolded. The eastern boundary of the Owl Creek Mountains is characterized by a well-defined alignment of folds that extend north-northwest from the Owl Creek thrust front. Bridger monocline, Wildhorse Butte anticline, and Red Hole anticline lie along this trend. Initial Laramide folding, probably during latest Cretaceous time, resulted in a single, continuous, north-northwest-trending anticline with a southwestward vergence. This anticline was progressively unfolded from south to north as the Owl Creek Range was thrust southward over the Wind River basin in earliest Eocene time; scissors-like vertical motion along this flexure rotated the axial surface of the early formed Bridger anticline, resulting in a monocline with a reversed vergence (northeastward). Formation of the Thermopolis/East Warm Springs anticline parallel to the north flank of the range accompanied thrusting and effectively refolded the northern end of the Wildhorse Butte anticline along an east-west axis. Faulting of the oversteepened south limb of the Red Hole cross fold was contemporaneous with folding. Cross-cutting fold axes in this area and the Mud Creek area to the west are best explained by a counterclockwise change in stress direction during the latest phase of the Laramide orogeny. Vertical movement along the eastern side of the Owl Creek Range results from differential motion in the hanging wall of the crystalline thrust sheet.

  19. The nature of protein folding pathways

    PubMed Central

    Englander, S. Walter; Mayne, Leland

    2014-01-01

    How do proteins fold, and why do they fold in that way? This Perspective integrates earlier and more recent advances over the 50-y history of the protein folding problem, emphasizing unambiguously clear structural information. Experimental results show that, contrary to prior belief, proteins are multistate rather than two-state objects. They are composed of separately cooperative foldon building blocks that can be seen to repeatedly unfold and refold as units even under native conditions. Similarly, foldons are lost as units when proteins are destabilized to produce partially unfolded equilibrium molten globules. In kinetic folding, the inherently cooperative nature of foldons predisposes the thermally driven amino acid-level search to form an initial foldon and subsequent foldons in later assisted searches. The small size of foldon units, ∼20 residues, resolves the Levinthal time-scale search problem. These microscopic-level search processes can be identified with the disordered multitrack search envisioned in the “new view” model for protein folding. Emergent macroscopic foldon–foldon interactions then collectively provide the structural guidance and free energy bias for the ordered addition of foldons in a stepwise pathway that sequentially builds the native protein. These conclusions reconcile the seemingly opposed new view and defined pathway models; the two models account for different stages of the protein folding process. Additionally, these observations answer the “how” and the “why” questions. The protein folding pathway depends on the same foldon units and foldon–foldon interactions that construct the native structure. PMID:25326421

  20. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; McDougall, I.R.; Constine, L.S.

    1995-03-30

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves` disease or euthyroid Graves` ophthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benign adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity. 39 refs.

  1. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a ‘splicing noise’, co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities. PMID:27528755

  2. Disulfide isoforms of recombinant glia maturation factor beta.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, A; Lim, R

    1990-09-14

    Recombinant human glia maturation factor beta (r-hGMF-beta) is a single-chain polypeptide (141 amino acid residues) containing three cysteines, at positions 7, 86 and 95. Nascent r-hGMF-beta exists in the reduced state and has no biological activity. The protein can be activated through oxidative refolding by incubation with a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of the refolded r-hGMF-beta shows the presence of four peaks, corresponding to the reduced form plus three newly generated intrachain disulfide-containing isoforms predicted from the number of cysteine residues. Only one isoform shows biological activity when tested for growth suppression on C6 glioma cells. We infer from the HPLC elution pattern that the active form contains the disulfide bridge Cys86-Cys95.

  3. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells.

    PubMed

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2016-08-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a 'splicing noise', co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities.

  4. Extreme developmental temperatures result in morphological abnormalities in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta): a climate change perspective.

    PubMed

    Telemeco, Rory S; Warner, Daniel A; Reida, Molly K; Janzen, Fredric J

    2013-06-01

    Increases in extreme environmental events are predicted to be major results of ongoing global climate change and may impact the persistence of species. We examined the effects of heat and cold waves during embryonic development of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in natural nests on the occurrence of abnormal shell morphologies in hatchlings. We found that nests exposed to extreme hot temperatures for >60 h produced more hatchlings with abnormalities than nests exposed to extreme hot temperatures for shorter periods, regardless of whether or not nesting females displayed abnormal morphologies. We observed no effect of extreme cold nest temperatures on the occurrence of hatchlings with abnormalities. Moreover, the frequency of nesting females with abnormal shell morphologies was approximately 2-fold lower than that of their offspring, suggesting that such abnormalities are negatively correlated with survival and fitness. Female turtles could potentially buffer their offspring from extreme heat by altering aspects of nesting behavior, such as choosing shadier nesting sites. We addressed this hypothesis by examining the effects of shade cover on extreme nest temperatures and the occurrence of hatchling abnormalities. While shade cover was negatively correlated with the occurrence of extreme hot nest temperatures, it was not significantly correlated with abnormalities. Therefore, female choice of shade cover does not appear to be a viable target for selection to reduce hatchling abnormalities. Our results suggest that increases in the frequency and intensity of heat waves associated with climate change might perturb developmental programs and thereby reduce the fitness of entire cohorts of turtles.

  5. Regulation of NADPH Oxidase 5 by Protein Kinase C Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Yanfang; Haigh, Steven; Johnson, John; Lucas, Rudolf; Stepp, David W.; Fulton, David J. R.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5) is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular complications of diabetes

  6. 5-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Meike J; Suess, Beatrix; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the two initial steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, a group of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid. An increased level of leukotrienes is associated with chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma or atherosclerosis. In this MiniReview, we focus on recent findings regarding alternative splice variants of 5-LO with a special emphasis on two potential protein isoforms expressed in human B-lymphocytes which might be of interest as new drug targets.

  7. RSK isoforms in cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sulzmaier, Florian J; Ramos, Joe W

    2013-10-15

    Metastasis, the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor to secondary sites throughout the body, is the primary cause of death for patients with cancer. New therapies that prevent invasion and metastasis in combination with current treatments could therefore significantly reduce cancer recurrence and morbidity. Metastasis is driven by altered signaling pathways that induce changes in cell-cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton, integrin function, protease expression, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell survival. The ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of kinases is a group of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) effectors that can regulate these steps of metastasis by phosphorylating both nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. However, our understanding of RSK function in metastasis remains incomplete and is complicated by the fact that the four RSK isoforms perform nonredundant, sometimes opposing functions. Although some isoforms promote cell motility and invasion by altering transcription and integrin activity, others impair cell motility and invasion through effects on the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of RSK action depends both on the isoform and the cancer type. However, despite the variance in RSK-mediated outcomes, chemical inhibition of this group of kinases has proven effective in blocking invasion and metastasis of several solid tumors in preclinical models. RSKs are therefore a promising drug target for antimetastatic cancer treatments that could supplement and improve current therapeutic approaches. This review highlights contradiction and agreement in the current data on the function of RSK isoforms in metastasis and suggests ways forward in developing RSK inhibitors as new antimetastasis drugs.

  8. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  9. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Aquino-Silva, M R; Schwantes, M L; Schwantes, A R

    2003-02-01

    Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37) and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2) and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0). While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  10. Folding at the birth of the nascent chain: coordinating translation with co-translational folding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-02-01

    In the living cells, the folding of many proteins is largely believed to begin co-translationally, during their biosynthesis at the ribosomes. In the ribosomal tunnel, the nascent peptide may establish local interactions and stabilize α-helical structures. Long-range contacts are more likely outside the ribosomes after release of larger segments of the nascent chain. Examples suggest that domains can attain native-like structure on the ribosome with and without population of folding intermediates. The co-translational folding is limited by the speed of the gradual extrusion of the nascent peptide which imposes conformational restraints on its folding landscape. Recent experimental and in silico modeling studies indicate that translation kinetics fine-tunes co-translational folding by providing a time delay for sequential folding of distinct portions of the nascent chain.

  11. Petrofabric test of viscous folding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Charles M.

    1984-06-01

    Compression and extension axes are deduced from quartz deformation lamellae in a quartzite and a graywacke folded into an asymetrical syncline. Deformation lamellae fabrics in the two sandstones are distinctly different. In the graywacke, regardless of bedding orientation or position on the fold, compression axes are normal or nearly normal to the axial planar rough cleavage. Extension axes generally lie in the cleavage plane, parallel to dip. In most quartzite samples, compression axes are parallel or subparallel to bedding, at high angles to the fold axis and extension axes are normal to bedding. Two samples from the very base of the formation indicate compression parallel to the fold axis with extension parallel to bedding, at high angles to the fold axis. One of these two shows both patterns. The lamellae fabric geometry in these two samples suggests the presence of a neutral surface in the quartzite. The lamellae-derived compression and extension axes are in good agreement with the buckling behavior of a viscous layer (quartzite) embedded in a less viscous medium (graywacke and shale below and shale and carbonate above).

  12. Computational and theoretical methods for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Compiani, Mario; Capriotti, Emidio

    2013-12-03

    A computational approach is essential whenever the complexity of the process under study is such that direct theoretical or experimental approaches are not viable. This is the case for protein folding, for which a significant amount of data are being collected. This paper reports on the essential role of in silico methods and the unprecedented interplay of computational and theoretical approaches, which is a defining point of the interdisciplinary investigations of the protein folding process. Besides giving an overview of the available computational methods and tools, we argue that computation plays not merely an ancillary role but has a more constructive function in that computational work may precede theory and experiments. More precisely, computation can provide the primary conceptual clues to inspire subsequent theoretical and experimental work even in a case where no preexisting evidence or theoretical frameworks are available. This is cogently manifested in the application of machine learning methods to come to grips with the folding dynamics. These close relationships suggested complementing the review of computational methods within the appropriate theoretical context to provide a self-contained outlook of the basic concepts that have converged into a unified description of folding and have grown in a synergic relationship with their computational counterpart. Finally, the advantages and limitations of current computational methodologies are discussed to show how the smart analysis of large amounts of data and the development of more effective algorithms can improve our understanding of protein folding.

  13. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James CA

    2016-01-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding, where obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone:substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a novel structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed Residual Electron and Anomalous Density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the E. coli chaperone Spy. This study resulted in a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 while bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded and native-like states, and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  14. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  15. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  16. The alternative translated MDMXp60 isoform regulates MDM2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Tournillon, Anne-Sophie; López, Ignacio; Malbert-Colas, Laurence; Naski, Nadia; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Isoforms derived from alternative splicing, mRNA translation initiation or promoter usage extend the functional repertoire of the p53, p63 and p73 genes family and of their regulators MDM2 and MDMX. Here we show cap-independent translation of an N-terminal truncated isoform of hMDMX, hMDMXp60, which is initiated at the 7th AUG codon downstream of the initiation site for full length hMDMXFL at position +384. hMDMXp60 lacks the p53 binding motif but retains the RING domain and interacts with hMDM2 and hMDMXFL. hMDMXp60 shows higher affinity for hMDM2, as compared to hMDMXFL. In vitro data reveal a positive cooperative interaction between hMDMXp60 and hMDM2 and in cellulo data show that low levels of hMDMXp60 promote degradation of hMDM2 whereas higher levels stabilize hMDM2 and prevent hMDM2-mediated degradation of hMDMXFL. These results describe a novel alternatively translated hMDMX isoform that exhibits unique regulatory activity toward hMDM2 autoubiquitination. The data illustrate how the N-terminus of hMDMX regulates its C-terminal RING domain and the hMDM2 activity. PMID:25659040

  17. Glutaminases in brain: Multiple isoforms for many purposes.

    PubMed

    Campos-Sandoval, José A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Cardona, Carolina; Lobo, Carolina; Peñalver, Ana; Márquez, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but recent studies are now revealing a considerably degree of complexity in its pattern of expression and functional regulation. Novel transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene have been recently found and characterized in brain. Co-expression of different isoforms in the same cell type would allow cells to fine-tune their Gln/Glu levels under a wide range of metabolic states. Moreover, the discovery of protein interacting partners and novel subcellular localizations, for example nucleocytoplasmic in neurons and astrocytes, strongly suggest non-neurotransmission roles for Gls2 isoforms associated with transcriptional regulation and cellular differentiation. Of note, Gls isoforms have been considered as an important trophic factor for neuronal differentiation and postnatal development of brain regions. On the other hand, glutaminases are taking center stage in tumor biology as new therapeutic targets to inhibit metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Interestingly, glutaminase isoenzymes play seemingly opposing roles in cancer cell growth and proliferation; this issue will be also succinctly discussed with special emphasis on brain tumors.

  18. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  19. Proteopedia: Rossmann Fold: A Beta-Alpha-Beta Fold at Dinucleotide Binding Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanukoglu, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The Rossmann fold is one of the most common and widely distributed super-secondary structures. It is composed of a series of alternating beta strand (ß) and alpha helical (a) segments wherein the ß-strands are hydrogen bonded forming a ß-sheet. The initial beta-alpha-beta (ßaß) fold is the most conserved segment of Rossmann folds. As this segment…

  20. Palaeomagnetic analysis of plunging fold structures: Errors and a simple fold test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Simon A.

    1995-02-01

    The conventional corrections for bedding dip in palaeomagnetic studies involve either untilting about strike or about some inclined axis—the choice is usually governed by the perceived fold hinge orientation. While it has been recognised that untilting bedding about strike can be erroneous if the beds lie within plunging fold structures, there are several types of fold which have plunging hinges, but whose limbs have rotated about horizontal axes. Examples are interference structures and forced folds; restoration about inclined axes may be incorrect in these cases. The angular errors imposed upon palaeomagnetic lineation data via the wrong choice of rotation axis during unfolding are calculated here and presented for lineations in any orientation which could be associated with an upright, symmetrical fold. This extends to palaeomagnetic data previous analyses which were relevant to bedding-parallel lineations. This numerical analysis highlights the influence of various parameters which describe fold geometry and relative lineation orientation upon the angular error imparted to lineation data by the wrong unfolding method. The effect of each parameter is described, and the interaction of the parameters in producing the final error is discussed. Structural and palaeomagnetic data are cited from two field examples of fold structures which illustrate the alternative kinematic histories. Both are from thin-skinned thrust belts, but the data show that one is a true plunging fold, formed by rotation about its inclined hinge, whereas the other is an interference structure produced by rotation of the limbs about non-parallel horizontal axes. Since the angle between the palaeomagnetic lineations and the inclined fold hinge is equal on both limbs in the former type of structure, but varies from limb to limb in the latter, a simple test can be defined which uses palaeomagnetic lineation data to identify rotation axes and hence fold type. This test can use pre- or syn-folding

  1. An Investigation of Voice Quality in Individuals with Inherited Elastin Gene Abnormalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Christopher R.; Awan, Shaheen N.; Marler, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    The human elastin gene (ELN) is responsible for the generation of elastic fibres in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue throughout the body, including the vocal folds. Individuals with Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and Williams syndrome (WS) lack one normal ELN allele due to heterozygous ELN abnormalities, resulting in a…

  2. Osmolyte-induced folding of an intrinsically disordered protein: folding mechanism in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chu; Oas, Terrence G

    2010-06-29

    Understanding the interconversion between thermodynamically distinguishable states present in a protein folding pathway provides not only the kinetics and energetics of protein folding but also insights into the functional roles of these states in biological systems. The protein component of the bacterial RNase P holoenzyme from Bacillus subtilis (P protein) was previously shown to be unfolded in the absence of its cognate RNA or other anionic ligands. P protein was used in this study as a model system to explore general features of intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) folding mechanisms. The use of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte that stabilizes the unliganded folded form of the protein, enabled us to study the folding process of P protein in the absence of ligand. Transient stopped-flow kinetic traces at various final TMAO concentrations exhibited multiphasic kinetics. Equilibrium "cotitration" experiments were performed using both TMAO and urea during the titration to produce a urea-TMAO titration surface of P protein. Both kinetic and equilibrium studies show evidence of a previously undetected intermediate state in the P protein folding process. The intermediate state is significantly populated, and the folding rate constants are relatively slow compared to those of intrinsically folded proteins similar in size and topology. The experiments and analysis described serve as a useful example for mechanistic folding studies of other IDPs.

  3. Non-cylindrical fold growth in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Nikolaus; Bretis, Bernhard; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountains extends over 1800 km from Kurdistan in N-Iraq to the Strait of Hormuz in Iran and is one of the world most promising regions for the future hydrocarbon exploration. The Zagros Mountains started to form as a result of the collision between the Eurasian and Arabian Plates, whose convergence began in the Late Cretaceous as part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system. Geodetic and seismological data document that both plates are still converging and that the fold and thrust belt of the Zagros is actively growing. Extensive hydrocarbon exploration mainly focuses on the antiforms of this fold and thrust belt and therefore the growth history of the folds is of great importance. This work investigates by means of structural field work and quantitative geomorphological techniques the progressive fold growth of the Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines located in the NE of the city of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq. This part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt belongs to the so-called Simply Folded Belt, which is dominated by gentle to open folding. Faults or fault related folds have only minor importance. The mechanical anisotropy of the formations consisting of a succession of relatively competent (massive dolomite and limestone) and incompetent (claystone and siltstone) sediments essentially controls the deformation pattern with open to gentle parallel folding of the competent layers and flexural flow folding of the incompetent layers. The characteristic wavelength of the fold trains is around 10 km. Due to faster erosion of the softer rock layers in the folded sequence, the more competent lithologies form sharp ridges with steeply sloping sides along the eroded flanks of the anticlines. Using an ASTER digital elevation model in combination with geological field data we quantified 250 drainage basins along the different limbs of the subcylindrical Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines. Geomorphological indices of the drainage

  4. C/EBP Transcription Factors in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Selective Changes in Expression of Isoforms Correlate with the Neoplastic State

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanjay; Ebner, John; Warren, Christine B.; Raam, Manu S.; Piliang, Melissa; Billings, Steven D.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of leucine-zipper transcription factors that regulate physiological processes such as energy metabolism, inflammation, cell cycle, and the development and differentiation of several tissues including skin. Recently, a role for C/EBPs in tumor cell proliferation and differentiation has been proposed, but the incomplete characterization in the literature of multiple translational isoforms of these proteins has made interpretation of these roles difficult. Therefore, we have carefully reexamined C/EBP isoform expression in human non-melanoma skin cancers. C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and C/EBPδ were analyzed histologically in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The individual isoforms of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ were examined by immunofluorescent digital imaging, western blotting and DNA binding activity (electrophoretic mobility shift analysis). Expression of all C/EBP family proteins was decreased in SCC tumors. Suppression was greatest for C/EBPα, less for C/EBPβ, and least for C/EBPδ. Western analyses confirmed that C/EBPα p42 and p30 isoforms were decreased. For C/EBPβ, only the abundant full-length isoform (C/EBPβ−1, LAP*, 55 kD) was reduced, whereas the smaller isoforms, C/EBPβ−2 (LAP, 48 kD) and C/EBPβ−3 (LIP, 20 kD), which are predominantly nuclear, were significantly increased in well- and moderately-differentiated SCC (up to 14-fold for C/EBPβ−3). These elevations correlated with increases in PCNA, a marker of proliferation. Although C/EBPβ displayed increased post-translational modifications in SCC, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ−1 (Thr 235) was not altered. C/EBP-specific DNA binding activity in nuclear and whole-cell extracts of cultured cells and tumors was predominantly attributable to C/EBPβ. In summary, two short C/EBPβ isoforms, C/EBPβ−2 and C/EBPβ−3, represent strong candidate markers for epithelial skin malignancy, due to their preferential expression in carcinoma versus normal skin

  5. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  6. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    DOE PAGES

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surfacemore » codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.« less

  7. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  8. Thermal stability of idealized folded carbyne loops

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-unfolding items provide a practical convenience, wherein ring-like frames are contorted into a state of equilibrium and subsequently  pop up’ or deploy when perturbed from a folded structure. Can the same process be exploited at the molecular scale? At the limiting scale is a closed chain of single atoms, used here to investigate the limits of stability of such folded ring structures via full atomistic molecular dynamics. Carbyne is a one-dimensional carbon allotrope composed of sp-hybridized carbon atoms. Here, we explore the stability of idealized carbyne loops as a function of chain length, curvature, and temperature, and delineate an effective phase diagram between folded and unfolded states. We find that while overall curvature is reduced, in addition to torsional and self-adhesive energy barriers, a local increase in curvature results in the largest impedance to unfolding. PMID:24252156

  9. The early folding kinetics of apomyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, R. V.; Weaver, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The folding pathway of apomyoglobin has been experimentally shown to have early kinetic intermediates involving the A, B, G, and H helices. The earliest detected kinetic events occur on a ns to micros time scale. We show that the early folding kinetics of apomyoglobin may be understood as the association of nascent helices through a network of diffusion-collision-coalescence steps G + H <--> GH + A <--> AGH + B <--> ABGH obtained by solving the diffusion-collision model in a chemical kinetics approximation. Our reproduction of the experimental results indicates that the model is a useful way to analyze folding data. One prediction from our fit is that the nascent A and H helices should be relatively more helix-like before coalescence than the other apomyoglobin helices. PMID:9521125

  10. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-01

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. The specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  11. Microbial Manipulation of the Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are encased in a protein, DNA and polysaccharide matrix that protects the community, promotes interactions with the environment, and helps cells to adhere together. The protein component of these matrices is often a remarkably stable, β-sheet-rich polymer called amyloid. Amyloids form ordered, self-templating fibers that are highly aggregative, making them a valuable biofilm component. Some eukaryotic proteins inappropriately adopt the amyloid fold and these misfolded protein aggregates disrupt normal cellular proteostasis, which can cause significant cytotoxicity. Indeed, until recently amyloids were considered solely the result of protein misfolding. However, research over the past decade has revealed how various organisms have capitalized on the amyloid fold by developing sophisticated biogenesis pathways that coordinate gene expression, protein folding, and secretion so that amyloid-related toxicities are minimized. How microbes manipulate amyloids, by augmenting their advantageous properties and by reducing their undesirable properties, will be the subject of this review. PMID:23108148

  12. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  13. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  14. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  15. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  16. Acidosis-mediated regulation of the NHE1 isoform of the Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger in renal cells.

    PubMed

    Odunewu, Ayodeji; Fliegel, Larry

    2013-08-01

    The mammalian Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a ubiquitous plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH by removing a proton in exchange for extracellular sodium. Renal tissues are subject to metabolic and respiratory acidosis, and acidosis has been shown to acutely activate NHE1 activity in other cell types. We examined if NHE1 is activated by acute acidosis in HEK293 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Acute sustained intracellular acidosis (SIA) activated NHE1 in both cell types. We expressed wild-type and mutant NHE1 cDNAs in MDCK cells. All the cDNAs had a L163F/G174S mutation, which conferred a 100-fold resistance to EMD87580, an NHE1-specific inhibitor. We assayed exogenous NHE1 activity while inhibiting endogenous activity with EMD87580 and while inhibiting the NHE3 isoform of the Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger using the isoform-specific inhibitor S3226. We examined the activation and phosphorylation of the wild-type and mutant NHE1 proteins in response to SIA. In MDCK cells we demonstrated that the amino acids Ser⁷⁷¹, Ser⁷⁷⁶, Thr⁷⁷⁹, and Ser⁷⁸⁵ are important for NHE1 phosphorylation and activation after acute SIA. SIA activated ERK-dependent pathways in MDCK cells, and this was blocked by treatment with the MEK inhibitor U0126. Treatment with U0126 also blocked activation of NHE1 by SIA. These results suggest that acute acidosis activates NHE1 in mammalian kidney cells and that in MDCK cells this activation occurs through an ERK-dependent pathway affecting phosphorylation of a distinct set of amino acids in the cytosolic regulatory tail of NHE1.

  17. Autoinhibition mechanism of the plasma membrane calcium pump isoforms 2 and 4 studied through lipid–protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mangialavori, Irene C.; Corradi, Gerardo; Rinaldi, Débora E.; delaFuente, María Candelaria; Adamo, Hugo P.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2014-01-01

    The autoinhibition/activation of the PMCA (plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase) involves conformational changes in the membrane region of the protein that affect the amount of lipids directly associated with the transmembrane domain. The lipid–protein-dependence of PMCA isoforms 2 and 4 expressed and obtained in purified form from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated using the phosphatidylcholine analogue [125I]TID-PC/16 {l-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromemyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine}, which was incorporated into mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and the non-ionic detergent C12E10 [deca(ethylene glycol) dodecyl ether]. We found no differences between the recombinant PMCA4 and PMCA purified from erythrocytes (ePMCA). However, titration of the half-maximal activation by Ca2+/calmodulin of PMCA2 showed 30-fold higher affinity than PMCA4. PMCA2 exhibited a lower level of labelling in the autoinhibited conformation relative to PMCA4, indicating that the lower autoinhibition was correlated with a lower exposure to lipids in the autoinhibited state. Analysis of the lipid–protein stoichiometry showed that the lipid annulus of PMCA varies: (i) in accordance to the conformational state of the enzyme; and (ii) depending on the different isoforms of PMCA. PMCA2 during Ca2+ transport changes its conformation to a lesser extent than PMCA4, an isoform more sensitive to modulation by calmodulin and acidic phospholipids. This is the first demonstration of a dynamic behaviour of annular lipids and PMCA. PMID:22214540

  18. Autoinhibition mechanism of the plasma membrane calcium pump isoforms 2 and 4 studied through lipid-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Irene C; Corradi, Gerardo; Rinaldi, Débora E; de la Fuente, María Candelaria; Adamo, Hugo P; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2012-04-01

    The autoinhibition/activation of the PMCA (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase) involves conformational changes in the membrane region of the protein that affect the amount of lipids directly associated with the transmembrane domain. The lipid-protein-dependence of PMCA isoforms 2 and 4 expressed and obtained in purified form from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated using the phosphatidylcholine analogue [125I]TID-PC/16 {l-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromemyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine}, which was incorporated into mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and the non-ionic detergent C12E10 [deca(ethylene glycol) dodecyl ether]. We found no differences between the recombinant PMCA4 and PMCA purified from erythrocytes (ePMCA). However, titration of the half-maximal activation by Ca2+/calmodulin of PMCA2 showed 30-fold higher affinity than PMCA4. PMCA2 exhibited a lower level of labelling in the autoinhibited conformation relative to PMCA4, indicating that the lower autoinhibition was correlated with a lower exposure to lipids in the autoinhibited state. Analysis of the lipid-protein stoichiometry showed that the lipid annulus of PMCA varies: (i) in accordance to the conformational state of the enzyme; and (ii) depending on the different isoforms of PMCA. PMCA2 during Ca2+ transport changes its conformation to a lesser extent than PMCA4, an isoform more sensitive to modulation by calmodulin and acidic phospholipids. This is the first demonstration of a dynamic behaviour of annular lipids and PMCA.

  19. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation.

  20. Statistical definition of nail fold capillary pattern in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, T; Ishikawa, H

    1994-01-01

    Image analysis of videographs of nail fold capillaries was performed in patients with systemic sclerosis (SS), and the capillary patterns were defined by canonical discriminant analysis. Forty-eight of 55 SS patients were significantly differentiated from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and normal controls. Normal controls and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus showed identical nail fold capillary patterns; in patients with dermatomyositis the pattern was similar to that of SS. The canonical discriminant analysis revealed that only 5 of 55 (9%) SS patients showed a normal capillary pattern. The abnormal capillary pattern in SS patients correlated with microvascular disturbances such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital pitting scars and low finger temperature. Our results indicate that quantitative analysis of the nail fold capillaries is useful in evaluating the microvascular disturbances in SS patients.

  1. Loss of Predominant Shank3 Isoforms Results in Hippocampus-Dependent Impairments in Behavior and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kouser, Mehreen; Speed, Haley E.; Dewey, Colleen M.; Reimers, Jeremy M.; Widman, Allie J.; Gupta, Natasha; Liu, Shunan; Jaramillo, Thomas C.; Bangash, Muhammad; Xiao, Bo; Worley, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The Shank3 gene encodes a scaffolding protein that anchors multiple elements of the postsynaptic density at the synapse. Previous attempts to delete the Shank3 gene have not resulted in a complete loss of the predominant naturally occurring Shank3 isoforms. We have now characterized a homozygous Shank3 mutation in mice that deletes exon 21, including the Homer binding domain. In the homozygous state, deletion of exon 21 results in loss of the major naturally occurring Shank3 protein bands detected by C-terminal and N-terminal antibodies, allowing us to more definitively examine the role of Shank3 in synaptic function and behavior. This loss of Shank3 leads to an increased localization of mGluR5 to both synaptosome and postsynaptic density-enriched fractions in the hippocampus. These mice exhibit a decrease in NMDA/AMPA excitatory postsynaptic current ratio in area CA1 of the hippocampus, reduced long-term potentiation in area CA1, and deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. In addition, these mice also exhibit motor-coordination deficits, hypersensitivity to heat, novelty avoidance, altered locomotor response to novelty, and minimal social abnormalities. These data suggest that Shank3 isoforms are required for normal synaptic transmission/plasticity in the hippocampus, as well as hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. PMID:24259569

  2. Efficient oxidative folding of conotoxins and the radiation of venomous cone snails.

    PubMed

    Bulaj, Grzegorz; Buczek, Olga; Goodsell, Ian; Jimenez, Elsie C; Kranski, Jessica; Nielsen, Jacob S; Garrett, James E; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2003-11-25

    The 500 different species of venomous cone snails (genus Conus) use small, highly structured peptides (conotoxins) for interacting with prey, predators, and competitors. These peptides are produced by translating mRNA from many genes belonging to only a few gene superfamilies. Each translation product is processed to yield a great diversity of different mature toxin peptides (approximately 50,000-100,000), most of which are 12-30 aa in length with two to three disulfide crosslinks. In vitro, forming the biologically relevant disulfide configuration is often problematic, suggesting that in vivo mechanisms for efficiently folding the diversity of conotoxins have been evolved by the cone snails. We demonstrate here that the correct folding of a Conus peptide is facilitated by a posttranslationally modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamate. In addition, we show that multiple isoforms of protein disulfide isomerase are major soluble proteins in Conus venom duct extracts. The results provide evidence for the type of adaptations required before cone snails could systematically explore the specialized biochemical world of "microproteins" that other organisms have not been able to systematically access. Almost certainly, additional specialized adaptations for efficient microprotein folding are required.

  3. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  5. Computational analysis of hydrogenated graphyne folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenear, Christopher; Becton, Matthew; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-02-01

    This letter employs molecular mechanics simulations to analyze the geometric changes of foreign-atom-doped graphyne. Simulation results show that higher the density of dopant and the greater area covered by the dopant correlates to a greater folding angle of the graphyne sheet. Compared to graphene, graphyne folding could prove to be more effective for various nanodevices based on its unique band gap, especially when doped, and its tunable interactions with and absorption of foreign molecules. Therefore, our findings may offer unique perspectives into the development of novel graphyne-based nanodevices and stimulate the community's research interest in graphene-related origami.

  6. FOLD LENS FLUX ANOMALIES: A GEOMETRIC APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, David M.; Chessey, Mary K.; Harris, Wendy B.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2010-06-01

    We develop a new approach for studying flux anomalies in quadruply imaged fold lens systems. We show that in the absence of substructure, microlensing, or differential absorption, the expected flux ratios of a fold pair can be tightly constrained using only geometric arguments. We apply this technique to 11 known quadruple lens systems in the radio and infrared and compare our estimates to the Monte Carlo based results of Keeton et al. We show that a robust estimate for a flux ratio from a smoothly varying potential can be found, and at long wavelengths those lenses deviating from this ratio almost certainly contain significant substructure.

  7. Fold Lens Flux Anomalies: A Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, David M.; Chessey, Mary K.; Harris, Wendy B.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2010-06-01

    We develop a new approach for studying flux anomalies in quadruply imaged fold lens systems. We show that in the absence of substructure, microlensing, or differential absorption, the expected flux ratios of a fold pair can be tightly constrained using only geometric arguments. We apply this technique to 11 known quadruple lens systems in the radio and infrared and compare our estimates to the Monte Carlo based results of Keeton et al. We show that a robust estimate for a flux ratio from a smoothly varying potential can be found, and at long wavelengths those lenses deviating from this ratio almost certainly contain significant substructure.

  8. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  9. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2008-06-24

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  10. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  11. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-14

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  12. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  13. Genetic engineering of the branched fatty acid metabolic pathway of Bacillus subtilis for the overproduction of surfactin C14 isoform.

    PubMed

    Dhali, Debarun; Coutte, François; Arias, Anthony Argüelles; Auger, Sandrine; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Lalk, Michael; Niehren, Joachim; de Sousa, Joana; Versari, Cristian; Jacques, Philippe

    2017-04-03

    Surfactin, a lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, is one of the most powerful biosurfactants known. This molecule consists of a cyclic heptapeptide linked to a β-hydroxy fatty acid chain. The isomery and the length of the fatty acid (FA) chain are responsible for the surfactin's activities. In this study, the gene codY, which encode for the global transcriptional regulator and the gene lpdV, located in the bkd operon (lpdV, bkdAA, bkdAB and bkdB genes), which is responsible for the last step of the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) degradation in acyl-CoA were deleted. The influence of these deletions on the quantitative and qualitative surfactin production was analysed. The surfactin production was quantified by RP-HPLC and the surfactin isoforms were characterized using LC-MS-MS and GC-MS analysis. The results obtained in the mutants showed an enhancement of surfactin specific production by a factor of 5.8 for the codY mutant and 1.4 for lpdV mutant. Moreover qualitative analysis of the lpdV mutant reveals that it mainly produced surfactin C14 isoform (2 fold more than the wild type) with linear FA chain. Complete analysis of the extracellular metabolites using (1) H quantitative NMR reveals a reduced production of acetoin in this mutant. This work demonstrates for the first time an original approach to overproduce specifically surfactin with C14 FA chain.

  14. Functional dissection of NEAT1 using genome editing reveals substantial localisation of the NEAT1_1 isoform outside paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruohan; Harvey, Alan R; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Fox, Archa H

    2017-03-21

    Large numbers of long non-coding RNAs have been discovered in recent years, but only a few have been characterised. NEAT1 (nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1) is a mammalian long non-coding RNA that is important for the reproductive physiology of mice, cancer development and the formation of subnuclear bodies termed paraspeckles. The two major isoforms of NEAT1 (3.7kb NEAT1_1 and 23kb NEAT1_2 in human) are generated from a common promoter and are produced through the use of alternative transcription termination sites. This gene structure has made the functional relationship between the two isoforms difficult to dissect. Here we used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to create several different cell lines: total NEAT1 knockout cells, cells that only express the short form, NEAT1_1, and cells with 2-fold more NEAT1_2. Using these reagents, we obtained evidence that NEAT1_1 is not a major component of paraspeckles. In addition, our data suggest NEAT1_1 localises in numerous non-paraspeckle foci we termed 'microspeckles' which may carry paraspeckle-independent functions. This study highlights the complexity of lncRNA and showcases how genome editing tools are useful in dissecting the structural and functional roles of overlapping transcripts.

  15. Cyt c6-3: A New Isoform of Photosynthetic Cyt c6 Exclusive to Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Alejandro; Valladares, Ana; Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Hervás, Manuel; Navarro, José A; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P

    2016-10-25

    All known cyanobacteria contain Cyt c6, a small soluble electron carrier protein whose main function is to transfer electrons from the Cyt b6 f complex to PSI, although it is also involved in respiration. We have previously described a second isoform of this protein, the Cyt c6-like, whose function remains unknown. Here we describe a third isoform of Cyt c6 (here called Cytc6-3), which is only found in heterocyst-forming filamentous cyanobacteria. Cyt c6-3 is expressed in vegetative cells but is specifically repressed in heterocysts cells under diazotrophic growth conditions. Although there is a close structural similarity between Cyt c6-3 and Cyt c6 related to the general protein folding, Cyt c6-3 presents differential electrostatic surface features as compared with Cyt c6, its expression is not copper dependent and has a low reactivity towards PSI. According to the different expression pattern, functional reactivity and structural properties, Cyt c6-3 has to play an as yet to be defined regulatory role related to heterocyst differentiation.

  16. Reduction and alkylation of peanut allergen isoforms Ara h 2 and Ara h 6; characterization of intermediate- and end products.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Luykx, Dion; Warmenhoven, Hans; Verbart, Dennis; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jong, Govardus A H; Velickovic, Tanja Cirkovic; Koppelman, Stef J

    2013-12-01

    Conglutins, the major peanut allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, are highly structured proteins stabilized by multiple disulfide bridges and are stable towards heat-denaturation and digestion. We sought a way to reduce their potent allergenicity in view of the development of immunotherapy for peanut allergy. Isoforms of conglutin were purified, reduced with dithiothreitol and subsequently alkylated with iodoacetamide. The effect of this modification was assessed on protein folding and IgE-binding. We found that all disulfide bridges were reduced and alkylated. As a result, the secondary structure lost α-helix and gained some β-structure content, and the tertiary structure stability was reduced. On a functional level, the modification led to a strongly decreased IgE-binding. Using conditions for limited reduction and alkylation, partially reduced and alkylated proteins were found with rearranged disulfide bridges and, in some cases, intermolecular cross-links were found. Peptide mass finger printing was applied to control progress of the modification reaction and to map novel disulfide bonds. There was no preference for the order in which disulfides were reduced, and disulfide rearrangement occurred in a non-specific way. Only minor differences in kinetics of reduction and alkylation were found between the different conglutin isoforms. We conclude that the peanut conglutins Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 can be chemically modified by reduction and alkylation, such that they substantially unfold and that their allergenic potency decreases.

  17. A primate-specific, brain isoform of KCNH2 affects cortical physiology, cognition, neuronal repolarization and risk of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Huffaker, Stephen J; Chen, Jingshan; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Sambataro, Fabio; Yang, Feng; Mattay, Venkata; Lipska, Barbara K; Hyde, Thomas M; Song, Jian; Rujescu, Dan; Giegling, Ina; Mayilyan, Karine; Proust, Morgan J; Soghoyan, Armen; Caforio, Grazia; Callicott, Joseph H; Bertolino, Alessandro; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Chang, Jay; Ji, Yuanyuan; Egan, Michael F; Goldberg, Terry E; Kleinman, Joel E; Lu, Bai; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2009-05-01

    Organized neuronal firing is crucial for cortical processing and is disrupted in schizophrenia. Using rapid amplification of 5' complementary DNA ends in human brain, we identified a primate-specific isoform (3.1) of the ether-a-go-go-related K(+) channel KCNH2 that modulates neuronal firing. KCNH2-3.1 messenger RNA levels are comparable to full-length KCNH2 (1A) levels in brain but three orders of magnitude lower in heart. In hippocampus from individuals with schizophrenia, KCNH2-3.1 expression is 2.5-fold greater than KCNH2-1A expression. A meta-analysis of five clinical data sets (367 families, 1,158 unrelated cases and 1,704 controls) shows association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in KCNH2 with schizophrenia. Risk-associated alleles predict lower intelligence quotient scores and speed of cognitive processing, altered memory-linked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals and increased KCNH2-3.1 mRNA levels in postmortem hippocampus. KCNH2-3.1 lacks a domain that is crucial for slow channel deactivation. Overexpression of KCNH2-3.1 in primary cortical neurons induces a rapidly deactivating K(+) current and a high-frequency, nonadapting firing pattern. These results identify a previously undescribed KCNH2 channel isoform involved in cortical physiology, cognition and psychosis, providing a potential new therapeutic drug target.

  18. Understanding the role of the topology in protein folding by computational inverse folding experiments.

    PubMed

    Mucherino, Antonio; Costantini, Susan; di Serafino, Daniela; D'Apuzzo, Marco; Facchiano, Angelo; Colonna, Giovanni

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that protein folding should be revisited as the emergent property of a complex system and that the nature allows only a very limited number of folds that seem to be strongly influenced by geometrical properties. In this work we explore the principles underlying this new view and show how helical protein conformations can be obtained starting from simple geometric considerations. We generated a large data set of C-alpha traces made of 65 points, by computationally solving a backbone model that takes into account only topological features of the all-alpha proteins; then, we built corresponding tertiary structures, by using the sequences associated to the crystallographic structures of four small globular all-alpha proteins from PDB, and analysed them in terms of structural and energetic properties. In this way we obtained four poorly populated sets of structures that are reasonably similar to the conformational states typical of the experimental PDB structures. These results show that our computational approach can capture the native topology of all-alpha proteins; furthermore, it generates backbone folds without the influence of the side chains and uses the protein sequence to select a specific fold among the generated folds. This agrees with the recent view that the backbone plays an important role in the protein folding process and that the amino acid sequence chooses its own fold within a limited total number of folds.

  19. Hydroxyapatite surface-induced peptide folding.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Lisa A; Beebe, Thomas P; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-04-25

    Herein, we describe the design and surface-binding characterization of a de novo designed peptide, JAK1, which undergoes surface-induced folding at the hydroxyapatite (HA)-solution interface. JAK1 is designed to be unstructured in buffered saline solution, yet undergo HA-induced folding that is largely governed by the periodic positioning of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues within the primary sequence of the peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the peptide remains unfolded and monomeric in solution under normal physiological conditions; however, CD spectroscopy indicates that in the presence of hydroxyapatite, the peptide avidly binds to the mineral surface adopting a helical structure. Adsorption isotherms indicate nearly quantitative surface coverage and Kd = 310 nM for the peptide-surface binding event. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with the adsorption isotherm data suggests that JAK1 binds to HA, forming a self-limiting monolayer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HA surfaces to trigger the intramolecular folding of designed peptides and represents the initial stages of defining the design rules that allow HA-induced peptide folding.

  20. Protein folded states are kinetic hubs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Gregory R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding molecular kinetics, and particularly protein folding, is a classic grand challenge in molecular biophysics. Network models, such as Markov state models (MSMs), are one potential solution to this problem. MSMs have recently yielded quantitative agreement with experimentally derived structures and folding rates for specific systems, leaving them positioned to potentially provide a deeper understanding of molecular kinetics that can lead to experimentally testable hypotheses. Here we use existing MSMs for the villin headpiece and NTL9, which were constructed from atomistic simulations, to accomplish this goal. In addition, we provide simpler, humanly comprehensible networks that capture the essence of molecular kinetics and reproduce qualitative phenomena like the apparent two-state folding often seen in experiments. Together, these models show that protein dynamics are dominated by stochastic jumps between numerous metastable states and that proteins have heterogeneous unfolded states (many unfolded basins that interconvert more rapidly with the native state than with one another) yet often still appear two-state. Most importantly, we find that protein native states are hubs that can be reached quickly from any other state. However, metastability and a web of nonnative states slow the average folding rate. Experimental tests for these findings and their implications for other fields, like protein design, are also discussed. PMID:20534497

  1. Sequential self-folding of polymer sheets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Shaw, Brandi; Dickey, Michael D.; Genzer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Shape plays an important role in defining the function of materials, particularly those found in nature. Several strategies exist to program materials to change from one shape to another; however, few can temporally and spatially control the shape. Programming the sequence of shape transformation with temporal control has been driven by the desire to generate complex shapes with high yield and to create multiple shapes from the same starting material. This paper demonstrates a markedly simple strategy for programmed self-folding of two-dimensional (2D) polymer sheets into 3D objects in a sequential manner using external light. Printed ink on the surface of the polymer sheets discriminately absorbs light on the basis of the wavelength of the light and the color of the ink that defines the hinge about which the sheet folds. The absorbed light gradually heats the underlying polymer across the thickness of the sheet, which causes relief of strain to induce folding. These color patterns can be designed to absorb only specific wavelengths of light (or to absorb differently at the same wavelength using color hues), thereby providing control of sheet folding with respect to time and space. This type of shape programming may have numerous applications, including reconfigurable electronics, actuators, sensors, implantable devices, smart packaging, and deployable structures. PMID:28275736

  2. Adaptive Origami for Efficiently Folded Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    4 3.2 Design of 2D-to- 3D Actuating Mechanisms...printing, lithography) to convert surface patterns on substrates into stable 3D objects. The design and fabrication of structures based on folding...Nafion, where prescribed 3D geometric information can be encoded as a spatially patterned composite of discrete shape-memory and locked-shape-memory

  3. Fold in Origami and Unfold Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgeson, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Students enjoy origami and like making everything from paper cranes to footballs out of small, colorful squares of paper. They can invent their own shapes and are intrigued by the polyhedrons that they can construct. Paper folding is fun, but where is the math? Unless teachers develop lessons that address mathematical objectives, origami could be…

  4. Coiling and Folding of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2007-11-01

    The study of fluid jets impacting on a flat surface has industrial applications in many areas, including processing of foods and consumer goods, bottle filling, and polymer melt processing. Previous studies have focused primarily on purely viscous, Newtonian fluids, which exhibit a number of different dynamical regimes including dripping, steady jetting, folding, and steady coiling. Here we add another dimension to the problem by focusing on mobile (low viscosity) viscoelastic fluids, with the study of two wormlike-micellar fluids, a cetylpyridinum-salicylic acid salt (CPyCl/NaSal) solution, and an industrially relevant shampoo base. We investigate the effects of viscosity and elasticity on the dynamics of axi-symmetric jets. The viscoelasticity of the fluids is systematically controlled by varying the concentration of salt counterions. Experimental methods include shear and extensional rheology measurements to characterize the fluids, and high-speed digital video imaging. In addition to the regimes observed in purely viscous systems, we also find a novel regime in which the elastic jet buckles and folds on itself, and alternates between coiling and folding behavior. We suggest phase diagrams and scaling laws for the coiling and folding frequencies through a systematic exploration of the experimental parameter space (height of fall, imposed flow rate, elasticity of the solution).

  5. Clinical evaluation of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Brent E; Bastian, Robert W

    2004-02-01

    Vocal fold paralysis is regarded as a sign of other pathologic findings until investigation has proven that there is no lesion to explain the paralysis. We have outlined a cost-effective and time- and labor-efficient method for the clinical evaluation of vocal fold paralysis, including a focused history; vocal capability assessment to find deficits in the function of palate,pharynx, and larynx: and, finally, an intense examination under topical anesthesia to demonstrate these deficits. In essence, it is the endoscopic version of a radiographic study from the skull base through the aortic arch. This method is streamlined as compared with prior protocols for evaluation of vocal fold paralysis, because it directs the necessary further workup according to the likely site of the lesion as indicated by the extended physical examination and can be conducted entirely in the physician's office. Radiographic workup should include CT of the skull base through the upper mediastinum if solely a recurrent nerve paralysis is present; it should include MRI of the skull base if high vagal signs and symptoms are present. If MRI is negative, CT may also be needed for complete evaluation. Neurologic signs that are not all ipsilateral require MRI of the brain and consultation with a neurologist. Esophageal obstruction combined with vocal fold paralysis mandates evaluation via esophagoscopy or an esophagram.

  6. Folded cavity design for a ruby resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunkumar, K. A.; Trolinger, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A folded cavity laser resonator operating in the TEM(00) mode has been built and tested. The new oscillator configuration leads to an increase in efficiency and to better line narrowing due to the increased number of passes through the laser rod and tuning elements, respectively. The modification is shown to lead to cavity ruggedization.

  7. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  8. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  9. Folding and faulting of an elastic continuum

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Panos A.

    2016-01-01

    Folding is a process in which bending is localized at sharp edges separated by almost undeformed elements. This process is rarely encountered in Nature, although some exceptions can be found in unusual layered rock formations (called ‘chevrons’) and seashell patterns (for instance Lopha cristagalli). In mechanics, the bending of a three-dimensional elastic solid is common (for example, in bulk wave propagation), but folding is usually not achieved. In this article, the route leading to folding is shown for an elastic solid obeying the couple-stress theory with an extreme anisotropy. This result is obtained with a perturbation technique, which involves the derivation of new two-dimensional Green's functions for applied concentrated force and moment. While the former perturbation reveals folding, the latter shows that a material in an extreme anisotropic state is also prone to a faulting instability, in which a displacement step of finite size emerges. Another failure mechanism, namely the formation of dilation/compaction bands, is also highlighted. Finally, a geophysical application to the mechanics of chevron formation shows how the proposed approach may explain the formation of natural structures. PMID:27118925

  10. Fast phase randomization via two-folds.

    PubMed

    Simpson, D J W; Jeffrey, M R

    2016-02-01

    A two-fold is a singular point on the discontinuity surface of a piecewise-smooth vector field, at which the vector field is tangent to the discontinuity surface on both sides. If an orbit passes through an invisible two-fold (also known as a Teixeira singularity) before settling to regular periodic motion, then the phase of that motion cannot be determined from initial conditions, and, in the presence of small noise, the asymptotic phase of a large number of sample solutions is highly random. In this paper, we show how the probability distribution of the asymptotic phase depends on the global nonlinear dynamics. We also show how the phase of a smooth oscillator can be randomized by applying a simple discontinuous control law that generates an invisible two-fold. We propose that such a control law can be used to desynchronize a collection of oscillators, and that this manner of phase randomization is fast compared with existing methods (which use fixed points as phase singularities), because there is no slowing of the dynamics near a two-fold.

  11. How do metal ions direct ribozyme folding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, Natalia A.; Thirumalai, D.

    2015-10-01

    Ribozymes, which carry out phosphoryl-transfer reactions, often require Mg2+ ions for catalytic activity. The correct folding of the active site and ribozyme tertiary structure is also regulated by metal ions in a manner that is not fully understood. Here we employ coarse-grained molecular simulations to show that individual structural elements of the group I ribozyme from the bacterium Azoarcus form spontaneously in the unfolded ribozyme even at very low Mg2+ concentrations, and are transiently stabilized by the coordination of Mg2+ ions to specific nucleotides. However, competition for scarce Mg2+ and topological constraints that arise from chain connectivity prevent the complete folding of the ribozyme. A much higher Mg2+ concentration is required for complete folding of the ribozyme and stabilization of the active site. When Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+ the ribozyme folds, but the active site remains unstable. Our results suggest that group I ribozymes utilize the same interactions with specific metal ligands for both structural stability and chemical activity.

  12. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  13. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, has been reported in captive and free-ranging cervids. An abnormal isoform of a prion protein (PrP-CWD) has been associated with CWD in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and this prion protein can be detected with i...

  14. Design and synthesis of isoform-selective phospholipase D (PLD) inhibitors. Part II. Identification of the 1,3,8-triazaspiro[4,5]decan-4-one privileged structure that engenders PLD2 selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lavieri, Robert; Scott, Sarah A; Lewis, Jana A; Selvy, Paige E; Armstrong, Michelle D; Alex Brown, H; Lindsley, Craig W

    2009-04-15

    This Letter describes the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of isoform-selective PLD inhibitors. By virtue of the installation of a 1,3,8-triazaspiro[4,5]decan-4-one privileged structure, PLD inhibitors with nanomolar potency and an unprecedented 40-fold selectivity for PLD2 over PLD1 were developed. Interestingly, SAR for this diverged from our earlier efforts, and dual PLD1/2 inhibitors were also discovered within this series.

  15. Fault-related folding during extension: Plunging basement-cored folds in the Basin and Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; John, Barbara E.

    1997-01-01

    Folds are able to form in highly extended areas where stratified cover rocks respond to basement fault offsets. The response of cover rocks to basement faulting can be studied especially well in plunging structures that expose large structural relief. The southern Basin and Range province contains plunging folds kilometres in amplitude at the corners of domino-like tilt blocks of basement rocks, where initially steep transverse and normal faults propagated upward toward the layered cover rocks. Exposed tilted cross sections, as much as 8 km thick, display transitions from faulted basement to folded cover that validate laboratory models of forced folds. The folded cover masks a deeper extensional style of brittle segmentation and uniform steep tilting.

  16. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-02

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions.

  17. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  18. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of tropomodulin isoforms leads to thin filament elongation in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gokhin, David S; Tierney, Matthew T; Sui, Zhenhua; Sacco, Alessandra; Fowler, Velia M

    2014-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) induces sarcolemmal mechanical instability and rupture, hyperactivity of intracellular calpains, and proteolytic breakdown of muscle structural proteins. Here we identify the two sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms, Tmod1 and Tmod4, as novel proteolytic targets of m-calpain, with Tmod1 exhibiting ∼10-fold greater sensitivity to calpain-mediated cleavage than Tmod4 in situ. In mdx mice, increased m-calpain levels in dystrophic soleus muscle are associated with loss of Tmod1 from the thin filament pointed ends, resulting in ∼11% increase in thin filament lengths. In mdx/mTR mice, a more severe model of DMD, Tmod1 disappears from the thin filament pointed ends in both tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles, whereas Tmod4 additionally disappears from soleus muscle, resulting in thin filament length increases of ∼10 and ∼12% in TA and soleus muscles, respectively. In both mdx and mdx/mTR mice, both TA and soleus muscles exhibit normal localization of α-actinin, the nebulin M1M2M3 domain, Tmod3, and cytoplasmic γ-actin, indicating that m-calpain does not cause wholesale proteolysis of other sarcomeric and actin cytoskeletal proteins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. These results implicate Tmod proteolysis and resultant thin filament length misspecification as novel mechanisms that may contribute to DMD pathology, affecting muscles in a use- and disease severity-dependent manner.

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism mutations affect common folding and trafficking in the α/β-hydrolase fold proteins.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-12-01

    The α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins is composed of structurally related members that, despite great diversity in their catalytic, recognition, adhesion and chaperone functions, share a common fold governed by homologous residues and conserved disulfide bridges. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in various family members have been found for congenital endocrine, metabolic and nervous system disorders. By examining the amino acid sequence from the various proteins, mutations were found to be prevalent in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold of the homologous proteins. This is the case for the thyroglobulin mutations linked to congenital hypothyroidism. To address whether correct folding of the common domain is required for protein export, we inserted the thyroglobulin mutations at homologous positions in two correlated but simpler α/β-hydrolase fold proteins known to be exported to the cell surface: neuroligin3 and acetylcholinesterase. Here we show that these mutations in the cholinesterase homologous region alter the folding properties of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain, which are reflected in defects in protein trafficking, folding and function, and ultimately result in retention of the partially processed proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accordingly, mutations at conserved residues may be transferred amongst homologous proteins to produce common processing defects despite disparate functions, protein complexity and tissue-specific expression of the homologous proteins. More importantly, a similar assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain tertiary structure among homologous members of the superfamily is required for correct trafficking of the proteins to their final destination.

  20. Nomenclature proposal to describe vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Clark A; Mau, Ted; Remacle, Marc; Hess, Markus; Eckel, Hans E; Young, VyVy N; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Yung, Katherine C; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-08-01

    The terms used to describe vocal fold motion impairment are confusing and not standardized. This results in a failure to communicate accurately and to major limitations of interpreting research studies involving vocal fold impairment. We propose standard nomenclature for reporting vocal fold impairment. Overarching terms of vocal fold immobility and hypomobility are rigorously defined. This includes assessment techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria for determining vocal fold immobility and hypomobility. In addition, criteria for use of the following terms have been outlined in detail: vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold immobility/hypomobility associated with mechanical impairment of the crico-arytenoid joint and vocal fold immobility/hypomobility related to laryngeal malignant disease. This represents the first rigorously defined vocal fold motion impairment nomenclature system. This provides detailed definitions to the terms vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis.

  1. Abnormalities in the expression of nebulin in chromosome-2 linked nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sewry, C A; Brown, S C; Pelin, K; Jungbluth, H; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Labeit, S; Manzur, A; Muntoni, F

    2001-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The most common autosomal recessive form affecting infants (NEM2) links to chromosome 2q, and is caused by mutations in the gene for nebulin. We have examined the immunocytochemical expression of nebulin in skeletal muscle in 11 cases of nemaline myopathy, from ten families, with linkage compatible to chromosome 2q.22, the locus for nebulin. Mutations in the gene for nebulin have been found in eight of these cases. Immunolabelling with polyclonal antibodies to C-terminal regions of nebulin was compared with antibodies to fibre-type-specific myofibrillar proteins, including myosin heavy chain isoforms and alpha-actinin isoforms. No cases showed a complete absence of C-terminal nebulin, and no enhancement of labelling of the rods was seen with conventional fluorescence microscopy. In control muscle an antibody to the M176-181 repeat region of nebulin showed higher expression in fibres with slow myosin, while ones to the serine-rich domain and to the SH3 domain showed uniform expression. In some cases of nemaline myopathy differences in these patterns were observed. Two siblings with a homozygous mutation in exon 185, that produces a stop codon, showed an absence of labelling only with the SH3 antibody, and other cases showed uneven labelling with this antibody or some fibres devoid of label. Fibre type correlations also showed differences from controls, as some fibres had a fast isoform of one protein but a slow isoform of another. These results indicate that analysis of nebulin expression may detect abnormalities in some cases linked to the corresponding locus and may help to direct molecular analysis. In addition, they may also be relevant to studies of fibre type plasticity and diversity in nemaline myopathy.

  2. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  3. [4 anthroposcopic markers in the Northern Greece population: hand folding, arm folding, tongue rolling and tongue folding].

    PubMed

    Pentzos-Daponte, A

    1986-03-01

    Four anthroposcopic traits, namely hand clasping, arm folding, tongue rolling and tongue curling have been studied in a total of 7763 individuals from Thessaloniki and its surroundings, representing a sample of the population of Northern Greece. The statistical analysis of the data indicates significant sex differences only concerning tongue rolling. The frequencies obtained for the four traits under study are compared with data from the literature.

  4. The Characterization of GSDMB Splicing and Backsplicing Profiles Identifies Novel Isoforms and a Circular RNA That Are Dysregulated in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cardamone, Giulia; Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Rimoldi, Valeria; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities in alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as recurrent features in autoimmune diseases (AIDs). In particular, a growing body of evidence suggests the existence of a pathogenic association between a generalized defect in splicing regulatory genes and multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, several studies have documented an unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS patients possibly contributing to the disease etiology. In this work, using a combination of PCR-based techniques (reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR, fluorescent-competitive, real-time, and digital RT-PCR assays), we investigated the alternatively-spliced gene encoding Gasdermin B, GSDMB, which was repeatedly associated with susceptibility to asthma and AIDs. The in-depth characterization of GSDMB AS and backsplicing profiles led us to the identification of an exonic circular RNA (ecircRNA) as well as of novel GSDMB in-frame and out-of-frame isoforms. The non-productive splicing variants were shown to be downregulated by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in human cell lines, suggesting that GSDMB levels are significantly modulated by NMD. Importantly, both AS isoforms and the identified ecircRNA were significantly dysregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of relapsing-remitting MS patients compared to controls, further supporting the notion that aberrant RNA metabolism is a characteristic feature of the disease. PMID:28272342

  5. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  6. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  7. Cyclooxygenase Isoform Exchange Blocks Brain-Mediated Inflammatory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Zajdel, Joanna; Kumar Singh, Anand; Engblom, David

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is the main source of inducible prostaglandin E2 production and mediates inflammatory symptoms including fever, loss of appetite and hyperalgesia. COX-1 is dispensable for fever, anorexia and hyperalgesia but is important for several other functions both under basal conditions and during inflammation. The differential functionality of the COX isoforms could be due to differences in the regulatory regions of the genes, leading to different expression patterns, or to differences in the coding sequence, resulting in distinct functional properties of the proteins. To study the molecular underpinnings of the functional differences between the two isoforms in the context of inflammatory symptoms, we used mice in which the coding sequence of COX-2 was replaced by the corresponding sequence of COX-1. In these mice, COX-1 mRNA was induced by inflammation but COX-1 protein expression did not fully mimic inflammation-induced COX-2 expression. Just like mice globally lacking COX-2, these mice showed a complete lack of fever and inflammation-induced anorexia as well as an impaired response to inflammatory pain. However, as previously reported, they displayed close to normal survival rates, which contrasts to the high fetal mortality in COX-2 knockout mice. This shows that the COX activity generated from the hybrid gene was strong enough to allow survival but not strong enough to mediate the inflammatory symptoms studied, making the line an interesting alternative to COX-2 knockouts for the study of inflammation. Our results also show that the functional differences between COX-1 and COX-2 in the context of inflammatory symptoms are not only dependent on the features of the promoter regions. Instead they indicate that there are fundamental differences between the isoforms at translational or posttranslational levels. PMID:27861574

  8. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity.

  9. Differential expression of functional guanylyl cyclases in melanocytes: absence of nitric-oxide-sensitive isoform in metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Das, P K; van den Wijngaard, R M; Lenz, W; Klockenbring, T; Malcharzyk, V; Drummer, C; Gerzer, R

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive endogenous molecule with multiple functions and its cellular signaling activity is mainly mediated by activation of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) hemeprotein. The expression of the NO-sensitive soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase was studied in various cultured melanocytic cells by measuring the accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the presence and absence of NO donors. Here we report that 3-morpholino-sydnonimine, a donor of NO redox species, and (Z)-1-[2- (2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, a direct NO donor, induced a 20-fold increase in intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in nonmetastatic melanoma cells and normal melanocytes in culture that could be related to cellular melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was due to stimulation of the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase as such increase was completely abolished by using a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of functional soluble guanylyl cyclase was further confirmed by the presence of alpha1 and beta1 subunits in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, none of the NO donors induced guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in metastatic melanoma cells, which could be attributed to the absence of the beta1 subunit that is essential for catalytic activity of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase. Metastatic melanoma cells produced higher levels of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in response to natriuretic peptides than other cell types, however, due to upregulation of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase activities, but they are less pigmented or unpigmented. The present finding suggests that NO signaling in association with melanogenesis is dependent on the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, whereas absence of soluble guanylyl

  10. The shape and mechanics of curved-fold origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-12-01

    We develop recursion equations to describe the three-dimensional shape of a sheet upon which a series of concentric curved folds have been inscribed. In the case of no stretching outside the fold, the three-dimensional shape of a single fold prescribes the shape of the entire origami structure. To better explore these structures, we derive continuum equations, valid in the limit of vanishing spacing between folds, to describe the smooth surface intersecting all the mountain folds. We find that this surface has negative Gaussian curvature with magnitude equal to the square of the fold's torsion. A series of open folds with constant fold angle generate a helicoid.

  11. Microfluidic Mixers for Studying Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Wu, Ling; Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which a protein folds into its native conformation is highly relevant to biology and human health yet still poorly understood. One reason for this is that folding takes place over a wide range of timescales, from nanoseconds to seconds or longer, depending on the protein1. Conventional stopped-flow mixers have allowed measurement of folding kinetics starting at about 1 ms. We have recently developed a microfluidic mixer that dilutes denaturant ~100-fold in ~8 μs2. Unlike a stopped-flow mixer, this mixer operates in the laminar flow regime in which turbulence does not occur. The absence of turbulence allows precise numeric simulation of all flows within the mixer with excellent agreement to experiment3-4. Laminar flow is achieved for Reynolds numbers Re ≤100. For aqueous solutions, this requires micron scale geometries. We use a hard substrate, such as silicon or fused silica, to make channels 5-10 μm wide and 10 μm deep (See Figure 1). The smallest dimensions, at the entrance to the mixing region, are on the order of 1 μm in size. The chip is sealed with a thin glass or fused silica coverslip for optical access. Typical total linear flow rates are ~1 m/s, yielding Re~10, but the protein consumption is only ~0.5 nL/s or 1.8 μL/hr. Protein concentration depends on the detection method: For tryptophan fluorescence the typical concentration is 100 μM (for 1 Trp/protein) and for FRET the typical concentration is ~100 nM. The folding process is initiated by rapid dilution of denaturant from 6 M to 0.06 M guanidine hydrochloride. The protein in high denaturant flows down a central channel and is met on either side at the mixing region by buffer without denaturant moving ~100 times faster (see Figure 2). This geometry causes rapid constriction of the protein flow into a narrow jet ~100 nm wide. Diffusion of the light denaturant molecules is very rapid, while diffusion of the heavy protein molecules is much slower, diffusing less than 1 μm in 1 ms

  12. Enolase isoforms activities in spermatozoa from men with normospermia and abnormospermia.

    PubMed

    Force, Andre; Viallard, Jean-L; Grizard, Genevieve; Boucher, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Total enolase as well as enolase-alphaalpha. (ENO-alphaalpha, ubiquitous) and enolase-S (ENO-S, sperm-specific) activities were measured in total and Percoll-selected sperm from 30 normospermic fertile men and 20 abnormospermic infertile patients. The total enolase activity was significantly higher in total sperm from patients with abnormospermia compared with normospermic patients (11.1 +/- 1.9 vs. 4.8 +/- 0.5 mlU/10(7) sperm P < .05). ENO-alphaalpha activity was significantly higher in total sperm from abnormospermic men than from normospermic men (P < .05). ENO-alphaalpha activity in Percoll-selected sperm was significantly lower compared with total sperm in both group of patients; however, for the same sperm fraction ENO-alphaalpha activity did not differ between normospermic and abnormospermic men. ENO-alphaalpha activity was related to the cell contamination ratio and to the percentage of spermatozoa with abnormal morphology. Furthermore, ENO-alphaalpha was positively correlated with the percentage of immature sperm showing an excess of residual cytoplasm. ENO-S activity was significantly higher in total sperm from normospermic patients than from abnormospermic patients (P < .05). ENO-S activity in Percoll-selected sperm was not significantly different compared with total sperm in both group of patients. However, this activity was significantly lower in Percoll-selected sperm from abnormospermic men compared with normospermic men (P < .05). ENO-S activity was not related to the cell contamination ratio but was significantly correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology. The 2 enolase isoforms seem to reflect 2 opposite aspects of sperm cells quality: ENO-alphaalpha is associated with abnormal spermatozoa, immature spermatozoa, or both; and ENO-S is associated with normal spermatozoa. As an additional index to distinguish normal from abnormal semen, the ENO-S:ENO-alphaalpha ratio was evaluated for total and Percoll-selected sperm in both

  13. Vocal fold and ventricular fold vibration in period-doubling phonation: physiological description and aerodynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Lucie; Henrich, Nathalie; Pelorson, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Occurrences of period-doubling are found in human phonation, in particular for pathological and some singing phonations such as Sardinian A Tenore Bassu vocal performance. The combined vibration of the vocal folds and the ventricular folds has been observed during the production of such low pitch bass-type sound. The present study aims to characterize the physiological correlates of this acoustical production and to provide a better understanding of the physical interaction between ventricular fold vibration and vocal fold self-sustained oscillation. The vibratory properties of the vocal folds and the ventricular folds during phonation produced by a professional singer are analyzed by means of acoustical and electroglottographic signals and by synchronized glottal images obtained by high-speed cinematography. The periodic variation in glottal cycle duration and the effect of ventricular fold closing on glottal closing time are demonstrated. Using the detected glottal and ventricular areas, the aerodynamic behavior of the laryngeal system is simulated using a simplified physical modeling previously validated in vitro using a larynx replica. An estimate of the ventricular aperture extracted from the in vivo data allows a theoretical prediction of the glottal aperture. The in vivo measurements of the glottal aperture are then compared to the simulated estimations.

  14. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  15. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  16. Separation of arginase isoforms by capillary zone electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing in density gradient column.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, M M; Legaz, M E

    1995-04-01

    Four major arginase isoforms, I, II, III and IV, have been detected in Evernia prunastri thallus. They differ in terms of both physical and biochemical properties. The isoelectric point (pI) of these proteins has been determined by both isoelectric focusing in density gradient column and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE). Isoelectric focusing revealed charge microheterogeneity for isoforms II and IV whereas arginases I and II had the same pI value of 5.8. HPCE separation confirmed this charge microheterogeneity for isoform IV but not for isoform III, and provided evidence of microheterogeneity for isoforms I and II. The effect of various electrolyte buffers and running conditions on the HPCE separation of arginase isoform were investigated. Addition of 0.5 mM spermidine (SPD) to the running buffer reduced the electroosmotic flow (EOF) and permitted discriminating between the native proteins and protein fragments.

  17. Evolutionary, environmental and tissue controls on the occurrence of multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein

    SciTech Connect

    Battey, J.F.; Ohlrogge, J.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Previous research has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP). We have examined the development of this trait in evolutionarily diverse species. Isoforms were resolved by Western blotting and native PAGE of {sup 3}H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed in primitive vascular plants including gymnosperms, ferns and Psilotum and the nonvascular liverworts and mosses. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, unicellular algae and bacteria such as Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single electrophoretic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants. We have also examined light and tissue control over the expression of ACP isoforms. The expression of multiple forms of ACP in leaf of Spinacia and Avena is altered very little by light. Rather, the different patterns of ACP isoforms are primarily dependant on tissue source.

  18. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  19. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  20. An isoform of Taiman that contains a PRD-repeat motif is indispensable for transducing the vitellogenic juvenile hormone signal in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiming; Yang, Libin; Song, Jiasheng; Kang, Le; Zhou, Shutang

    2017-03-01

    Taiman (Tai) has been recently identified as the dimerizing partner of juvenile hormone (JH) receptor, Methoprene-tolerant (Met). However, the role of Tai isoforms in transducing vitellogenic signal of JH has not been determined. In this study, we show that the migratory locust Locusta migratoria has two Tai isoforms, which differ in an INDEL-1 domain with the PRD-repeat motif rich in histidine and proline at the C-terminus. Tai-A with the INDEL-1 is expressed at levels about 50-fold higher than Tai-B without the INDEL-1 in the fat body of vitellogenic adult females. Knockdown of Tai-A but not Tai-B results in a substantial reduction of vitellogenin expression in the fat body accompanied by the arrest of ovarian development and oocyte maturation, similar to that caused by depletion of both Tai isoforms. Either Tai-A or Tai-B combined with Met can induce target gene transcription in response to JH, but Tai-A appears to mediate a significantly higher transactivation. Our data suggest that the INDEL-1 domain plays a critical role in Tai function during reproduction as Tai-A appears be more active than Tai-B in transducing the vitellogenic JH signal in L. migratoria.

  1. Fast-Folding Proteins under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kapil; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are subject to a variety of stresses in biological organisms, including pressure and temperature, which are the easiest stresses to simulate by molecular dynamics. We discuss the effect of pressure and thermal stress on very fast folding model proteins, whose in vitro folding can be fully simulated on computers and compared with experiments. We then discuss experiments that can be used to subject proteins to low and high temperature unfolding, as well as low and high pressure unfolding. Pressure and temperature are prototypical perturbations that illustrate how close many proteins are to instability, a property that cells can exploit to control protein function. We conclude by reviewing some recent in-cell experiments, and progress being made in simulating and measuring protein stability and function inside live cells. PMID:26231095

  2. Chevron folding patterns and heteroclinic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, Christopher J.; Chakhchoukh, Amine N.; Dodwell, Timothy J.; Kuske, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    We present a model of multilayer folding in which layers with bending stiffness EI are separated by a very stiff elastic medium of elasticity k2 and subject to a horizontal load P. By using a dynamical system analysis of the resulting fourth order equation, we show that as the end shortening per unit length E is increased, then if k2 is large there is a smooth transition from small amplitude sinusoidal solutions at moderate values of P to larger amplitude chevron folds, with straight limbs separated by regions of high curvature when P is large. The chevron solutions take the form of near heteroclinic connections in the phase-plane. By means of this analysis, values for P and the slope of the limbs are calculated in terms of E and k2.

  3. Convoluted accommodation structures in folded rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodwell, T. J.; Hunt, G. W.

    2012-10-01

    A simplified variational model for the formation of convoluted accommodation structures, as seen in the hinge zones of larger-scale geological folds, is presented. The model encapsulates some important and intriguing nonlinear features, notably: infinite critical loads, formation of plastic hinges, and buckling on different length-scales. An inextensible elastic beam is forced by uniform overburden pressure and axial load into a V-shaped geometry dictated by formation of a plastic hinge. Using variational methods developed by Dodwell et al., upon which this paper leans heavily, energy minimisation leads to representation as a fourth-order nonlinear differential equation with free boundary conditions. Equilibrium solutions are found using numerical shooting techniques. Under the Maxwell stability criterion, it is recognised that global energy minimisers can exist with convoluted physical shapes. For such solutions, parallels can be drawn with some of the accommodation structures seen in exposed escarpments of real geological folds.

  4. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  5. Vocal fold mobility alteration reversed after thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Miazaki, Aline Paterno; Araújo-Filho, Vergilius José Furtado; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; de Araujo-Neto, Vergilius José Furtado; Cernea, Claudio Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of the inferior or recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in mobility derangement of the vocal folds occurs more frequently due to thyroid malignancy invasion. Although uncommon, the same derangement, which is caused by benign thyroid entities, is also described and reverts to normality after a thyroidectomy in up to 89% of cases. In these cases, the pathogenesis of the vocal cord mobility disturbance is attributed to the direct compression of the RLN by massive thyroid enlargement. The authors describe three cases of patients presenting unilateral vocal cord palsy, which, before surgery, was diagnosed by laryngoscopy concomitantly with large and compressive goiter. Vocal fold mobility became normal after the thyroidectomy in all three cases. Therefore, it is noteworthy that these alterations may present reversibility after appropriate surgical treatment. An early surgical approach is recommended to reduce the nerve injury as much as possible; to preserve the integrity of both RLNs since the nerve function will be restored in some patients. PMID:27818960

  6. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    DOEpatents

    Markley, Finley W.

    1976-01-01

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  7. Ubiquitylation Directly Induces Fold Destabilization of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Daichi; Walinda, Erik; Fukada, Harumi; Sugase, Kenji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a common post-translational modifier and its conjugation is a key signal for proteolysis by the proteasome. Because the molecular mass of ubiquitin is larger than that of other modifiers such as phosphate, acetyl, or methyl groups, ubiquitylation not only influences biochemical signaling, but also may exert physical effects on its substrate proteins by increasing molecular volume and altering shape anisotropy. Here we show that ubiquitylation destabilizes the fold of two proteins, FKBP12 and FABP4, and that elongation of the conjugated ubiquitin chains further enhances this destabilization effect. Moreover, NMR relaxation analysis shows that ubiquitylation induces characteristic structural fluctuations in the backbone of both proteins. These results suggest that the ubiquitylation-driven structural fluctuations lead to fold destabilization of its substrate proteins. Thus, physical destabilization by ubiquitylation may facilitate protein degradation by the proteasome. PMID:27991582

  8. Expression and 1,4-dihydropyridine-binding properties of brain L-type calcium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Huber, Irene G; Koschak, Alexandra; Wild, Claudia; Obermair, Gerald J; Einzinger, Ursula; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Sartori, Simone B; Striessnig, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) isoforms Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 display similar 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) binding properties and are both expressed in mammalian brain. Recent work implicates Ca(v)1.3 channels as interesting drug targets, but no isoform-selective modulators exist. It is also unknown to what extent Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 contribute to L-type-specific DHP binding activity in brain. To address this question and to determine whether DHPs can discriminate between Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 binding pockets, we combined radioreceptor assays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We bred double mutants (Ca(v)-DM) from mice expressing mutant Ca(v)1.2 channels [Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-)] lacking high affinity for DHPs and from Ca(v)1.3 knockouts [Ca(v)1.3(-/-)]. (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) and Ca(v)-DM brains was reduced to 15.1 and 4.4% of wild type, respectively, indicating that Ca(v)1.3 accounts for 10.7% of brain LTCCs. qPCR revealed that Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 alpha(1) subunits comprised 0.08% of the LTCC transcripts in mouse whole brain, suggesting that they cannot account for the residual binding. Instead, this could be explained by low-affinity binding (127-fold K(d) increase) to the mutated Ca(v)1.2 channels. Inhibition of (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) (predominantly Ca(v)1.3) and wild-type (predominantly Ca(v)1.2) brain membranes by unlabeled DHPs revealed a 3- to 4-fold selectivity of nitrendipine and nifedipine for the Ca(v)1.2 binding pocket, a finding further confirmed with heterologously expressed channels. This suggests that small differences in their binding pockets may allow development of isoform-selective modulators for LTCCs and that, because of their very low expression, Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 are unlikely to serve as drug targets to treat CNS diseases.

  9. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A.

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  10. Expression of CD44 isoforms in renal cell tumors. Positive correlation to tumor differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Terpe, H. J.; Störkel, S.; Zimmer, U.; Anquez, V.; Fischer, C.; Pantel, K.; Günthert, U.

    1996-01-01

    CD44 isoforms have been implicated in tumor progression and embryogenesis. Primary renal cell tumors (n = 100) of various histopathological differentiation and grading stages were analyzed for expression of CD44 isoforms in comparison with nonmalignant adult and fetal renal tissues. Evaluations were performed by immunohistochemistry using CD44 isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies and by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). In the nonmalignant kidney no CD44 variant isoforms were detected. There was a significant increase in expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and several variant isoforms (CD44v) in the course of tumor differentiation in clear cell carcinomas (n = 68) from stages G1 to G3 (P < 0.0001 for CD44s and isoforms containing CD44-6v, and P < 0.007 for those containing CD44-9v). Also, in chromophilic cell carcinomas (n = 13), CD44 isoform expression correlated with grading; ie, no CD44 expression was detected in G1 tumors, whereas in approximately 50% of the G2 tumors, CD44s, CD44-6v, and CD44-9v isoforms were present. Oncocytomas (n = 8), which are benign renal cell tumors, did not express CD44 isoforms, whereas invasive chromophobe cell carcinomas (n = 11) were positive for CD44s and CD44v isoforms. Transcript analyses by RT-PCR revealed that the upregulated isoforms in the carcinoma cells contained exons 8 to 10 and 3, 8 to 10 in combination from the variant region. In conclusion, expression of variant CD44 isoforms was strongly correlated with grading and appears to mediate a more aggressive phenotype to renal cell tumors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8579108

  11. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    In appropriate physiological milieux proteins spontaneously fold into their functional three-dimensional structures. The amino acid sequences of functional proteins contain all the information necessary to specify the folds. This remarkable observation has spawned research aimed at answering two major questions. (1) Of all the conceivable structures that a protein can adopt, why is the ensemble of native-like structures the most favorable? (2) What are the paths by which proteins manage to robustly and reproducibly fold into their native structures? Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis has guided the pursuit of answers to the first question whereas Levinthal's paradox has influenced the development of models for protein folding dynamics. Decades of work have led to significant advances in the folding problem. Mean-field models have been developed to capture our current, coarse grain understanding of the driving forces for protein folding. These models are being used to predict three-dimensional protein structures from sequence and stability profiles as a function of thermodynamic and chemical perturbations. Impressive strides have also been made in the field of protein design, also known as the inverse folding problem, thereby testing our understanding of the determinants of the fold specificities of different sequences. Early work on protein folding pathways focused on the specific sequence of events that could lead to a simplification of the search process. However, unifying principles proved to be elusive. Proteins that show reversible two-state folding-unfolding transitions turned out to be a gift of natural selection. Focusing on these simple systems helped researchers to uncover general principles regarding the origins of cooperativity in protein folding thermodynamics and kinetics. On the theoretical front, concepts borrowed from polymer physics and the physics of spin glasses led to the development of a framework based on energy landscape theories. These

  12. Detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding derived from in utero MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Kim, Kio; Roosta, Ahmad; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Understanding human brain development in utero and detecting cortical abnormalities related to specific clinical conditions is an important area of research. In this paper, we describe and evaluate methodology for detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding from population-based studies of fetal brain anatomies imaged in utero. We use a general linear modeling framework to describe spatiotemporal changes in curvature of the developing brain and explore the ability to detect and localize delays in cortical folding in the presence of uncertainty in estimation of the fetal age. We apply permutation testing to examine which regions of the brain surface provide the most statistical power to detect a given folding delay at a given developmental stage. The presented methodology is evaluated using MR scans of fetuses with normal brain development and gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 27.86 weeks. This period is critical in early cortical folding and the formation of the primary and secondary sulci. Finally, we demonstrate a clinical application of the framework for detection and localization of folding delays in fetuses with isolated mild ventriculomegaly.

  13. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness.

  14. Heat capacity change for ribonuclease A folding.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. N.; Grimsley, G. R.; Thomas, S. T.; Makhatadze, G. I.

    1999-01-01

    The change in heat capacity deltaCp for the folding of ribonuclease A was determined using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal denaturation curves. The methods gave equivalent results, deltaCp = 1.15+/-0.08 kcal mol(-1) K(-1). Estimates of the conformational stability of ribonuclease A based on these results from thermal unfolding are in good agreement with estimates from urea unfolding analyzed using the linear extrapolation method. PMID:10422839

  15. Calnexin, calreticulin and the folding of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Calnexin and calreticulin are molecular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum (ERJ. They are lectins that interact with newly synthesized glycoproteins that have undergone partial trimming of their core N-linked oligosaccharides. Together with the enzymes responsible for glucose removal and a glucosyltransferase that re-glucosylates already-trimmed glycoproteins, they provide a novel mechanism for promoting folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control in the ER.

  16. Chen’s Double Eyelid Fold Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Chia; Tai, Hao-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Double eyelidplasty can construct palpebral folds and enhance beauty perception for Asians with single eyelids. A new palpebral parameter for the quantitative interpretation of surgical outcomes is proposed on the basis of a photometric study of the altered proportions of Asian eyes after double eyelid operation. Methods: A total of 100 Asian adults with single upper eyelids who were satisfied with the enlarged eyes by operation were included in the study. A retrospective measurement of palpebral parameters in the frontal profile both preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively was performed. The proportions of various parameters in the eyebrow–eye aesthetic unit were calculated and analyzed. Results: Double eyelidplasty can augment the vertical dimension of palpebral fissure by 27.9% increase on average. The vertical ratio of palpebral fissure to the eyebrow–eye unit is augmented by 34.4% increase. The vertical ratio of the subunit below double eyelid fold peak to the unit is augmented by 82.6% increase. Conclusions: Double eyelidplasty can substantially enlarge the vertical dimensions of the eyes of Asians with single eyelids. The eyes are perceived to be larger because of the visually assimilated illusion of the superimposed eyelid fold and the relative proportions of the eyebrow–eye unit. The authors propose using a vertical ratio of the subunit below double eyelid fold peak in the eyebrow–eye unit to measure the visually perceived proportion of the eye in the unit. This ratio can be applied clinically for a quantitative evaluation of the surgical outcome after double eyelidplasty. PMID:27200243

  17. Resummation of semiclassical short folded string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo; Macorini, Guido

    2012-02-01

    We reconsider semiclassical quantization of folded string spinning in AdS3 part of AdS5 × S5 using integrability-based (algebraic curve) method. We focus on the "short string" (small spin S) limit with the angular momentum J in S 5 scaled down according to {mathcal J} = ρ sqrt {S} in terms of the variables {mathcal J} = J/ sqrt {λ } , S = S/ sqrt {λ } . The semi-classical string energy in this particular scaling limit admits the double expansion E = {sum {_{{n = 0}}^{infty }sum {_{{p = 0}}^{infty }left( {sqrt {λ } } right)} }^{{1 - n}}}{a_{{n,p}}}left( ρ right){S^{{P + 1/2}}} . It behaves smoothly as J → 0 and partially resums recent results by Gromov and Valatka. We explicitly compute various one-loop coefficients a1, p ( ρ) by summing over the fluctuation frequencies for integrable perturbations around the classical solution. For the simple folded string, the result agrees with what could be derived exploiting a recent conjecture of Basso. However, the method can be extended to more general situations. As an example, we consider the m-folded string where Basso's conjecture fails. For this classical solution, we present the exact values of a 1,0( ρ) and a 1,1( ρ) for m = 2, 3, 4, 5 and explain how to work out the general case.

  18. Is Protein Folding Sub-Diffusive?

    PubMed Central

    Krivov, Sergei V.

    2010-01-01

    Protein folding dynamics is often described as diffusion on a free energy surface considered as a function of one or few reaction coordinates. However, a growing number of experiments and models show that, when projected onto a reaction coordinate, protein dynamics is sub-diffusive. This raises the question as to whether the conventionally used diffusive description of the dynamics is adequate. Here, we numerically construct the optimum reaction coordinate for a long equilibrium folding trajectory of a Go model of a -repressor protein. The trajectory projected onto this coordinate exhibits diffusive dynamics, while the dynamics of the same trajectory projected onto a sub-optimal reaction coordinate is sub-diffusive. We show that the higher the (cut-based) free energy profile for the putative reaction coordinate, the more diffusive the dynamics become when projected on this coordinate. The results suggest that whether the projected dynamics is diffusive or sub-diffusive depends on the chosen reaction coordinate. Protein folding can be described as diffusion on the free energy surface as function of the optimum reaction coordinate. And conversely, the conventional reaction coordinates, even though they might be based on physical intuition, are often sub-optimal and, hence, show sub-diffusive dynamics. PMID:20862361

  19. Understanding the folding-function tradeoff in proteins.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Shachi

    2013-01-01

    When an amino-acid sequence cannot be optimized for both folding and function, folding can get compromised in favor of function. To understand this tradeoff better, we devise a novel method for extracting the "function-less" folding-motif of a protein fold from a set of structurally similar but functionally diverse proteins. We then obtain the β-trefoil folding-motif, and study its folding using structure-based models and molecular dynamics simulations. CompariA protein sequence serves two purpson with the folding of wild-type β-trefoil proteins shows that function affects folding in two ways: In the slower folding interleukin-1β, binding sites make the fold more complex, increase contact order and slow folding. In the faster folding hisactophilin, residues which could have been part of the folding-motif are used for function. This reduces the density of native contacts in functional regions and increases folding rate. The folding-motif helps identify subtle structural deviations which perturb folding. These may then be used for functional annotation. Further, the folding-motif could potentially be used as a first step in the sequence design of function-less scaffold proteins. Desired function can then be engineered into these scaffolds.

  20. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  1. Substrate specificity, kinetic properties and inhibition by fumonisin B1 of ceramide synthase isoforms from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Cahoon, Edgar B; Markham, Jonathan E

    2016-03-01

    Ceramide makes up the acyl-backbone of sphingolipids and plays a central role in determining the function of these essential membrane lipids. In Arabidopsis, the varied chemical composition of ceramide is determined by the specificity of three different isoforms of ceramide synthase, denoted LAG one homologue 1, -2 and -3 (LOH1, LOH2 and LOH3), for a range of long-chain base (LCB) and acyl-CoA substrates. The contribution of each of these isoforms to the synthesis of ceramide was investigated by in vitro ceramide synthase assays. The plant LCB phytosphingosine was efficiently used by the LOH1 and LOH3 isoforms, with LOH1 having the lowest Km for the LCB substrate of the three isoforms. In contrast, sphinganine was used efficiently only by the LOH2 isoform. Acyl-CoA specificity was also distinguished between the three isoforms with LOH2 almost completely specific for palmitoyl-CoA whereas the LOH1 isoform showed greatest activity with lignoceroyl- and hexacosanoyl-CoAs. Interestingly, unsaturated acyl-CoAs were not used efficiently by any isoform whereas unsaturated LCB substrates were preferred by LOH2 and 3. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a general inhibitor of ceramide synthases but LOH1 was found to have a much lower Ki than the other isoforms pointing towards the origin of FB1 sensitivity in plants. Overall, the data suggest distinct roles and modes of regulation for each of the ceramide synthases in Arabidopsis sphingolipid metabolism.

  2. Biological functions of p53 isoforms through evolution: lessons from animal and cellular models.

    PubMed

    Marcel, V; Dichtel-Danjoy, M-L; Sagne, C; Hafsi, H; Ma, D; Ortiz-Cuaran, S; Olivier, M; Hall, J; Mollereau, B; Hainaut, P; Bourdon, J-C

    2011-12-01

    The TP53 tumour-suppressor gene is expressed as several protein isoforms generated by different mechanisms, including use of alternative promoters, splicing sites and translational initiation sites, that are conserved through evolution and within the TP53 homologues, TP63 and TP73. Although first described in the eighties, the importance of p53 isoforms in regulating the suppressive functions of p53 has only become evident in the last 10 years, by analogy with observations that p63 and p73 isoforms appeared indispensable to fully understand the biological functions of TP63 and TP73. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of 'p53 isoforms', including new data on p63 and p73 isoforms. Details of the alternative mechanisms that produce p53 isoforms and cis- and trans-regulators identified are provided. The main focus is on their biological functions (apoptosis, cell cycle, aging and so on) in cellular and animal models, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila. Finally, the deregulation of p53 isoform expression in human cancers is reviewed. Based on these latest results, several developments are expected in the future: the identification of drugs modulating p53 isoform expression; the generation of animal models and the evaluation of the use of p53 isoform as biomarkers in human cancers.

  3. Nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms and their functions in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Rekawiecki, R; Kowalik, M K; Kotwica, J

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), which is produced by the corpus luteum (CL), creates proper conditions for the embryo implantation, its development, and ensures proper conditions for the duration of pregnancy. Besides the non-genomic activity of P4 on target cells, its main physiological effect is caused through genomic action by the progesterone nuclear receptor (PGR). This nuclear progesterone receptor occurs in two specific isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. PGRA isoform acts as an inhibitor of transcriptional action of PGRB. The inactive receptor is connected with chaperone proteins and attachment of P4 causes disconnection of chaperones and unveiling of DNA binding domain (DBD). After receptor dimerization in the cells' nucleus and interaction with hormone response element (HRE), the receptor coactivators are connected and transcription is initiated. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and reflects the different levels of P4 effect on the reproductive system. Both isoforms, PGRA and PGRB, also show a different response to the P4 receptor antagonist activity. Connection of the antagonist to PGRA can block PGRB, but acting through the PGRB isoform, P4 receptor antagonist may undergo conversion to a strongly receptor agonist. A third isoform, PGRC, has also been revealed. This isoform is the shortest and does not have transcriptional activity. Alternative splicing and insertion of additional exons may lead to the formation of different PGR isoforms. This paper summarizes the available data on the progesterone receptor isoforms and its regulatory action within the female reproductive system.

  4. Unravelling the different functions of protein kinase C isoforms in platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Poole, Alastair W

    2011-06-23

    Platelets tightly regulate haemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in most platelet responses implicated in thrombus formation. Recent pharmacological and mouse gene knockout approaches show that the conventional PKC isoforms and the novel PKC isoforms contribute in distinct ways to these platelet responses. We hypothesize that, in platelets and other cells, the characteristic functions of PKC isoforms are established through unique activation mechanisms and unique interacting protein partners, which result in isoform-specific patterns of substrate phosphorylation. For identifying the substrate proteins in a living cell, new methodology is available and discussed.

  5. Multiple isoforms of β-TrCP display differential activities in the regulation of Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Hyunjoon; Kim, Rokki; Yun, Sangmoon; Kim, Minseong; Han, Jin-Kwan; Costantini, Frank; Jho, Eek-hoon

    2008-01-01

    The F-box proteins β-TrCP 1 and 2 (β-transducin repeat protein) have 2 and 3 isoforms, respectively, due to alternative splicing of exons encoding the N-terminal region. We identified an extra exon in between the previously known exons 1 and 2 of β-TrCP1 and β-TrCP2. Interestingly, sequence analysis suggested that many more isoforms are produced than previously identified, via the alternative splicing of all possible combination of exons II to V of β-TrCP1 and exons II to IV of β-TrCP2. Different mouse tissues show specific expression patterns of the isoforms, and the level of expression of the isoform that has been used in most published papers was very low. Yeast two-hybrid assays show that β-TrCP1 isoforms containing exon III, which are the most highly expressed isoforms in most tissues, do not interact with Skp1. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of transiently expressed β-TrCP1 isoforms suggests that the presence of exon III causes β-TrCP1 to localize in nuclei. Consistent with the above findings, isoforms including exon III showed a reduced ability to block ectopic embryonic axes induced via injection of Wnt8 or β-catenin in Xenopus embryos. Overall, our data suggest that isoforms of β-TrCPs generated by alternative splicing may have different biological roles. PMID:18929646

  6. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated impairment of B cell differentiation involves dysregulation of paired box 5 (Pax5) isoform, Pax5a.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dina; Manzan, Maria A; Crawford, Robert B; Chen, Weimin; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2008-08-01

    The persistent environmental contaminant and immunotoxicant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), markedly suppresses humoral immune responses. We recently reported impaired down-regulation of paired box 5 (Pax5), a repressor of B cell differentiation and concomitant suppression of the IgM response by TCDD in the murine CH12.LX B cell line. The objectives of the current study were to determine the impact of TCDD treatment on molecular outcomes characteristic of terminal B cell differentiation and to assess the role that Pax5 isoforms plays in the suppression of B cell differentiation by TCDD. In this study, we show that the highly abundant full-length Pax5 isoform, Pax5a, and at least two additional modestly expressed Pax5 isoforms were expressed in CH12.LX and splenic B cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated B cells, all of the identified Pax5 isoforms were synchronously down-regulated, and in the presence of TCDD cotreatment they were abnormally and synchronously elevated, suggesting a common mechanism of regulation. Furthermore, B cell differentiation markers X-box protein-1 and major histocompatibility complex class II showed that the levels to which Pax5 was derepressed by TCDD were sufficient to impair B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin gene expression. Confirming the involvement of Pax5, ectopic expression of Pax5a in the LPS-activated CH12.LX cells closely mimicked the suppression of the IgM response by TCDD. In summary, our results demonstrate that Pax5a has a critical role in both the TCDD-mediated impairment of B cell differentiation and the suppression of the humoral immune response.

  7. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  8. Quantification of spatiotemporal patterns of Ras isoform expression during development

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs frequently dysregulated in cancer and in a group of developmental disorders called Rasopathies. Three Ras genes encode four proteins that differentially contribute to these phenotypes. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) we have measured the gene expression profiles of each of the Ras isoforms in a panel of mouse tissues derived from a full developmental time course spanning embryogenesis through to adulthood. In most tissues and developmental stages we observe a relative contribution of KRas4B > > NRas ≥ KRas4A > HRas to total Ras expression with KRas4B typically representing 60–99% of all Ras transcripts. KRas4A is the most dynamically regulated Ras isoform with significant up-regulation of expression observed pre-term in stomach, intestine, kidney and heart. The expression patterns assist interpretation of the essential role of KRas in development and the preponderance of KRas mutations in cancer. PMID:28117393

  9. Isoform-dependent interaction of BRDG1 with Tec kinase.

    PubMed

    Yokohari, K; Yamashita, Y; Okada, S; Ohya, K; Oda, S; Hatano, M; Mano, H; Hirasawa, H; Tokuhisa, T

    2001-11-30

    Tec is the prototype of an emerging family of protein-tyrosine kinases. Tec and Btk, another member of this family, together participate in the development of B-cell immune system. We previously identified one of the downstream messengers for human Tec kinase, BRDG1. BRDG1 is associated with Tec and becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in B-cells by the engagement of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). Here we show that overexpression of BRDG1 strongly augments BCR-mediated activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) but not that of c-Jun and the promoters of c-MYC and BCL-xL genes. Furthermore, we isolated the murine orthologue of BRDG1. Three isoforms of BRDG1 are generated by alternative splicing of the message. Two of them have a deletion of 33 amino acids in a Pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of BRDG1. Both the tyrosine-phosphorylation and CREB-activating ability of BRDG1 were isoform-dependent, suggesting a role of the PH domain of BRDG1. These data have identified a novel regulatory mechanism of CREB family of transcriptional factors.

  10. Isoform-Specific Localization of A-RAF in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Anton; Ono, Makoto; Goff, Stephen A.; Macaluso, Frank; Wennogle, Lawrence P.

    2000-01-01

    RAF kinase is a family of isoforms including A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF. Despite the important role of RAF in cell growth and proliferation, little evidence exists for isoform-specific function of RAF family members. Using Western analysis and immunogold labeling, A-RAF was selectively localized in highly purified rat liver mitochondria. Two novel human proteins, which interact specifically with A-RAF, were identified, and the full-length sequences are reported. These proteins, referred to as hTOM and hTIM, are similar to components of mitochondrial outer and inner membrane protein-import receptors from lower organisms, implicating their involvement in the mitochondrial transport of A-RAF. hTOM contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, which function in protein-protein interactions. TPR domains are frequently present in proteins involved in cellular transport systems. In contrast, protein 14-3-3, an abundant cytosolic protein that participates in many facets of signal transduction, was found to interact with C-RAF but not with A-RAF N-terminal domain. This information is discussed in view of the important role of mitochondria in cellular functions involving energy balance, proliferation, and apoptosis and the potential role of A-RAF in regulating these systems. PMID:10848612

  11. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  12. Tau Isoform Composition Influences Rate and Extent of Filament Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qi; Congdon, Erin E.; Nagaraja, Haikady N.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The risk of developing tauopathic neurodegenerative disease depends in part on the levels and composition of six naturally occurring Tau isoforms in human brain. These proteins, which form filamentous aggregates in disease, vary only by the presence or absence of three inserts encoded by alternatively spliced exons 2, 3, and 10 of the Tau gene (MAPT). To determine the contribution of alternatively spliced segments to Tau aggregation propensity, the aggregation kinetics of six unmodified, recombinant human Tau isoforms were examined in vitro using electron microscopy assay methods. Aggregation propensity was then compared at the level of elementary rate constants for nucleation and extension phases. We found that all three alternatively spliced segments modulated Tau aggregation but through differing kinetic mechanisms that could synergize or compete depending on sequence context. Overall, segments encoded by exons 2 and 10 promoted aggregation, whereas the segment encoded by exon 3 depressed it with its efficacy dependent on the presence or absence of a fourth microtubule binding repeat. In general, aggregation propensity correlated with genetic risk reported for multiple tauopathies, implicating aggregation as one candidate mechanism rationalizing the correlation between Tau expression patterns and disease. PMID:22539343

  13. ETOPOSIDE INDUCES CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN SPERMATOCYTES AND SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Pearson, F S; Bishop, J B; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-07-15

    Etoposide (ET) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of leukemia, lymphomas and many solid tumors, such as testicular and ovarian cancers, that affect patients in their reproductive years. The purpose of the study was to use sperm FISH analyses to characterize the long-term effects of ET on male germ cells. We used a mouse model to characterize the induction of chromosomal aberrations (partial duplications and deletions) and whole chromosomal aneuploidies in sperm of mice treated with a clinical dose of ET. Semen samples were collected at 25 and 49 days after dosing to investigate the effects of ET on meiotic pachytene cells and spermatogonial stem-cells, respectively. ET treatment resulted in major increases in the frequencies of sperm carrying chromosomal aberrations in both meiotic pachytene (27- to 578-fold) and spermatogonial stem-cells (8- to 16-fold), but aneuploid sperm were induced only after treatment of meiotic cells (27-fold) with no persistent effects in stem cells. These results demonstrate that male meiotic germ cells are considerably more sensitive to ET than spermatogonial stem-cell and that increased frequencies of sperm with structural aberrations persist after spermatogonial stem-cell treatment. These findings predict that patients who undergo chemotherapy with ET may have transient elevations in the frequencies of aneuploid sperm, but more importantly, may have persistent elevations in the frequencies of sperm with chromosomal aberrations, placing them at higher risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes long after the end of their chemotherapy.

  14. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  15. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server. PMID:27660761

  16. Folding of a detachment and fault - Modified detachment folding along a lateral ramp, southwestern Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christopher; Whisner, S. Christopher; Whisner, Jennifer B.

    2014-12-01

    The inversion of the Middle Proterozoic Belt sedimentary basin during Late Cretaceous thrusting in Montana produced a large eastwardly-convex salient, the southern boundary of which is a 200 km-long oblique to lateral ramp subtended by a detachment between the Belt rocks and Archean basement. A 10 km-long lateral ramp segment exposes the upper levels of the detachment where hanging wall Belt rocks have moved out over the Paleozoic and Mesozoic section. The hanging wall structure consists of a train of high amplitude, faulted, asymmetrical detachment folds. Initial west-east shortening produced layer parallel shortening fabrics and dominantly strike slip faulting followed by symmetrical detachment folding. 'Lock-up' of movement on the detachment surface produced regional simple shear and caused the detachment folds to become asymmetrical and faulted. Folding of the detachment surface after lock-up modified the easternmost detachment folds further into a southeast-verging, overturned fold pair with a ramp-related fault along the base of the stretched mutual limb.

  17. Mass-production of human ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 to screen isoform-specific inhibitor: a different substrate specificity and inhibitory regulation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Hyun; An, Sojin; Lee, Woo-Song; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Young-Kook; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2003-10-03

    Recently, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase was found to be present as two isoforms, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2, in mammalian tissues with different metabolic functions and tissue-specific locations. In this study, the isoforms were mass-produced individually from insect cells to establish a more sensitive and reliable screening method for specific inhibitors against each isoform. The expressed hACAT-1 and hACAT-2 appeared as a 50 kDa- and a 46 kDa-band on SDS-PAGE, respectively, from Hi5 cells and they preferred to exist in oligomeric form, from dimer to tetramer, during the purification process. They also exhibited an approximate 3.4 to 3.7-fold increase in activities when compared to rat liver microsomal fractions at the same protein concentration. Known ACAT inhibitors, pyripyropene A, oleic acid anilide, and diethyl pyrocarbonate, were tested to evaluate the inhibitory specificity and sensitivity of the expressed enzymes. Interestingly, pyripyropene A inhibited only the hACAT-2 fraction with IC(50)=0.64 microM but not the hACAT-1 fraction; whereas the fatty acid anilide did not show a significant difference in inhibitory activity with either hACAT-1 or hACAT-2. Furthermore, cholesterol was more rapidly utilized by hACAT-1, but hACAT-2 esterified other cholic acid derivatives more efficiently. These results suggest that the specificity of each substrate and inhibitor was highly different, depending on each isoform from the viewpoint of the regulatory site and the substrate binding site location.

  18. Digoxin derivatives with enhanced selectivity for the α2 isoform of Na,K-ATPase: effects on intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Katz, Adriana; Tal, Daniel M; Heller, Dan; Haviv, Haim; Rabah, Bilal; Barkana, Yaniv; Marcovich, Arie L; Karlish, Steven J D

    2014-07-25

    In the ciliary epithelium of the eye, the pigmented cells express the α1β1 isoform of Na,K-ATPase, whereas the non-pigmented cells express mainly the α2β3 isoform of Na,K-ATPase. In principle, a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor with selectivity for α2 could effectively reduce intraocular pressure with only minimal local and systemic toxicity. Such an inhibitor could be applied topically provided it was sufficiently permeable via the cornea. Previous experiments with recombinant human α1β1, α2β1, and α3β1 isoforms showed that the classical cardiac glycoside, digoxin, is partially α2-selective and also that the trisdigitoxose moiety is responsible for isoform selectivity. This led to a prediction that modification of the third digitoxose might increase α2 selectivity. A series of perhydro-1,4-oxazepine derivatives of digoxin have been synthesized by periodate oxidation and reductive amination using a variety of R-NH2 substituents. Several derivatives show enhanced selectivity for α2 over α1, close to 8-fold in the best case. Effects of topically applied cardiac glycosides on intraocular pressure in rabbits have been assessed by their ability to either prevent or reverse acute intraocular pressure increases induced by 4-aminopyridine or a selective agonist of the A3 adenosine receptor. Two relatively α2-selective digoxin derivatives efficiently normalize the ocular hypertension, by comparison with digoxin, digoxigenin, or ouabain. This observation is consistent with a major role of α2 in aqueous humor production and suggests that, potentially, α2-selective digoxin derivatives could be of interest as novel drugs for control of intraocular pressure.

  19. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  20. Mammotroph autoregulation: the differential roles of the 24K isoforms of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Ho, T W; Greenan, J R; Walker, A M

    1989-03-01

    In this study we have attempted to determine which of the secreted 24K isoforms was responsible for autocrine regulation of PRL secretion by comparing the isoforms synthesized and secreted by normal cells, which do autoregulate, with those synthesized and secreted by GH3 cells, which do not normally autoregulate. Comparable numbers of cells were washed free of serum and then extracted into Tris-buffered saline by sonication and detergent treatment. Proteins present in these cell extracts and in samples of culture medium were then precipitated with cold acetone (-20 C; 48 h) and subsequently dissolved in urea-lysis buffer for 2-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis. The 2-D patterns for normal cells showed four 24K PRL isoforms inside the cells and three 24K PRL isoforms (designated 2, 3, and 3') secreted into the medium. The 2-D patterns for GH3 cells showed very little intracellular storage of PRL, but what was present was identified as 24K PRL isoform 2. The GH3 cells secreted large amounts of only 24K PRL isoform 2. Preparations of PRL containing only isoforms 1,2, and 3 (at a total radioimmunoassayable concentration of 5 micrograms/ml PRL) were capable of inducing autoregulation in GH3 cells, as evidence by decreased secretion of prelabeled intracellular PRL. Initiation of autoregulation in GH3 cells caused granulation and the intracellular production of isoform 3. Since a) a preparation containing isoforms 1, 2, and 3 was found to induce autoregulation in GH3 cells, b) isoform 1 is not a secreted form, and c) isoform 2 does not cause autoregulation (at least in GH3 cells), it is deduced that isoform 3 is an autocrine form of PRL. Since initiation of autoregulation in GH3 cells caused those cells to produce isoform 3, it is further deduced that the autoregulatory defect in GH3 cells lies in the actual lack of production of isoform 3 and not in an inherent inability of these cells to produce isoform 3.

  1. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na{sub v}1.2a, Na{sub v}1.4, Na{sub v}1.5, and Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat {beta}1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a and Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel {alpha} subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na{sub v}1.4 > Na{sub v}1.2a > Na{sub v}1.5 > Na{sub v}1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na{sub v}1.5 and Na{sub v}1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na{sub v}1.2a or Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms with the {beta}1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium

  2. Expression of Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms in Native Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Béziau, Delphine M.; Toussaint, Fanny; Blanchette, Alexandre; Dayeh, Nour R.; Charbel, Chimène; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η) based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs) remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA), pulmonary (PA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA). mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA), δ4 (only expressed in MCA), η1 (expressed in all but MA) and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested). The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1) in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found in the

  3. Two temporally synthesized charge subunits interact to form the five isoforms of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, R N; Eising, R

    1990-01-01

    Five charge isoforms of tetrameric catalase were isolated from cotyledons of germinated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings. Denaturing isoelectric focusing of the individual isoforms in polyacrylamide gels indicated that isoforms A (most anodic) and E (most cathodic) consisted of one subunit of different charge, whereas isoforms B, C and D each consisted of a mixture of these two subunits. Thus the five isoforms apparently were formed through combinations of two subunits in different ratios. Labelling cotyledons in vivo with [35S]methionine at three daily intervals in the dark, and translation in vivo of polyadenylated RNA isolated from cotyledons at the same ages, revealed synthesis of two different subunits. One of the subunits was synthesized in cotyledons at all ages studied (days 1-3), whereas the other subunit was detected only at days 2 and 3. This differential expression of two catalase subunits helped explain previous results from this laboratory showing that the two anodic forms (A and B) found in maturing seeds were supplemented with three cathodic forms (C-E) after the seeds germinated. These subunit data also helped clarify our new findings that proteins of isoforms A, B and C (most active isoforms) accumulated in cotyledons of plants kept in the dark for 3 days, then gradually disappeared during the next several days, whereas isoforms D and E (least active isoforms) remained in the cells. This shift in isoform pattern occurred whether seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to continuous light after day 3, although exposure to light enhanced this process. These sequential molecular events were responsible for the characteristic developmental changes (rise and fall) in total catalase activity. We believe that the isoform changeover is physiologically related to the changeover in glyoxysome to leaf-type-peroxisome metabolism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1695843

  4. The role of ascorbate in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Lőrincz, Tamás

    2014-05-01

    Ascorbate was linked to protein folding a long time ago. At the first level of this connection, it had been shown that ascorbate functions as an essential cofactor in the hydroxylation enzymes involved in collagen synthesis. Although the hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by the members of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase family are considered to be ascorbate dependent, the hydroxylation of proline alone does not need ascorbate. Prolyl 4-hydroxylases participate in two catalytic reactions: one in which proline residues are hydroxylated, while 2-oxoglutarate is decarboxylated and molecular oxygen is consumed. This reaction is ascorbate independent. However, in another reaction, prolyl 4-hydroxylases catalyze the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate uncoupled from proline hydroxylation but still needing molecular oxygen. At this time, ferrous iron is oxidized and the protein is rendered catalytically inactive until reduced by ascorbate. At the second level of the connection, the oxidation and the oxidized form of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate, is involved in the formation of disulfide bonds of secretory proteins. The significance of the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of protein disulfide isomerase was debated because protein disulfide isomerase as a dehydroascorbate reductase was found to be too slow to be the major route for the reduction of dehydroascorbate (and formation of disulfides) in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. However, very recently, low tissue ascorbate levels and a noncanonical scurvy were observed in endoplasmic reticulum thiol oxidase- and peroxiredoxin 4-compromised mice. This novel observation implies that ascorbate may be involved in oxidative protein folding and creates a link between the disulfide bond formation (oxidative protein folding) and hydroxylation.

  5. Heterogeneity of ouabain binding sites in Schistosoma mansoni. First evidence for the presence of two (Na+ + K+)-ATPase isoforms in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Pardon, R S; Noël, F

    1994-01-20

    Binding experiments with [3H]ouabain were performed to investigate the presence of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase (EC3.6.1.3) isoforms in adult male Schistosoma mansoni, the trematode responsible for human schistosomiasis. Non-linear regression analysis of equilibrium experiments performed with homogenates in a Mg-Pi medium indicated the presence of about 10% (Bmax = 223 +/- 67 fmol/mg protein) high-affinity sites (KD = 0.285 +/- 0.045 microM) and 90% (Bmax = 2117 +/- 348 fmol/mg protein) sites with a 20-fold lower affinity (KD = 4.9 +/- 1.28 microM). This was confirmed by their-exponential decay of [3H]ouabain dissociation. Furthermore, determination of association and dissociation rate constants indicated that the two classes of binding sites differed by their dissociation rate constants for ouabain (k-1 = 0.0185 +/- 0.0019 min-1 and 0.0997 +/- 0.0528 min-1 for high- and low-affinity sites, respectively). Surprisingly, the association rate constant measured for ouabain binding to S. mansoni homogenate (0.038 microM-1.min-1) was lower (25- to 80-fold) than the one usually observed for mammalian enzymes. This is the first direct evidence for the existence of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase isoforms in platyhelminths, invertebrates of great importance from the phylogenetic point of view.

  6. Role of noradrenaline on the expression of the Na+/K+-ATPase alpha2 isoform and the contractility of cultured rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Lafayette, Simone S L; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Noël, François

    2002-11-15

    Rat vasa deferentia were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium in the absence or presence of 1 microM noradrenaline (NA) to investigate if the lack of NA release is the key factor to explain the selective reduction of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) isoform previously observed after in vivo denervation of this organ (Quintas et al., Biochem Pharmacol 2000;60:741-7). The lack of effects of the indirect sympathomimetic tyramine and the neuronal amine uptake blocker cocaine on NA curves indicated that cultured organs were denervated completely. Organ culture induced supersensitivity, expressed as a 6.3-fold increase of pD(2) and a 42% elevation of maximal contraction for NA but not for Ba(2+). Western blotting indicated that the level of the alpha(1) isoform of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was unchanged after organ culture, but the alpha(2) isoform was down-regulated drastically to levels that were barely detectable. The addition of NA to the culture medium did not prevent the reduction of alpha(2) expression although it did impede NA supersensitivity (in fact a 4-fold decrease of pD(2) and a 32% reduction of maximal response were observed after incubation in the presence of NA). A striking reduction of L-type Ca(2+) channel expression also was observed, indicated by an 85% decrease of [3H]isradipine binding sites. These data suggest that NA is a trophic factor relevant to the control of muscle contraction, mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, but not to the expression of either Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase or the L-type Ca(2+) channel.

  7. Statistically Derived Rules for RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, Michael

    2004-03-01

    What I am not going to talk about, although I could improvise, is predicting RNA folding by energy minimization. Peter Schuster certainly talked about it, although he didn't present any algorithms, etc. If I had been trained as a physicist or a chemist instead of a mathematician, and if my chemical colleagues had cared about statistics or Boltzmann distributions, I think I would have come up with the McCaskill algorithm for computing partition functions earlier, because no one ever told me that that was a problem needing to be solved. I think there's a good potential for combining the two approaches ...

  8. Polarization aberrations of crossed folding mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, David G.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-08-01

    Polarization aberrations due to varying polarization state across the field of view (FOV) are investigated for crossed folding mirrors. We define crossed mirrors as oriented in space such that s-polarized light incident on the first mirror is p-polarized at the second mirror. This completely compensates for polarization state changes at one point in the field of view. The resulting polarization aberrations are explored across the FOV using the example of aluminum mirrors overcoated with a 12 layer, highly reflective, dielectric stack. The polarization aberration is very low along a band across the field of view. For arbitrary points in the FOV, the retardance and diattenuation are slightly elliptical.

  9. Energy landscape in protein folding and unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Baglioni, Piero; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We use 1H NMR to probe the energy landscape in the protein folding and unfolding process. Using the scheme ⇄ reversible unfolded (intermediate) → irreversible unfolded (denatured) state, we study the thermal denaturation of hydrated lysozyme that occurs when the temperature is increased. Using thermal cycles in the range 295

  10. Computational Solutions to the Protein Folding Problem,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-19

    A TRIDENT SCHOLAR oN PROJECT REPORT 0 NO. 223 "Computational Solutions to the Protein Folding Problem" L T -’ ’r i SEP 2 7 1994 ýV UNITED STATES...potential energy function (Chapter II), 25 1 2 2 U = X• k( l 1 -lo) 2+ X.ko (8,-8o) 2+X.-[1l + cos (Pip + )] Equation 4.1 xei (C ¶±~12.4 a where ri, is...iterative process, a set of k >_ 2"t+ l distinct local minima are computed. This can be done with rela- tive ease by using an efficient unconstrained

  11. Modelling RNA folding under mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    VIEREGG, JEFFREY R.; TINOCO, IGNACIO

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA unfolding and refolding under mechanical tension. The hierarchical nature of RNA structure and the existence of thermodynamic parameters for base pair formation based on nearest-neighbour interactions allows modelling of sequence-dependent folding dynamics for any secondary structure. We calculate experimental observables such as the transition force for unfolding, the end-to-end distribution function and its variance, as well as kinetic information, for a representative RNA sequence and for a sequence containing two homopolymer segments: A.U and G.C. PMID:16969426

  12. Antibody-detected folding: kinetics of surface epitope formation are distinct from other folding phases.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, C. S.; Jemmerson, R.; Nall, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of macromolecular surface formation in yeast iso-2 cytochrome c and its site-specific mutant, N52I iso-2, has been studied using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a tertiary epitope including K58 and H39. The results indicate that epitope refolding occurs after fast folding but prior to slow folding, in contrast to horse cytochrome c where surface formation occurs early. The antibody-detected (ad) kinetic phase accompanying epitope formation has k(ad) = 0.2 s(-1) and is approximately 40-fold slower than the fastest detectable event in the folding of yeast iso-2 cytochrome c (k2f approximately 8 s(-1)), but occurs prior to the absorbance- and fluorescence-detected slow folding steps (k1a approximately 0.06 s(-1); k1b approximately 0.09 s(-1)). N5I iso-2 cytochrome c exhibits similar kinetic behavior with respect to epitope formation. A detailed dissection of the mechanistic differences between the folding pathways of horse and yeast cytochromes c identifies possible reasons for the slow surface formation in the latter. Our results suggest that non-native ligation involving H33 or H39 during refolding may slow down the formation of the tertiary epitope in iso-2 cytochrome c. This study illustrates that surface formation can be coupled to early events in protein folding. Thus, the rate of macromolecular surface formation is fine tuned by the residues that make up the surface and the interactions they entertain during refolding. PMID:10739255

  13. Communication between RNA folding domains revealed by folding of circularly permuted ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Lease, Richard A; Adilakshmi, Tadepalli; Heilman-Miller, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2007-10-12

    To study the role of sequence and topology in RNA folding, we determined the kinetic folding pathways of two circularly permuted variants of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, using time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting. Circular permutation changes the distance between interacting residues in the primary sequence, without changing the native structure of the RNA. In the natural ribozyme, tertiary interactions in the P4-P6 domain form in 1 s, while interactions in the P3-P9 form in 1-3 min at 42 degrees C. Permutation of the 5' end to G111 in the P4 helix allowed the stable P4-P6 domain to fold in 200 ms at 30 degrees C, five times faster than in the wild-type RNA, while the other domains folded five times more slowly (5-8 min). By contrast, circular permutation of the 5' end to G303 in J8/7 decreased the folding rate of the P4-P6 domain. In this permuted RNA, regions joining P2, P3 and P4 were protected in 500 ms, while the P3-P9 domain was 60-80% folded within 30 s. RNase T(1) digestion and FMN photocleavage showed that circular permutation of the RNA sequence alters the initial ensemble of secondary structures, thereby changing the tertiary folding pathways. Our results show that the natural 5'-to-3' order of the structural domains in group I ribozymes optimizes structural communication between tertiary domains and promotes self-assembly of the catalytic center.

  14. The Numba ductile deformation zone (northwest Cameroon): A geometric analysis of folds based on the Fold Profiler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, T.; Chatué, C. Njiki; Kwékam, M.; Nké, B. E. Bella; Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Fozing, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Numba ductile deformation zone (NDDZ) is characterised by folds recorded during the three deformation phases that affected the banded amphibole gneiss. Fold-shape analyses using the program Fold Profiler with the aim to show the importance of folding events in the structural analysis of the NDDZ and its contribution to the Pan-African orogeny in central Africa have been made. Classical field method, conic sections method and Ramsay's fold classification method were applied to (i) have the general orientation of folds, (ii) analyze the fold shapes and (iii) classify the geometry of the folded bands. Fold axes in banded amphibole gneiss plunge moderately (<15°) towards the NNE or SSW. The morphology of F1, F2 and F3 folds in the study area clearly points to (i) Z-shape folds with SE vergence and (ii) a dextral sense of shear motion. Conic section method reveals two dominant families: F1 and F3 folds belong to parabolic shape folds, while F2 folds belong to parabolic shape and hyperbolic shape folds. Ramsay's scheme emphasizes class 1C (for F1, F2 and F3 folds) and class 3 (for F2 folds) as main fold classes. The co-existence of the various fold shapes can be explained by (i) the structuration of the banded gneiss, (ii) the folding mechanisms that associate shear with a non-least compressive or flattening component in a ductile shear zone and (iii) the change in rheological properties of the band during the period of fold formation. These data allow us to conclude that the Numba region underwent ductile dextral shear and can be integrated (i) in a correlation model with the Central Cameroon Shear Zone (CCSZ) and associated syn-kinematic intrusions and (ii) into the tectonic model of Pan-African belt of central Africa in Cameroon.

  15. NOX isoforms in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Siu, Kin Lung; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Yixuan; Guo, Jun; Youn, Ji Youn; Du, Jie; Cai, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and we have recently established a causal role of uncoupled eNOS in this severe human disease. We have also shown that activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) lies upstream of uncoupled eNOS. Therefore, identification of the specific NOX isoforms that are required for eNOS uncoupling and AAA formation would ultimately lead to novel therapies for AAA. In the present study, we used the Ang II infused hph-1 mice to examine the roles of NOX isoforms in the development of AAA. We generated double mutants of hph-1-NOX1, hph-1-NOX2, hph-1-p47phox, and hph-1-NOX4. After two weeks of Ang II infusion, the incidence rate of AAA substantially dropped from 76.5% in Ang II infused hph-1 mice (n=34) to 11.1%, 15.0%, 9.5% and 0% in hph-1-NOX1 (n=27), hph-1-NOX2 (n=40), hph-1-p47phox (n=21), and hph-1-NOX4 (n=33) double mutant mice, respectively. The size of abdominal aortas of the four double mutant mice, determined by ultrasound analyses, was significantly smaller than the hph-1 mice. Aortic nitric oxide and H4B bioavailabilities were markedly improved in the double mutants, while superoxide production and eNOS uncoupling activity were substantially diminished. These effects seemed attributed to an endothelial specific restoration of dihydrofolate reductase expression and activity, deficiency of which has been shown to induce eNOS uncoupling and AAA formation in both Ang II-infused hph-1 and apoE null animals. In addition, over-expression of human NOX4 N129S or T555S mutant newly identified in aneurysm patients increased hydrogen peroxide production, further implicating a relationship between NOX and human aneurysm. Taken together, these data indicate that NOX isoforms 1, 2 or 4 lies upstream of dihydrofolate reductase deficiency and eNOS uncoupling to induce AAA formation. These findings may promote development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of the disease by inhibiting NOX signaling.

  16. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  17. Numerical modeling of fold-and-thrust belts: Applications to Kuqa foreland fold belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Morgan, J. K.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We constructed discrete element models to simulate the evolution of fold-and-thrust belts. The impact of rock competence and decollement strength on the geometric pattern and deformation mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts has been investigated. The models reproduced some characteristic features of fold-and-thrust belts, such as faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, far-traveled thrust sheets, passive-roof duplexes, and back thrusts. In general, deformation propagates farther above a weak decollement than above a strong decollement. Our model results confirm that fold-and-thrust belts with strong frictional decollements develop relatively steep and narrow wedges formed by closely spaced imbricate thrust slices, whereas fold belts with weak decollements form wide low-taper wedges composed of faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, and back thrusts. Far-traveled thrust sheets and passive-roof duplexes are observed in the model with a strong lower decollement and a weak upper detachment. Model results also indicate that the thickness of the weak layer is critical. If it is thick enough, it acts as a ductile layer that is able to flow under differential stress, which helps to partition deformation above and below it. The discrete element modeling results were used to interpret the evolution of Kuqa Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt along northern Tarim basin, China. Seismic and well data show that the widely distributed Paleogene rock salt has a significant impact on the deformation in this area. Structures beneath salt are closely spaced imbricate thrust and passive-roof duplex systems. Deformation above salt propagates much farther than below the salt. Faults above salt are relatively wide spaced. A huge controversy over the Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt is whether it is thin-skinned or thick-skinned. With the insights from DEM results, we suggest that Kuqa structures are mostly thin-skinned with Paleogene salt as decollement, except for the rear part near the backstop, where the

  18. Mesozoic folds, fossil fields, and future finds ( )

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.W.; Witter, G.G.

    1988-02-01

    Drilling and surface geologic mapping have shown that pre-Tertiary, post-Triassic folds and upthrusted anticlines in an eastern Nevada fold-belt have accumulated major oil columns. This Mesozoic foldbelt involves a Cambrian through Triassic section, which has hundreds of feet of porosity in Ordovician sandstones, Silurian and Devonian carbonates, and Mississippian sandstones. In addition to the Devonian Pilot and Mississippian Chainman shales, source rocks are found in Cambrian and Ordovician shales and in some Paleozoic carbonates. The occurrence of live and dead oil shows in hundreds of vertical feet of porosity in wells drilled on several of these Mesozoic structures is interpreted as evidence that these structures were giant oil fields prior to being breached by Tertiary Basin and Range extensional faulting, which allowed vertical hydrocarbon leakage. Noting that undrilled Mesozoic structures still exist in the foldbelt and noting that natural processes are seldom 100% efficient - including, probably, the disruptive effects of Basin and range extensional faulting - the authors suggest that there is a very good chance of finding one or more giant fields in the remaining structures of this foldbelt.

  19. Probing RNA folding by hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria; Monachello, Dario

    2014-01-01

    In recent years RNA molecules have emerged as central players in the regulation of gene expression. Many of these noncoding RNAs possess well-defined, complex, three-dimensional structures which are essential for their biological function. In this context, much effort has been devoted to develop computational and experimental techniques for RNA structure determination. Among available experimental tools to investigate the higher-order folding of structured RNAs, hydroxyl radical probing stands as one of the most informative and reliable ones. Hydroxyl radicals are oxidative species that cleave the nucleic acid backbone solely according to the solvent accessibility of individual phosphodiester bonds, with no sequence or secondary structure specificity. Therefore, the cleavage pattern obtained directly reflects the degree of protection/exposure to the solvent of each section of the molecule under inspection, providing valuable information about how these different sections interact together to form the final three-dimensional architecture. In this chapter we describe a robust, accurate and very sensitive hydroxyl radical probing method that can be applied to any structured RNA molecule and is suitable to investigate RNA folding and RNA conformational changes induced by binding of a ligand.

  20. The folding landscape of the epigenome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olarte-Plata, Juan D.; Haddad, Noelle; Vaillant, Cédric; Jost, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The role of the spatial organization of chromatin in gene regulation is a long-standing but still open question. Experimentally it has been shown that the genome is segmented into epigenomic chromatin domains that are organized into hierarchical sub-nuclear spatial compartments. However, whether this non-random spatial organization only reflects or indeed contributes—and how—to the regulation of genome function remains to be elucidated. To address this question, we recently proposed a quantitative description of the folding properties of the fly genome as a function of its epigenomic landscape using a polymer model with epigenomic-driven attractions. We propose in this article, to characterize more deeply the physical properties of the 3D epigenome folding. Using an efficient lattice version of the original block copolymer model, we study the structural and dynamical properties of chromatin and show that the size of epigenomic domains and asymmetries in sizes and in interaction strengths play a critical role in the chromatin organization. Finally, we discuss the biological implications of our findings. In particular, our predictions are quantitatively compatible with experimental data and suggest a different mean of self-interaction in euchromatin versus heterochromatin domains.

  1. Analysis of folded pulse forming line operation.

    PubMed

    Domonkos, M T; Watrous, J; Parker, J V; Cavazos, T; Slenes, K; Heidger, S; Brown, D; Wilson, D

    2014-09-01

    A compact pulse forming line (CPFL) concept based on a folded transmission line and high-breakdown strength dielectric was explored through an effort combining proof-of-principle experiments with electromagnetic modeling. A small-scale folded CPFL was fabricated using surface-mount ceramic multilayer capacitors. The line consisted of 150 capacitors close-packed in parallel and delivered a 300 ns flat-top pulse. The concept was carried to a 10 kV class device using a polymer-ceramic nanocomposite dielectric with a permittivity of 37.6. The line was designed for a 161 ns FWHM length pulse into a matched load. The line delivered a 110 ns FWHM pulse, and the pulse peak amplitude exceeded the matched load ideal. Transient electromagnetic analysis using the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC was conducted to examine the nature of the unexpected pulse shortening and distortion. Two-dimensional analysis failed to capture the anomalous behavior. Three-dimensional analysis replicated the pulse shape and revealed that the bends were largely responsible for the pulse shortening. The bends not only create the expected reflection of the incident TEM wave but also produce a non-zero component of the Poynting vector perpendicular to the propagation direction of the dominant electromagnetic wave, resulting in power flow largely external to the PFL. This analysis explains both the pulse shortening and the amplitude of the pulse.

  2. Fold Lens Flux Anomalies: A Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wendy B.; Chessey, M. K.; Goldberg, D. M.; Richards, G. T.

    2010-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing of quasars is a powerful tool to learn about the distribution of dark matter in lensing galaxies. Multiply imaged quasar systems have symmetries which allow for an understanding of the lensing galaxy without detailed mass reconstructions. Keeton et al. (2005) defined a useful expression for the flux anomaly of "fold'' lenses, which we might naively expect to have the same flux: Rfold=(fA-fB)/(fA+fB), where "A'' and "B'' represent the positive and negative parity images straddling a critical curve. We show that the geometric configuration of the images greatly constrains the possible flux anomalies allowable from a smooth galaxy potential. Using gravlens, we create a number of simple galaxies from various mass models to put our solution to the test, and find that simulated flux anomalies are reproduced to an accuracy of |δ R| < 0.04. We then apply our approach to a radio sample of 9 well-studied fold lenses and quickly identify those with significant substructure.

  3. Structure of a Folding Intermediate Reveals the Interplay Between Core and Peripheral Elements in RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Westhof, Eric; Qin, Hong; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-07-13

    Though the molecular architecture of many native RNA structures has been characterized, the structures of folding intermediates are poorly defined. Here, we present a nucleotide-level model of a highly structured equilibrium folding intermediate of the specificity domain of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA, obtained using chemical and nuclease mapping, circular dichroism spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular modeling. The crystal structure indicates that the 154 nucleotide specificity domain is composed of several secondary and tertiary structural modules. The structure of the intermediate contains modules composed of secondary structures and short-range tertiary interactions, implying a sequential order of tertiary structure formation during folding. The intermediate lacks the native core and several long-range interactions among peripheral regions, such as a GAAA tetraloop and its receptor. Folding to the native structure requires the local rearrangement of a T-loop in the core in concert with the formation of the GAAA tetraloop-receptor interaction. The interplay of core and peripheral structure formation rationalizes the high degree of cooperativity observed in the folding transition leading to the native structure.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases.

  5. Characterization of the human CUTA isoform2 present in the stably transfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingchun; Yang, Huirong; Yan, Lichong; Yang, Liu; Yu, Long

    2009-01-01

    CUTA, Homo sapiens divalent cation tolerance homolog, has been implicated in anchoring of acetylcholinesterase in neuronal cell membranes. However, a protein highly homologous to CUTA in Rattus norvegicus is structurally similar to the signal transduction protein PII, and this similarity suggests an intriguing role of CUTA in signal transduction. Recent researches indicated that CUTA was one of the 35 key genes responsible for lactation in mammary gland development. However, the physiological role of CUTA is still unclear, so more information of this gene is needed. In this study, the expression profile of CUTA gene in human tissues was examined, and our research revealed that CUTA gene was constitutively expressed in all of the 18 tissues tested. As reported, CUTA gene has five variant transcripts encoding three isoforms with different N terminals. CUTA isoform2 is encoded by three of the five variant transcripts as the common part of the three isoforms. So CUTA isoform2 was chose as representative to characterize the CUTA protein. We constructed a HeLa cell line stably transfected with the encoding sequence of CUTA isoform2 for further study. The subcellular location and oligomeric structure of the CUTA isoform2 was analyzed in the stable cell lines. It was found that the CUTA isoform2 was mainly located in mitochondria as a new potential mitochondrial protein. Furthermore, CUTA isoform2 formed trimers in cell lysate with the possible occurrence of heteropolymers. These findings would be helpful to the further study on the specific function of CUTA protein.

  6. Mammalian mRNA Splice-Isoform Selection Is Tightly Controlled

    PubMed Central

    Chisa, Jennifer L.; Burke, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Post-transcriptional RNA processing is an important regulatory control mechanism for determining the phenotype of eukaryotic cells. The processing of a transcribed RNA species into alternative splice isoforms yields products that can perform different functions. Each type of cell in a multi-cellular organism is presumed to actively control the relative quantities of alternative splice isoforms. In this study, the alternatively spliced isoforms of five mRNA transcription units were examined by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR amplification. We show that interindividual variation in splice-isoform selection is very highly constrained when measured in a large population of genetically diverse mice (i.e., full siblings; N = 150). Remarkably, splice-isoform ratios are among the most invariant phenotypes measured in this population and are confirmed in a second, genetically distinct population. In addition, the patterns of splice-isoform selection show tissue-specific and age-related changes. We propose that splice-isoform selection is exceptionally robust to genetic and environmental variability and may provide a control point for cellular homeostasis. As a consequence, splice-isoform ratios may be useful as a practical quantitative measure of the physiological status of cells and tissues. PMID:17179090

  7. Evidence for multiple protein kinase C isoforms in the leukocytes of a marine teleost, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Mericko, P A; Burnett, K G

    1998-05-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of isozymes mediates a diverse range of cellular functions, including activation of vertebrate lymphocytes through membrane-bound antigen receptors. The complex role of PKC in mammalian cells may be orchestrated in part by the presence of multiple isoforms, each of which displays a distinctive tissue distribution, substrate specificity and pattern of regulation. In the present study, PKC isoforms were identified in peripheral blood leukocytes of the marine teleost fish Sciaenops ocellatus by immunoprecipitation and Western blot using antibodies to mammalian isoforms. Functional activity was monitored by evaluating translocation of the teleost isoforms from membrane to cytosol in response to phorbol ester treatment. Teleost conventional isoforms PKC alpha and PKC beta (82 kDa) completely translocated out of the cytosol in response to phorbol ester. Phorbol ester did not induce translocation of teleost atypical isoform PKC zeta (67 kDa), as has been shown for its mammalian homologue. Although their identity as distinct isoforms is less clear, proposed teleost novel PKC delta (84, 86 kDa) and PKC eta (83, 85 kDa) also translocated out of the cytosol. The presence of multiple isoforms representing each of the three major classes of PKC in red drum leukocytes implies that the complexity of signal transduction pathways in vertebrates is highly conserved.

  8. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Singh, Salam Herojeet; Kumar, Prabodh; Ramachandra, Nallur B; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-08-01

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to another depending on physiological demands and pathological conditions. In Drosophila, amajority of themyofibrillar proteins in the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed exclusively in the IFMs, during later stages of development, we have looked at the developmental and functional importance of each of the troponin subunits (troponin-I, troponin-T and troponin-C) and their isoforms. We show that all the troponin subunits are required for normal myofibril assembly and flight, except for the troponin-C isoform 1 (TnC1). Moreover, rescue experiments conducted with troponin-I embryonic isoform in the IFMs, where flies were rendered flightless, show developmental and functional differences of TnI isoforms and importance of maintaining the right isoform.

  9. Novel alternative splicing isoform biomarkers identification from high-throughput plasma proteomics profiling of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, biomarkers define molecular taxonomies of patients and diseases and serve as surrogate endpoints in early-phase drug trials. Molecular biomarkers can be much more sensitive than traditional lab tests. Discriminating disease biomarkers by traditional method such as DNA microarray has proved challenging. Alternative splicing isoform represents a new class of diagnostic biomarkers. Recent scientific evidence is demonstrating that the differentiation and quantification of individual alternative splicing isoforms could improve insights into disease diagnosis and management. Identifying and characterizing alternative splicing isoforms are essential to the study of molecular mechanisms and early detection of complex diseases such as breast cancer. However, there are limitations with traditional methods used for alternative splicing isoform determination such as transcriptome-level, low level of coverage and poor focus on alternative splicing. Results Therefore, we presented a peptidomics approach to searching novel alternative splicing isoforms in clinical proteomics. Our results showed that the approach has significant potential in enabling discovery of new types of high-quality alternative splicing isoform biomarkers. Conclusions We developed a peptidomics approach for the proteomics community to analyze, identify, and characterize alternative splicing isoforms from MS-based proteomics experiments with more coverage and exclusive focus on alternative splicing. The approach can help generate novel hypotheses on molecular risk factors and molecular mechanisms of cancer in early stage, leading to identification of potentially highly specific alternative splicing isoform biomarkers for early detection of cancer. PMID:24565027

  10. Targeting of the Nuclear Receptor Coativator Isoform Delta 3aib1 in Breast Cancer. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    using a regulatable AIB1 directed ribozyme , resulted in reduced tumor growth in vivo. Overall, these data indicate a major role for AIB1 and its isoform...regulatable AIB1 directed ribozyme , resulted in reduced tumor growth in vivo. Overall, these data indicate a major role for AIB1 and its isoform ∆3AIB1 in

  11. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  12. Estrogen and progesterone receptor isoforms expression in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Saqui-Salces, Milena; Neri-Gómez, Teresa; Gamboa-Dominguez, Armando; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: We studied the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms expression in gastric antrum and corpus of female gerbils and their regulation by estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). METHODS: Ovariectomized adult female gerbils were subcutaneously treated with E2, and E2 + P4. Uteri and stomachs were removed, the latter were cut along the greater curvature, and antrum and corpus were excised. Proteins were immunoblotted using antibodies that recognize ER-alpha, ER-beta, and PR-A and PR-B receptor isoforms. Tissues from rats treated in the same way were used as controls. RESULTS: Specific bands were detected for ER-alpha (68 KDa), and PR isoforms (85 and 120 KDa for PR-A and PR-B isoforms, respectively) in uteri, gastric antrum and corpus. We could not detect ER-beta isoform. PR isoforms were not regulated by E2 or P4 in uterus and gastric tissues of gerbils. ER-alpha isoform content was significantly down-regulated by E2 in the corpus, but not affected by hormones in uterus and gastric antrum. CONCLUSION: The presence of ER-alpha and PR isoforms in gerbils stomach suggests that E2 and P4 actions in this organ are in part mediated by their nuclear receptors. PMID:18837087

  13. Does Compound I Vary Significantly between Isoforms of Cytochrome P450?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are important in many areas, including pharmaceutical development. Subtle changes in the electronic structure of the active species, Compound I, have been postulated previously to account partly for the experimentally observed differences in reactivity between isoforms. Current predictive models of CYP metabolism typically assume an identical Compound I in all isoforms. Here we present a method to calculate the electronic structure and to estimate the Fe–O bond enthalpy of Compound I, and apply it to several human and bacterial CYP isoforms. Conformational flexibility is accounted for by sampling large numbers of structures from molecular dynamics simulations, which are subsequently optimized with density functional theory (B3LYP) based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics. The observed differences in Compound I between human isoforms are small: They are generally smaller than the spread of values obtained for the same isoform starting from different initial structures. Hence, it is unlikely that the variation in activity between human isoforms is due to differences in the electronic structure of Compound I. A larger difference in electronic structure is observed between the human isoforms and P450cam and may be explained by the slightly different hydrogen-bonding environment surrounding the cysteinyl sulfur. The presence of substrate in the active site of all isoforms studied appears to cause a slight decrease in the Fe–O bond enthalpy, apparently due to displacement of water out of t